PART ONE

 

The Gloucestershire Main Line - 1800 to 1830

 

This is the second of four sections of the first part of the Collett family line

 

Updated July 2017

 

The September 2011 update was the result of new information

received from Brian Gregory Collett (Ref. 1R49) of Cairns in Australia.

The information for an earlier update was kindly provided by

Rod Murray of Hallett Cove in South Australia (Ref. 1O42)

 

It is also thanks to Martin Davies of Stourton in the West Midlands

that the lines of the three brothers Richard, John and Isaac (Ref. 1N4, N6 & N7)

have been taken forward to form Part 37 – The Oxford City Line

 

 

1N1

Sarah Collett was born in the hamlet of Whelford and, with no church at Whelford at that time, she was baptised at the parish church in Kempsford on 9th August 1818.  She was the eldest child of Robert Collett and his wife Mary Trotman.

 

 

 

 

1N2

William Collett was born at Whelford in 1820 and was baptised at Kempsford on 20th March 1820, the eldest son of Robert and Mary Collett.  While no positive record of William has been located in the census of 1841, it was after he was 21 when her married Maria Clargo of Hinton Parva near Swindon.  Maria was four years younger than William, having been born on 15th February 1824 at Little Hinton, the daughter of Thomas Clargo and Ann Pearce.

 

 

 

By the time of the census in 1851 Maria had given birth to four children while she and William were living in Whelford, including a set of twin boys who sadly died shortly after.  Just after their first daughter was baptised at Kempsford in 1849 the family left Whelford, when they moved to Highworth near Swindon, where they were living in 1851.  As a result of their loss, the family on that occasion comprised William, age 30, Maria Collett, who was 27, their son Fredrick Collett who was seven, and their daughter Mary who was two years old.

 

 

 

Over the next decade a further three children were added to the family living in Highworth.  So by the time of the next census in 1861 the family was made up of William, age 39, Maria, age 37, and their five children Frederick Collett, age 17, Mary Jane Collett, age 13, Ann Collett who was seven, Thomas Collett, who was three, and William Collett who had not yet reached his first birthday.

 

 

 

Maria gave birth to a further two children during the 1860s, but according to the census for Highworth in 1871 four of the older children were not living with William and Maria by that time.  The family recorded as living at Cherry Orchard Lane in Highworth on that occasion was William, age 50, an agricultural labourer from Whelford, his wife Maria, age 47, from Hinton, Wilts, Thomas Collett who was 14 and working as a shepherd boy, Arthur Collett, who was eight, and Maria Collett who was three years old.  Living nearby in Faringdon Road was the couple’s married son Frederick with his wife Emma.

 

 

 

Maria Collett died at Highworth during the 1870s, leaving just her husband and youngest daughter still living in Highworth in 1881.  William Collett was listed as a widower and labourer who had been born at Whelford, although he gave his age as being 58 rather than 60.  At that time in his life he was living at 3 Wrag Cottage in Highworth with his daughter Maria Collett who was 14 and who had been born at Highworth.  According to the next census in 1891 William Collett was still living at Highworth and he gave the census enumerator a more accurate assessment of his age when he was recorded as being 70 years old.  It would appear that he died within the next decade, as there was no record of him in the next census in 1901.

 

 

 

1O1

Frederick Collett

Born in 1843 at Whelford

 

1O2

Joseph Collett               twin

Born in 1846 at Whelford

 

1O3

Ralph Collett                 twin

Born in 1846 at Whelford

 

1O4

Mary Jane Collett

Born in 1848 at Whelford

 

1O5

Ann Collett

Born in 1853 at Highworth

 

1O6

Thomas Collett

Born in 1857 at Highworth

 

1O7

William Collett

Born in 1860 at Highworth

 

1O8

Arthur Collett

Born in 1862 at Highworth

 

1O9

Maria Collett

Born in 1867 at Highworth

 

 

 

 

1N3

Mary Ann Collett was born at Whelford and was baptised at Kempsford on 28th July 1822, the daughter of Robert and Mary Collett.

 

 

 

 

1N4

Richard Collett was born at Whelford in 1824, the son of Robert and Mary Collett, although curiously, unlike his siblings, no baptism record for him at Kempsford has been found.  However, it is established that he left the family home in Gloucestershire and moved to Oxford with his brothers, and it was there that he met, and later married, Sarah Speake on 12th June 1848 in the area to the south of Oxford known as South Hinksey.

 

 

 

The continuation of this family line is provided in

Part 37 – The Oxford City Line 1820 to 2006 (Ref. 37N1)

 

 

 

 

1N5

Anne Collett was born at Whelford and was baptised at Kempsford on 25th June 1826.  She later married William Curtis on 16th October at Norton, near Gloucester.  William was born in 1824 at either Down Hatherley or Sandhurst, both of which are villages adjacent to Norton.  The marriage produced three children for the couple, and all of them were born while the family was living at Norton.  They were William George Curtis (born on 18th May 1855), Jane Curtis (born on 21st December 1857), and Alfred Curtis (born on 6th September 1859.  Anne, who may also have been known as Jane, died in 1890 and was buried on 12th November 1890 at nearby Leigh.

 

 

 

William George Curtis was the great great grandfather of Sally Walters of Canada.

 

 

 

 

1N6

John Collett was born at Whelford during the first six months of 1828 and was baptised at Kempsford on 3rd August 1828, the son of Robert and Mary Collett.  It would appear that he accompanied his older brother Richard (above) in a move that took them from Whelford to Oxford, possibly when he was around twenty years of age.

 

 

 

The continuation of this family line is provided in

Part 37 – The Oxford City Line 1820 to 2006 (Ref. 37N3)

 

 

 

 

1N7

Isaac Collett was born at Whelford and was baptised at Kempsford on 26th September 1830, the son of Robert and Mary Collett.  Just a few months before the census in 1851 Isaac’ mother died, so the census return for Kempsford that year recorded Isaac as being 20 and an agricultural labourer, like his father, with whom he was living together with his brother Joseph (below) and sister Sarah Ann.  Isaac later married Emma who was born in 1838 at Cumnor, in what was then Berkshire, to the west of Oxford, which is now part of Oxfordshire following the 1974 boundary changes.

 

 

 

The continuation of this family line is provided in

Part 37 – The Oxford City Line 1820 to 2006 (Ref. 37N4)

 

 

 

 

1N8

Charles Collett was born at Whelford and was baptised at Kempsford on 28th April 1833.  The baptism record at Kempsford confirmed that Charles was the son of Robert and Mary Collett, and later in his life, he accompanied three of his brothers (above) when they moved to live and work in Oxford.

 

 

 

The continuation of this family line is provided in

Part 37 – The Oxford City Line 1820 to 2006 (Ref. 37N5)

 

 

 

 

1N9

Joseph Collett was born at Whelford and was baptised at Kempsford on 24th May 1835, the son of Robert Collett and his wife Mary Trotman.  He was six years old in 1841, and at the age of 16 Joseph was living with his widowed father at Kempsford where he was an agricultural labourer like his father and his older brother Isaac (above).  He was also still living there in 1851, together with their younger sister Sarah Ann Collett (below).  It was eight years later on 11th April 1859 that Joseph married Piety Chappell (Chapple) at St Nicholas Church in Bristol.  She was born at Hawkesbury in 1839, where she was one year old in the June census of 1841, the daughter of John and Hannah Chapple.  It would appear that Piety gave birth to the couple’s first child towards the end of the same year or very early in the following year.  However, there are a number of unsolved issues relating to the early life of Joseph Collett.

 

 

 

Firstly, the marriage record for Piety Chappell confirmed she was a spinster and the daughter of John Collins Chappell, while the groom was curiously named as George Collett, bachelor, the son of Robert Collett.  To add to the confusion, they were named as George and Piety Collet in the census of 1861, by which time they were living at Wotton-under-Edge with their first two children.  In addition to which, at the time of the baptism of their first child at Berkeley in 1860 the parents were named as George and Piety Collett, as they were in 1873 for the joint baptism of two of their later children.

 

 

 

To further complicate matters, within the census return in 1861 both Joseph (George) and Piety said they were born at Hawkesbury, albeit recorded in error as Tewkesbury.  So the questions are, had Joseph left his family through some problem that made him change his name, and why did he did wish to acknowledge where he was actually born.  All of these issues were thankfully resolved in the later census returns when he referred to himself as Joseph Collett from Kempsford.  It seems unlikely that he was Joseph George Collett since there was no previous George Collett in any of the earlier generations of his family.

 

 

 

After being at Berkeley, for the birth of their first child, and at Bowcott at the time of the birth of their second child, Joseph and Piety and their two daughters were residing within the Gloucestershire parish of Wotton-under-Edge, near Dursley, in 1861.  The census that year included George Collet from Tewkesbury who was 25, rather than Joseph Collett, age 25 and from Kempsford, his wife Piety Collet who was 23 and from Tewkesbury, rather than Piety Collett, age 21 from Hawkesbury, Elizabeth Collet who was one year old from Berkeley, and Mary Collet who was only a few months old and born at Bowcott, just two miles north-east of Wotton-under-Edge.

 

 

 

Five more children were added to their family during the next decade, during which time the family left Wotton-under-Edge and moved north to Dursley where they were living in 1871.  Jos Collett was 34 and from Kempsford, Piety Collett was 31 and from Hawkesbury, Elizth Collett was 11, Mary Collett was 10, Sarah (listed as S A Collett) was eight, John Collett was seven, Eliza Collett was five, George Collett was two, and Rosa (listed as R E Collett), was only a few months old.

 

 

 

Within a year the family had moved again, on that occasion to Uley, one mile north-east of Dursley, where all of the couple’s remaining children were born.  According to the census in 1881, the family was settled at Rockstowe in Uley when Joseph Collett, age 44 and from Kempsford was a cowman and an agricultural labourer.  His wife Piety Collett from Hawkesbury Upton was 41, and still living there with them were eight of their eleven children.  They were Elizabeth Collett, age 21, Eliza Collett, age 15, George Collett, age 12, Rosie Collett, age 10, Albert Collett, who was seven, Minnie Collett, who was six, Florence Collett, who was three, and Arthur Collett who was not one year old.

 

 

 

The three absent children were Mary, who was working as a parlour at a private hotel in London at the age of 20, Sarah Ann, who was a domestic nursemaid with a family at Bromley in Kent, and John was a policeman in Somerset.  Only the four of the five youngest children were still living at the family home in 1891.  The Uley census that year recorded the reduced family as Joseph Collett, age 54, Piety Collett, age 51, Rose E Collett, who was 30, Minnie K Collett, who was 16, Florence L Collett, who was 13, and Arthur H Collett who was 10.  Also living in the Uley registration district was their daughter Eliza Collett who was 26.

 

 

 

After a further ten years the census return for March 1901 recorded the elderly couple as still living within the parish of Uley, where Joseph Collett from Whelford was 66 and a cattleman working on a local farm, with his wife Piety from Hawkesbury who was 61, and just two of their children.  They were Florence L Collett, age 23 from Uley, and Arthur H Collett, also from Uley, who was a general agricultural labourer at the age of 20.  Joseph and Piety both died during the first three months of 1911 and, judging by the record of their deaths held at the Dursley register office, there may have been only days separating their passing.  Their respective reference numbers indicate that Joseph Collett was the first to go (Ref. 6a 193) at the age of 75, and was followed very shortly after by Piety Collett with the very next reference number (Ref. 6a 194), when she was 71.

 

 

 

1O10

Elizabeth Collett

Born in 1859 at Berkeley

 

1O11

Mary Collett

Born in 1860 at Bowcott, Wotton-u-Edge

 

1O12

Sarah Ann Collett

Born in 1862 at Wotton-under-Edge

 

1O13

John Collett

Born in 1863 at Wotton-under-Edge

 

1O14

Eliza Collett

Born in 1865 at Wotton-under-Edge

 

1O15

George Collett

Born in 1868 at Dursley

 

1O16

Rosa Emma Collett

Born in 1870 at Dursley

 

1O17

Albert Collett

Born in 1873 at Uley

 

1O18

Minnie K Collett

Born in 1875 at Uley

 

1O19

Florence L Collett

Born in 1877 at Uley

 

1O20

Arthur Henry Collett

Born in 1880 at Uley

 

 

 

 

1N13

Cornelius Collett was born at Fairford in 1843, the third child and only known son of William Collett and his wife Hannah Dixon.  He was seven years old in the census of 1851, and was an apprenticed plumber at the age of 17 in 1861.  On both occasions he was living with his family at Fairford.  Sometime later, between 1862 and 1866, he moved north to live at Hartlepool in County Durham, where he married Catherine around 1869.  Their first child was born at Hartlepool in 1870 and was followed by another four children who were also born there over the next ten years.

 

 

 

According to the 1881 Census the family was living at 31 Corporation Road in Throston, a district of Hartlepool.  Cornelius was 36 and was working as an insurance agent.  His place of birth was confirmed as being Fairford, while his wife Catherine was 34 and had been born at Bishops Auckland.  Their family comprised four sons, William Collett who was ten, Albert Collett who was eight, Arthur Collett who was four, and Walter Collett who was one year old, plus their daughter Thirza E Collett who was six years of age.

 

 

 

Living with the family up until her death in 1877, had been Cornelius’ mother, the widow Hannah Collett, his father William Collett, having already died prior to that time.  Two years later Cornelius Collett died in 1883, and his death was recorded at Hartlepool.

 

 

 

1O21

William Collett

Born in 1870 at Hartlepool

 

1O22

Albert Collett

Born in 1872 at Hartlepool

 

1O23

Arthur Collett

Born in 1874 at Hartlepool

 

1O24

Thirza E Collett

Born in 1876 at Hartlepool

 

1O25

Walter Collett

Born in 1880 at Hartlepool

 

 

 

 

1N14

Elizabeth Collett was born at Fairford in 1845, the youngest known child of William Collett of Whelford and his wife Hannah Dixon.  In the Fairford census of 1851 Elizabeth was five years old, when she was living there in the Cirencester registration district with her family.   What happened to Elizabeth over the next three decades is not known, but by 1881 she was living and working in South Wales.

 

 

 

According to the census in 1881 unmarried Elizabeth Collett, age 36 and from Cirencester, was living at 27 New Market Inn in Brecknock St John Evangelist.  Living there with her was ‘her sister’ Harriet Collett who was 18 and born at Llanelly, who was working as an inn keeper, as was Elizabeth. 

 

 

 

However, the reference to Harriet as her sister is very confusing.  It would not have been possible for this to be the case, since Elizabeth’s mother was born in 1808 and would have been 54 at the time of Harriet’s birth.  It is more than likely that she was the youngest daughter of George Collett (Ref. 1O69), from Cirencester, and his wife Rachel from Clydach.  And it was at the Railway Inn at Clydach near Llanelly that George and Rachel were living at that same time in 1881, thus making another connection with the two inns.

 

 

 

 

1N15

Edwin Collett was born at Whelford in 1836 and was baptised at nearby Kempsford church on 25th September 1836.  It would appear that he never married as he appeared in the census records as a bachelor living with his father John Collett on every occasion from 1841 to 1881.  At the age of 45 in 1881 he was listed as Edward Collett, an agricultural labourer, while at all other times he was referred to as Edwin.  It is not known what happen to Edwin after 1881, but neither he nor his father featured in the census returns of 1891 or 1901.

 

 

 

 

1N16

Alfred Collett was born at Whelford in 1840 and was baptised at Kempsford on 3rd August 1840.  He was just one year old at the time of the 1841 Census and was recorded as still living at the family home in Whelford in both 1861, age 21, and again in 1871 when he was 31.  Rather oddly he was missing in 1851 when he would have been 11.

 

 

 

In 1881 Alfred was 41 and was still living with his widowed father John at Whelford, where he was listed as a bachelor, having the same occupation as his father, it being that of a carrier.  It would appear that he married when into his forties, during the middle of the 1880s, but so far it has not been determined who was his wife, as she seemed to be missing from the 1901 Census record.

 

 

 

The census return confirmed that married Alfred Collett was a cider maker aged 59, when he was living at Horcott, where he also said that it was there that he had been born.  Horcott is a hamlet within the parish of Kempsford, not far from Whelford.  Ten years later in April 1911 Alfred was listed in the census return as Frederick Alfred Collett of Kempsford, age 71, and at that time he was still living in Whelford.

 

 

 

 

1N17

Frederick Collett was born at Whelford on 2nd December 1843 and was the son of John Collett and Maria Ferris, as confirmed by his Kempsford baptism on 2nd June 1844.  In the census of 1851 Frederick was seven years old, when he was living with his family at Whelford.  Two years later his mother died, so in 1861 when he was 17, he was living with his father and was working as a wheeler.

 

 

 

During the following year, on 7th November, Frederick joined the Royal Horse Artillery at Woolwich and signed on for twelve years.  In the end, he actually served with them for a total of thirty-two years and one day. 

 

The details of his service life have kindly been provided by his great granddaughter Lurleen Soutar of Portsmouth and are as follows:

 

At the time he joined up he was 5 feet 4¾ inches, with grey eyes and light brown hair, with a fair complexion and no distinguishing marks.

 

The first five years two hundred and sixty-six days of his military life were spent in England presumably undergoing training. 

 

 

 

On 1st August 1868 Frederick was posted to India where she spent a total of ten years two hundred and three days during which time he fought in the Jowaki Campaign in Afghanistan from 1877 to 1878.  He was promoted to sergeant on 26th October 1875, a position he held until 29th June 1880 when he was made Master Gunner.

 

 

 

Historical Note:  In November 1877 a British force of some 1500 men was sent out under Colonel Mocatta to punish the Jowaki Afridis at the North-West Frontier.  The short Afghan Campaign forced the Afghan Amir to accept a British Mission at Kabul.

 

 

 

It was while Frederick was in India, and before his involvement in the Afghan conflict, that he married Roseanna Rose.  Roseanna, referred to as Rosa, was the youngest daughter of machine maker Frederick Rose and his wife Martha Blackwell, having been born at Fairford on 13th November 1844.  The marriage by banns of Frederick and Roseanne took place at Campbellpore in India on 28th May 1876.  The marriage certificate gave Frederick’s age as 31 and Rosa’s as 30, he was a bachelor and a sergeant with the Royal Horse Artillery, and she a spinster.

 

 

 

The couple’s first two children were born while they were still in India and shortly after the birth of the second child the family returned to England on 20th February 1879.  The family then spent a relatively short period of five hundred and fifty-two days back in England during which time the couple were blessed with a set of twins of which one tragically died.  At the end of his spell in England Frederick was once again posted overseas, this time to Gibraltar.  This posting commenced on 25th August 1880 and lasted for eleven years and fifty-nine days. 

 

 

 

And it was at Gibraltar where the couple’s next six children, all daughters, were born.  Sadly only two of the girls survived beyond childhood.  Frederick’s time serving on Gibraltar came to an end on 22nd October 1891.  The following day he was transferred to the island of Jersey where he was appointed Keeper of the Castle at Mont Orgueil Castle, a position he held for three years and seventeen days until he was discharged from the army on 8th November 1894. 

 

 

 

Within in his military service records there was a note that indicated his ‘intended residence’ at the time of his discharge was to be 74 Chapel Street, Gorse Hill in Swindon.  However, the sea journey from Jersey to mainland Britain shortly after may have been too much for Frederick’s wife who never fully recovered from the ordeal and within three months of his discharge from the army Rosa had passed away. 

 

 

 

The death certificate confirmed the date as being 1st February 1895 and that she had died from ‘obstinate vomiting following a sea voyage, exhaustion and a four-day coma’.  The address at which the couple was staying was stated as being 55 Ferndale Road, Gorse Hill in Swindon.  Frederick was the informant and under occupation for him was written ‘of independent means’.  Following the death of Rosa, Frederick returned to Jersey where for the next twenty years he was employed by the government as the warder of Mont Orgueil Castle. 

 

 

 

Just after the turn of the century Frederick was listed in the 1901 Census as being aged 56 and was living at that time in the St Martins district of Jersey with his daughter Gertrude Collett who was 19.  Frederick’s occupation was confirmed as being warder of Mont Orgueil Castle and his place of birth was simply given as England, while daughter Gertrude’s place of birth was confirmed as being Gibraltar.

 

 

 

By April 1911 Frederick’s daughter Gertrude had left Jersey and in her place were two of Frederick’s nieces and a nephew.  The census record confirmed that Frederick Collett was the 65 years old caretaker of Mont Orgueil Castle and came from Kempsford.  Working with Frederick as assistant caretaker was his niece Lillian Maud Collett 26 from Meysey Hampton near Kempsford.  His other niece Jessie Maria Collett 31 from Kempsford was acting as Frederick’s housekeeper, while the nephew was four years old Frederick Reynold Collett who had been born at St Helier on Jersey.

 

 

 

Both nieces were unmarried ladies and it is possible that Frederick the nephew was the base-born child of one of them who was sent to Jersey to avoid the embarrassment.  The address where the group was living at that time was described as The Lodge, Mont Orgueil, St Martin in Jersey.  What is even more strange is the fact that the youngest of Frederick’s three brothers, Charles Collett (below), died while still a young child, and his two older brothers did not marry and were both bachelors in 1881.  So it is possible that the two ‘nieces’ living with Frederick in 1911 were in fact his daughters.

 

 

 

His daughter Jessie was reputedly born in India around 1879 which was when his ‘niece Jessie Maria was born, and his daughter Maud was reputedly born in Gibraltar around 1886 which was when his ‘niece’ Lillian Maud was born.  A fairly extensive search has revealed no suitable alternative to this.

 

 

 

Upon his retirement four years later in 1915, Frederick left Jersey and moved to Derby and where he lived for two years at 94 Uttoxeter New Road before his death on 1st May 1917.  He was aged 72 and the cause of death was stated as ‘valvular disease of the heart’ and ‘syncope’.  The death certificate also confirmed he was an army pensioner and former master gunner.  The informant of the death at Derby was his married daughter Edith Harrison of 12 Hillersdon Avenue in Barnes (which is still there today).  An obituary appeared in the Derby Daily Telegraph on Friday 4th May 1917 which read as follows:

 

 

 

DERBY VETERAN’S FUNERAL

The funeral of an army veteran took place today (Friday) at the Old Cemetery with full military honours.  The deceased was Mr Frederick Collett, formerly a master gunner in the Royal Artillery, who died on Tuesday last at the age of 72.  He served 32 years in the army, most of which time he was in India and Gibraltar.  He held three medals, including one for meritorious service, which entitled him to an increased pension.  After leaving the army he was for another 20 years in the government service being warden of Mont Orgueil Castle, Jersey, where he was well known and respected.  The cortege left 94 Uttoxeter Road where he passed away, the chief mourners being Mr and Mrs Fred Harris (son-in-law and daughter), Mr and Mrs Baker (sister and brother-in-law) and the misses Jessie and Lily Baker (nieces).  The Notts and Derbyshire Regiment provided the bearer and firing party under Sergeant Walker, and the Rev. J E S Hackforth chaplain to the forces conducted the service.  The Last Post was sounded by buglers at the graveside.  Some beautiful wreaths were sent by relatives and friends.  Messrs Wathall & Co. were the undertakers.

 

 

 

The three medals he received were the Jowaki Campaign Medal, a Long Service and Good Conduct Medal awarded in 1882, and the Meritorious Service Medal which came with an annuity of ten pounds.

 

 

 

1O26

Edith Collett

Born in 1877 in India

 

1O27

Jessie Collett

Born in 1878 in India

 

1O28

Frederick Collett           twin

Born in 1880 in England

 

1O29

Rosy Collett                   twin

Born in 1880 in England

 

1O30

Gertrude Collett

Born in 1881 at Gibraltar

 

1O31

Annie Collett

Born in 1883 at Gibraltar

 

1O32

Mary Collett

Born in 1884 at Gibraltar

 

1O33

Ida Collett

Born in 1885 at Gibraltar

 

1O34

Maud Collett

Born in 1886 at Gibraltar

 

1O35

Jenny Collett

Born in 1887 at Gibraltar

 

 

 

 

1N18

Charles Robert Collett was born at Whelford in 1848 and was baptised on 11th June 1848 at Kempsford where he was also buried on 3rd August 1851 aged just three years.

 

 

 

 

1N19

Emma Collett was baptised at Kempsford on 13th March 1831, although she was born at Whelford where she was living with her family in 1841 at the age of 10 years.  By the time of the census of 1861 she was married and was Emma Maskling living as a boarder and housekeeper at the Whelford home of her widowed uncle John Collett (Ref. 1M7).  That year’s census recorded that Emma was 29 and that she had with her, her two daughters Jane Maskling who was three, and Elizabeth Clara Maskling who was one year old.

 

 

 

Ten years later according to the census of 1871 Emma at 40 years of age was a widow and her children living with her were listed as Clara Maskling (born 1860), Elizabeth Maskling (born 1862), Albert Ernest Maskling (1864), Louisa Maskling (born 1865) and Angelina Maskling (born 1866), and presumably her husband had died sometime between 1866 and 1871.  On that occasion, as ten years earlier, Emma was still living with her uncle John Collett at his Whelford home, where she was housekeeper to John and his three bachelor sons Edwin, Alfred and Frederick (above).

 

 

 

It was the same situation in 1881, except she was then recorded as Emma Maslin, age 49.  She was still a widow and housekeeper to John Collett and just two of his sons.  However, Emma then had two new younger children they being Francis Henry Maslin who was seven and who was listed as deaf and dumb, and Ernest Theodore Maslin who was four, both of whom were listed as having been born at Kempsford.  Who the father was of those two children has yet to be determined.

 

 

 

 

1N20

Eliza Collett was born at Whelford and was baptised at Kempsford on 18th August 1833, the second child of James Collett and his wife Elizabeth Tyrrell.

 

 

 

 

1N21

Hannah Collett was born at Whelford and baptised at Kempsford on 21st June 1835.  In 1851 she was 16 and was a servant at the home of her uncle John Collett (Ref. 1M7) in Whelford.

 

 

 

 

1N22

Job Collett was born on 8th August 1837 and was baptised at Kempsford on 10th September 1837.  He married Susannah Gibbs at Highworth on 10th March 1863.  Susannah was born at Hampton in Highworth on 7th January 1843 and was baptised there on 8th February 1844, the daughter of Joseph and Charlotte Gibbs.  Job was described as being 25, while his bride was 20, in the parish register.

 

 

 

Once married Job and Susannah settled in Hampton Hill, and it was there that six of their seven children were born.  By 1871 the marriage had produced the first two children when the family was listed as Job Collett, age 33, Susannah Collett, age 27, Cornelius Collett who was seven, and Mary J Collett who was four.  All of the baptism records, so far located for the children of the family, confirmed that their parents were Job and Susannah Collett.

 

 

 

According to the next census in 1881, Job was a hurdle maker just like his father James Collett.  He was recorded as being 43 and born at Kempsford.  His wife Susannah was 38, and with them were the four youngest of their seven children.  They were Rose Collett, who was nine, Winifred Collett, who was six, Berthelay Collett, who was five, and Ada Collett who was eleven months old, and all confirmed as born at Hampton.  So far no record has been found in 1881 for Cornelius and Mary Jane who would have been 17 and 14 respectively.  Sometime during the next few years the family left Highworth, when they moved to Whelford where their last child was born.

 

 

 

So in 1891 the family living in the Kempsford area comprised Job Collett 53 and Susannah Collett 49, and their three youngest daughters Bertha Collett 14, Ada Collett 10, and Olive who was two years old.  It is interesting to note, that at that time Job’s son Cornelius was still living in Highworth at the age of 27.

 

 

 

Job Collett died during the next ten year leaving Susannah as a widow aged 58 in 1901, when she was living at Kempsford where she had been forced to take work as an agricultural labourer to support herself and her daughter Olive Collett, who was 12 and confirmed as born at Whelford.  By the time of the Whelford census in April 1911, Susannah Collett was 68 and was living there with her son Cornelius Collett who was unmarried at 46, and her daughter Olive Collett who was 22. 

 

 

 

1O36

Cornelius Collett

Born on 02.07.1864 at Hampton Hill

 

1O37

Mary Jane Collett

Born on 18.09.1867 at Hampton Hill

 

1O38

Rose Collett

Born on 21.09.1871 at Hampton Hill

 

1O39

Winifred Collett

Born on 31.05 1874 at Hampton Hill

 

1O40

Bertha Annie Collett

Born on 29.06.1876 at Hampton Hill

 

1O41

Ada Collett

Born on 19.04.1880 at Hampton Hill

 

1O42

Olive Collett

Born on 08.08.1888 at Whelford

 

 

 

 

1N23

Timothy Collett was born in 1840 and was baptised at Kempsford on 19th April 1840.  He married Elizabeth Smith at Highworth on 21st January 1866 at a time when Elizabeth was with-child, since the couple’s first son was born five months later.  Both of them were described as being 25, and Timothy’s father was confirmed as James Collett.  Elizabeth was born at Hinton Parva near Swindon in 1841 and all of their known children were born at Highworth, there being a nine-year gap between the first and second child listed below.

 

 

 

Tragically it would appear from the Highworth census of 1871 that Timothy’s and Elizabeth’s first child did not survive, as it was just the two of them that were listed in the census return, when both of them were 30.  During the next ten years the couple were blessed with another three children who were born at Highworth.  According to the next census in 1881, Timothy, at 40, was an agricultural labourer living at Westrop in Highworth with his wife Elizabeth and their two oldest children, Albert Collett who was six, and Annie Collett who was four years old.  Perhaps rather strangely, the couple’s latest edition, Harriet Collett was eleven months old and was listed as living with Timothy’s married sister Ruth Addis nee Collett (below).

 

 

 

Ten years later the family was still living at Highworth in 1891 where Timothy and Elizabeth were both 50 and living with them were their three children Albert Collett, age 16, Annie Collett, age 13, and Alice Collett who was nine years old.  Their daughter Harriet was eleven and was still living in Highworth with Timothy’s sister Ruth Addis.

 

 

 

During the next decade Timothy would appear to have died since, by March 1901, Elizabeth was a widow and had left Highworth and was then living alone at Kempsford at the age of 59, and by April 1911 she too had passed away.

 

 

 

1O43

James Collett

Baptised on 17.06.1866 at Highworth

 

1O44

Albert Collett

Born in 1875 at Highworth

 

1O45

Annie Collett

Born in 1877 at Highworth

 

1O46

Harriet Collett

Born in May 1880 at Highworth

 

1O47

Alice Collett

Born in 1882 at Highworth

 

 

 

 

1N24

Ruth Collett was born at Whelford in 1842 and was baptised later that year at Kempsford on 2nd October 1842.  She was the youngest child of James Collett and Elizabeth Tyrrell and shortly after she was born her mother died.  Her father later married Susannah of Wanborough, near Swindon.  By the time Ruth was 26 she had given birth to a base-born daughter and it may have been just prior to this that she and her father, together with James’ second wife Susannah, left Whelford and moved to Highworth in Wiltshire where her baby was born.

 

 

 

Three years later Ruth and her daughter were confirmed as living at Highworth in April 1871 at the home of James Collett and his wife Susannah.  Ruth Collett was 29 and her daughter Elizabeth was three years old.  Sometime during the next decade, while still at Highworth, Ruth met and married William Addis an agricultural labourer who was born at Highworth in 1839.

 

 

 

In the census of 1881 Ruth Addis gave her age as 35 (sic), while William Addis was 41.  The couple was living at Westrop in Highworth with Ruth’s daughter Elizabeth Collett, age 13, who was working an agricultural labourer.  Living with the family of three was Ruth’s niece Harriet Collett aged just eleven months, the daughter of Ruth’s brother Timothy (above).

 

 

 

1O48

Elizabeth Collett

Born in 1868 at Highworth

 

 

 

 

1N25

Barbara Collett was born at Bibury either during the latter months of 1798 or the first two months of 1799, shortly after the marriage of her parents in 1798.  She was baptised at the Church of St Mary in Bibury on 28th February 1799, the eldest of the seven known children of Giles Collett and his wife Elizabeth Gregory.  Barbara may well have been married by 1841 since no record of a Barbara Collett has been found in any census return.

 

 

 

 

1N26

Giles Lawrence Collett was born in 1801 at Bibury, where he was baptised as Giles Laurence on 3rd April 1801, the eldest son of Giles and Elizabeth Collett.  It has been assumed that Giles later travelled to London where he took up work as a smith and where he possibly married (1) Elizabeth, although no record of their marriage has so far been found.  What is known for sure is that Giles and Elizabeth had a daughter and her baptism was recorded at St George’s Church in Hanover Square in London on 29th August 1827 (Ref. 724), the parents being named as Giles Lawrence Collett, a smith, and his wife Elizabeth whose abode was described as the Workhouse.  During April of the following year Giles Lawrence Collett was on trial in Gloucestershire and was sentenced to one month in prison for larceny.  What he stole was not mentioned in the papers. 

 

 

 

Six years after that Giles Collett married (2) Ann Ship at the Church of St John the Evangelist in Lambeth on 21st September 1834, presumably following the death of his first wife Elizabeth and possibly even his daughter.  Once married the couple settled in London and it was at the Church of St Martin-in-the-Field that their first three known children were baptised.  The baptism entry there for their son also revealed that he had been born one month earlier on 14th September 1838.

 

 

 

Perhaps times were still hard for Giles and his family, as he once again resorted to stealing and on 25th November1839 he was sentenced at the Old Bailey to seven years in prison.  At that time in his life the record shows his crime was ‘larceny by servant’ when he was a married man aged 34 who was working as a smith.  He was dispatched from Newgate Prison in London on 16th December 1839 and sent to Portsmouth where he was assigned to the ship Leviathan.  The record also indicates that he received a pardon four years later on 9th October 1843.  However, the census in 1841 recorded just Giles Collett, age 35, on Portsea Island perhaps where there was a prison, but where his wife and children were on that day has still to be discovered. 

 

 

 

Upon his release from prison Giles was reunited with Ann and his family and by the time of the next census in 1851 the family was residing at Green Deya Court in the parish of St Sepulchre, within the West London area, under the name Callett (an enumerator error).  Giles and Ann were both 45, and Giles from Cirencester was still working as a smith.  Three children had been added to the family after his release, although there was no record of the couple’s eldest son Leonard.  On that occasion the children were listed as Elizabeth who was 15, Eleanor who was 14, Charlotte who was eight, John who was five and Francis who was two.  It was seven years later that Giles Collett died, his death recorded in West London (Ref. 1c 30) during the first three months of 1858.  The baptism of his youngest daughter Charlotte was conducted at St Sepulchre, while the birth of his youngest son Francis was registered at West London (Ref. 2 265) during the first quarter of 1849.

 

 

 

1O49

Elizabeth Collett

Baptised on 29.08.1827 in London

 

The following are the three known children of Giles Collett and Ann Ship:

 

1O50

Elizabeth Ellen Collett

Baptised on 20.09.1835 in London

 

1O51

Eleanor Isabel Collett

Baptised on 11.06.1837 in London

 

1O52

Leonard Frederick Collett

Born on 14.09.1838; bapt on 21.10.1838

 

1O53

Charlotte Felton Collett

Born on 11.07.1842; bapt on 15.03.1843

 

1O54

John Collett

Born in 1845 in London

 

1O55

Francis Collett

Born in 1848 in London

 

 

 

 

1N27

Isabel Collett was born at Bibury in 1803 and was baptised there on 3rd March 1803, the daughter of Giles and Elizabeth Collett.  Isabel never married and on the day of the census in 1851 Isabel Collett from Bibury was 44 when she was a servant at the Paddington home of Luke Price and his family.  No record of her has been found ten years later but in 1871, and again ten years later, she was listed living within the Kensington district of London.  In 1871 she was 68 and that year she was lodging with the Stevens family when, as Isabella Collett, she was working as a charwoman.  By 1881 she was 78 and an inmate at 87 Portland Road in Kensington, which was described as a home for the aged and the poor.  She had no stated occupation, while her place of birth was confirmed as Bibury in Gloucestershire.  It was just less than five years later that the death of Isabel Collett, aged 83, was recorded at Kensington (Ref. 1a 98) during the first three months of 1886.

 

 

 

 

1N28

Francis Collett was born at Bibury in 1804 where he was baptised at the Church of St Mary on 22nd November 1804, the son of Giles and Elizabeth Collett.  It was at the church of St Mary de Lode in Gloucester that he married Sarah Elizabeth King on 8th November 1828.  Sarah was the daughter of Thomas and Ann King and was baptised at Coln St Aldwyns on 21st June 1806.  She was not the Sarah King baptised at Bristol on 2nd February 1806, who was the daughter of John and Catherine King.  In the census of 1851 Sarah’s place of birth was named as Coln St Aldwyns, where all of the couple’s children were baptised even though the family was only living there when their three eldest children were born.  Sometime between August 1838 and June 1841 the family settled in the town of Cirencester, where they were living when the first national census was conducted that year.

 

 

 

At that time in their lives, the family comprised Francis and Sarah, who were both given the rounded age of 35, Sarah who was 12, Ann who was nine, Henry, who was six, and Azaria, who was two years old.  After a further ten years the family was living within the Castle Ward area of Cirencester, by which time Sarah had presented Francis with two more children, although sadly their youngest daughter died when she was four years old.  The census in 1851 recorded that Francis Collett, age 46 and from Bibury, was a whitesmith, that his wife Sarah was 45, and that their three children on that occasion were Henry Collet, who was 16, Francis Collett, who was 12 and from Northleach, and William Giles Collett who was just two years old and born after the family settled in Cirencester.  Of the couple’s two absent daughters, it is established that Sarah, the eldest child, had already left England for New Zealand as a servant in the employ of the Reverend Thomas Jackson who is reputed to be the first Bishop of Canterbury, while Sarah is understood to be the first Collett to settle in Canterbury.

 

 

 

It was almost exactly one year later that Francis, together with his eldest son Henry Cornelius Collett who was a carpenter, sailed on the ship ‘Samarang’ to New Zealand, ahead of the rest of the family.  The sailing ship left England on 26th March 1852 and arrived in New Zealand on 31st July that year.  It was believed within the family that Francis came from a long line of stonemasons.  However, the passenger list confirmed that he was a blacksmith, while his death certificate stated that he was a whitesmith, as he had been in 1851.  The Colletts were skilled tradesmen with a fair education, but not affluent enough to set themselves up as businessmen or landowners.  In a list of persons eligible for Jury Service in Christchurch in 1853 a Francis Collett and a James Collett, were both described as blacksmiths of Papanui.

 

 

 

It was seven years after Francis and Henry had arrived in New Zealand that the rest of their family joined them there.  The New Zealand Immigration and Passenger Lists Database included a Sarah Collett amongst the passengers of the sailing ship ‘Clontarf’ which arrived at Lyttelton on 5th January 1859.  Travelling with Sarah were two of her three surviving children, and they were her married daughter Anne Bryan with her husband, and her youngest son William Collett.  What had happened to Azaria Francis Collett is not known at this time, as he too may have died between 1851 and 1859 as his older sister Elizabeth did in 1846.  The place of residence stated for immigrant Sarah Collett, age 52, was Cirencester in Gloucestershire, England.  Another Collett on board the ‘Clontarf’ for that same journey was Harriet Rayner nee Collett (62M33) of London, who had with her, just nine children, her husband having previously sailed to New Zealand in 1856.

 

 

 

It may also be significant that carpenter Samuel Collett (Ref. 1N69) of Quenington, just half a mile from Coln St Aldwyns, travelled to New Zealand in 1858 and that he and his family also settled in Canterbury.  Having been reunited with his wife, Francis and Sarah were living at Charles Street in Kaiapoi in 1860, when his occupation was simply that of a labourer.  At that time he was recorded as being eligible to serve as militia man with the Christchurch District Militia for the year ending 31st March 1861.  Also included on that same listing was the aforementioned Samuel Collett of Lower Avon North in Christchurch, whose occupation was confirmed as being that of a carpenter.

 

 

 

Sarah Collett nee King died in May 1861, and was buried on 25th May 1861 at Barbadoes Street Cemetery.  Following the death of his wife Francis Collett remained living with his daughter Sarah Isabella Roil and her two youngest children, the twins.  One night in 1884 he went to bed with a little devotional reading to close the day.  Nobody could have guessed that it was to be his final sleep.  His daughter found him the next morning with, resting on his chest, the old prayer book given to him thirty-two years earlier in the church near Cirencester.  Francis Collett died at Christchurch, Canterbury NZ, on 17th May 1884 and was buried with his late wife in the Barbadoes Street Cemetery.  In New Zealand to this day, there is an old prayer book with the inscription “From Cirencester, England - Midlent Sunday March 21 1852 to F. Collett, Bibury The Holy Church throughout the world doth acknowledge Thee”, this being the same prayer book that Francis was holding when he passed away.

 

 

 

1O56

Sarah Isabella Collett

Born in 1829 at Coln St Aldwyns

 

1O57

Anne Collett

Born in 1832 at Coln St Aldwyns

 

1O58

Henry Cornelius Collett

Born in 1834 at Coln St Aldwyns

 

1O59

Azaria Francis Collett

Born in 1838 at Northleach

 

1O60

Elizabeth Mary Collett

Born in 1841 at Cirencester

 

1O61

William Giles Collett

Born in 1848 at Cirencester

 

 

 

 

1N29

Catherine Collett was born at Bibury in 1806 and was baptised at St Mary’s Church on 1st January 1807, the daughter of Giles and Elizabeth Collett.   Like her eldest sister Barbara (above), no record of Catherine has been found in any census so there is a possibility that she was married prior to 1841.

 

 

 

 

1N30

Henry Collett was born at Bibury in 1808 and baptised there on 21st October 1808, the youngest son of Giles and Elizabeth Collett.  As with his brother Giles Lawrence Collett (above), no record of Henry of Bibury has been found in any census, therefore he may have died before June 1841 or left the country.

 

 

 

 

1N31

Frances Collett was born at Bibury in 1812 and was it was there also that she was baptised on 6th September 1812, the last known child of Giles Collett and his wife Elizabeth Gregory.  Frances would have been only fifteen years old when her mother died and was buried at Bibury in 1827, and was twenty-one when her father passed away in 1833.  During the last three months of 1852 a Frances Collett married Joshua Wiltshire at Cirencester (Ref. 6a 641), and there is ever possibility that this was Frances Collett from nearby Bibury

 

 

 

 

1N32

Henry Collett was, it is estimated, born around 1790.  He was married and widowed during his life, and was married for a second time on 14th November 1844 to Elizabeth King at the Church of All Hallows the Great in the City of London.  Henry was described as a widower and the son of William Day Collett, while Elizabeth’s father was named as George Patterson; therefore it is very likely she had been born as Elizabeth Patterson.

 

 

 

 

1N33

Lydia Collett was born at Cricklade during 1799, the eldest child of John and Betty Collett who was baptised at St Sampson's Church in Cricklade on 16th February 1800.  She was only 18 when she married (1) Edmund Wall on 3rd February 1818 with whom she had ten children, and all of them born and baptised at Siddington.  Edmund Wall was baptised on 4th May 1799 at South Cerney, but died on 5th August 1845 and was buried at Siddington on 9th August 1845.  For another reference to the Wall family name, see also Betty Collett (below).  She was Lydia’s younger sister and she married John Chesterman Wall at Siddington, whose death was recorded at Cricklade.  It therefore seems very likely that Edmund Wall and John Chesterman Wall were brothers.

 

 

 

Following the death of Edmund Wall in 1845, Lydia married (2) Harry Packer on 28th May 1849 at Siddington.  According to the Census of 1851 for Siddington, Harry Packer was born at Ashton Keynes and was a labourer at 66.  Living with him at that time was his wife Lydia Packer, age 52, who gave her place of birth as Siddington rather than Cricklade, and her daughter Emma Wall who was 11.

 

 

 

The ten children of Lydia Collett and Edmund wall were Elizabeth Wall, who was baptised on 3rd December 1818, Mary Wall, who was baptised on 20th December 1821, Thomas Wall, who was baptised on 6th March 1823, Edmund Wall, who was baptised on 7th May 1825, William Wall, who was baptised on 4th December 1826, Eliza Wall, who was baptised on 14th July 1828, Maria Wall, who was baptised on 8th May 1831, John Wall, who was baptised on 7th September 1833, Jane Wall, who was baptised on 14th April 1837, Emma Wall who was baptised on 10th November 1839 at Siddington, and she later married William Poocock.

 

 

 

This is the family line of Doreen Cox of Cirencester.

 

 

 

 

1N34

James Collett was born at Siddington where he was baptised at St Peter’s Church on 28th November 1801, the eldest son of John and Elizabeth Collett.  Tragically he suffered an infant death and died shortly after.

 

 

 

 

1N35

James Collett was born at Siddington and was baptised there on 28th November 1802 at St Peter’s Church, when his parents were named as John and Betty Collett.  It was also there that he later married Sarah Maysey on 3rd March 1828.  Sarah Maizey was baptised at Fairford on 30th June 1811, the daughter of James and Mary Maizey.  The couple initially settled in Siddington, where the twins were born before the family moved to Bristol, where daughter Jane was born.

 

 

 

No positive record of the family has been found in 1841 or 1851, although it is confirmed that the couple’s two youngest daughters were baptised at Swainswick near Bath either side of 1850.  However, by 1861 the family was identified residing at Swainswick within the Bath & Batheaston registration district of Somerset, where James Collett from Siddington was 59, his wife Sarah was 52, and living there with them were three children.  They were daughters Jane Collett, age 25, Eliza Collett who was 12, and Sarah Collett who was nine.

 

 

 

During the next few years James’ wife died at Swainswick, so by 1871 the family still living there comprised widower James Collett, age 69, Jane Collett, who was 36, and Sarah Collett who was 19.  According to the 1881 Census James was living at Swainswick in Somerset.  He was a former labourer aged 79 who had been born in Siddington, when he had living with him his unmarried daughter Jane Collett, age 46 and from Marshfield near Bristol, who was a laundress aged 46.

 

 

 

1O62

Martha Collett                 twin

Baptised on 12.06.1829 at Siddington

 

1O63

Mary Collett                     twin

Baptised on 12.06.1829 at Siddington

 

1O64

Jane Collett

Born in 1835 at Marshfield

 

1O65

Eliza Collett

Born in 1848 at Swainswick

 

1O66

Sarah Collett

Born in 1851 at Swainswick

 

 

 

 

1N36

Henry Collett was born at Siddington and baptised St Peter’s Church on 28th August 1805, the son of John and Elizabeth Collett.  Henry was an agricultural labourer and he was married by banns to (1) Elizabeth Mills of Painswick in Gloucestershire on 16th October 1827 at nearby Haresfield, all as confirmed by the bishop’s transcript.  Elizabeth was born at Haresfield in 1808 and was baptised there as Betsy Mills on 26th March 1809, the daughter of Edward Mills and Sarah Steel.  However, another source says she was the daughter of William and Martha Mills, and that she was born at Painswick on 1st May 1803.

 

 

 

Following their wedding the couple settled in the town of Painswick where their first five children were baptised.  The birth certificate for their fifth children Henry, states that his father was labourer Henry Collett and that his mother was Elizabeth Collett, formerly Mills.  The birth was registered in the Stroud sub-district of Painswick, and Henry Collett signed the register by making the mark of a cross.  Unfortunately the residence of the informant is not clear to read on the certificate, but it may be that it was ‘Haresfield, Painswick’.  This might indicate that the family was living in Haresfield, but that the children were baptised in Painswick, as perhaps there was no parish church in Haresfield.

 

 

 

Sometime after 1838 the family moved for a short while to Stroud, where their sixth child was baptised, before finally settling down to live at Cirencester where their last two children were born.  The 1841 Census recorded the family living at Cirencester with both Henry’s and Elizabeth’s rounded age being stated as 35.  The children at that time were William Collett, age 12, Sarah, age 10, George Collett who was eight, Edwin Collett was six, Henry Collett was three, and Harriett Collett who was one year old.

 

 

 

Elizabeth Collett nee Mills died on 26th March 1850 while the family was living at Cirencester.  From the 1851 Census Henry, an agricultural labourer, was a widower aged 45 and all of his children were still living at Cirencester with him.  They were William Collett, who was 22, Sarah Collett 20, George Collett 18, Edwin Collett 15, Henry Collett 12, Harriett Collett 10, and James Collett who was eight years old.  Where their daughter was that day has not been discovered.  The census return also confirmed Painswick as the place of birth of the first five children and Stroud and Cirencester for the last two.  Sometime between 1851 and 1861 Henry married (2) the widow Mary from South Cerney.

 

 

 

However, during those same ten years nearly all of his children left the family home, leaving just his youngest child Jane living with him and Mary.  The 1861 Census for Cirencester listed the three of them under the incorrect spelling of the surname.  Henry Callett from Siddington was 55, Mary Callett was 57, while Henry’s daughter Jane Callett was 17.  With no further record of Henry after that, it seems likely that he died between 1861 and 1871.

 

 

 

Certainly Mary Collett, a widow of 69 and from South Cerney, was still living in Cirencester in 1871, and on that occasion had her granddaughter Selina Pittaway from Cirencester, age nine years, living there with her.  It was the same situation ten years later, when Mary Collett of South Cerney was 80 and described as an agricultural labourer’s widow, while still living with her at 8 Beeches Cottage in Cirencester was her granddaughter Selina Pittaway, age 19, who was a dressmaker.  Selina was presumably the daughter of one of Mary’s children from her previous marriage.

 

 

 

1O67

William Collett

Born in 1829 at Painswick

 

1O68

Sarah Collett

Born in 1831 at Painswick

 

1O69

George Collett

Born in 1833 at Painswick

 

1O70

Edwin Collett

Born in 1835 at Painswick

 

1O71

Henry Collett

Born in 1838 at Painswick

 

1O72

Harriett Collett

Born in 1840 at Stroud

 

1O73

James Collett

Born in 1842 at Cirencester

 

1O74

Jane Collett

Born in 1843 at Cirencester

 

 

 

 

1N37

Betty Collett was born at Siddington in 1808 and was baptised there on 5th June 1808, the daughter of John and Elizabeth Collett, as confirmed in the parish register for St Peter’s Church.  Although baptised as Betty she was often later referred to in various documents throughout her life as Elizabeth.  On 16th June 1827 at Siddington she was married by banns to (1) John Chesterman Wall who was also of Siddington, where he was baptised on 14th August 1803.  John was probably the brother of Edmund Wall who married Betty’s older sister Lydia Collett (above).

 

 

 

John Wall died on 9th July 1855 and his death was recorded at the Cricklade District office.  Betty spent the next eleven years as a widow before she married (2) John Tombs on 6th October 1866 at Siddington.  Eight years later on 12th July 1874 Betty Collett died at Siddington as a result of chronic heart disease and asthma.  The death certificate recorded at Cirencester District office gave her age as 67.  That office also recorded the death of Mary Wall on 20th October 1846 who was possibly Betty’s daughter who would have been just been approaching her fourteenth birthday.  From Betty’s daughter Ruth Wall is the family line of Sue and Gareth Kinsey of Hartfield in East Sussex.

 

 

 

The nine children of Betty Collett and John Chesterman Wall were all born and baptised at Siddington and were Jacob Wall (born on 25.07.1828 and baptised on 10.08.1828), George Wall (see below), Mary Ann Wall (born on 03.12.1832 and baptised on 14.12.1832), Emmanuel Wall (born on 18.03.1835 and baptised on 06.04.1835), Charlotte Wall (born on 02.09.1837 and baptised 18.09.1837), Ruth Wall (baptised on 18.08.1838), Stephen Wall (born circa 1842), Caroline Wall (baptised on 30.06.1844), and Alfred William Wall (baptised on 10.12.1848).

 

 

 

Their second son George Wall was born at Siddington on 4th November 1830, where he was baptised on 9th January 1831.  He was still there when he married Elizabeth Cook Saunders by banns in the parish church at Siddington on 5th June 1852.  Elizabeth was the daughter of Thomas Saunders and Jemima Cook baptised on 12th April 1833 at Brokenborough, near Malmesbury in Wiltshire.  The couple had nine children born at Siddington between 1852 and 1875, two of which died as children.  For the early part of his life, George was simply a labourer but from the 1871 Census onwards his occupation was that of a shepherd.

 

 

 

In 1881 the family home was at ‘The Quarries’ in Siddington and this changed to ‘The Common’ in Siddington in 1891.  George Wall died of heart failure at Siddington on 4th September 1895 at the age of 65, at which time he was listed as a farmer labourer.  Elizabeth Wall died from gangrene of the leg on 2nd May 1906 also at Siddington at the age of 73, and was referred to as ‘the widow of the late George Wall, shepherd’.

 

 

 

Eldest surviving daughter Selina Wall born on 28th Dec 1854 married George Woodward at Cirencester on 23rd Dec 1880, this being the family line of Lesley Rolfe of Buckinghamshire

 

 

 

 

1N38

JOHN COLLETT was born at Siddington and baptised there on 12th April 1811, the son of John and Elizabeth Collett.  He later married Mary Ann Dent of Stoke Gifford in Gloucestershire in 1836.  Mary was born in 1815 and was the daughter of John Dent (1778-1841) and Sarah Iles (1779-1841) of Siddington.  Both of her parents died in July 1841, first her mother on the sixth day of the month, followed by her father exactly three weeks later.

 

 

 

About six years after they were married, on 27th March 1842 a John Collett, who was a labourer from Siddington, was sentenced to a term of imprisonment in Gloucester Gaol.  The interval between the dates of birth of John’s third and fourth child suggests that the gaoled man was indeed this John Collett.

 

 

 

By 1851 John Collett was 40 and his wife Mary was 36.  Listed in that year’s census for Siddington with the couple were four of their first five children.  Sarah Collett was 11, Alice Collett was eight, Charles Collett was four, and Isabella Collett was two years old, and all of them born at Siddington.  All of couple’s next three children were also born at Siddington where, in 1855, John signed the birth register for his son Robert with a cross, at which time his occupation was stated as being that of agricultural labourer.

 

 

 

According to the next census in 1861 John Collett from Siddington was 49 and his wife Mary was 48.  On that occasion five of their children were living with them at Siddington and they were Sarah who was 21, Charles who was 14, Robert who was 12, Isabella who was three and William who was one year old.  How the ages of both Robert (who would have been six) and Isabella (who would have been 12) were reversed is a mystery, unless it was an error made by the enumerator.  John and Mary were still living in Siddington at the time of the 1871 census, when John was 60 and a labourer, while Mary was 56.  The only child still living with them on that occasion was their youngest son Henry who was six years old.

 

 

 

For the census of 1881 John Collett, age 70, was still working as an agricultural labourer and he and wife Mary, who was 66, were living at Upper Siddington with their youngest child Henry Collett who was 15 and another agricultural labour.  It was within the next twelve months that Mary Ann Collett died, her death recorded at Cirencester (Ref. 6a 250) during the first quarter of 1882.

 

 

 

1O75

Susanna Collett

Born on 01.04.1837 at Siddington

 

1O76

Sarah Ann Collett

Born on 06.10.1839 at Siddington

 

1O77

Alice Collett

Born on 23.07.1842 at Siddington

 

1O78

Charles Iles Collett

Born on 02.08.1846 at Siddington

 

1O79

Isabella Collett

Born on 25.05.1849 at Siddington

 

1O80

ROBERT COLLETT

Born on 15.07.1855 at Siddington

 

1O81

William Edward Collett

Born on 24.07.1859 at Siddington

 

1O82

Henry John Collett

Born in 1865 at Siddington

 

 

 

 

1N39

Thomas Collett was born at Siddington on 1st October 1813 and was baptised there 24th October 1813, the son of John and Elizabeth Collett.  He married Elizabeth Gardiner at Fairford on 8th October 1837, where she was baptised on 26th May 1814.

 

 

 

 

1N40

Dinah (Diana) Collett was born at Siddington on 20th April 1816 and was baptised there on 9th June 1816, the youngest child of John and Elizabeth (Betty) Collett.  She was 21 years old when she married John Robertson at Siddington on 31st December 1837.

 

 

 

 

1N41

Nancy Collett was baptised at Stonehouse on 19th May 1799, and she later married James Stockham on 23rd August 1835 at Bisley in Gloucestershire.

 

 

 

 

1N42

Sarah Collett was possibly born during 1803 and was baptised on 15th April 1804 at Stonehouse in a double ceremony with her brother John Collett (below).  It would appear she never married and died at Stonehouse on 29th February 1840, aged 38 years, which would indicate she was born in 1802 or 1803.  She was buried in the Stonehouse Churchyard with her father and mother, Aaron and Sarah Collett, her brother John Collett, and her baby sister Hester Collett (below).

 

 

 

 

1N43

John Collett was baptised at Stonehouse on 15th April 1804 in a double ceremony with his older sister Sarah Collett (above).  No record has been found to suggest that he ever married, and he died on 20th January 1835 aged 30, just two weeks before his father Aaron Collett passed away, following which John was buried in Stonehouse Churchyard.

 

 

 

 

1N44

Martha Collett was baptised on 28th September 1806 at Stonehouse and later married Samuel James.  Their daughter, Sarah James was born at Berkeley in 1839 and was listed in the census of 1851 as living at the home of her uncle Martin Collett (below).  Martha was referred to as daughter Martha James, wife of Samuel James, in the Will of her father Aaron Collett.

 

 

 

 

1N45

Hester Collett was baptised at Stonehouse on 24th December 1809, but she failed to see her first birthday when she died on 13th December 1810 and was buried in Stonehouse Churchyard.

 

 

 

 

1N46

Martin Collett was baptised at Stonehouse on 7th November 1813, where he later married Elizabeth Taylor on 21st April 1840.  She was born in 1811 and her entry in the marriage register stated she was ‘of Quedgeley’.  In 1835 Martin inherited the family business as a carpenter and wheelwright upon the death of his father Aaron Collett.  He was joint executor of his father’s Will with his mother Sarah Collett.

 

 

 

Six years later in 1841 Martin and Elizabeth were living at Wheatenhurst when their ages were given as 25 and 30 respectively.  Living with them was Martin’s widowed mother Sarah Collett, who was70.  According to the next census in 1851, Martin Collett, age 37, was an estate builder’s foreman living at Ham, to the south of Berkeley.  Living with him was his wife Elizabeth, who was 41, his son John Martin Collett, who was five years old, his mother Sarah Collett, age 80, and his niece Sarah James, age 12, who was born in neighbouring Berkeley, the daughter of Martin’s older sister Martha James nee Collett (above).

 

 

 

Martin’s and Elizabeth’s daughter Martha, who would have been six years of age at the time of the census, was not listed with the family, nor has she been recorded anywhere at any time thereafter, so it is assumed that she very likely suffered an infant death.  After a further ten years, Martin, age 47, and Elizabeth, age 50, were living in the St John the Baptist area of Gloucester in 1861, together with their son John M Collett who was 15.  During the next decade it would appear that both Martin and Elizabeth passed away, since there was no record of them within the census of 1871.

 

 

 

1O83

Martha Collett

Born in 1844 at Stonehouse

 

1O84

John Martin Collett

Born in 1845 at Stonehouse

 

 

 

 

1N47

Harriett Collett was born at Minchinhampton during 1803, where she was baptised on 1st January 1804, the eldest child of William Collett and Sarah Watts.  Her parents are known to have lived at Bownham Cottage in Minchinhampton, where Harriett may have been born.

 

 

 

 

1N48

Ann Collett was born at Minchinhampton and was baptised there on 7th April 1805, the second child of William and Sarah Collett.  She later married John Gardner at nearby Bisley on 10th July 1825.

 

 

 

 

1N49

John Collett was born at Minchinhampton and it was there also that he was baptised on 12th July 1807, the eldest son of William and Sarah Collett.  It was also at Minchinhampton that he later married Sarah, although nothing further is known as to what happened to them after that.

 

 

 

 




1N50

William Collett was baptised on 7th May 1809 at Minchinhampton and was buried at nearby Woodchester on 1st September 1839 aged 30 years.

 

 

 

 

1N51

Sarah Collett was baptised on 21st June 1811 at Minchinhampton.  She was around 21 when she married James Midwinter on 24th March 1832 at Kempsford, where their daughter Ann Collette Midwinter was born and baptised on 26th March 1833.

 

 

 

 

1N52

George Collett was baptised at Minchinhampton on 18th July 1813, the son of William Collett and Sarah Watts.  Upon leaving school he followed in his father’s footsteps by becoming a carpenter.  He later married (1) Jane Packer on 23rd December 1834 at the parish church in nearby Leonard Stanley.  Jane was born at Aston Blank, where she was baptised on 13th February 1814.  Both George and Jane signed the marriage register in their own hand, indicating a certain level of education.  The witness to the marriage was Daniel Watts who may have been attached to the church as he also signed the previous entry in the church register.  It is also possible that this same Daniel was the father of George’s mother who was a witness at his parents’ wedding over thirty years earlier.

 

 

 

See also Part 10 – Other Branch Lines for more details of the Watts family.

 

 

 

It was very likely George’s occupation as a carpenter that was the reason for him and his family moving so many times during their life.  Initially the couple settled down for the first five years of their married life in Jane’s home town of Leonard Stanley.  While they were living there their first three children were born, but sadly it was also there that their first-born son also died three days after his birth.  Not long after that tragedy George and Jane, together with their two daughters, left Leonard Stanley and moved the twelve miles north to Leckhampton, just south of Cheltenham, where their next child was born.

 

 

 

By the time of the first national census in early June 1841 George and Jane were confirmed as residing at Leckhampton with their three daughters.  The census record listed the family as George Collett, age 28, who was a carpenter, his wife Jane Collett, who was 27, and their daughters Sarah Collett who was five, Mary Collett who was four, and Harriet Collett who was just one year old.  Sometime during the next decade George and Jane moved two more times, the first time to Morden, near Kingston-on-Thames, where their second son was born, and then to Colnbrook to the east of Slough, where the next three sons were born.

 

 

 

The census of 1851 recorded the family living at Colnbrook in the Eton & Iver district of Buckinghamshire.  George gave his age as 36, the same as wife Jane, and their children with them at that time were Mary Collett, age 14, Harriet Collett, age 10, Charles Collett who was six, and Oliver Collett who was only one year old.  It seems likely that other children were born into the family during the five years between Charles and Oliver, who sadly did not survive.

 

 

 

Also no trace has been found of the family’s eldest daughter Sarah Collett who would have been 15, so it may be assumed that she too had died between 1841 and 1851.  Jane presented George with four more children during the following decade, the last of which was born at nearby Langley in Slough.

 

 

 

According to the next census in 1861 the family was living at Langley and comprised George Collett, age 47, Jane Collett, age 46, their three sons Charles Collett, age 16, Walter Collett, who was eight, George Collett, who was six, and their daughter Caroline Collett who was one year old.  It may be safe to assume that eldest surviving daughter Mary, like her sister Harriet, had already left the family home to be married.  However, no trace has been found of their son Oliver, who would have been 10 years old.

 

 

 

Another move of home seems to have taken place during the 1860s since, by the time of the 1871 Census the family was living at Colnbrook within the Stanwell registration district.  George and Jane were both listed as being aged 57 and living there with them were their two sons Walter Collett, age 18, and George Collett, age 16, and their daughter Caroline Collett who was 11.  Sometime during the next few years Jane died leaving George a widower to care for his young daughter.

 

 

 

It seems highly likely that George Collett may have met the widow Mrs Emma McCann through his son Charles George Collett who, during the latter half of the 1860, moved to Ham in Surrey where he was married and where he raised his family.  Living within the Kingston-on-Thames registration district in 1871, which also included Ham just to the north of Kingston, was Emma McCann with her three children, one of which Ann was born at Ham in 1861. 

 

 

 

Emma’s husband was Herbert McCann who was a mariner, and it is assumed that his absence from the Kingston census in 1871 was due to a fatal accident while at sea.  Emma was born on the 10th March 1835, the eldest daughter of William and Ann Vincent of Chertsey, where Emma Vincent was baptised on 15th April 1835.  The Chertsey census in 1841 recorded her family as William Vincent, who was 34, Ann Vincent, age 35, Joseph Vincent, who was eight, Emma who was six, Ann Vincent who was four, and Edmond Vincent who was two years old.

 

 

 

Emma Vincent married Herbert McCann towards the end of the 1850s, although no record of the couple and their children has been found in the next census of 1861.  However, by 1871, Emma McCann was living at Kingston-on-Thames with just her three children living there with her.  Emma was 35, her eldest daughter, named as Laura McCann rather than Louisa McCann, was 12, Annie McCann was nine, and Herbert McCann was four years old.  It is also understood that Emma had another son, Edward McCann, who died while still very young.

 

 

 

How widower George Collett met widow Emma McCann is not known precisely, but it is possible that it was through George’s son Charles George Collett, as previously mentioned above and discussed further below.  What is known is that George married (2) Emma McCann around 1876, when Emma brought with her into the Collett family her young son Herbert McCann, who had adopted the Collett surname by the day of the census in 1881.  Also by that time Emma has presented George with the first of their two children.

 

 

 

So the family recorded as residing at King John’s Palace in Colnbrook in April 1881 was made up of George Collett, age 66, a carpenter from Minchinhampton, his wife Emma Collett, age 46, who was born at nearby Chertsey, and their two sons Herbert Collett, who was 14 and born at Kingston-on-Thames, who was described as a carpenter’s son, and Arthur Collett who was three years old, who had been born at Colnbrook.  It should be made clear that Herbert was not described as George’s stepson.

 

 

 

King John’s Palace was a large country cottage which dates from the 13th Century, which today is a Grade II listed building situated on the Bath Road in Colnbrook.  It was never a palace and it is believed that it was first addressed as King John’s Place.  Containing many wooden parts to the structure of the house, it seems very likely that George Collett, as a carpenter, was employed there by the owner of the property at that time, and that he and his family occupied a room or rooms in the extremely large property.  The census in 1881 showed that the owner was very likely Captain Robert Hetherington, late of the Third Somerset Regiment, who was born at Colnbrook.  Also living at the same address as him and the Collett family were six other families whose members included a gardener, a charwoman, two labourers from separate family groups, and two men from two other families who were described as general dealers.

 

 

 

Also at the time of the census in 1881 Emma’s two daughters, Louisa and Anne, were both living and working in Kingston-on-Thames.  Louisa McCann, age 22 and from London, was a dressmaker, who was lodging at the home of Samuel Lee in East Road, while Anne McCann, age 19 and from Ham in Surrey, was a housemaid living at 1 Surbiton Hill Park, the home of property owner Jessy Ann Walter.  What is also curious about the census in 1881, is that living with George’s married son Charles George Collett at Ham was Julie Vincent who was 17 and from Ham.  She very possibly related to Emma McCann nee Vincent, providing yet another likely link between her and George Collett, as discussed above.

 

 

 

Within a year of the census day in 1881 Emma gave birth to the couple’s last child and, indeed, she may well have been already pregnant with the child on the actual day of the census, her son Frank being born at King John’s Palace in Colnbrook during 1881/1882.  However, according to the next census in 1891 the Collett family had left Colnbrook, after living there for around thirty years, and was recorded at Bromley in Kent.  George Collett was 77, Emma Collett was 57, Arthur Collett was 14 and Frank Collett was 10 years of age.

 

 

 

By March 1901 the widow Emma Collett, age 66 and born at Chertsey, was living at Bromley in Kent with her two sons by her second husband George Collett.  Arthur Collett, age 23, and Frank Collett, age 18, were both confirmed as having been born at Colnbrook in Middlesex.  Emma died during the first decade of the new century, and her two sons both became married men.

 

 

 

1O85

Sarah Ann Collett

Born in 1835 at Leonard Stanley

 

1O86

Mary Collett

Born in 1837 at Leonard Stanley

 

1O87

John William Collett

Born in 1839 at Leonard Stanley

 

1O88

Harriet Collett

Born in 1840 at Leckhampton, Glos

 

1O89

Charles George Collett

Born in 1845 at Wick, Wiltshire

 

1O90

Oliver Collett

Born in 1850 at Colnbrook, Bucks

 

1O91

Walter William Collett

Born in 1853 at Colnbrook, Bucks

 

1O92

George Collett

Born in 1857 at Colnbrook, Bucks

 

1O93

Caroline Jane Collett

Born in 1859 at Langley, Bucks.

 

1O94

Herbert McCann - adopted

Born in 1867 at Kingston-on-Thames

 

The next two children certainly came from George’s second marriage to Emma McCann, and they were:

 

1O95

Arthur Charles Collett

Born in 1878 at Colnbrook

 

1O96

Frank Collett

Born in 1881 at Colnbrook

 

 

 

 

1N53

Joseph Collett was baptised on 15th October 1815 at Minchinhampton and was buried at Woodchester on 29th April 1817, only a few months after his father William Collett and his mother Sarah both passed away.

 

 

 

 

1N54

William Collett was born at Leonard Stanley where he was baptised on 4th December 1808, the eldest child of James Collett and his wife Hannah Land.

 

 

 

 

1N55

Thomas Collett was born at Leonard Stanley on Wednesday 19th June 1811, and was baptised there on 14th July 1811, the son of James and Hannah Collett.  When he was around five years old his parents took the family the short distance to live in Woodchester, and it was there that Thomas later married Elizabeth Rogers on 1st March 1835.  Elizabeth had been born at Thrupp near Stroud on Wednesday 27th June 1815 at twenty minutes past three o’clock in the morning, the daughter of Samuel and Betty Rogers, and was therefore just under twenty years of age on her wedding day.  Once they were married the couple settled in Woodchester.

 

 

 

After six years of marriage Elizabeth had presented Thomas with two children, as listed living with the couple at Woodchester in 1841.  According to the census that year, Thomas Collett had a rounded age of 25, when he was nearer 30, his wife Elizabeth was 20, which was obviously incorrect, and their children were James Collett who was four, and Adelaide Collett who was three.

 

 

 

By the time of the census in 1851, Thomas Collett, age 39, and his wife Elizabeth Collett, age 35, were living at Selsey Road in Woodchester, the same street in which Thomas’ widowed mother and his youngest sister Susannah Collett (below) were also living at that time.  Elizabeth was a laundress and she and Thomas had their three children living with them.  James N Collett was 13 and a wool sorter, Adelaide Collett who 12, and Henry Collett was nine years old.  All three children were confirmed as having been born at Woodchester.  It has also come to light in 2013, thanks to Jennie Cordner, that the actual time and date of birth was recorded for each of the couple’s three children.

 

 

 

Thomas Collett was a plumber and died in 1854 as a victim of the cholera epidemic that affected the area in the early 1850s.  With no records of the family so far found after 1861 it is not known what happened to them after Thomas passed away, but in 1871 Elizabeth Collett, age 55, was living at Woodchester within the Stroud & Rodborough registration district, when living there with her was her granddaughter Elizabeth H Collett, the eldest child of her youngest son Henry.  Furthermore, apart from his baptism and his appearance in the 1851 census, it is possible that her other son James Nathaniel Collett had died around the same time as his father, or shortly thereafter.

 

 

 

Having lost her husband, and with no other means of financial support, Elizabeth was forced to let rooms at her home, as confirmed in the census of 1881.  On that occasion widow Elizabeth Collett was living at The Lodge in Selsey Road, Woodchester, while in the adjacent dwelling was her married daughter Adelaide with her own family.  The Lodge appears to be a very large dwelling since another twenty-three people were also residing there.  Elizabeth Collett, age 65 and from Stroud, was described as a retired landlady.

 

 

 

1O97

James Nathaniel Collett

Born in 1837 at Woodchester

 

1O98

Adelaide Collett

Born in 1838 at Woodchester

 

1O99

Henry Albert Collett

Born in 1842 at Woodchester

 

 

 

 

1N56

John Collett was baptised on 29th May 1814 at Leonard Stanley.  He married (1) Sarah Harrison on 16th April 1844 at Frampton-on-Severn, where their son was born.  The three of them were recorded together in the census of 1851, when John was 36, Sarah was 37, and son Charles was five.  It was a similar situation ten years later when once again they were still living within the Wheatenhurst & Frampton registration district.  John was 48, Sarah was 47 and Charles was 15.

 

 

 

With their son joining the navy, the couple were on their own at the same location in 1871 when John was 58 and Sarah was 57.  Shortly after the census that year Sarah died, following which John later married (2) Jane with whom he was living in 1881.  The census on that occasion listed the couple living at Bradley Lane in Wootton Under Edge where John Collett from Stroud was 68 and a flower gardener, while his wife was Jane Collett, who was 57 and from Horsley.

 

 

 

1O100

Charles Collett

Born in 1846 at Frampton-on-Severn

 

 

 

 

1N57

Elizabeth Collett was baptised at Leonard Stanley on 20th March 1817, the eldest daughter of James Collett and Hannah Land who had been born on 10th February that year.  She later married her cousin Henry Collett (Ref. 1N65) on 13th July 1840 at St Mary de Lode Church in Gloucester.

 

 

 

Details of the family and the continuation of this line are provided in

Part 6 - The New Zealand Line from 1800 to 2000 commencing with the Ref. 6N1.

 

 

 

This is the family line of Maxwell Amner Collett of New Zealand.

 

 

 

 

1N58

Edwin Collett was born at Woodchester where he was baptised on 22nd August 1819 at Woodchester, the son of James and Elizabeth Collett.  He was also known as James Edwin Collett by his descendants, although no actual official record of him using the name James has been found.  Before the family moved to Woodchester in 1818, the previous four children of James Collett were recorded with their mother being Hannah, who was Hannah Land, whereas on the death of Edwin’s sister Elizabeth (above) in 1881, her mother was named as Elizabeth Moss.  Even more curious is the fact that Edwin’s youngest unmarried sister Susannah (below) was living with her elderly widowed mother Hannah in 1851.  So were Hannah and Elizabeth the same person and the only wife of James Collett. 

 

 

 

It was also at Woodchester that Edwin later married Martha Ann Baston from nearby Rodborough.  Once married the couple initially settled in the small village of Amberley, which in those days very likely had no church of its own, hence the reason why their first child was baptised in nearby Woodchester.  Edwin was a coachman, but tragically by the time of the census in 1851 the couple’s first child had died just three months earlier.  It may have been that tragedy which resulted in the couple leaving Amberley since, by the end of March 1851, Edwin Collett, age 31, was living at Selsey Road in Woodchester with his much younger wife Martha who was only 22.  Living in the same street was his mother Hannah Collett with his youngest sister Susannah (below), while in another dwelling on the same road was the family of his older brother Thomas (above).  Six months later Martha gave birth to a second son while the couple was still living in Woodchester.

 

 

 

It was six years later that Edwin, Martha, and their son William, sailed out of Southampton bound for Brisbane in Australia and arrived in Moreton Bay on the sailing ship ‘The Parsee' on 9th February 1857.  The move to a new life in the colony had been prompted by their cousins who had already made the journey to Sydney.  Queensland only became a separate colony in 1859, two years after Edwin and Martha had settled there.  The sea voyage in 1857 may not have been that comfortable for Martha who was pregnant throughout the journey with the couple’s third child.  Just over a month after they arrived Martha gave birth to another son Wallace Edwin Collett who was born on 19th March 1857.  Four years later their family was completed with the birth of a fourth son, James Fords Collett, who was born at Cadargra in Queensland on 27th April 1861.

 

 

 

After nearly forty years Edwin Collett died on 10th October 1896 at the age of 77, and less than six months later his wife Martha Ann Collett nee Baston passed away on 13th February 1897, aged 68.  Both of them were buried at Stone Quarry Cemetery in Jeebropilly, within the City of Ipswich in Queensland.  Of particular interest, is the fact that they were pioneers of Ipswich and actually named their farm Amberley after their home village in Gloucestershire, which lies just south of Woodchester, a name which became established and is now the name of the suburb of Ipswich.

 

 

 

After his death, the following notice was published in the local newspaper.  “Name of deceased proprietor, Edwin Collett of Three Mile Creek, near Ipswich, a farmer.  Date of death 10th October 189.  Names of Claimants: Joseph Foote Cribb of Ipswich, merchant, and William Perrem of Rosewood, farmer.  Description and Situation of Land: Portions 72, 74 75, 75, 78, 179, 180, 184 and 185 in the County of Churchill, parish of Jeebropilly.  Estate claimed to be transmitted – fee simple.  Particulars of Wills or otherwise – Will dated 29th February 1896.  Date within which caveat may be lodged – 20th April 1897,

 

 

 

Wikipedia 2012 states that, Amberley is a small community located in South East Queensland, south of Ipswich.  The origin of the suburb name is from Amberley in the United Kingdom, and was previously used by Edwin and Martha Collett for their residence in the 1850s as it was their hometown.  Australia's biggest air force base, the RAAF Amberley is situated there, and the Bureau of Meteorology has a weather observation station in Amberley.  The Jeebropilly coal mine is located just to the west of Amberley.

 

 

 

New information and photographs were kindly provided by Ross Windle in 2017, the great great grandson of James Edwin Collett of Amberley, whose mother Lydia May Collett (Ref. 1Q46) comes from Rosewood in Australia.  More information can be found at Ref. 1P111, when James’ great granddaughter Edna Sunner was interviewed about her early ancestor’s arrival in Queensland.

 

 

 

1O101

William Henry Collett

Born in 1849 at Amberley

 

1O102

William Edward Collett

Born in 1851 at Woodchester

 

1O103

Wallace Edwin Collett

Born in 1857 in Ipswich, Queensland

 

1O104

James Fords Collett

Born in 1861 at Cadargra, Queensland

 

 

 

 

1N59

Joseph Collett was born at Woodchester and was baptised there on 9th September 1823, another son of James and Elizabeth Collett.

 

 

 

 

1N60

Caroline Collett was born at Woodchester where she was also baptised on 1st October 1826, the daughter of James and Elizabeth Collett.

 

 

 

 

1N61

Susannah Collett was born at Woodchester where she was baptised on 15th February 1829, when she was named as the child of James and Elizabeth Collett, rather than James and Hannah Collett.  It was also at Selsey Road in Woodchester, within the Stroud & Rodborough registration district, that she was living with her widowed mother Hannah Collett in 1851.  Their surname was incorrectly recorded as Callett, when Susanna Callett, age 22, was a servant, presumably looking after her elderly mother who actually died less than two years later.  It was around three years later and just sixteen months after her mother had passed away, that Susannah Collett married James Smart at Woodchester on 26th March 1854. 

 

 

 

 

1N62

Ann Collett was born at Leonard Stanley, the first child of Thomas Collett and his wife Ann Antill, who was baptised there on 30th May 1813.

 

 

 

 

1N63

Mary Collett was baptised on 2nd April 1815 at Leonard Stanley.  She married Augustus Wilkins on 7th April 1842 at St Matthew's Church at Stonehouse.  Ten months prior to her wedding day, Mary Collett, age 25, when she was still living within the Stroud & Stonehouse district of Gloucestershire.

 

 

 

 

1N64

Charles Collett was baptised on 30th March 1817 at Leonard Stanley.  It was around 1840 that he married Eliza who was born at Haresfield in 1816.  According to the census of 1851, he was a carpenter employing two men, when he was living at Coln St Aldwyns where all of his children were born.

 

 

 

By the time of the next census in 1861 Charles Collett was listed as being 44 and Eliza was 45.  Charles was a builder and wheelwright and he and Eliza were still residing at Coln St Aldwyns, where living with them were their children Charles Collett, age 17, who was described as ‘afflicted from birth’, Francis Collett, age 15, who was a carpenter, Eleanor Collett, age 13, Aaron Thomas Collett, age 11, Raymond Collett, who was seven, and Victoria Collett who was three years old.  Eleanor, Aaron and Raymond were listed as being scholars, as they were still attending school.

 

 

 

Ten years on and the family at Coln St Aldwyns then comprised Charles, age 54, a carpenter and builder, Eliza 56, Eleanor 23, Aaron 21 and Raymond 17 - both carpenters, and Maud who was 13.  All of the children were confirmed as having been born at Coln St Aldwyns.  Living with the family was nephew Thomas Higgins, age 14, who was a carpenter born at Haresfield who, because of his place of birth, was likely to be related to Eliza, rather than Charles.  This may even indicate that Eliza’s maiden name was Higgins.

 

 

 

What is of interest is that Charles’ and Eliza’s son Francis Collett married Harriet of Butleigh Wootton and living with them at Coln St Aldwyns in 1871 was a cousin Caroline Higgins, also of Butleigh Wootton.  This would make the aforementioned Thomas Higgins the brother of Caroline, and may point to the fact that Harriet was another Higgins sibling, bearing in mind the identical birth place.

 

 

 

According to the 1881 Census Charles Collett was a carpenter employing 3 men and a boy.  His age was given as being 64 and his place of birth as Leonard Stanley.  Living with him at Coln St Aldwyns was his wife Eliza, his unmarried daughter Eleanor Collett, age 33, and his son Raymond J Collett, a 27 years old carpenter.  Sometime after 1881 Eliza Collett passed away.

 

 

 

In the following census of 1891 widower Charles Collett was 74 and was still listed as a builder.  Living with him was his daughter Eleanor Collett, age 43 and his housekeeper, and his grandson George Collett who was 14 and a carpenter’s apprentice from Eastleach.  The enumerator for the Coln St Aldwyns census in 1891 was Charles’ son Raymond Collett, whilst the aforementioned grandson George Collett (Ref. 1P125) was the son of Charles’ son Aaron Thomas Collett who had died nine years earlier.

 

 

 

1O105

Eliza Ann Collett

Born in 1842 at Coln St Aldwyns

 

1O106

Charles Christopher Collett

Born in 1844 at Coln St Aldwyns

 

1O107

Francis Collett

Born in 1845 at Coln St Aldwyns

 

1O108

Eleanor Collett

Born in 1848 at Coln St Aldwyns

 

1O109

Aaron Thomas Collett

Born in 1850 at Coln St Aldwyns

 

1O110

Raymond John Collett

Born in 1854 at Coln St Aldwyns

 

1O111

Victoria Maude Collett

Born in 1858 at Coln St Aldwyns

 

 

 

 

1N65

Henry Collett was born at Leonard Stanley on 27th April 1818 and was baptised there on 2nd August 1818, the second son of Thomas Collett and Ann Antill.  He later married his cousin Elizabeth Collett (above) on 13th July 1840 at St Mary de Lode Church in Gloucester.

 

 

 

Details of the family and the continuation of this line are provided in

Part 6 - The New Zealand Line from 1800 to 2000 commencing with the Ref. 6N1.

 

 

 

 

1N66

Elizabeth Collett was baptised on 9th April 1820 at Leonard Stanley.  According to the Census of 1851 she was 31 years of age, unmarried and living at the home of the Webster family of dressmakers at Ebley, near Stroud, where she was listed as being an apprentice dressmaker.

 

 

 

 

1N67

George Collett was born in 1822 and was baptised on 26th April 1823 at Leonard Stanley.  He married Harriet Frape at nearby Eastington around 1844, where Harriet had been born in 1821.  According to the census of 1851 the couple was living at Newtown in Stonehouse within the Wheatenhurst & Frampton registration district of Gloucestershire which may have been a temporary home as nearly all of their children were born at Eastington.  Living there with them in 1851 was their son Thomas Collett from Eastington who was five, while George Collett was 29 and a carpenter journeyman and his wife Harriet was 30.  Also living with the young family on that day was Harriet’s mother Hannah Frape who was described as being aged 73 and a widow and a laundress who was also born at Eastington. 

 

 

 

By the time of the birth of the couple’s second child two years later George and Harriet were once again residing in Eastington, less than two miles from Newtown.  It was very likely George’s work as a carpenter that resulted in the family moving around more than perhaps other families would at that time.  At the time of the census of 1861 the family was still living in Eastington within the Frampton & Wheatenhurst area.  The family on this occasion comprised George 38, Harriet 39, and their children Thomas Collett, age 15, James Collett who was seven, and Sarah Collett who was two years old. 

 

 

 

However, during the months following the census day in 1861 the family left Gloucestershire and moved north to Cheshire, and it was at Nantwich that George’s and Harriet’s fourth known child was born.  That was confirmed by the census of 1871 when the family was recorded as living at Wybunbury, just south of Nantwich.  George was 48, his wife was 50, and still with them were three of their four known children.  They were James Collett who was 17, Sarah Collett, age 12, and Emma Collett who was eight years old.  The couple’s eldest child, Thomas, was married and living in London by then.

 

 

 

Ten years later in 1881 the family had moved yet again and, on that occasion, they were living at 35 Oxford Road at Altrincham in Cheshire.  With George, age 58, and described as a joiner from Leonard Stanley, was his wife Harriet who was 60, and their daughter Sarah J Collett, age 22, both of them confirmed as being from Eastington.  Their youngest daughter Emma Collett was living and working in Nantwich at that time, while their second son James Collett was lodging in Manchester where he was working.

 

 

 

1O112

Thomas Collett

Born in 1845 at Eastington

 

1O113

James Henry Collett

Born in 1853 at Eastington

 

1O114

Sarah Jane Collett

Born in 1858 at Eastington

 

1O115

Emma Collett

Born in 1862 at Nantwich

 

 

 

 

1N68

Edward Collett was very likely born in 1824 or 1825 and was baptised at Leonard Stanley on 16th April 1826 and was the seventh children of Thomas Collett and Ann Antill.  Shortly after he was born his family settled in Haresfield to the north of Leonard Stanley, and that move may have taken place while he was still an infant, because he later stated that he had been born at Haresfield, rather than at Leonard Stanley.  Up until receipt of new information from Kelvin Parker in Christchurch New Zealand during 2012 very little was known about Edward except that he married Sarah and that at the time of the birth of their first child Edward and Sarah were living at Coln St Aldwyns. 

 

 

 

In 1841 Edward Collett, age 16, was living with his older brother Charles and his older sister Elizabeth within the Bibury & Chedworth registration district, which included Coln St Aldwyns.  It was around six years later that he married (1) Sarah and by the time of the census in 1851 their marriage had been blessed with the birth of two children.  Edward Collet (sic) was 26, Sarah Collet was 25, Henry Collet was three and Thomas Collet was just four months old and named after his grandfather who was living close by at Coln St Aldwyns.  Edward was a carpenter, whose place of birth was recorded as Haresfield, Sarah had been born at nearby Quenington, Henry had been born at Coln St Aldwyns, while Thomas had been born after the family settled in Hatherop.  And it was also at Hatherop that the couple’s last child was born.

 

 

 

It may well have been during the birth of her daughter Lucy, or shortly thereafter, that Sarah died, because a few years later Edward Collett married (2) Mary Anne Bracknell on 27th July 1858 at St John’s Church in Kenilworth.  The Warwickshire marriage record confirmed that Edward was a widower and a carpenter living at Hatherop, whose father was Thomas Collett.  Mary Anne Bracknell was baptised at the Parish Church of St Mary in Warwick on 29th January 1832, the daughter of Daniel and Ann Bracknell.

 

 

 

Not long after they were married Edward and Mary Anne left England when they moved to Piltown in County Kilkenny in Ireland, where their son was born during 1859.  It must be assumed that the whole family was still living in Ireland in 1861, since no record of any of them has been found in Britain on that occasion.  However, Edward’s two eldest sons did return and by 1871 Reuben Henry was married and was living in Stratton St Margaret near Swindon, while Thomas had joined the Royal Navy and later married a girl from Kilkenny. 

 

 

 

It is not known precisely what happened to Edward and Mary Anne after their son Edward William emigrated to New Zealand in 1876.  However, within the Ireland Civil Registration Indexes 1845-1958 there is a for an Edward Collett who died at Carrick-On-Suir, the registration district for Kilkenny, between July and September 1891 at the age of 67 which would place him as being born around 1824.  So there is a strong possibility that this was Edward Collett from Leonard Stanley.

 

 

 

1O116

Reuben Henry Collett

Born in 1847 at Coln St Aldwyns

 

1O117

Thomas Collett

Born in 1850 at Hatherop

 

1O118

Lucy Maria Collett

Born in 1855 at Hatherop

 

The following is the only child of Edward Collett by his second wife Mary Anne Bracknell:

 

1O119

Edward William Collett

Born in 1859 at Piltown, Ireland

 

 

 

 

1N69

Samuel Collett was born on 1st April 1832 at Haresfield near Gloucester, the eighth of nine children of wheelwright Thomas Collett of Leonard Stanley and his wife Ann Antill.  It was a few years earlier that his parents had taken the family from Leonard Stanley, the five miles north to Haresfield just south of Gloucester, where Ann presented her husband with their last two children Samuel and his brother John (below).  And it was also at Haresfield that the family was living when the first national census was conducted in June 1841, when Samuel was nine years old.  Two years later in 1843, Samuel’s mother died and was buried at Haresfield on 11th October 1843 at the age of 55.  Upon leaving school Samuel became a carpenter working with local farmers repairing drays and farm implements, and repairing homes and furniture.  He charged half a crown for each day’s work and by the time he left England he was charging Four Shillings per day.  In 1850 he was working in the Fairford area of Gloucestershire.

 

 

 

By the time of the next census in March 1851, Samuel Collett, who was two days short of his nineteenth birthday, was no longer living with his widowed father.  Instead he was a lodger at the home of labourer John Smith and his wife Eliza in the village of Coln St Aldwyns, just two miles north of Fairford.  The census that year confirmed that Samuel was a carpenter who was 20 years old (sic), who had been born at Haresfield.  Less than half a mile from Col St Aldwyns is the village of Quenington where, on that same occasion, Samuel’s future bride to be, Elizabeth Gardner, age 26 and a dressmaker, was still living with her elderly parents, where she had also been born.

 

 

 

Like many couples living in Gloucestershire around that time, the place to be married, according to local historians, was St Mary’s Church in Cheltenham, and it was there that Samuel married Elizabeth later that same year.  The details recorded there are as follows - Parish of Cheltenham [St Marys] 1851, Register 6, Entry 457, Samuel Collett, carpenter, father Thomas Collett and mother Ann, married (1) Elizabeth Gardner, father John Gardner cordwainer (shoemaker) and mother Elizabeth, while the couple gave their address as 15 Montpellier Street in Cheltenham.  Once married the couple returned to Quenington where their first three children were born and baptised at the Church of St Swithuns.  In 1858 Samuel and Elizabeth had assisted passage when they sailed to Christchurch in New Zealand on board the barque ship ‘Indiana’.  Travelling with them were their three Gloucestershire born children who were recorded on the passenger list as Ernest, age five years, Amanda, also five years, and George who was three. 

 

 

 

Also on board the ‘Indiana’ was Joseph Bates with his family which is significant because when Samuel’s nephew, Edward William Collett (Ref. 1O119), emigrated to New Zealand eighteen years later on his own, it would appear he knew exactly where he was going and the work he would be doing.  That situation had obviously been prepared in advance for him by his uncle, Samuel, who would have had common interests with Joseph Bates, both of them being carpenters and likely working alongside each other on building houses, churches, etc.

 

 

 

Samuel kept a diary in which he recorded the following details of their sea journey.  Monday 2nd August 1858 went on board the ‘Indiana’ bound for New Zealand, moved out of the docks on Wednesday to Gravesend and stayed until the Thursday afternoon and went onto Sheerness and started on the Friday morning, 6th August.  On Sunday 8th there was a female child born and on Friday met with a vessel in distress.  Supplied her with provisions and proceeded south to Spain. On Friday 20th sailed passed the Island of Madeira.  On Sunday 22nd the new baby was christened Indiana McKirdy, named aptly after the ship and its captain.  The voyage met fair winds and arrived at Lyttelton in New Zealand on 23rd November 1858.

 

 

 

Samuel Collett, occupation carpenter, was recorded as being eligible to serve as militia man with the Christchurch District Militia for the year ending 31st March 1861, as was labourer Francis Collett (Ref. 1N28) of Charles Street in Kaiapoi.  The address given for Samuel Collett on that occasion was Lower Avon North in Christchurch. One further child was added to his family once they were settled within the Canterbury district of Christchurch, not far from the port of Lyttelton, but tragically the child died when he was around four months old.  His death was followed six years later by the passing of Elizabeth Collett who died on 7th March 1866 at the age of 40. 

 

 

 

Samuel maintained a record of his early life in his diary, where he recorded the following notes up until the death of his wife.  Upon arrival in New Zealand he charged 10 Shillings per day for his services, a substantial uplift over his recent charge rate in England.  Potatoes cost 4 Shillings/cwt, pork and beef were 6 pence/pound, wheat 5 Shillings/bushel, milk 2d a pint, and bread 11d a loaf.  He started working in Christchurch for a Mr Inwood, but within the year was self-employed.  At first the family rented a house from Mr Dudley, where the family lived until April 1862.  Samuel did a lot of work for Mr Dudley, while Elizabeth did dressmaking and other jobs for Mrs Dudley.  The rent was always a contra account in favour of the Colletts, even though the cost of making a dress in those days varied from 3 Shillings to 7 Shillings per garment, and children’s stilts were 5 Shillings a pair.

 

 

 

Over the next few years Samuel built houses for several of the early Christchurch settlers, including Messrs J Palmer, A Heron, C Greenstreet, Pitt, Laine, F E Wright, de Troy, F E Stewart, P Kerr, Adley of the Oxley Hotel, Cowlishaw, P Cunningham, Hitchens, Ringwood and Mr Murphy.  In 1869 he started to do a lot of work for Mr W D Wood at the Riccarton Mill, including the building a bake-house in Armagh Street for the sum of One Hundred and Thirteen Pounds.  The following year he spent at Lyttelton building a store for Messrs Wood and Cunningham.  By now Samuel had three employees, one being John Cuff, who travelled on the ‘Indiana’ with him.  They were paid Ten Shillings each per day, while the rail fare of Two Shillings and Six Pence for the return ticket to Lyttelton proved costly.

 

 

 

Over the years Samuel had undertaken repair work for the Avonside Church, certainly as early as 1864, as he sent an account for Two Pounds Twelve Shillings and Six Pence to ‘Stay and brace the Belfry’, a temporary structure which housed one of the bells brought out from England by The Pilgrims.  Samuel was a good churchman paying Two Pounds a year for his church sittings, so it was logical further work from the Anglicans would come his way.  The last recorded work he did on the Church was in 1876 when he built the vestry side of the chancel.  As with most churches in Christchurch, severe damage occurred during the earthquakes in 2011.

 

 

 

Following the death of his wife, Elizabeth was buried in the grounds of the church.  Two years later Samuel Collett married (2) Esther Lennard in 1868, with whom he had a further two daughters, both of whom were born while the couple were still living in Christchurch.  Life was hard in that era and a further family tragedy happened in 1877 when Samuel’s youngest surviving son George William Collett died at the age of 23.  By then George was a married man with a son of his own, who was subsequently raised by his grandparents Samuel and Esther.

 

 

 

South of Christchurch is the town of Waimate, a rich farming area where, on 12th November 1878, five sawmills were operating.  On that day, with a strong north-westerly wind and tinder dry conditions, a fire quickly spread and forest, farms and houses were burnt to the ground.  Waimate went into a decline with high unemployment and people left the district.  Samuel Collett could see the possibilities and took his family to live there later that same year.  His early work was involved with repairing a cookhouse for Mr M Studholme, and building a grain store for Mr H Watts at Studholm Junction, while in the following year another store was built for Mr Frank Slee.  A hotel followed in 1883 for Mr Sherwin, and in 1887 a five-roomed house was built for Mr Chiverton for the sum of 125 Pounds and 16 Shillings. 

 

 

 

His versatility as a building contractor is demonstrated in one account in 1885 for the Rev C Coats, which includes the words ‘to new casements for the Maori Church, repairing the walls, stopping nail holes and easing ventilators’ for which he was paid One Pound 10 Shillings.  As the local Maoris did not use the church, the Reverend Coats had it moved to the back of the vicarage where it was used as a study and a schoolroom.  Samuel also did work for the Catholic Church, Dooleys Hotel and Waimate Hospital.  He built coffins and even conducted funerals.  In 1888 he set up his own undertaking company, cleverly sited opposite the hospital and, up until he handed over the business to his grandson George William Collett upon his retirement in 1899, he had conducted 367 funerals. 

 

 

 

Samuel Collett was also involved in the business of W. R. Collett & Bros, Wine & Spirit Company, which manufactured aerated waters and cordials and was situated in the High Street at Waimate.  The company was established in 1897, but had ceased manufacturing soft drink by about 1903.

 

 

 

He also was a Borough Councillor, and served on the Licensing Board, while both he and Esther grew flowers which they exhibited at the local shows.  Tragedy again struck on 16th June 1896 when a fire totally destroyed a house he owned in Christchurch.  This was rented out and was used as a lodging place which, thankfully was insured.  It was three years later that Samuel, at the age of 67, finally stopped working, when his grandson George William Collett took over all of Samuel’s business interests.  Samuel Collett died at Waimate on 12th July 1914 when he was 82, his wife Esther Collett nee Lennard having died two years earlier in 1912 at the age of 69.  Both of them were buried in the Catholic section at the Waimate Cemetery in New Zealand.  An obituary published in the local newspaper on 14th July 1914 stated that “An old resident died on Sunday in the person of Mr Samuel Collett.  He had entered his eighty-third year and had lived in Waimate for 36 years.”

 

 

 

Hori Coutts Collett, the great grandson of Samuel Collett, via his son of George William Collett, and his grandson George William Collett, lived in Christchurch from 1906 to 2001, and it was he, at the age of 93, who wrote his family’s life story in the book “The History of Two Families”.

 

 

 

1O120

Ernest Collett                             twin

Born in 1852 at Quenington

 

1O121

Amanda Elizabeth Collett         twin

Born in 1852 at Quenington

 

1O122

George William Collett

Born in 1855 at Quenington

 

1O123

Thomas John Collett

Born in 1859 at Christchurch, NZ

 

The following are the two children from Samuel’s second marriage to Esther Lennard:

 

1O124

Edith Amy Eleanor Collett

Born in 1872 at Christchurch, NZ

 

1O125

Alice Mabel Matilda Collett

Born in 1873 at Christchurch, NZ

 

 

 

 

1N70

John Collett was born at Haresfield in 1833, and was the youngest child of Thomas Collett and Ann Antill.  In the first census in June 1841 John was eight years old and was living with his family at Haresfield.  Two years later his mother died in 1843 and was buried at Haresfield.  In 1851 John was 17 and was the only child of the family still living at Haresfield with his widowed father. It was during the next four years that John married Jane Hook who was from Kingswood in Gloucester.  Jane was the daughter of John Hook and Elizabeth Hale.  Once married John and Jane initially settled in Kings Stanley near Stroud where the first of their six children were born.

 

 

 

Some years after that, but before the census in April 1861, the family of three moved north to Birmingham where their remaining children were born.  The census that year recorded the family living within the Parish of St Thomas in Birmingham where John was 28, his wife Jane was 27, and their son Charles was four years old.  Four further children were added to the Birmingham family over the next decade, so by 1871 the family living at York Road in Birmingham St Thomas comprised carpenter John Collett and his wife Jane who were both 37, together with their five children Charles H Collett, age 14, Amy A Collett who was nine, Hubert (Herbert) C Collett who was six, Florence J Collett who was four and John H Collett who was one year old.

 

 

 

The couple’s last child was born later that same year while John and Jane were still living in the St Thomas district of Birmingham.  However, some time during the following ten years that family made the move south to Kings Norton in Worcestershire.  This was confirmed in the census of 1881 when the family was living at 59 Clevedon Road in Kings Norton.  John Collett, age 47, from Haresfield was a builder by then, employing four men and one boy.  His wife Jane from Kingswood in Gloucester was also 47.  All six of their children were still living with the couple, and they were Charles Collett of Kings Stanley who was 24, Amy G Collett who was 19, Hubert (Herbert) E Collett who was 16, Florence J Collett who was 14, John H Collett who was 11, and Ernest A Collett who was nine years old.

 

 

 

With no record of John living with his family in 1891, it must be assumed that he died during the 1880s, perhaps even during an accident at work.  The Kings Norton census in 1891 listed his wife Jane Collett, age 57, together with her eldest son Charles Collett who was 34, her two youngest sons John Collett 21 and Arthur Collett 19, and her daughter Florence who was 24.

 

 

 

The census of 1901 again had widow Jane Collett of Kingswood living at Kings Norton.  She was then 67 and was living on her own means.  The only members of her family still living with her at that time were unmarried daughters Amy and Florence.  Jane was still living there with her two daughters for company ten years later in April 1911 when she was 77.

 

 

 

1O126

Charles Hook Collett

Born in 1856 at Kings Stanley

 

1O127

Amy Georgina Collett

Born in 1861 at Birmingham

 

1O128

Hubert Edward Collett

Born in 1864 at Birmingham

 

1O129

Florence Jane Collett

Born in 1866 at Birmingham

 

1O130

John Harvey Collett

Born in 1869 at Birmingham

 

1O131

Arthur Ernest Collett

Born in 1871 at Birmingham

 

 

 

 

1N71

James Collett was born at Leonard Stanley in 1824, where he was baptised on 17th February 1828, the eldest child of Charles Collett and his wife Sarah Edmunds.  In the Leonard Stanley census of 1841, within the Stroud & Stonehouse registration district, James was 16 and was still living there with his family.  It is established that James’ father and some of his brothers sailed to Canada during the second half of 1841, but so far no record of James has been found within the passenger lists, so what happened to him has still to be determined.

 

 

 

However, he too travelled to Canada and settle on Prince Edward Island, where his three children by his wife Henrietta were born and baptised.  All three children were born at Summerside, while the two eldest children were later baptised on the same day in a joint ceremony at Crapaud in Queens County, using just their first christian names, in addition to which no baptism record has been found for son James.  It is also established that the children of James’ brother Charles John Collett (below) were also born within the Summerside area of the island. 

 

 

 

1O132

James Artemas Collett

Born circa 1851 at Summerside, PEI

 

1O133

Sarah Jane Collett

Born in 1853 at Summerside, PEI

 

1O134

William Charles Collett

Born in 1855 at Summerside, PEI

 

 

 

 

1N72

Aaron Lot Collett was born at Leonard Stanley in 1828, and was baptised there on 21st May 1829, the son of Charles and Sarah Collett.  It was simply as Aaron Collett, age 12, that he was recorded in the census of 1841, when he was still living in Leonard Stanley with his family.  Later that same year Aaron and some of his brothers sailed to Canada with their father Charles, where they settled on Prince Edward Island.

 

 

 

During the mid-1850s when Aaron was around 26 or 27, he married (1) Eliza, and together they had four known children, two sons and two daughters, before Eliza passed away during the 1870.  The birth of the couple’s first child took place at Westmorland Settlement and, at the subsequent baptism the child’s parents were confirmed as Aaron and Eliza.  Three further children were added to their family during the same decade, but it was after the birth of his youngest son that Eliza must have died.  In 1861 Aaron Collett and his family were residing at Lot 29 in the Queens district of Prince Edward Island.

 

 

 

According to the Canadian census of 1881 Aaron Collett, age 51 and from England, was a widower and a farmer still living and working on Lot 29 in the Queens district of Prince Edward Island.  His eldest son William K (sic) Collett, age 23, was helping his father on the farm, while the two daughters Louisa A Collett, age 21, and Lisca Collett, age 17, had no stated occupation so were probably keeping house for the family.  Aaron’s youngest son James C Collett was still attending school at the age of 13, and all four children were confirmed as having been born on Prince Edward Island.

 

 

 

Aaron was still living in the same district ten years later, when he was recorded as being 62 years of age, while within the next census conducted on 31st March 1901 he was listed as a Canadian nationalised citizen from England.  By that time in his life he was 70 and had living with him his second wife Annie who was 51 and born on Prince Edward Island whom he married after 1891.

 

 

 

1O135

William Henry Collett

Born in 1857 at Prince Edward Island

 

1O136

Louisa A Collett

Born in 1859 at Prince Edward Island

 

1O137

Lisca Collett

Born in 1863 at Prince Edward Island

 

1O138

James Charles Collett

Born in 1867 at Prince Edward Island

 

 

 

 

1N73

Charles John Collett was born at Leonard Stanley in 1829, and it was there also that he was baptised on 20th February 1831, another son of wheelwright Charles Collett and his wife Sarah.  Charles Collett was 11 years old in the Leonard Stanley census of 1841 when he was still living there with his family.  Later that same year Charles, together with his father and his brothers Aaron (above), and Anthony (below), sailed to Canada, where they arrived at Prince Edward Island towards the end of that year.  The original plan may have been for the rest of the family to join them there, once they were settled.  In the event it would appear that Charles’ mother remained in England, since she was still living at Ebley in Stonehouse in 1851.

 

 

 

Upon the death of his father, either during the last two months of 1861 or the first five months of 1862, Charles junior inherited one flock bed and five pounds, for his role as joint executor of the Will, plus one sixth of his father estate comprising the land at Summerside that his father had purchased in June 1855 which was valued at £285 after deduction of debtors bills and funeral expenses – see Will in Legal Documents.

 

 

 

Around ten years later Charles, who was very likely a shipbuilder and ship owner, married (1) Annie McLeod on Prince Edward Island and they had five children before Annie, who was born in Scotland during 1836, died on 13th February 1871 at Crapaud on Prince Edward Island.  She was only 35 and it was stated that she had died ‘after much suffering’ following the birth of her last child exactly one month earlier.  The first two children were baptised at Richmond near Summerside, while the remainder were baptised at Summerside itself.  Following her death Charles married (2) Margaret although sadly they had only been married for less than a year when Charles died at Summerside on 12th February 1872.  His death certificate stated that he was 41 and that he was buried that same day in the churchyard of St John’s Anglican Church in Crapaud, just north of Victoria, with his first wife Annie. 

 

 

 

The Will of Charles Collet of Victoria in Queens County was made on 13th January 1872 and was proved one month later on 14th February, two days after he passed away.  The document named his wife as Margaret and listed his children curiously in the following order: Harriet Peters Collet; Sarah Jane Collet; Charles Frederick Collet; Eliza Caroline Collet; and James Beaufort Collet – see Will in Legal Documents

 

 

 

By the time of the Canadian census of 1881 Charles’ and Annie’s eldest son Charles Collett, age 12, was living on Lot 29 in the Queens district of Prince Edward Island, the same address as his two uncles, Aaron Collett and Anthony Collett, who were also living on Lot 29 on that occasion.  Charles’ eldest daughter Sarah Jane was also recorded in the census that year at the home of the McKinon family, when she was 19.  No record of the couple’s other three children has been found in the census of 1881, even though they were all still alive long after that time.  Eliza would have been 16, and Harriet would have been 14, with James being around ten years old.

 

 

 

1O139

Sarah Jane Collett

Born in 1862 at Prince Edward Island

 

1O140

Eliza Caroline Collett

Born in 1864 at Prince Edward Island

 

1O141

Harriet Peters Collett

Born in 1866 at Prince Edward Island

 

1O142

Charles Frederick Collett

Born in 1869 at Prince Edward Island

 

1O143

James Beaufort Collett

Born in 1870 at Prince Edward Island

 

 

 

 

1N74

William Collett was baptised on 10th June 1832 at Leonard Stanley, one of the nine known children of Charles Collett and his wife Sarah Edmunds.  Tragically he was just two years old when he died, and was buried at Leonard Stanley on 26th July 1834.

 

 

 

 

1N75

Anthony Collett was born at Leonard Stanley in 1832, where he was baptised on 29th December 1833, the fifth son of Charles and Sarah Collett.  Anthony was eight years old in 1841, when he was still living with his family at Leonard Stanley.  His name was on the passenger list of the ship that sailed from England to Canada in the second half of 1841, when he accompanied his father and his two older brothers Aaron and Charles to Prince Edward Island. 

 

 

 

It would appear that Anthony was in his mid-twenties when he married Mary on Prince Edward Island, and judging by the name of their first child, Mary may have been Mary Lowther.  Whilst there is nearly a ten-year gap between the birth of the couple’s first child and their sequent twins, only one other Collett baptism record has been found amongst the Prince Edward Island records during those years and that was the baptism of Charles William Collett at Richmond, just west of Summerside.  He was baptised on 10th May 1860, when he was named as the son of Mary Collett (Ref. 1N79) and not the wife of Anthony Collett.

 

 

 

By the time of the Canadian census in 1881 the family of four was living at Lot 29 in the Queens district of Prince Edward Island where Anthony’s brother Aaron (above) was also living, as well as two children from the family of their deceased brother Charles.  Anthony Collett from England, was 47 and was a miller, his wife Mary who was born at Prince Edward Island was also 47, while their two children were both 14 and were attending the local school in Queens.  By that time their eldest daughter, who would have been 24, was very likely married.

 

 

 

1O144

Hannah Lowther Collett

Born in 1857 at Prince Edward Island

 

1O145

William Collett               twin

Born in 1866 at Prince Edward Island

 

1O146

Elizabeth Collett              twin

Born in 1866 at Prince Edward Island

 

 

 

 

1N76

Sarah Elizabeth Collett was born at Leonard Stanley in 1834 and, as the first daughter of Charles and Sarah Collett she was named after her mother.  It was also at Leonard Stanley that she was baptised on 27th September 1835, and in the census of 1841 she was recorded just as Sarah Collett aged six years.  It seems likely that she later joined her father in Canada, where she eventually married to become Sarah Goldsmith, which was how she was named in her father’s Will of 1861 when she received one sixth of his estate.  Over the next few years Sarah’s husband died, following which she married (2) the much younger Charles Benjamin Doyle at Amherst in Nova Scotia on 13th August 1866.  Sarah Elizabeth Goldsmith, a widow of 30, was the daughter of Charles Collett and Sarah E (Edmunds).  Charles Benjamin Doyle was only 23, the son of Luke and Mary Doyle.  By the time of the census in 1891 Charles B Doyle, age 45, and his wife Sarah were residing at Cumberland in Nova Scotia.

 

 

 

 

1N77

Anne Collett was born at Leonard Stanley in 1836, where she was baptised on 11th June 1837, and where she was recorded as Ann Collett, aged four years, living with her family in 1841.  Thereafter it is unclear what happen to Anne and the rest of her family, with no record having so far been found in any later census, except for her mother Sarah, who was living alone in Leonard Stanley in 1851.  However, at the time her father made his Will at Summerside on Prince Edward Island in Canada in October 1861 Anne was referred to as daughter Ann Beers, who received one sixth of his estate.

 

 

 

 

1N78

Miriam Collett was born at Leonard Stanley in 1840, and was baptised there on 4th October 1840, the daughter of Charles and Sarah Collett.  Earlier information may have suggested that her name was Mary, Maria, or even Ann, but it was as Miriam Collett that she was recorded in the census of 1841, when she was under one year old and living with her family at Leonard Stanley.  Like the other members of her family it would appear that she later settled at Summerside on Prince Edward Island where she was later married to become Miriam Gould, as named by her father in his Will of 1861 when she received one flock bed and a pair of blankets, plus one sixth of the value of his estate.

 

 

 

Ten years after the death of her father Miriam Gould from England was 32 when she and her husband were living at Amherst in Cumberland, Nova Scotia, where her older married sister Sarah Doyle was living in 1891.

 

 

 

 

1N79

Mary Matilda Collett was born at Leonard Stanley after the census day on the sixth of June in 1841, but was baptised there on 1st November 1841, the youngest child of Charles Collett and his first wife Sarah Edmunds.  Most of her family, but excluding her mother, emigrated to Canada around the time she was born, following which they settled on Prince Edward Island where Mary may have later joined them if she did not travel there at the same time.  It was on Prince Edward Island that Mary Collett gave birth to a base-born child when she was around 19 years of age, the child being named after her own father.  By the end of the following year Mary had married and it was as Mary Chaswell that she was named as one of the six children of Charles Collett of Summerside in his Will of 1861 in which she received one sixth of his estate.

 

 

 

According to the Summerside census in 1881 Mary and her large family were recorded under the surname of Croswell.  Mary M Croswell from England was 39, her husband Henry was 51 and their nine children were William Charles Croswell (formerly Collett), who was 21, Minnie L Croswell, who was 18, Ann N Croswell, who was 20, Sarah E Croswell, who was 17, Mary A Croswell, who was 15, Amelia M Croswell, who was 12, Alberta Croswell who was four, Susan E Croswell who was two, and James A Croswell who was one year old.  Every member of the household except Mary Matilda had been born on Prince Edward Island.

 

 

 

1O147

Charles William Collett

Born in 1860 at Prince Edward Island

 

 

 

 

1N80

Susannah Collett was born at Lot 29, Upper Westmorland on Prince Edward Island during 1847, and was baptised there on 19th September 1847, the daughter of Charles Collett and the second lady in his life, who may have been his second wife, although no details of her are currently known.  Her father died when she was only fourteen years old, when she was named as a beneficiary under the terms of his Will of 1861 through which she received one feather bed and a pair of blankets, plus one sixth of the value of his estate.

 

 

 

 

1O1

Frederick Collett was born at Whelford in 1843 and was the eldest child of William Collett and Maria Clargo.  Frederick was baptised later that year at the parish church in Kempsford on 1st October 1843.  Following the death of his twin brothers and the birth of his sister Mary Jane (below), Frederick’s family moved to Highworth near Swindon in Wiltshire where they were residing in 1851.  The census that year recorded Frederick Collett as being seven years old, the eldest of the two surviving children.  He was still living there with his larger family in 1861 when he was 17.

 

 

 

Just prior to the next census in 1871 Frederick married (1) Emma, and on the day of the census the newly married couple were residing at a dwelling on Faringdon Road in Highworth, right next door a beer-house.  Frederick Collett from Whelford was 28 and a labourer, and his wife Emma Collett, age 22, was from Highworth.  Perhaps Emma died in childbirth, because by the time of the census in 1881 Frederick was married to the much younger (2) Harriet.  It is would appear that living next door to a beer house may have opened a job opportunity for Frederick, as detailed in the census of 1881.

 

 

 

Sometime between 1871 and 1881 Frederick was taken on by the local brewer as a brewery labourer.  In 1881 he was living at Westrop in Highworth, where he was recorded in error as Fredrick Collot, age 38, from Kempsford.  His wife was confirmed as Harriet Collot, who was 27 and from Highworth, and their marriage by that time had produced one child for the couple.  He was named as Fredrick Collot, who was two years old, who had been born at Highworth.  It may be of interest that also living at Westrop in 1881 was Timothy Collett (Ref. 1N23) from Kempsford with his family, and separately his sister Ruth Addis nee Collett (Ref. 1N24) with her family.

 

 

 

So far no record of what happened to the family after that time has been unearthed, even though it is established that son Frederick was still living in Highworth in 1891 at the age of 12, but by 1901 he was serving with the Royal Navy.

 

 

 

1P1

Frederick Collett

Born in 1878 at Highworth

 

 

 

 

1O2

Joseph Collett was born at Whelford in 1846 and was the twin brother of Ralph Collett (below).  The twins were baptised in a joint ceremony at Kempsford on 14th June 1846, when their parents were confirmed as William and Maria Collett.  Tragically neither of them survived, and by 1851 the family was living in Highworth, without either of the two boys.

 

 

 

 

1O3

Ralph Collett was the twin brother of Joseph (above) and was baptised in a joint ceremony at Kempsford on 14th June 1846, the two sons of William and Maria Collett.  It would appear that both Ralph and his twin brother died shortly after they were baptised since neither of them was living with the family in 1851 or at anytime thereafter.

 

 

 

 

1O4

Mary Jane Collett was born at Whelford in 1848 and was baptised at Kempsford on 18th January 1849, the daughter of William and Maria Collett.  Not long after she was baptised her family moved to Highworth where they were living in 1851, when Mary was two years old, and again in 1861 when, as Mary Jane Collett she was 13.  It is expected that she was married by the time of the census in 1871, because she was no living with her parents in Highworth.

 

 

 

 

1O5

Ann Collett was born at Highworth in 1853 and was living there with her parents in 1861 when she was recorded as Ann Collett who was seven years old.  No record of her has been found after that time so it is assumed that since she was not living with her family at Highworth in 1861 that she had suffered a childhood death.

 

 

 

 

1O6

Thomas Collett was born at Highworth in 1857 where he was baptised on 23rd December 1857, the son of William and Maria Collett.  Thomas was three years old in the Highworth census of 1861, and was 14 in the following Highworth census on 1871.  It was just over six years later that he married (1) Sarah Ann Comley on 14th October 1878.  Ann was born in 1860 at Clanfield, north of Faringdon in Berkshire, and all four of their children were born at Highworth.

 

 

 

In 1881 Thomas stated he was aged 21 a labourer of Highworth married to Sarah aged 20 of Clanfield.  Living with them at 21 Eastrop Cottage in Highworth was their daughter Annie aged one year and born at Highworth.  As there was no record of the couple’s eldest daughter in the census it must be assumed she was an infant death.

 

 

 

What happened to his first wife is not known, but after less than eight years with Sarah, Thomas married (2) Dorcas Cockhead on 12th May 1885.  Dorcas was born in 1868 at Bishopstone in Wiltshire and was the daughter of Charles and Sarah Cockhead.  At the time of their marriage, Dorcas already had a daughter Clara Tryphena Cockhead, who was born earlier that year at Stratton St Margaret.  All of the subsequent children of Thomas and Dorcas Collett were also born at Highworth.

 

 

 

By April 1891 five of Thomas’ children were living with their grandfather William Collett at his Highworth home.  They were Harriet Collett, age 11, William Collett who was five, Ada Collett, who was three, Florence Collett, who was two, and Ernest Collett who was not yet one year old.  No record has so far been found of their father Thomas Collett, or his wife Dorcas.

 

 

 

According to the 1901 Census the family was still living at Highworth and comprised Thomas, who was 43 and an ordinary agricultural labourer, Dorcas was 33, plus the following children, Annie Collett, age21, Ellen Collett, age 19, William, age 15, Ada Collett, age 13, Florence Collett, age 12, Mary Collett, who was nine, Eva E Collett, who was seven, Louisa Collett, who was five, Matilda Collett, who was two, and baby Bernard Collett who was not yet one year old.  From the census details the absence of Harriet Collett, who would have been 17, and Ernest Collett, who would have been 10 or 11, perhaps indicate two further child deaths in the family.

 

 

 

Ten years later in April 1911 the family living at Highworth comprised Thomas Collett, age 54, Dorcas Collett, age 44, and their six children Louisa Naomi Collett 14, Matilda Ruth Collett 12, Alice Belinda Collett, age nine, Beatrice Maria Collett, age five, and Victor Jesse Collett who was two.  By then the couple’s son Bernard Collett had been kicked by a horse and had died from his injuries.

 

 

 

Thomas’ and Dorcas’ daughter Alice Belinda Collett was responsible for relating a fascinating insight into the life of a young country girl, which is reproduced in part, at the end of the third section of this family line, after the individual entry for Alice Belinda Collett.  In this she refers to her mother (Dorcas) leaving Thomas to ‘go off with another man’ and taking with her the two youngest children Ri (Maria) and Jess.

 

 

 

1P2

Edith Collett

Born in 1879 at Highworth

 

1P3

Annie Collett

Born in 1880 at Highworth

 

1P4

Ellen Collett

Born in 1882 at Highworth

 

1P5

Harriet Collett

Born in 1883 at Highworth

 

The following are the children from Thomas’ second marriage to Dorcas Cockhead:

 

1P6

William Thomas Collett

Born in 1886 at Highworth

 

1P7

Ada E Collett

Born in 1888 at Highworth

 

1P8

Florence R Collett

Born in 1889 at Highworth

 

1P9

Ernest F Collett

Born in 1890 at Highworth

 

1P10

Mary Collett

Born in 1892 at Highworth

 

1P11

Eva E Collett

Born in 1894 at Highworth

 

1P12

Louisa Naomi Collett

Born in 1896 at Highworth

 

1P13

Matilda Ruth Collett

Born in 1898 at Highworth

 

1P14

Bernard Collett

Born in 1900 at Highworth

 

1P15

Alice Belinda Collett

Born in 1902 at Highworth

 

1P16

Gladys Elsie Collett

Born in 1904 at Highworth

 

1P17

Beatrice Maria Collett

Born in 1906 at Highworth

 

1P18

Victor Jesse Bernard Collett

Born in 1908 at Highworth

 

 

 

 

1O7

William Collett was born at Highworth in 1860 but was baptised there after the census in 1861, in which he was under one year old.  The baptism record at Highworth confirmed he was the son of William and Maria Collett and that he was baptised there on 16th February 1862.  Curiously William was not living with his family on the day of the next census in 1871 when he would have been around 10 or 11 years of age.

 

 

 

However, according to the census in 1881, when he was 21, William had already left the family home in Highworth for a new life in Kent, where he was living and working a 78 Hills Yard in Sevenoaks, the home of grocer Thomas Hill who was employing William as a servant and grocer’s assistant.  By the turn of the century William had returned to Wiltshire and was back living in Highworth, where he was working with his brother Frederick as a brewer’s cellar man at the age of 38 years.

 

 

 

 

1O8

Arthur Collett was born at Highworth in 1862, the youngest son of William and Maria Collett.  He was eight years old in the Highworth census of 1871, when he was living there with his family.  However, it is unclear at this time as to what exactly happened to him after 1871 when it is known that his mother died and his widowed father was still living in Highworth, but with just Arthur’s sister Maria (below) for company.

 

 

 

 

1O9

Maria Collett was born at Highworth in 1867, the last child born to William and Maria Collett.  Maria was three years old in 1871 when she was one of only three children still living at Highworth with her parents.  During the next decade her mother passed away, and so by the time of the census in 1881 Maria Collett, age 14, was the only child living with her widowed father William Collett who was still living in Highworth but at 3 Wrag Cottage in the town.  It is likely that she was married by the time of the census in 1891.

 

 

 

 

1O10

Elizabeth Collett was born at Berkeley in Gloucestershire towards the end 1859 following the wedding of her parents at Bristol in April that same year.  It was also at Berkeley that she was baptised on 1st April 1860, the eldest child of Joseph Collett and his wife Piety Chappell.  It should be noted that it was under the name of George Collett that her father married Piety, and that her baptism record also named her parents as George and Piety.  Why Joseph called himself George in the official records is not known, whereas in the census returns he did use his correct name of Joseph.

 

 

 

During the next year Elizabeth’s sister Mary (below) was born at Bowcott near Wotton-under-Edge, and by the time of the census on the seventh of April 1861 the family was recorded in the town Wotton-under-Edge when Elizabeth Collet (sic) was one year old.  It was around six years later that her parents took the family to live in nearby Dursley before they eventually settled in the village of Uley, two miles east of Dursley.  But it was at Dursley that she was living with her family in 1871 when she was recorded as Elizth Collett age 11 and from Berkeley.

 

 

 

Elizabeth Collett, age 21 and from Wick Berkeley, was how she was described in the Uley census of 1881 when she was the eldest child of the eight children living at Rockstowe in Uley with her parents.  She was not credited with having an occupation, so was most likely helping her mother with her younger siblings.  No record of her as Elizabeth Collett has been found after 1881 so there is every chance that she was married during the 1880s.

 

 

 

 

1O11

Mary Collett was born at Bowcott near Wotton-under-Edge, possible at the end of 1860 or very early in 1861.  Not long after she was born her parents left Bowcott and settled in the town of Wotton-under-Edge where Mary Collet (sic) was living with her parents and her older sister Elizabeth (above) in 1861.  After six years or so in Wotton, the family moved again to Dursley, where two of Mary’s siblings were born, before they finally settled in nearby Uley.  The Dursley census of 1871 recorded Mary Collett as being ten years old.  On leaving school during the next few years Mary sought work in domestic service and by 1881 she was employed as a parlour maid at a private hotel at London Wall in the St Mary Aldermanbury district of London.  The hotel was managed by Frederick Rayment and his wife, while parlour maid Mary Collett was recorded as being 20 years of age and from Wotton-under-Edge. 

 

 

 

 

1O12

Sarah Ann Collett was born at Wotton-under-Edge in 1862 and was five years old when her family moved north from Wotton to the town of Dursley, where they were living in 1871.  The census that year included Sarah as S A Collett who was eight years old.  Within the next few months the family moved again, that time to the village of Uley just east of Dursley, where Sarah’s family was still living in 1881.  However, by that time Sarah Ann Collett, age 18 and from Dursley, was working as a nursemaid at the home of Arthur and Octavia Hayward at Elm Lodge, Southlands Road in Bromley, Kent. 

 

 

 

It seems a long way from Bromley in Kent to Birmingham, but it was there during the last three months of 1882 that the death of a Sarah Ann Collett was recorded (Ref. 6d 65) when she was 20 years of age.

 

 

 

 

1O13

John Collett was born at Wotton-under-Edge during 1863, the eldest son and fourth child of Joseph Collett and his wife Piety Chappell.  By 1871 he and his family were living in Dursley when John Collett was seven years old.  On finishing his education John became a policeman and in 1881 he was described as a police officer while he was in lodgings at Oldland Common in Bitten, Somerset, midway between Bath and Bristol.  He was curiously described as John Collett from Bow Heh in Gloucestershire and was 19, rather than 17.  Although a lodger, he was also head of the householder, which very likely indicates the property in which he was lodging was a police house or police station.  There was one of resident, and that was George Hayward age 19 from Kempsford.

 

 

 

Rather curiously no record of John has been found within the census of 1891, but was during the first half of the 1890s that John married Elizabeth who was born at Coleford in the Forest of Dean area of Gloucestershire.  It was also there that the couple’s second child was born, with the first having been born across the River Severn at Berkeley where John eldest sister had been born in 1859.  The census in 1901 placed John and Elizabeth with their first three children living at Tortworth, near Wotton-under-Edge, where their daughter Alice had been born.  Although it was at Wotton-under-Edge that John had been born, in the census return that year his place of birth was recorded as Dursley to where his family moved when he was around four years old.  John Collett, age 37, was working as a watchman and lodge keeper, while his Elizabeth from Coleford was 38.

 

 

 

The couple’s three children on that occasion were their son Frederick, who was five, who had been born at Berkeley, their son William, who was four, who had been born at Coleford, and their daughter Alice who was three years old.  The family continued to live at Tortworth for at least another four years since it was while they were still living there that Elizabeth presented John with their fourth and last children.  During the few years after the birth the family left Gloucestershire when they moved to Monmouth in South Wales, where they were living in April 1911.

 

 

 

By that time in their life John Collett from Uley was 47, his wife Elizabeth was 48, and their children were confirmed as Frederick J S (sic) Collett, who was 15, William H Collett, who was 14, Alice Maud Collett, who was 13, and Charles Ernest Collett who was six years old.  By the summer of 1917 John and Elizabeth had returned to Gloucestershire and were living at the Post Office in Christchurch, near Coleford in the Forest of Dean, when they received the tragic news that their eldest son Frederick had been killed during the fighting at the Ypres Salient.

 

 

 

1P19

Frederick John James Collett

Born in 1895 at Berkeley, Glos

 

1P20

William H Collett

Born in 1896 at Coleford, Glos

 

1P21

Alice Maud Collett

Born in 1897 at Tortworth, Glos

 

1P22

Charles Ernest Collett

Born in 1904 at Tortworth, Glos

 

 

 

 

1O14

Eliza Collett was born at Wotton-under-Edge in 1865 and was one year old when her family moved to Dursley, when Eliza was five years old in 1871.  Another move later that year saw the family living in nearby Uley, where Eliza was 15 in 1881.  At the end of the next decade Eliza Collett, age 26 had already left the family home in Uley, but was living and working close by within the same census registration district.

 

 

 

 

1O15

George Collett was born at Dursley in 1868 and was two years old in 1871 when he was still living at Dursley with his family.  When he was around three years old his parents took the family to live at nearby Uley, and it was there in Rockstowe that George Collett was 12 and still attending school in 1881.  By the time he was 22 George Collett from Dursley in Gloucestershire was the only Collett living and working in the Uttoxeter area of Staffordshire.  So far no trace of him has been found anywhere in Great Britain after that time.

 

 

 

 

1O16

Rosa Emma Collett was born at Dursley on 13th January 1871 and was three months old in the Dursley census of 1871 when she was listed with her family simply as R E Collett.  Shortly after that her family moved to Uley, where Rosa was baptised in a joint ceremony with her brother Albert (below) on 13th July 1873, the daughter of George (Joseph) and Piety Collett.  In 1881 she was recorded as Rosie Collett, age 10, who was at school in Uley while living with her family at Rockstowe.  Ten years later the census in 1891 listed Rose E Collett, age 20, as the oldest of the four children still living at the family home in Uley.  She was still unmarried in April 1901, when the census that month recorded that she was living in Stafford, which raises the question, had she moved north to that county to be with her George (above).

 

 

 

She was still unmarried in April 1901, when the census that month recorded that she was living in Stafford, which raises the question, had she moved north to that county to be with her George (above)?  However, according to the census that year Rosa E Collett, from Bowcott (?) in Gloucestershire was living in the village of Oaken near Codsall where she was working as a domestic housemaid at the age of 30.  After a further ten years spinster Rosa Emma Collett, who was 40 and from Dursley, was once again living within the county of Gloucestershire, in the city of Gloucester itself.  No other Collett was living with her at that time.

 

 

 

Around the time of the Second World War unmarried Rosa Emma Collett was residing at 31 Staunton Road in Coleford, on the edge of the Forest of Dean, and it was there that she died on 21st September 1947, following which she was buried at Coleford with her brother Albert Collet (below) who had died two years earlier.  Her Will was proved in Gloucester on 20th April 1948 when the executor of her estate of £502 was named as Charles Ernest Collett, a motor engineer.  Charles was the son of Rosa’s older brother John Collett (above).

 

 

 

 

1O17

Albert Collett was born at Uley on 8th May 1873, and was baptised there in a joint ceremony with his older sister Rosa (above) on 13th July 1873, the son of George (Joseph) and Piety Collett.  The census in 1881 confirmed that he was seven years old and living with his family at Rockstowe in Uley.  It seems very odd that no record of Albert has been found in any census after 1881, particularly since it is known that he died and was buried at Coleford during 1945 where his unmarried sister Rosa Emma Collett (above) lived at 31 Staunton Road in Coleford, where she he passed away two years later.  New information unearthed in 2012 reveals that he married Elizabeth Cullis at Coleford on 20th September 1902, and that shortly after that Elizabeth presented Albert with a daughter Isabel.  The occupation of Albert Collett was that of a police inspector, similar to his older brother John (above) who was a policeman.

 

 

 

1P23

Isabel Ellen Collett

Born after 1902 at Coleford

 

 

 

 

1O19

Florence L Collett was born at Uley in 1877, the youngest daughter of Joseph and Piety Collett.  At the time of the census in 1881 Florence was three years old and living with her family at Rockstowe in Uley.  Ten years late it was as Florence L Collett, age 13, that she was still living with her parents at Uley.  It was again as Florence L Collett that she was one of only two children still living with her parents at Uley in 1901 when she was 23 and with no defined occupation.  Following the deaths of both of her parents during the first ten years of the new century, Florence Collett, age 33 and born at Uley, was still living there alone in April 1911.

 

 

 

 

1O20

Arthur Henry Collett was born at Uley during late 1880 or early in 1881, the youngest and last child born to Joseph Collett and his Piety Chappell.  It was simply as Arthur Collett that he was listed with his family at Rockstowe in Uley when he was only a few months old.  More information about him was given in the Uley census of 1891 when he was named as Arthur H Collett who was 10 years old.  On leaving school in Uley Arthur was employed as a general agricultural labourer, as confirmed in the Uley census of 1901 when Arthur H Collett, age 20, and his sister Florence (above) were the only children still living with their parents at the family’s home.

 

 

 

Possible after the death of both of his parents within the next two years Arthur appears to have left Uley and travelled north to Tewkesbury, where he met and married Emily Elizabeth who was born there in 1881.  It was also in Tewkesbury that they settled, and where their three known children were born.  It is possible that more children were added to the family after 1911, but on the occasion of the census that year the family was made up of Arthur Henry Collett, from Uley who was 30, his wife Emily Elizabeth Collett, age 29, and their three children.  They were Arthur Charles Collett, who was five, Christabel Beatrice, who was four, and Alfred Gilbert who was two years old.

 

 

 

1P24

Arthur Charles Collett

Born in 1905 at Tewkesbury

 

1P25

Christabel Beatrice Collett

Born in 1907 at Tewkesbury

 

1P26

Alfred Gilbert Collett

Born in 1908 at Tewkesbury

 

 

 

 

1O22

Albert Collett was born at Hartlepool in 1872 and he emigrated to Australia, where he lived until his death in 1968.

 

 

 

1P27

Arthur Dudley Collett

Date of birth unknown

 

 

 

 

1O26

Edith Collett was born in India in 1877.  She married Frederick Harrison towards the end of the nineteenth century when in her early twenties.  By March 1901 Edith and her husband were living in the Barnes area of London where Edith was 24 and born in India, while Frederick, age 29, was a carpet warehouseman who had been born at Dover in Kent.  Frederick was the son of Harry D Harrison who was the Deputy Principal at the India Office of the Bank of England who was born at Blackheath in Kent but who also lived at Barnes.

 

 

 

It is understood that the marriage of Edith and Frederick did not produce any children for the couple.  In May 1917 it fell to Edith to inform the Derby registrar of the death of her father Frederick Collett, and her address at that time was 12 Hillersdon Avenue in Barnes.  The obituary in the Derby Daily Telegraph included an error when it made reference to the presence of son-in-law and daughter Mr and Mrs Fred Harris rather than Harrison and unlike others named in the article, there were no nephews or nieces included with Edith and Frederick.

 

 

 

 

1O27

Jessie Collett was born in India in 1878 and was the daughter of Frederick Collett and Rosanne Rose.  By 1911 it would appear, although not proved, that Jessie was acting as housekeeper for her father Frederick on the island of Jersey where he was the caretaker at Mont Orgueil Castle.  However, there is a caveat to this, in that she was listed as Frederick’s niece Jessie Maria Collett aged 31, a single lady from Kempsford, where Frederick was baptised.  Also living with them was another ‘niece’ who may have been Maud Collett (below) who was also a daughter of Frederick Collett.  By the time of the death of her father in 1917 Jessie was married and had emigrated to Australia.  It is understood that like her sister Edith (above) she too had a childless married.

 

 

 

 

1O28

Frederick Collett was born in 1880 after his parents returned to England from India during the previous year.  He was one half of a set of twins but did not survive and was missing from the family when his father was posted to Gibraltar in August 1880.

 

 

 

 

1O29

Rosy Collett was one half of a set of twins who were born in England in 1880.  Sadly, her twin brother Frederick (above) and only male sibling, died shortly after the birth.  It is known that she married and that may have happened before 31st March 1901 as there is no suitable Rosy Collett in the census that took place on that day.  It is also known that the marriage produced three children for Rosy and her husband, they being Lurleine, John and Beulah.

 

 

 

 

1O30

Gertrude Collett was born in Gibraltar in 1881.  At the age of nineteen she was the only one of nine daughters still living with her widowed father in 1901.  Her father Frederick was the warder of Mont Orgueil Castle in Jersey and at that time he and his daughter Gertrude were living in the St Martin’s district of the island.  Gertrude later married William Bull with whom she had five children.  Before they were married William was listed in the 1901 Census as an able seaman with the Royal Navy based at Hampshire.  His age was given as 22 and his place of birth was stated as being Birmingham.  The couple’s five children were William Bull who died when he was five, Frederick Bull, Edward Bull, Ernest Bull and Barbara Bull.  And it was Barbara’s married daughter Lurleen Soutar who kindly provided details of the life and family of Frederick Collett her great grandfather.

 

 

 

 

1O34

Maud Collett was born at Gibraltar in 1886 and was the daughter of Frederick Collett and his wife Rosanne Rose.  By 1911 it would appear, although not proved, that Maud had joined her father on the island of Jersey where he was the caretaker at Mont Orgueil Castle, and where Maud was listed as the assistant caretaker.  It would appear from the census return that Maud, who was referred to as the niece of Frederick Collett, was recorded as Lillian Maud Collett age 26 who was born at Meysey Hampton, very close to Kempsford.  Also living at The Lodge to Mont Orgueil Castle with them was Maud’s sister Jessie (above) and a four-year-old boy by the name of Frederick Reynold Collett.

 

 

 

Although described as the nephew of head of the household Frederick, he could not have been a nephew since none of Frederick’s two surviving brothers ever married, and it was not the son of Jessie Collett since it is known she had no children.  The only logical explanation is that he was the base-born son of Maud Collett and possibly a Mr Reynold, and that she had fallen pregnant in Gloucestershire and had been sent to live with her father to cover any embarrassment, although none of this has been confirmed at this time.

 

 

 

1P28

Frederick Reynold Collett

Born in 1906 at Jersey

 

 

 

 

1O36

Cornelius Collett was born at Hampton Hill in the parish of Highworth on 2nd July 1864.  He was the first-born children of Job Collett and Susannah Gibbs and was baptised at Highworth on 4th September 1864.  In the Highworth census of 1871 Cornelius was seven years old and was living at Hampton Hill with his parents and younger sister Mary (below), although his whereabouts ten years has not been discovered.  During the 1880s his family left Highworth and moved to Whelford where his father had been born, but according to the census of 1891 Cornelius had stayed on at Highworth where he was still living and working at the age of 27.  Again no record has been found that reveals where he was in March 1901, but by April 1911 and, following the death of his father, Cornelius Collett was 46 when he was living at Whelford with his widowed mother Susannah who was 68, and his much younger sister Olive Collett who was 22.

 

 

 

 

1O37

Mary Jane Collett was born at Hampton Hill on 18th September 1867 and was baptised at Highworth on 11th October 1867.  At the age of four she was listed in the Highworth census of 1871 as Mary J Collett when living at Hampton Hill with her parents and older brother Cornelius (above).  No further record for Mary Jane Collett has been found in any subsequent census returns although, in 1881 a Jane Collett, age 15 and from Highworth, was employed as a domestic servant at 1 Victoria Street in Swindon, the home of the Horsell family.

 

 

 

 

1O38

Rose Collett was born at Hampton Hill on 21st September 1871 and was nine years old in the census of 1881 when she was living with her family at Hampton Hill in Highworth.  By the time she was 19 Rose had already left the family home in Highworth.  In the mid 1890s she married Joseph Mulcock who was born at Quenington in Gloucestershire with whom she had six children prior to 1911.

 

 

 

By March 1901 the family was living at Crudwell where Joseph was 28 and a domestic groom, while his wife Rose was 29, and their first child Dora Mulcock was two years old and had been born at Kempsford.  During the next ten years a further five children were added to the family which, by April 1911, had moved to Bristol.  Joseph Mulcock was 38, Rose Mulcock 39, and their six children were Dora Mulcock was 12, Reginald Mulcock was 10, Rose Mulcock was eight, Violet Mulcock was seven, Albert Mulcock was four, and Francis Mulcock who was two years old.

 

 

 

 

1O39

Winifred Collett was born at Hampton Hill on 31st May 1874 and was baptised at Highworth on 25th June 1874, the daughter of Job and Susannah Collett.  Apart from the census return for 1881, in which Winifred was six years old and living with her family at Hampton Hill, no other records after this time have so far been found for her.

 

 

 

 

1O40

Bertha Annie Collett was born at Hampton Hill on 29th June 1876 and was baptised at Highworth on 21st July 1876.  She was five years old in 1881 when she was listed as Berthelay Collett, but was referred to as Bertha Collett in the census of 1891 when she was 14 years old and living with her parents at Whelford.  Around the time of reaching adulthood she left the Kempsford area and made her way to London where, in 1901, she was living at Lewisham at the age of 24 where she was employed as a domestic servant.  It is understood that by the time of the census of 1911 that she was married and was recorded as Bertha Annie Davies, age 34 and from Hampton in Highworth.  At that time she was living at Newtown in Montgomeryshire and her husband may well have been Samuel Davies who was 44.

 

 

 

 

1O41

Ada Collett was born at Hampton Hill on 19th April 1880 and was eleven months old at the time of the Highworth census of 1881.  During the next few years her parents left the Highworth area and moved the short distance to Whelford where they were living in 1891 when Ada was ten years old.  It seems very likely according to the census of 1911 that Ada married William Henry Bulpit and by that time the childless couple were living within the Cricklade registration district, where Ada Annie Bulpit of Hampton was 30, and her husband was 29.

 

 

 

 

1O42

Olive Collett was born at Whelford on 8th August 1888 after her parents had moved there from Hampton Hill in Highworth.  In 1891 Olive was two years old and was living with her parents and her two older sisters Bertha and Ada (above) at Whelford.  Sometime during the next decade Olive’s father died and by March 1901 Olive was the only child still living at Whelford with her widowed mother Susannah.  Olive was still at school and was 12 years old, while her mother was then the bread-winner and had taken up work as an agricultural labourer at the age of 58.  Ten years later Olive Collett was 22 and was still living with her mother at Whelford, but by that time they had been joined by Olive’s much older brother Cornelius who was 46.

 

 

 

Thanks to new information gratefully received from Rod Murray of South Australia, it is established that Olive did eventually marry seven years later and towards the end of the Great War.  The wedding took place at Cirencester on 22nd April 1918 when she married Joseph Moulding.  The marriage produced five daughters for Olive and Joseph and they were, Joyce Victoria Moulding (born on 10th January 1921), Olive Winifred Moulding (born on 22nd September 1923), Peggy Irene Moulding (born on 19th April 1925), Kathleen Rosemary Moulding (born on 5th May 1930), and Nancy Ruth Moulding (born on 4th September 1933).  The five daughters in turn presented the world with a further thirty-two children, one of whom was the mother-in-law of Rod Murray, Olive Moulding nee Collett, she being his wife’s grandmother.

 

 

 

 

1O45

Annie Collett was born at Highworth in 1877 and was three years old in the 1881 Census when she was living with her parents Timothy and Elizabeth Collett at Westrop in Highworth.  Just after the turn of the century Annie was still a spinster at the age of 23 and was working as a domestic cook in Highworth.

 

 

 

 

1O48

Elizabeth Collett was the base-born daughter of Ruth Collett and was been in 1868 at Highworth shortly after her mother had left Whelford.  In early April 1871 Elizabeth was three years old and was living with her mother Ruth Collett at the home of her grandfather James Collett and his second wife Susannah who had also moved to Highworth around the same time.  Ten years later in 1881, Elizabeth Collett, age 13, was working as an agricultural labourer while living with her mother, who had since married William Addis.

 

 

 

 

1O56

Sarah Isabella Collett was born at Coln St Aldwyns in 1829 where she was baptised on 13th April 1829, the first child born to Francis Collett by his wife Sarah King.  By 1838 Sarah and her family were living in Northleach, and by June 1841 they were recorded in the census that year residing in the town of Cirencester, where Sarah Collett was 12.  After a further ten years Sarah was not living with her family in Castle Ward in Cirencester in 1851 since by then she had already emigrated to New Zealand as a servant employed by the Reverend Thomas Jackson.

 

 

 

It was on board the sailing ship ‘Castle Eden’ that Sarah sailed out of Gravesend on 28th September 1850, stopping at Plymouth on 3rd October, before eventually arriving at Lyttelton in New Zealand on 7th February 1851.  The passenger list confirmed that she was 21 years of age, that her occupation was that of servant, and that she travelled in steerage.  Her employer, the Rev Jackson was expected to be the first Bishop of Canterbury within the Church of England settlement, under the leadership of John Robert Godley.  It is understood that Sarah had received assisted passage, which was funded by the Canterbury Association.  The Rev Jackson did not last long in the new world, and quickly returned to England via Wellington.

 

 

 

Four years after arriving in New Zealand Sarah was nursemaid to the young children of Sir Thomas Tancred, the eighth baronet, and his wife Lady Tancred, who arrived in the country onboard the ‘Hampshire’ during May 1855.  It is rumoured that Sarah Isabella Collett was more than likely the first Collett to settle in Canterbury, and she was followed there by her father Francis with her brother Henry in 1852, and by her mother Sarah with her sister Anne and her brother William in 1859, by which time Anne was married to Isaac Bryan.

 

 

 

It was on 23rd February 1854 at St Michael’s Church that Sarah married (1) Henry William Roil, of the French family de la Roile, who was born at Alton in Hampshire on 9th March 1821, the son of Thomas Roil and Sarah Sewery.  In 1845 Henry was a farmer in Waimea East now renamed as Richmond in Nelson.  The following advertisement in the Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle could be about Henry prior to his move south.  It was dated 23rd March 1850 and read as follows:  ”To be Let or Sold, the fifty-acre section, No.71, Waimea East, adjoining Mr Saxton`s farm, distant five miles from Nelson, with a fine stream of water running on one side; at present occupied by Mr Roil.  For terms of sale or lease apply to B. Walmsley, Motueka. If not sold, can be leased from Lady Day next. The above is one of the best Sections in the district.  At the time that Henry married Sarah he was the licensee of the Sawyer`s Arms Hotel in Papanui, which was destroyed by fire in 1898, although by that time the owner was a Mr Cooper.

 

 

 

Over eight years Sarah presented Henry with six children at Christchurch and they were Sarah Ann Roil (15th February 1855 – 30th May 1944), Francis [Frank] Roil (1856-1915), William Roil (1858 - 1885), James Roil (1860 - 1903), and Henry Thomas Roil and Eliza Louisa Roil who were born on 21st June 1862.  Henry died on 4th July 1943, while Eliza died in 1946.  The last two children were twins and were born after their father Henry had died as a result of the injuries he sustained in an accident while driving a bullock dray, so they never knew their father.  At the time of the incident the calf of his leg was torn away, following which tetanus set in, and he died a few weeks later on 27th May 1862 and was buried three days later at St Pauls in Papanui.  The twins were born one month after.

 

 

 

It was also in 1861 that Sarah’s mother died, after which her widowed father Francis lived with her and her family for many years, until he died peacefully in his sleep in 1884.  Around ten years earlier widow Sarah Roil married (2) James Barker, who was born at Somerset in England during 1817, and who died at Christchurch in 1895.  The marriage produced one son for the couple, Arthur Robert Barker, who was born in 1875 and who died in 1922, who Miriam May Campbell in 1896.  Sarah also opened a small general store in Oxford, which survived for only two years.  She then became a midwife and travelled as far as Christchurch for work.  Sarah Isabella Barker, formerly Roil nee Collett, died at Christchurch, Canterbury NZ, on 24th December 1910.  It is believed that Sarah’s sons were not best pleased with her second marriage, and while Francis Roil continued to live in Christchurch until his death in 1914, he did not visit his mother, William died as a young man near Masterton in the Wairarapa and James moved north, married and came to an early end in a fishing boat accident outside Thames in New Zealand. One of James' little sons also died and his widow took the other with her when she went to Australia. That left the twins, Thomas and Louisa, and when he was 14 years old Thomas also went to Australia.

 

 

 

Sarah’s son Arthur Robert Barker was a New Zealand Champion cyclist, and a pin-up boy, who owned a bicycle shop on Edgeware Road in Christchurch up until his death in 1922.  Many years later the name of the cycle shop on Edgeware Road was Hobday Cycles from where in 1957, twelve years-old Kelvin Parker (see Ref. 1Q64) was given a newly refurbished bike by his grandmother Gertrude Louise Collett nee Brittenden (Ref. 1P144).  It is therefore possible that the Hobdays who managed the shop were related to Betty Florence Hobday, the granddaughter of William Henry Collett (Ref. 1P31) who was the cousin of Arthur Robert Barker.

 

 

 

Rob, as he was known by family, was born when his half sister Louisa Bryan was about 12 or 13 years old and she knew him better than her full brothers except Tom.  Rob grew up into a likeable and unusually athletic child and at the Anniversary Day sports event in December 1890 he finished first in the 16-and-under cycle race when he completed the one mile course in 4 minutes 12 seconds on a penny-farthing bike, which won him 30 shillings.  Three years later Rob made his mark at the North Otago meeting in Oamaru on the modern type of two-wheeler racing cycle and became a nationally known figure.  The year 1895 was less successful for Rob, but that was the year his father died and the next year, when Rob went on his travels north, so did his mother, as it gave her the opportunity to visit relatives.  At Palmerston North in 1896, after competing in Oamaru, Christchurch and Fielding, Joey Barker, as he was affectionately known by his fellow competitors, entered the national championships of the League of New Zealand Wheelmen, when he carried off every event except one, the half-mile, in which he finished second to his Christchurch rival Tom Clarkson.

 

 

 

On the track in 1897 Rob held the New Zealand records for distances of a quarter, half and one mile, and he became something of a cult hero as fans could buy photoshots of him on his cycle, or being paced by three cyclists on a triple tandem.  “He is a racer from his toes to the tip of his curly head” wrote The New Zealand Cyclist in April 1897.  While he was still at his peak racing he worked as a representative in the bike shop of Morrow, Bassett & Co. and later had his own cycle shop in Edgeware Road.  The esteem to which he was held was apparent when, in a court case in Christchurch involving the stabbing of a horse in 1902, Arthur Robert Barker was called upon to give evidence as to the amount of time it would take to cycle a given distance on the cycle of the accused.

 

 

 

 

1O57

Anne Collett was born at Coln St Aldwyns in 1832 and it was there also that she was baptised on 20th June 1832, the daughter of Francis and Sarah Collett.  After a short period living in Northleach, the family moved to Cirencester where in 1841 ‘Ann’ Collett was nine years old.  Where she was in 1851 is not known, since she was no longer living in Cirencester with her family.  During the previous year her older sister Sarah (above) had emigrated to New Zealand, where Anne eventually went, but only after she had become a married lady. 

 

 

 

She married Isaac Bryan of Cheltenham, the son of shoemaker George Bryan and his wife Sarah Mace who was born at Daglingworth in 1832.  Rumour has it that they were married a few days after emigrating, which might indicate that they were actually married onboard the ‘Clontarf’ in 1858 on their voyage to a new life in New Zealand, where they arrived at Lyttelton in 1859.  Isaac Bryan was felling a tree when a branch came away and struck him in the chest.  He walked home and a doctor was called.  No outward sign of injury was found, but early next morning he became delirious and died.  Anne Bryan nee Collett died during 1897 and was buried at Reefton Old Cemetery on 5th November 1897.  Annie, as she was known, was a milliner and a straw-bonnet maker, who was well-read and generally considered a learned woman.

 

 

 

Isaac Bryan had died many years earlier in 1886, while their married had produced nine children when the family was living at Christchurch.  They were Sarah Ann Bryan (1859-1924), George Francis Bryan (1861-1925), Isaac Bryan (1863-1939), Ruth Anna King Bryan (1865-1947), Emily Mace Bryan (1867-1946), Alfred William Bryan (1869-1889), Alice Sparks Bryan (1871-1964), Ellen Electra Bryan (1873-1936), and Edith Elizabeth Bryan (1875-1947).

 

 

 

 

1O58

Henry Cornelius Collett was born at Coln St Aldwyns in 1834 and was baptised there on 5th February 1835, the first son of Francis and Sarah Collett.  Shortly after he was born his parents took the family to live for a while in Northleach before they settled in Cirencester, where they were living in June 1841 when Henry was six years old.  It was within the Castle Ward of Cirencester that Henry Collett, age 16 and from Coln St Aldwyns, was still living with his family in 1851.  However, twelve months later Henry, who was a carpenter by then, left England on 26th March 1852 on the sailing ship ‘Samarang’ with his father bound for New Zealand, where they arrived on 31st July that year.  It was not for another seven years that Henry’s mother made the same voyage, when she was accompanied by Henry’s married sister Anne Bryan (above) and her husband, and his youngest brother William (below), who arrived in Lyttelton on board the ship ‘Clontarf in early 1859.  What happened to Henry after 1859 is not known at this time.

 

 

 

 

1O59

Azaria Francis Collett was born at Northleach in 1838, but was baptised at Coln St Aldwyns on 29th July 1838, the son of Francis and Sarah Collett.  Not long after he was baptised his family moved south to Cirencester, and it was there that Azaria Collett was two years of age.  However, it was as Francis Collett, age 12 and from Northleach, that he was recorded with his family in Cirencester in 1851.

 

 

 

 

1O60

Elizabeth Mary Collett was born at Cirencester in 1841 but after the sixth of June that year.  It was on 19th September 1841 that she was baptised at Coln St Aldwyns the youngest of the three daughters of Francis and Sarah Collett.  Tragically she was just over four years old when she died at Cirencester on 24th January 1846.

 

 

 

 

1O61

William Giles Collett was born at Cirencester in 1848, although like all of his older siblings, he too was taken back to Coln St Aldwyns, where he was baptised on 22nd October 1848, the last child of Francis Collett and Sarah King.  William was listed with his family in the Castle Ward district of Cirencester under his full name of William Giles Collett when he was two years old in 1851, which also confirmed he had been born at Cirencester.  One year after the census day William’s father and older brother Henry formed an advance party for the family to eventually emigrate to New Zealand.  However, it was seven years after they had arrived in that country when William and his mother, together with his married sister Anne and her husband, left England onboard the ‘Clontarf’ in 1858 when William was only 10 years old.  It was some years later that William Giles Collett married the younger Janet McLean on 1st July 1873.

 

 

 

Contrary to what was written here previously, that Janet was the daughter of James McLean and his first wife Catherine Sutherland, it would now appear that she was the daughter of Peter McLean by an unnamed mother when she was born at Dunedin on 16th January 1857.  Another Peter McLean was born at Dunedin in 1854 and he was the son of James and Catherine McLean who had arrived in Dunedin from the Isle of Wight in England on the sailing ship ‘Phoebe Dunbar’ in 1850.  Accompanying the couple on their sea voyage were their two daughters.  So that raises the question, was Peter McLean the brother of James McLean, making his son Peter the cousin of Jane.  Or was Jane later adopted and brought up by James and Catherine as their own child?  In addition to all of this Janet (Jessie) Collett, the second daughter of William Giles Collett and his wife Janet McLean, married Harold Percy Charles McLean who was born at Kaituna in New Zealand on 16th September 1885, he being the son of Peter McLean and Kate O’Dell.

 

 

 

Sadly, it would appear, the marriage of farmer William Giles Collett and Janet McLean was not the great success that might have been expected.  By the time of the birth of the couple’s ninth child the father’s named was noted as being ‘not recorded’.  Such were the couple’s marital problems that in early 1902 Janet deserted William when she went to live with a friend in Wellington and, a little while later, she was admitted into a lunatic asylum.  William subsequently sought a divorce, with the following being published in the Marlborough Express on 22nd July 1914.  “IN THE SUPREME COURT OF NEW ZEALAND, HAMILTON DISTRICT, IN DIVORCE - To Janet Collett, late of Koromiko, in the Provincial District of Marlborough and Dominion of New Zealand, wife of William Giles Collett, of Te Kuiti, in the Provincial District of Auckland and Dominion aforesaid, Farmer. 

 

 

 

Whereas William Giles Collett aforesaid, claiming to have been lawfully married to you, the said Janet Collett, then Janet McLean, in Kaituna Valley, in the said Provincial District of Marlborough, on the first day of July, one thousand eight hundred and seventy-three, has lodged his petition in the Hamilton Registry of this Honorable Court praying that his said marriage with you be dissolved for that you did on the fourth day of January, one thousand nine hundred and two, wilfully desert the said William Giles Collett at Wellington without just cause, and that for five years and upwards from the said fourth day of January, one thousand nine hundred and two, down to the present time have continued to desert him, the said Petitioner, without just cause.

 

 

 

Now therefore take notice that unless within 28 days after the date of this advertisement you file an answer to the Petition of the said William Giles Collett, the said Court will proceed to have the said charge proved and to pronounce sentence therein notwithstanding your absence.  And further take notice that before filing the said answer you must enter an appearance in person or by your solicitor at the Registry of the said Court at Hamilton, and that if you do not enter such an appearance you will not be allowed to address the Court either in person or by counsel at any stage of the proceedings.

 

 

 

A copy of the Petition and Citation may be had on application to the Supreme Court Office at Hamilton.  Dated at Hamilton this sixth day of June, one thousand nine hundred and fourteen.  H. J. DIXON, Deputy Registrar.  The Citation was extracted by George Panton Finlay, of Te Kuiti, Solicitor, for the Petitioner, whose address for service is at the office of Erima Harvey Northcroft, Esquire, Solicitor, in Victoria Street, Hamilton.  Would any friend or friends of the respondent above-named to whose notice this advertisement may come kindly forward same on to her or draw her attention to same immediately.”

 

 

 

It was during 1936 in New Zealand that William Giles Collett passed away at the age of 88.  It may be significant that within the book ‘The Roots of Clover’ by Elsie Locke, the granddaughter of Annie Bryan nee Collett (Ref. 1O57), it is written that Bill (William Giles) Collett and his wife Janet MacLean had twelve children rather than just the nine listed below.  An abridged version of the book was reproduced in six monthly instalments in the Collett Newsletter from August 2014 to January 2015.

 

 

 

1P29

Emily Collett

Born in 1874 in New Zealand

 

1P30

Janet (Jessie) Collett

Born in 1876 in New Zealand

 

1P31

William Henry Collett

Born in 1879 in New Zealand

 

1P32

Francis Albert Collett

Born in 1881 in New Zealand

 

1P33

Florence Abenia Collett

Born in 1884 in New Zealand

 

1P34

Sarah Catherine Collett

Born in 1886 in New Zealand

 

1P35

Mary Rebecca Collett

Born in 1888 in New Zealand

 

1P36

Alice Collett

Born in 1891 in New Zealand

 

1P37

Ivy Winifred Collett

Born in 1898 in New Zealand

 

 

 

 

1O67

William Collett was born at Painswick and was baptised there on 25th January 1829.  He was 12 years old at the time of the 1841 Census and 22 in 1851, on both occasions he and his family were living at Cirencester, and for the latter event his place of birth was stated as being Painswick.  He was a plate layer and around 1853 he married Jane who was born at Somerford Keynes in 1827.

 

 

 

By the time of the census in 1861 William and Jane had three children, when the family living within the South Hamlet district of Gloucester, where William was 32, Jane was 33, and their children were George Collett, who was six, Elizabeth Collett, who was four, and Mary J Collett who was just one year old.  Over the next ten years just one more child was added to the family which in 1871 comprised William 42, Jane 44, George 16, Elizabeth 14, Mary J Collett 11, and William H Collett who was eight years old.

 

 

 

Even though William’s baptism took place at Painswick, he stated he was born in Cirencester when he was 52, at the time of the census in 1881.  The information may have been offered to the census enumerator simply because he and his family had lived for many years at Cirencester.  On that occasion the family was living at 33 Barlow Street in Gloucester, where Jane Collett was 54, and the couple’s children were listed as unmarried George Collett, age 26, Elizabeth Collett, age 24, Mary J Collett, age 21, and William H Collett who was 18.  All of the children had been born at Gloucester.  Living with the family at that time was ‘niece’ Laura Collett who was nine years old and from Cheltenham, and her brother, and ‘nephew’ to head of the household, Joseph G Collett also of Cheltenham who was seven years old.

 

 

 

Ten years later according to the census of 1891, William Collett and his wife Jane were 61 and 64 respectively and were still living in Gloucester at 33 Barlow Street in the Barton St Marys district of the city.  Living with William and Jane on that occasion was their son George, plus the aforementioned Laura and Joseph.  George was described as being 36 and a widower, and under the entry came ‘daughter’ Laura who was 19 and ‘son’ Joseph who was 17, where previously they had been ‘niece’ and ‘nephew’.  All of the members of the household were described as having been born at Gloucester on that occasion, even though in 1901 the record for Joseph Collett once again gave his place of birth as being Cheltenham.

 

 

 

The couple’s other son William Henry Collett was married by 1891 and was expecting a daughter of his own, as confirmed by the census of 1901.  However, by then it seems likely that both William and Jane had passed away during the 1890s, as neither of them was listed in the census of 1901.  For completeness, and in view of the conflicting relationships given to Laura Collett and Joseph Collett of Cheltenham (in 1881) and Gloucester (in 1891 and 1901), both have been included here as the two youngest children of William and Jane Collett.

 

 

 

1P38

George Collett

Born in 1854 at Gloucester

 

1P39

Elizabeth Collett

Born in 1856 at Gloucester

 

1P40

Mary Jane Collett

Born in 1859 at Gloucester

 

1P41

William Henry Collett

Born in 1863 at Gloucester

 

1P42

Laura Collett

Born in 1871 at Gloucester

 

1P43

Joseph G Collett

Born in 1873 at Gloucester

 

 

 

 

1O68

Sarah Collett was born at Painswick where she was baptised on 7th August 1831.  In the census records of 1841, 1851 and 1861, Sarah was aged 10, 20 and 30 respectively and was living at Cirencester with her father Henry Collett on each occasion.  It is not clear whether she ever married.

 

 

 

 

1O69

George Collett was born at Painswick and was baptised there on 3rd March 1833.  He was eight years old and 18 in the Cirencester census returns for 1841 and 1851, but during the next few years he travelled to South Wales where he took up work as a coal miner.  It was on 11th October 1856 when he married (1) Rachel Edmunds, the event recorded at Crickhowell (Ref. 11b 269) during the final three months of that year.  Rachel was the daughter of James and Esther Edmunds and was slightly older than George, having been born at Llanelly around 1830.  Once married the couple settled in Llanelly where they raised their three known children.

 

 

 

By the time of the census in 1861 Rachel had given birth to the first two children, both named after her recently deceased parents.  The census that year recorded the couple as George Collett, age 27 and from Stroud, and his wife Rachel who was 30.  Their children at that time were Esther who was two and James who was just one year old, both born at Llanelly like their mother, although in the later census return their place of birth was stated as being Clydach.  Staying with the family at Cuckoo’s Nest in Llanelly that day was Rachel’s eldest brother John Edmunds, a collier of 27, plus two members of the Collett family.  The first of them was George’s younger James Collett from Stroud who was 19 and a coal miner, while the other was Elizabeth aged eight years and from Cirencester who was described at the niece of George Collett, making her the child of one of his siblings.

 

 

 

One more child was added to the family during the following two years while they were still living at Cuckoo’s Nest, where the family was still living in 1871.  The census that year revealed the family as George Collett who was 36, his wife Rachel who was 38, and their three children Esther Collett who was 13, James Collett who was 11 and Harriett Collett who was eight years old.  Ten years later in the census of 1881

 

 

 

George, a coal miner aged 47, said he was born at Cirencester, where it is knowing he lived as a child.  His wife was confirmed again as Rachel who was 50 and born at Clydach.  The children living with them on that occasion at the Railway Inn at Clydach, near Llanelly, were their daughter Esther who was 22 and a dressmaker, and their son James who was 21 and a coal miner, both of them having been born at Clydach.  Also living with the family was George’s nephew and coal miner, Willoughby Joachim, who was 15 and born at Chillingham in Gloucestershire.

 

 

 

Their missing daughter Harriet Collett, who was 18, would appear to have been working as an inn keeper at nearby 27 New Market Inn in Brecknock St John Evangelist, although she was described as being the sister of inn keeper Elizabeth Collett of Cirencester who was 36.  Elizabeth (Ref. 1N14) was in fact the youngest child of William Collett and Hannah Dixon, so Harriet could not have been her sister.

 

 

 

Sadly their daughter Esther died in 1885 and by the time of the next census in 1891, George Collett from Cirencester was 56, while his wife Rachel was 58.  During the next ten years it would appear that Rachel passed away, following which George married (2) Mary Ann Pritchard, a widow with a grown-up son.  According to the next census in 1901 George Collett, at the age of 65, was still employed as a coal miner hewer.  He was residing at a dwelling referred to as Slopes Houses in Llanelly with his second wife Mary Ann Collett who was 58.  The only other person living at that address was George’s stepson John Pritchard, age 21, who was also a coal miner and a hewer.  All three members of the household were recorded as having been born at Llanelly.  Curiously no member of the family has been located in the census of 1911, not even John Pritchard.

 

 

 

It may be of interest that in March 1901 there was another Collett family living in the Slopes Houses in Llanelly and just one door from George and Mary Ann Collett.  That was the family of widowed John Collett (Ref. 31N11) from South Wraxall in Wiltshire.  See Part 31 – The Third Wiltshire Line for details of his separate Collett family.

 

 

 

1P44

Esther Collett

Born in 1858 at Clydach, Llanelly

 

1P45

James Collett

Born in 1860 at Clydach, Llanelly

 

1P46

Harriet Collett

Born in 1862 at Clydach, Llanelly

 

 

 

 

1O70

Edwin Collett was born at Painswick where he was baptised on 22nd February 1835.  He was recorded as being aged six and 15 in the 1841 and 1851 census returns for Cirencester.  For the later censuses of 1861 and 1871 Edwin was listed as 24 and 35 when he was living with the Cirencester & Fairford area.  It still has to be determined what happened to Edwin and whether he was married or not.

 

 

 

 

1O71

Henry Collett was born on 7th June 1838 and was baptised on 24th June 1838 at Painswick.  He was aged three years and 12 years in the respective Cirencester censuses of 1841 and 1851.  He later married Elizabeth Roberts on 6th April 1858 at Brynmawr near Crickhowell in South Wales.  Elizabeth was the daughter of Peter Roberts and was baptised at Abergavenny on 3rd January 1836.  It may have been his job as a coal miner that eventually led him to emigrate to Australia, which he did two years after he was married.  Henry Collett died at Victoria in Australia on 11th April 18, his wife having passed away twenty-eight years earlier on 20th April 1890.

 

 

 

Details of the family and the continuation of this line are provided in
Part 8 - The Australia Line from 1840 to 2000 commencing with the Ref. 8O1

 

 

 

This is the family line of cousins Don Collett (Ref. 8R21) and Ann Preston (Ref. 8S15)

 

 

 

 

1O72

Harriett Collett was born at Stroud where she was baptised on 24th June 1840.  Shortly after she was born the family moved to live at Cirencester and she was one year old and 10 years old in the Cirencester censuses of 1841 and 1851.  No record of Harriett has so far been found in the 1861 Census but it seems likely that she married Charles Ralph and that this took place around the end of the 1860s.  By early April 1871 she and Charles, age 29, were living in the Rodborough district of Stroud with their first-born son Walter Ralph who was one year old.

 

 

 

The 1881 Census still listed the couple as living at Stroud where the family had increased by a further three children.  The family comprised Harriett, age 40 and a tailoress, sons Walter 11 and James 10, and daughters Eleanor, who was nine, and Caroline, who was seven, all of them born at Stroud.  There was no record of her husband Charles at that time, but both he and Harriett appeared in the 1891 Census.  However, by the turn of the century Harriett was a 60 years old widow living on her own means and still residing living in Stroud.