PART ONE

 

The Gloucestershire Main Line - 1830 to 1880

 

This is the third of four sections of the first part of the Collett family line

 

Updated February 2019

 

 

1O83

Susanna Collett was born at Siddington on 1st April 1837 and was baptised there on 7th May 1837, the first child born to John Collett and his wife Mary Ann Dent.  She was seven years old when she died, her death recorded at Cirencester (Ref. 11 204) during the last three months of 1844.

 

 

 

 

1O84

Sarah Ann Collett was born at Siddington on 6th October 1839 and it was there that she was baptised on 23rd October 1839.  She was the eldest surviving child of John Collett and Mary Ann Dent and 11 years of age in the Siddington census of 1851.  Although it would appear that she never married, she gave birth to a base-born son at Siddington, the father’s name likely to be Haines from the name given to the child.

 

 

 

1P53

Edward Haines Collett

Born in 1861 at Siddington

 

 

 

 

1O85

Alice Collett was born on 23rd July 1842 at Siddington and was eight years old in 1851 when she was living at Siddington with her family.  It is understood that she was later married at Cirencester during March 1862.

 

 

 

 

1O86

Charles Iles Collett was born on 2nd August 1846 at Siddington and was four years old by the time of the Siddington census in 1851.  His second christian name was the same as the surname of the father of William Collett (Ref. 2N15) who was the base-born son of Elizabeth Collett (Ref. 2M9) of Bibury, who was born in 1806 and who was baptised on 11th March 1809 in Bibury.  No record of any member of his family has been found in 1861, but by the time of the census in 1871 Charles Collett from Siddington was living and working in Wales, where he was already married with two children.  The young family was residing at 5 Minus Road in the village of Taibach within the parish of Margam near Port Talbot.  Charles, aged 25, was employed as a labourer in a copper works, his wife (1) Catherine from Taibach was 33, and their two children, also born there, were Robert Collett, who was three, and Mary J Collett, who was only eleven months old.

 

 

 

During the next ten years three more children were added to the family while they were still living in Taibach, which was where they were living in 1881, albeit Taibach within the Margam registration district.  The census that year placed the family living at 1 Woodfield in Taibach where Charles Collett, aged 34, was a general labourer who was curiously recorded as having been born at ‘Sylingbury in Gloucester’, although there is no record of such a place.  Residing there with Charles was his wife Catherine, aged 43, and their five children who were Robert Collett, aged 13, Mary J Collett, aged 11, Hannah Collett who was eight, William J Collett who was five, and Charles Collett who was two years old.  However, no further record of this family has been found after that time, which may be because they emigrated to one of the colonies.

 

 

 

It was at Taibach in the parish of Margam that the family was living in 1891, at which time the family was recorded in error under the Collet spelling of the surname.  The family comprised Charles Collet, aged 42 and from Siddington in Gloucestershire, Catherine Collet, aged 53, Mary Jane Collet who was 20, labourer Robert Collet who was 23, and Charles Collet who was 13.  During the next decade the couple’s eldest daughter was married and the family left Margam, when they moved to the village of Cwmdu to the east of Maesteg.

 

 

 

According to the census in 1901 the family was residing at 44 Castle Street in Cwmdu and had living there with them, their married daughter Mary Jane, her husband, and their two children.  Charles Collett, aged 52 and from Siddington in Glos, was a water filter with the local council, his wife Catherine was 63, unmarried son Robert was 33 and a labourer, while nine-year-old Alice Collett was described as the daughter of Charles and Catherine, which seems implausible when Catherine would have been 54 at the time of her birth.  Apart from Charles, all of the other members of his family had been born at Taibach and couple speak English and Welsh.

 

 

 

With Charles’ wife being that much older than him, it was inevitable that she died shortly after the census in 1901, and it was around 1905 or 1906 that he was re-married to (2) Jane.  By April 1911 the pair was residing at 51 Maesteg Road, Maesteg in Middle Llangynwyd, just south of Cwmdu, the home of Thomas and Elizabeth Davies.  Still with Charles was his eldest unmarried son Robert.  Charles Collett from Siddington was 64 and a water hewerman, Jane Collett was 58, and they had been married for five years, and with them was Robert Collett who was 43.  Charles survived for another fifteen years, when his death was recorded at Bridgend in 1926.

 

 

 

1P54

Robert Collett

Born in 1867 at Taibach, Wales

 

1P55

Mary Jane Collett

Born in 1870 at Taibach, Wales

 

1P56

Hannah Collett

Born in 1872 at Taibach, Wales

 

1P57

William John Collett

Born in 1875 at Taibach, Wales

 

1P58

Charles Collett

Born in 1878 at Taibach, Wales

 

 

 

 

1O87

Isabella Collett was born at Siddington on 25th May 1849, another daughter of John and Mary Ann Collett.  She was living there with her family in 1851 and again in 1861, while it was just less than six years later when the marriage of Isabella Collett and Edward Richard Law was recorded at Cirencester (Ref. 6a 476) during the first quarter of 1867.  After their wedding day, the couple headed west to Frampton-on-Severn, where their first child was born, and then to nearby Eastington, where the second child was born.  By 1871, the family was residing at Frocester, a village within the parish of Stroud, just south of Eastington.  Edward R Law from Kempsford was 25 and working as a groom, Isabella Law was 21 and from Siddington, and their two children were Martha J Law who was three and Kate Law who was one year old.

 

 

 

The couple’s next child was born at Frocester before Edward’s work took the family to Bisley, to the west of Stroud, where three more offspring were added to the family.  The Bisley census of 1881 described Edward as being a builder’s labourer from Fairford, who was 33.  Isabella was 30 and their children were listed as Martha who was 14, Kate who was 11, Edward J Law who was nine, Charles Law who was seven, Joshua Law who was five and Susanna Law who was two years old.  At the end of that decade, the family was again living in Bisley, where Edward was a carter aged 43 from Fairford, Isabella was 40, Edward was 19, Charles was 17, Joshua was 15, Susanna was 12, Richard J Law was 10, Lucy Law was eight, Lottie Law was four and Alice M Law who was still under one year old.  

 

 

 

Even though one last child was born into the family, the number of children living with the couple in 1901 was greatly reduced.  Also, by that time they were living in the village of Quenington, near Lechlade, where Edward was an agricultural labourer at 53, his wife was 51 and their three children were Richard aged 19, Alice aged 10 and George Law who was six and born at Minchinhampton.  During the next ten years Edward and Isabella travelled westward to Edgeworth, near Bisley, and it was there that they were residing in 1911.  Edward was 63 and a farm labourer from Fairford, Isabella was 61 and from Cirencester, and son George William Law was 17.  In the end, Isabella Law nee Collett was 88 years old when her death was recorded at Stroud register office (Ref. 6a 517) during the last three months of 1937.  

 

 

 

 

1O88

ROBERT COLLETT was born at Siddington in 1854 where he was baptised on 15th July 1855, the son of John Collett and Mary Ann Dent.  The baptism entry in the parish register recorded the occasion as 'Privately Baptised', which very likely indicates that the baptism was carried out at his home, since Robert may not have been well enough to attend St Peter’s Church in the village.

 

He was married twice, the first time to (1) Rosanna King of Eastcombe near Bisley, whom he married at Bisley Church on 7th September 1878.  Page 8, Entry No. 16 of the parish register at Bisley recorded the marriage as follows:

 

Robert Collett 24, bachelor and labourer of Eastcombe and Rose Hannah 27,

 

spinster of Eastcombe.  Robert’s father was listed as John Collett, labourer and Rose Hannah’s father was listed as Levi King, waterman (the Severn & Thames Canal passes close by Eastcombe).  The witnesses were Robert’s brother William Edward Collett and Louisa King, the sister of Rosanna and nine years her junior.

 

 

 

All of the children came from that first marriage, the first two children being born at Eastcombe, with the remainder being born at Siddington.  Robert’s occupation was that of a stonemason employed on the Earl of Bathurst's Estate at Cirencester where he worked for most of his life, building and repairing dry stone walls.  He and his family lived in Siddington up until the death of his wife Rosanna.  She was baptised Rose Anna on 29th August 1862, when she was twelve years of age.

 

 

 

The census in 1881 recorded the family as living in Church Road at Ashton Keynes, just across the boundary in Wiltshire.  The family at that time comprised Robert, aged 25, who was an agricultural labourer, his wife Rosanna, who was 28, and their two daughters Lily H Collett, who was two, and baby Alice Louisa Collett, who was just ten months old.  The place of birth for both children was confirmed as Eastcombe, which is near Bisley.  The only other person living with them at that time was lodger William Eggleton who was 23 years old and a shepherd from North Leach.

 

 

 

Within the next two years the family left Ashton Keynes and moved the four miles north, to settle in the village of Siddington.  By 1891 a further five children had been added to the family, which then comprised Robert, who was 36, Rose Anna, who was 38, Lillie Harriett Collett, aged 12, Alice Louisa Collett, aged 10, John Levi Collett who was nine, William Robert Collett who was seven, Bertie Henry Collett who was five, Ernest Collett who was three, and Walter Collett who was one-year old.

 

 

 

Ten years later, some of the children had left the family home in Siddington when, according to the census in March 1901, Robert Collett was 47 and was working as a navvy for the Great Western Railway.  His wife was recorded as Rosannah Collett, aged 46, and just five of their children were still living with them on that occasion.  They were William, aged 17, Ernest, aged 13, Walter, aged 11, Robert who was nine, and Mabel R Collett who was six years old.  Tragically Robert’s wife died almost exactly one year later.  Rose Anna Collett died of cancer of the liver while still living at Siddington on 28th March 1902. 

 

 

 

It was around one or two years later that Robert then married (2) Annie at Stratton near Cirencester, although no record of the marriage has been found.  Following the wedding Robert moved to Albion Street in Stratton, where he lived with Annie until they parted company prior to 1914.  According to the census in April 1911 Robert Collett, aged 56 and from Siddington, and his wife Annie, aged 53, were living at 49 Baunton in Cirencester, less than one mile north of the centre of Stratton, the dwelling described as having two bedrooms and a kitchen.  The census return, which was signed by Robert, indicated that he and Annie had been married for seven years, and that she had been born at Sopworth in Wiltshire, while Robert’s occupation was that of a mason.

 

 

 

Previously, very little was known about Robert’s second wife.  However, it is now established that she was born Annie Eliza Smith, a daughter of Isaac and Jane Smith.  Like all her siblings, she was born at Sopworth on the boundary between Gloucestershire and Wiltshire, with her birth recorded at Malmesbury (Ref. 5a 41) during the second quarter of 1859.  She was still living at Sopworth, with her family, in both 1861 and 1871.  Further research has failed to find any record of her first marriage, although it is understood that she was a widow when she married Robert Collett.  After separating from Robert, Annie continued to live in Cirencester and it was there that her death was recorded (Ref. 6a 683) during the first quarter of 1929, when she was 69.

 

 

 

Still living with the couple was Robert’s son Robert Collett, aged 19 from Siddington, who was employed as a general farm labourer.  One other person was living at the address, and that was Percy Collett who was 15 months old and born at Stratton, who was described as grandson to head of the household Robert Collett senior.  Whilst Robert Collett junior was recorded as being married, is it known that his full name was actually Robert Percy Collett.  Therefore, there is a strong possibility that baby Percy Collett was his son and that the absence mother may have died during the birth.  If this was proved to be true, then Robert Percy would have been only 17 when the child was conceived.  However, he was the only sibling still living in Stratton at the time of the birth, whereas all of his brothers had long since left Cirencester and were all married some years after 1911.  It is also known that there was a rift between Robert Percy Collett and his father, so this might have been the reason for their disagreement which resulted in Robert Percy eventually leaving his father when he moved to the Forest of Dean, to be with his brother Walter.

 

 

 

The only other member of Robert’s family still living in the Cirencester area, at Bagendon, was his youngest daughter Mabel Rose Collett who was 16 and was confirmed as having been born at Siddington.  At the time of the death of his son William in 1914, and according to his military records, his father Robert Collett was living at 3 Quarry Villas in Stratton in Cirencester, while his mother, simply named as Mrs Collett, the husband of Robert, was residing at 171 Gloucester Street in Cirencester.  Three years later in 1917, Robert Collett had moved again, and on that occasion his address was No. 2 Quarry Villas in Stratton.

 

 

 

Twenty years on, in 1937, when Robert was 82, he was living alone and, despite his advanced years, he was still managing to continue with his work building and repairing dry stone walls.  In the summer of 1945 at 90 years of age, he was known to have travelled from Stratton to Cinderford, on the edge of the Forest of Dean, to attend the funeral of his ‘long lost’ son Walter Collett who died there on the seventh of July.  By that time in his life Robert Collett was in a poor state of health and his daughter Alice Louisa Collett, who had accompanied her father to the funeral, persuaded him to return home with her to 7 Bathampton Street in Swindon.  And it was there that he spent the last four months of his life, eventually dying of pneumonia on 18th November 1945.

 

 

 

Details of Rosanna King’s family are provided in Part 10 - Other Branch Lines

commencing with the reference 10O2/King

 

 

 

1P59

Lily Harriett Collett

Born in 1879 at Eastcombe

 

1P60

ALICE LOUISA COLLETT

Born in 1881 at Eastcombe

 

1P61

John Levi Collett

Born in 1883 at Siddington

 

1P62

William Robert Collett

Born in 1883 at Siddington

 

1P63

Bertram Henry Collett

Born in 1885 at Siddington

 

1P64

Ernest Collett

Born in 1887 at Siddington

 

1P65

Walter Collett

Born in 1889 at Siddington

 

1P66

Robert Percy Collett

Born in 1892 at Siddington

 

1P67

Mabel Rose Collett

Born in 1894 at Siddington

 

 

 

 

1O90

Henry John Collett was born at Siddington during the fourth quarter of 1865, his birth recorded at Cirencester (Ref. 6a 311), the youngest child of John Collett and Mary Ann Dent.  He later married Martha Annie Maisey at Black Bourton near Faringdon in Oxfordshire, the event recorded at Witney (Ref. 3a 1115) during the second quarter of 1886.  Martha was born at Black Bourton in the first quarter of 1862 and the birth was again registered at Witney, where she was recorded as the daughter of James Maisey and Annie Yeatman of Alvescot.

 

 

 

It is also possible that Henry and Martha were perhaps married at Alvescot, where their first two children were born before they moved to Black Bourton, where their next child was born.  By April 1891 the family was living at Mill Lane in Alvescot within the Bampton & Witney registration district and comprised Henry John Collett aged 25, who was an agricultural labourer, Martha Annie Collett who was 29 and most likely pregnant with her next child, and their two daughters Alice Mary Collett who was four and Elsie Collett who was one-year-old.

 

 

 

The couple’s third child was born while the family was still living at Black Bourton later that same year, but shortly after Henry returned to live in Cirencester with his family, where the couple’s last three daughters were born.  Following a period of about five years at Cirencester the family moved again, that time to the Bristol area.  The move took place in either late 1900 or within the first couple of months of 1901, since the census for that year placed the family as living at The Hill in Almondsbury, just north of Bristol, where Henry was a carter on a farm.

 

 

 

Henry Collett was 35 and from Siddington, his wife Martha Annie Collett was 38 and from Alvescot, as were daughters Alice Mary aged 13 and Elsie aged 11, Edith Annie who was nine and from Black Bourton, while the youngest three girls were confirmed as having been born at Cirencester.  They were Ethel Lilian who was six, Winifred Maisey who was three and Elizabeth who was just one-year old.  It is possible that both Henry’s wife and his youngest daughter died shortly after the census day that year.

 

 

 

According to the next census, conducted for the Bristol area in April 1911, Henry J Collett of Cirencester was 45 and a carter on a farm who was residing at a dwelling on Harry Stoke Road in Stoke Gifford with his wife and three of their daughters.  Martha Collett from Alvescot was 48, Elsie was 21 and also born at Alvescot, Ethel Collett was 16 and Winifred Collett was 14, both of whom had been born at Cirencester.  It is possible that the family returned to the Cirencester area over the following couple of years, since the death of a Henry J Collett was recorded at Northleach register office (Ref. 6a 484) during the fourth quarter of 1914.

 

 

 

1P68

Alice Mary Collett

Born in 1887 at Alvescot, Oxon

 

1P69

Elsie Collett

Born in 1889 at Alvescot, Oxon

 

1P70

Edith Annie Collett

Born in 1891 at Black Bourton, Oxon

 

1P71

Ethel Lillian Collett

Born in 1894 at Cirencester

 

1P72

Winifred Maisey Collett

Born in 1897 at Cirencester

 

1P73

Elizabeth Collett

Born in 1899 at Cirencester

 

 

 

 

1O91

Martha Collett was born at Stonehouse and was baptised there on 24th May 1844, the daughter of Martin Collett and Elizabeth Taylor.  However, she suffered an infant death shortly after.

 

 

 

 

1O92

John Martin Collett was born at Stonehouse in 1845 and was five years old at the time of the census in 1851, when he and his parents were living at Wheatenhurst to the south of Gloucester.  Ten years later, when John M Collett was 15, he and his parents were living in the St John the Baptist district of Gloucester.  By 1871 bachelor John M Collett, aged 25, was living within the census registration district of Gloucester, Hamlet South, but four years later, during the first three months of 1875 he married Sarah Ann Dosson at Staines in Middlesex where the event was recorded (Ref. 3a 15).  The witnesses at the wedding were Elizabeth Edney, William Lake and Emily Steele.

 

 

 

Just four years after they were married, according to the Gloucester Almanac of 1879, John Martin Collett was living at Regent Street.  However, by the time of the next census in 1881, John and his young family were living at 2 Hawkesbury Villa, Weston Road in Longford St Mary in Gloucester.  The census return recorded that J M Collett was 35 and had been born at Stonehouse.  His occupation was that of a chemical manufacturer.  His wife was confirmed as Sarah A Collett, aged 32, who had been born at Neath in Glamorganshire.  Their children at that time were John Collett, who was four years old, Agnes Collett, who was two, and Gilbert Collett who was one-year old, all three of them having been born in Gloucester.

 

 

 

The company of J.M. Collett & Co Ltd, Chemical Manufacturers of Gloucester, was founded by John in 1869.  The company’s premises at Priory Factory, appears to have been established in St. Luke's Street, just off Southgate Street, as indicated in the 1883 Gloucester Almanac.  Some years later, a subsidiary company, Malt Products Ltd was established to produce photo-chemicals for use in warfare.  In 1898 Llanthony Abbey Farm, the former Augustinian Priory of Llanthony Secunda at Longtown, was sold to J. M. Collett, chemical manufacturer, who intended to build a factory there.  However, the farm was appropriated by the Great Western Railway in 1906.

 

 

 

From around 1903-1904 the company was base at 50 Bristol Road, on the left towards Bristol, before the canal bridge, and three-hundred yards beyond Tuffley Avenue.  In 1922 the company of J M Collett was listed as an exhibitor at a national show [Stand A53] where on display was such produces as Sulphite and Bisulphite of Soda, Meta Bisulphites, Sulphurous Acid, Bisulphite of Lime, and Glaubers Salt.  It was between 1948 and 1952 that the company was sold to Associated British Maltsters Ltd, with the site then being occupied by Contract Chemicals Ltd until 1998 to 2001, when it was sold for redevelopment.

 

 

 

By 1891, the census that year revealed that two further sons had been added to the family within the three years after previous census in 1881.  Head of the household John was listed as John M Collett, aged 45, when he was living at South Hamlet in Gloucester with his wife Sarah who was 43, their daughter Agnes who was 13, and their two new sons Leopold G Collett, who was eight, and Seymour Collett who was seven.  The couple’s eldest two sons, John Henry Collett, aged 14, and Gilbert Faraday Collett, aged 11, were attending school at Axminster in Somerset at that time.

 

 

 

Just after the turn of the century, according to the next census in 1901, John M Collett was living in Gloucester at the age of 55, where he was continuing to work as a chemical manufacturer, while still living with him was his wife Sarah who was 53.  Also, still living at the family home in Gloucester with them was their daughter Agnes who was 23, and two of their four sons, John who was 24 and Leopold who was 18, who were working with their father as chemical manufacturers.  Their address was Hillfield, 101 Great Western Road, off the London Road, the house being a Victorian-Italianate style property, standing in its own grounds, next to the Chapel of St. Mary Magdalene.  In 2011 the same building, Hillfield House on the renamed Denmark Street, is the Trading Standards Office for Gloucestershire County Council.

 

 

 

The couple’s second son Gilbert F Collett, aged 21, was living and working away from home at Cowley, to the south of Cheltenham.  Upon completing his initial education Gilbert entered Pembroke College at Cambridge University, when his father was described as John Martin Collett of Guy’s Cliff in Wolton, Gloucester, and later of Wynstone Place, Brookthorpe-with-Whaddon near Gloucester.

 

 

 

According to the Gloucester census of April 1911, John Martin Collett of Stonehouse was 65, and his wife Sarah Anne Collett from Neath in Glamorgan was 63.  At that time the couple was living at Kimsbury House in the parish of Upton St Leonards in Gloucester, from where John was confirmed as a chemical manufacturer.  The census return also confirmed that the couple had been married for 35 years.  Still living with John and Sarah were two of their five children.  Their unmarried son, Gilbert Faraday Collett aged 32, was a chemical manufacturer like his father, while their daughter Agnes Sophia Collett was recorded in error as being only 30 years of age, when in fact she was nearer 33.  Both of the children were confirmed as having been born at Gloucester.

 

 

 

The family of four living at Kimsbury House was supported by three domestic servants.  They were widow Rose Annie James 43 who was from Worcester and who was the cook, Miss Alice Maud Williams from Newent in Gloucestershire who was the housemaid aged 30, and Miss Jamie Hale who was 20 and from Taynton near Newent who was the under housemaid.

 

 

 

John Martin Collett was residing at Wynstone Place, Brookthorpe in Gloucestershire when he died on 25th November 1924 at the age of 78, his death recorded at Wheatenhurt register office (Ref. 6a 371).  Probate of his considerable personal effects, valued at £88,291 14 Shillings 2d, was granted jointed to John Henry Collett CMG and Gilbert Faraday Collett DSO, chemical manufacturers, and to the Reverend Seymour Collett, a clerk.

 

 

 

1P74

John Henry Collett

Born in 1876 at Gloucester

 

1P75

Agnes Sophia Collett

Born in 1877 at Gloucester

 

1P76

Gilbert Faraday Collett

Born in 1879 at Gloucester

 

1P77

Leopold George Collett

Born in 1882 at Gloucester

 

1P78

Seymour Collett

Born in 1883 at Gloucester

 

 

 

 

1O93

Sarah Ann Collett was born at Leonard Stanley where she was baptised on 26th December 1835.  In the 1841 Census she was five years old and living with her family at Leckhampton near Cheltenham.  However, ten years later, there was no record of her living with her family, nor has any record been found of her thereafter.

 

 

 

 

1O94

Mary Collett was born at Leonard Stanley in later 1836 or early 1837 and was baptised there on 14th May 1837.  At the age of four years she was living with her family at Leckhampton but by the time she was fourteen she and her family were living at Colnbrook in Buckinghamshire.

 

 

 

 

1O95

John William Collett was born at Leonard Stanley on 4th January 1839 and it was there that he died three days later on 7th January 1839, the son of George Collett and his first wife Jane Packer.

 

 

 

 

1O96

Harriet Collett was born in the early part of 1840 and was baptised on 1st September 1840 at Leckhampton just south of Cheltenham.  She was recorded as being aged one-year old in 1841.  By 1851 she was aged 10 and she and her family had moved to Colnbrook.  It was also at Colnbrook over six years later that she married Isaac Rendrey on 23rd December 1857.  In 1866 Harriet gave birth to a daughter Rhoda who was born to the couple while they were still living at Colnbrook.  However, some major tragedy befell the family in the years after that resulted in the deaths of both Harriet and Isaac.  By the time of the 1881 Census their daughter was an orphan aged 14 living at St John’s Orphanage in the Clewer district of Windsor where she was being educated by the Sisters of Mercy.

 

 

 

 

1O97

Charles George Collett was born in 1845 at Wick in Wiltshire, where he was baptised on 25th May 1845, the son of George Collett and his first wife Jane Packer.  He was six years old in the census of 1851, by which time he and his family were living at Colnbrook in Buckinghamshire, where he was also living in 1861 at the age of 16.  He later moved to Ham in Surrey where he married Ann who was born at Chertsey in 1837. 

 

 

 

By the time of the next census in 1871 Charles was listed in error as Charles G Collet, aged 26 and from Wiltshire, who was residing within the Kingston-on-Thames registration district, which included Ham, one mile north of Kingston.  Living there with him was his wife Ann Collet, aged 32, and their two children Walter C Collet, who was two, and Edward Collet who was one-year old, both of them born at Ham.  However, tragically the couple’s son Edward did not survive beyond childhood since he was missing from the family by 1881, when no record of him has been found anywhere within Great Britain.

 

 

 

Over the next couple of years, the family was still living in Ham, when Ann presented Charles with the first two of their three daughters.  Sometime after the birth of the second daughter, Charles took his family to nearby Kingston, where the couple’s last child was born.  And it was at Acre Road in Kingston-on-Thames, that the family was recorded in the census of 1881.  In the census return for that year Charles George Collett, aged 36 from Wiltshire, was a carpenter like his father and two of his brothers.  His wife Annie Collett from Chertsey was 43 and their four children were Walter Charles Collett, aged 12, Alice Collett who was nine, Lucey Collett who was eight, and Louisa Collett who was five years old.

 

 

 

Living with the family at that time was Julie Vincent, aged 17 and from Ham, who was described as Charles’ niece, and Frederick Trotter, aged 12 and also born in Surrey, who was described as his nephew.  It is interesting that Charles’ father George Collett, who was widowed during the 1870s, was re-married around 1876, when he married the widow Mrs Emma McCann, whose maiden name was Vincent.  This in itself raises the question, was the wife of Charles George Collett actually Ann Vincent.

 

 

 

The family of six was once again recorded together within the Kingston registration district in 1891, when Charles G Collett was 46, Ann Collett was 52, and their four children were Walter Chas Collett, aged 22, Alice Collett, aged 19, Lucie Collett, aged 18, and Louisa J Collett who was 14.  However, it was five years after that when Charles George Collett died in October 1896 at the age of 50.  At that time, he and his family were residing at Bloomfield Road in Kingston-on-Thames, and it was at All Saints Church in Kingston where he was buried on 15th October 1896, burial reference P33/1/38.

 

 

 

No record of his widow Ann has so far been found in the census of 1901, although their two youngest children were staying as boarders at a house in Kingston.  However, by 1911 the widow of Charles George Collett was 74 when Ann Collett from Chertsey was still living in Kingston-on-Thames but at the home of her married daughter Alice Daysh.  Living there with her was her youngest and unmarried daughter Louisa Collett from Kingston.

 

 

 

1P79

Walter Charles Collett

Born in 1868 at Ham, Surrey

 

1P80

Edward Collett

Born in 1870 at Ham, Surrey

 

1P81

Alice Collett

Born in 1872 at Ham, Surrey

 

1P82

Lucy Collett

Born in 1873 at Ham, Surrey

 

1P83

Louisa J Collett

Born in 1876 at Kingston-on-Thames

 

 

 

 

1O98

Oliver Collett was born at Colnbrook in 1849 with his birth recorded at Eton (Ref. 6 389) during the fourth quarter of that year.  By the time of the census in 1851 Oliver’s family was residing at Langley Marish, midway between Colnbrook and Slough, where Oliver Collett was listed as being one-year old.  He was approaching his third birthday when he was baptised at the Church of St Thomas in Colnbrook on 29th August 1852, when his parents were confirmed as George and Jane Collett.  Around the time of his tenth birthday Oliver Collett suffered a premature death, that sad event recorded at Eton (Ref. 3a 235) during the last three months of 1859.

 

 

 

 

1O99

Walter William Collett was born at Colnbrook in late 1852 or early 1853 and was baptised there on 28th August 1853.  The parish record indicated that he was baptised as William Walter, which contradicted the name he used during all of the later census records.  In 1861 he was eight years old, when he was living with his family at Colnbrook, and was 18 in 1871 by which time he was still living with his family in Colnbrook.  By 1881 Walter, aged 28, was working as a carpenter like his father before him.  He was still a bachelor when he was a lodger at the home of railway porter Ephraim Skinner at Church Lane in Edgware.  Walter gave his place of birth as Windsor.

 

 

 

It was during that same year that Walter became a married man for the first time.  The marriage by banns of Walter William Collett and (1) Dulcie Bella Mitchell was recorded at Fulham (Ref. 1a 384) during the last three months of 1881, the wedding ceremony conducted at the Church of St John on 8th October 1881.  The bride and the groom were both single and 28 years of age, with Walter working as a carpenter, the son of carpenter George Collett.  Dulcie’s father was described as William Mitchell deceased, a bootmaker.  The address for both of them was 1 Whiteland Terrace in Fulham, and they both signed the register in their own hand, with one of the witness being C Collett.  After nine years together, the childless couple was residing at Coopersale Road in Hackney when carpenter Walter William Collett from Colnbrook was 38 and Dulcie Collett was 37, her birth recorded at Northleach in Gloucestershire during the summer of 1853 under her full name.  Six years later the death of Dulcie Bella Collett was recorded at St Marylebone (Ref. 1a 328) during the second quarter of 1897 when she was 43.  The second marriage of Walter William Collett was recorded at Edmonton (Ref. 3a 478) during the first three months of 1898, when he married (2) Mary Ann Howlett.  

 

 

 

That was confirmed in the next census of 1901 when Walter and Mary were living at Northumberland Grove in the Tottenham area of London.  Walter W Collett from Colnbrook was still a carpenter at the age of 48 and his wife was described as Mary Ann Collett from Pimlico who was 40.  Ten years later the couple had left London and had settled at Staplehurst, nine miles south of Maidstone in Kent, where Walter Collett from Colnbrook was 58 and continuing to work as a carpenter, while living there with his wife of thirteen years, Mary Ann Collett who was 50 and from Pimlico.  Over the next two decades the couple returned to London, where the death of Walter W Collett was recorded at Edmonton register office (Ref. 3a 559) during the second quarter of 1930 when he was 77 years old.

 

 

 

 

1O100

George Collett was born at Colnbrook in 1855, where he was baptised on 28th June 1857, the son of George Collett and his first wife Jane Packer.  He appeared in the 1861 Census as being six years of age when he was still living with his family at Colnbrook.  Ten years later, when George Collett was 16 years old, he was still living with his family at Colnbrook within the Stanwell registration district.

 

 

 

His mother died during the 1870s, following which his father married Mrs Emma McCann nee Vincent, while George Collett married Lucy Warrell on 13th June 1880 at Bromley in Kent, where the couple settled.   According to the census nine months later, George and Lucy Collett were living at 8 Park End in Bromley where George, aged 26 and from Colnbrook, was working as a carpenter like his father and older brothers Charles and Walter (above).  His wife Lucy was 27 and her place of birth was recorded as Poyle, a village near Colnbrook.  Being only very recently married, the couple had not yet started a family by that time.

 

 

 

It was during the remainder of the century that Lucy presented George with two known children, both of them born at Bromley, the first of them listed with his parents in the Bromley census of 1891 when the family of three was residing at Park End.  On that day George Collett was 36 and a carpenter, Lucy Collett was 37, and their son Percy Collett was two years of age.  Another son was added to their family two years later which, by March 1091 was still living in Bromley but at Gwydyr Road. 

 

 

 

Head of the household was George Collett, aged 46 and from Colnbrook, whose occupation was still that of a carpenter, his wife Lucy Collett was 47 and also from Colnbrook, and their two sons were Percy Collett who was 12 and Walter Collett who was eight years old, both of them born at Bromley.  Also residing in Bromley at that time was George’s half-brothers Arthur Collett and Frank Collett (below), who were living with their widowed mother Emma.

 

 

 

The family eventually left Bromley, when they move the relatively short distance to the village of Dunton Green near Sevenoaks in Kent.  That was where three members of the family were recorded in the next census of 1911.  George Collett from Colnbrook was 56, Lucy Collett who 57 and from Poyle near Colnbrook, and their youngest son Walter Collett was 17.  The couple’s older son Percy George Collett was also living within the county of Kent, but further south at Hawkhurst.  Previously it was written here, in error, that George and Lucy had a daughter Helen, but it is now known that she was the daughter of George and Louise Collett (Ref. 23O1) as included in Part 23 – The Newbury & Wiltshire to Australia Line.

 

 

 

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Percy George Collett

Born in 1888 at Bromley

 

1P85

Walter Collett

Born in 1893 at Bromley

 

 

 

 

1O101

Caroline Jane Collett was born at Langley in Buckinghamshire on 30th April 1859, but was baptised at Colnbrook on 16th August 1859, the daughter of George and Jane Collett.  By the time of the 1861 Census for Colnbrook she was aged one year and ten years later, when she was 11 years old, she was again living with her family at Colnbrook, within the Stanwell registration district.  By the time of the census in 1881 Caroline Collett, aged 22 and from Colnbrook, was living and working at the home of solicitor William H Withall at Hatfield House, Portinscale Road, Wandsworth in Surrey, where she was employed as a kitchen maid.  Three and a half years later she married William Pratt on 18th October 1884 at Kingston upon Thames.

 

 

 

This is the family line of Dorothy Hilda Ellis nee Pratt, the wife of Ron Ellis, who was born

at Dagenham 5th June 1930 and who died at Selby in Yorkshire on 28th November 2014

 

 

 

 

1O102

Herbert William Collett, formerly Herbert William McCann, was born at Kingston-upon-Thames around 1867, the youngest child and only surviving son of mariner Herbert MacCann and his wife Emma Vincent.  Although no record of his family has been located in the census on 1861, by 1871 and at the age of four years, he was living with just his mother Emma McCann of Chertsey and his two older sisters in Kingston-on-Thames.  One of his sisters, Ann McCann, was born at Ham near Kingston in 1861, and it was at Ham that a member of the Collett family was also living in 1871, and it may have been through that link that Herbert’s widowed mother was introduced to George Collett who had just lost his wife

 

 

 

From this chance meeting Emma McCann married George Collett around 1876, and by 1881 Emma’s son Herbert McCann was recorded in the census as Herbert Collett, aged 14 and from Kingston.  The census that year listed the family’s address as a large cottage called King John’s Palace in Colnbrook, where Herbert’s father was recorded as George Collett, aged 66 and from Minchinhampton, and his mother was Emma Collett, aged 46 and from nearby Chertsey. Also, by that time Herbert had a half-brother, who was Arthur Collett who was three years old, who had been born at Colnbrook.  His adopted father George Collett died during the 1880s and not long after Herbert married Elizabeth Lile Mills on 21st September 1890, by which time Herbert had already fathered a son, and his bride was due to give birth to their second child over the coming months.

 

 

 

The wedding took place at the Church of St James The Great on Bethnal Green Road, following the posting of banns, and the details extract from the parish register are as follows:  Herbert Collett, 23 and a bachelor, married Elizabeth Lile Mills, 23 and a spinster.  He was a baker of Bethnal Green and his father was named as Herbert Collett deceased, while his bride, also of Bethnal Green, was the daughter of compositor John Mills.  The couple both signed the register, and the witnesses were Alfred James Mills and Ada Jessie Mills.  It is curious that his father was named as Herbert Collett, rather than Herbert McCann, but it may have simply been that his gave his father’s name as Herbert and the registrar made the mistake of assuming it was Collett.

 

 

 

The witness Alfred James Mills was Elizabeth’s younger brother, and in 1891 he was still living with his family in Clerkenwell, just two doors from the recently married young Collett couple.  Elizabeth’s parents were printer John George Mills, aged 52, and Sophia Mills, aged 57, and living at No 23 Rounall (?) Buildings with them were their three unmarried children Florence 21, Alfred 18, and Ernest who was 11.  Sophia, Florence and Alfred, like Elizabeth herself, were all recorded as having been born in Hertfordshire.

 

 

 

The same census recorded Herbert Collett, aged 24, as a pastry cook living at No 21 Rounall (?) Buildings with his wife Elizabeth Collett, aged 23, and their son Herbert Wm Collett who was two years old.  Both Herbert senior and Herbert junior were listed simply as having been born in London.

 

 

 

The registration of the birth of Herbert’s two sons has been found at Holborn, where the birth of his daughter Louisa May was also registered some years later – see details below.  First to be registered, prior to his wedding day, was the birth of his son Herbert William Collett during the last quarter of 1888, around two years before he married Elizabeth, while just over five years later the birth of his only other son Frank was also recorded at Holborn, during the first quarter of 1894.

 

 

 

Between the two boys, Herbert’s and Elizabeth’s daughter Ada was born on 12th December 1891 and she was baptised six weeks later at St James’ Church in Clerkenwell on 24th January 1892 as Ada Elizabeth Collett, the daughter of pastry cook Herbert William Collett and his wife Elizabeth.  Unfortunately, the address at which the family was living at that time is not clearly written, but looks something like 5 Wherlin Street.

 

 

 

In 1894 there is a record of a son by the name of Herbert Collett attending Great Ormond Street Children’s Hospital, while his home address was noted as being 9A Rosamund High Street at Clerkenwell in the Holborn district of London.  It was in 1899 that the couple’s penultimate child was born, following which she was baptised as Sarah May Collett at the Church of the Holy Redeemer in Clerkenwell on 12th November 1899, the daughter of Herbert and Elizabeth Collett of 12 Easton Street.  Sadly, she died not long after she was baptised.

 

 

 

By the time of the next census in 1901 Herbert Collett from Kingston in Surrey, was living at 12 Easton Street in Clerkenwell with his wife and their six surviving children, having already suffered the loss of their youngest child.  Herbert was 32 and a journeyman baker, his wife Elizabeth was 36 and from Hertford, and their children were Herbert Collett, aged 13, Ada Collett, aged 10, Frank Collett who was eight, Annie Collett who was six, May Collett who was three, and Jessie Collett who was three months old.

 

 

 

According to the census return all of the children had been born at Clerkenwell within the Finsbury district of London.  The birth of the couple’s third daughter, Louisa May Collett, was registered on 9th March 1898 at Holborn for the sub-district of Goswell Street, while the child was actually born on 24th January 1898 at 23 Rawstorne Street, just of Goswell Street [the A1].  At that time her parents were described as Herbert Collett, a pastry cook, and his wife Elizabeth Collett formerly Mills, and it was the latter who registered the child’s birth.

 

 

 

It was also at Clerkenwell between March 1901 and 1903 that both Herbert and Elizabeth died.  A record of the death of a Herbert Collett has been found in London in 1902, and that may be this Herbert William Collett.  Whether it was a double-death in some accident or other for the couple is not known.  What is known is that their six surviving children were then taken into care, with Ada and Frank being taken to live in Canada by the Doctor Barnados Children’s organisation during 1904.  They were subsequently followed to Canada by their sisters Louisa May and Jessie who made the same journey in 1911. 

 

 

 

The three sisters, Ada, Jessie and May, were eventually reunited in Canada and lived in the same town in Ontario for the remainder of their lives, while sadly all contact was lost with the remaining members of their family.  Louisa May Collett later married to become Louisa May Collett Rylett, and it was her granddaughter Marilee Rylett Magder of Whitby in Ontario who kindly provided the sad details of her family, together with this photo of sisters Jessie and Louisa May taken during the 1980s.

 

 

 

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Herbert William Collett

Born in 1888 at Clerkenwell

 

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Ada Elizabeth Collett

Born in 1891 at Clerkenwell

 

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Frank Collett

Born in 1893 at Clerkenwell

 

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Annie Collett

Born in 1895 at Clerkenwell

 

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Louisa May Collett

Born in 1898 at Clerkenwell

 

1P91

Sarah May Collett

Born in 1899 at Clerkenwell; infant death

 

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Jessie Collett

Born in 1900 at Clerkenwell

 

 

 

 

1O103

Arthur Charles Collett was born at Colnbrook on 29th December 1879.  Curiously his age in the following census returns appears to have been incorrectly recorded, and the only one to accurately reflect his real age was in 1911 when it was stated he was 31.  In the first of them, in 1881, he was listed as being aged three years (sic), when he was living with his parents George and Emma Collett at King John’s Palace in Colnbrook, together with his older brother Herbert (above).  Sometime during the 1880s Arthur’s parents took him and his younger brother Frank (below) to live at Bromley in Kent, where they were living in 1891 when Arthur was 14 (sic).  Shortly thereafter Arthur’s father passed away, so in the census of 1901 Arthur was still living with his widowed mother Emma and his brother Frank at Bromley.  At that time in his life unmarried Arthur Collett, aged 23 (sic) and from Colnbrook, was working as a domestic gardener with his brother.

 

 

 

Around 1908, according to the census of 1911, Arthur married Laura Emma, a fact that seems not to have been known by members of the family until the release of the census details.  In the census return the childless couple was living at 15 Tynley Road in Bickley in Kent where Arthur Collett of Colnbrook was 31 and a domestic gardener, while his wife of two years was Laura Emma Collett who was 31 and from Knockholt, near Sevenoaks.

 

 

 

What happened next to Arthur and Laura is not known at this time, but they were either divorced, or Laura died giving birth to the couple’s first child.  What is known for sure is that Arthur married Beatrice Isobel Manchester at the parish church of St John in Hampstead just six months later on 8th October 1911.  Beatrice was born at Chelsea in 1884, the daughter of clicker and boot cutter William Manchester who was born at Hamilton in Quebec in 1851 and who died in London in 1905.

 

 

 

Her mother was Annie Reason who was born at Twickenham in 1852 and who had died during the year before Beatrice was married.  The Manchester family name was closely linked to the boot and shoe trade over many generations.  William’s father George Manchester was a leather cutter in London and his uncle’s John and Henry were both boot and shoe makers of Kensington and Hammersmith respectively.  All of the children of these gentlemen also worked in the shoe business.

 

 

 

The marriage certificate for Arthur and Beatrice confirmed their ages as 32 and 27 and their address at that time was stated as being 18 Gardnor Road in Hampstead.  Gardnor Road was a short distance from Hampstead Heath and still exists in the early part of the twenty-first century.  The certificate confirmed Arthur’s father as George Collett deceased and Beatrice’s father as William Manchester deceased.  The witnesses at the marriage were Beatrice’s brothers William and Sydney Manchester.

 

 

 

At some time during the first eight years of their married life together Arthur and Beatrice moved from Gardnor Road on the west side of Hampstead Heath the fairly short distance to 44 Hollingsworth Street in Holloway on the east side of Hampstead Heath.  It was at that address that they were still living at the end of the Great War at a time when Beatrice’s younger sister Vera Frances Louise Manchester (1896-1983) was living with the family immediately prior to her marriage to Mark George Penn (1897-1959).  The couple’s marriage certificate in early 1919 gave 44 Hollingsworth Street as both Vera’s and Mark’s place of residence.

 

 

 

And it was Vera’s and Mark’s son Ronald Mark Penn, born at Chiswick in 1927 and now living in Australia, who kindly provided the vital linking information to enable this Collett family line to be extended.  New information received from Ron in early 2017 reveals that, when his mother Vera made her Will in 1962, she left £100 to Arthur Collett (junior) of 20 Church Lane in Finchley.  He was the only known child arising from the marriage between Arthur Charles Collett and Beatrice Isobel Manchester.  Although the actual date of birth of their son is not known.  What is known is that Arthur and Beatrice continued to live at Hollingsworth Street until towards the end of the 1930s.

 

 

 

This fact was confirmed within the 1939 Register, which placed Arthur, with his wife Beatrice and their son Arthur W L Collett, as living at 44 Hollingsworth Street in Islington, London.  The occupation of Arthur (senior) was that of a coal trimmer, heavy.  His nephew Ron Penn has vivid memories of visiting the family as a child in their two-up and one-down Georgian terrace house with an outside toilet in a small backyard.  It was very likely Arthur’s work which probably explains why Ron’s childhood impression of his uncle was of a rather unkempt sort of man.

 

 

 

Family members recall Arthur having a large moustache and wearing a peaked cloth cap, a collarless shirt, grey serge trousers, and a black waistcoat.  All of this coupled, with the fact he had a hunched-back, gave him a most fearsome appearance.  His hunched-back was the result of an industrial injury when he was seriously burnt removing ashes from a boiler.  Thanks to the aforementioned Ron Penn, it is now known that Arthur Charles Collett died during 1946.  His widow Beatrice survived him by twenty-five years when she passed at Islington during in 1971 at the age of 87.

 

 

 

During the information gathering process for Arthur Collett, another Collett family has been found that was in residence at the aforementioned Gardnor Road in Hampstead.  That family comprised Henry A Collett (q03) born at Marylebone in 1862, his wife Annie who was born in 1863 at St Pancras, and their six children.  Henry was Henry Augustus Collett and in 1940 he and Annie were living at18 Temple Grove in Golders Green in London where Annie Collett died on 8th June 1940.  Her estate of £444 0 Shillings 10d was administered in London on 20th July 1940 in favour of her husband Henry Augustus Collett, a retired grocer’s manager.  Not long after the death of his wife Henry Augustus Collett was still living at 18 Temple Grove when he died there on 22nd January 1942.  Surprisingly, one month later, his Will was proved at Llandudno on 27th February 1942 when the executor of his estate of £578 13 Shillings 3d was named as Frederick Arthur Collett (r06) a civil servant, who was his youngest son.

 

 

 

The couple’s children living at 15 Gardnor Road with them in 1901 were all born at Hampstead and they were Henry T Collett (r01) 16, Ethel Collett (r02) 14, Annie L Collett (r03) 12, Daisy S Collett (r04) 10, Augustus Collett (r05) who was seven, and Frank Collett (r06 - see Frederick Arthur above and below) who was five.  Also living with the family was Henry’s younger brother Arthur Collett (q09) aged 23, a goods porter who was also born at Hampstead.  Further research is needed to see where this family might be placed.

 

 

 

Ten years later the census in 1911 placed the family still living at 15 Gardnor Road in Hampstead when shop assistant Henry A Collett from London was 48 and his wife of twenty-seven years was Annie who was 47.  During their life together, the census return revealed that, they had six children, of which five were still living with them, their eldest son Henry having left home by that time.  They were Ethel Collett, aged 24, Lilian Collett, aged 22, Daisy Collett, aged 20, Augustus, aged 17, and Frederick who was 15.

 

 

 

It has now been discovered that Henry Augustus Collett who was born at Marylebone in London around 1862 was the son of Thomas Collett (p01) and Maria Louisa Bryant.  In 1871 the family was residing within the Christchurch sub-district of Marylebone under the name of Collet, where Thomas Collet was 37, his wife Maria Louisa was 34, and living with them and their six children was Thomas’ mother-in-law Maria Bryant aged 64.  The six children were George Henry Collett (q01) who was 12, James Collett (q02) who was 10, Henry Augustus Collett (q03) who was eight, Maria Louisa Collett (q04) who was six, and twins Thomas George (q05) and Alfred John Collet (q06) who were three years of age.

 

 

 

By 1881 the family had been enlarged by the birth of a further three children, although tragically by then the couple’s three youngest children in 1871 were not listed with the family and may therefore have died while still very young.  Also, by 1881 the family was living at 8 Upper Park Road in Hampstead where head of the household Thomas Collett was a lamplighter.  He was 47, Maria L Collett was 44, Thomas G Collett was 23 and a solicitor’s clerk, George H Collett was 22 and a goldsmith’s improver, Henry A Collett was 18 and a porter employed by a china dealer, Albert W Collett (q07) was six, Jane C Collett (q08) was four and Arthur C Collett (q09) was two years of age.  Every member of the household had been born at Marylebone.

 

 

 

1P93

Arthur William L Collett

Born in 1912 at Hampstead, London

 

 

 

 

1O104

Frank Collett was born at Colnbrook in 1881, but after the April census day that year, and by 1891 he and his brother Arthur (above) were living with their parents at Bromley in Kent.  His given age in the census that year was 10 years, while after a further ten years, and following the death of his father, Frank Collett from Colnbrook was 18 when he was still living at Bromley with his widowed mother and his brother Arthur.  The 1901 Census gave his occupation as being that of a domestic gardener, as was his brother.  Ten years later in April 1911, Frank Collett from Colnbrook was 28 and a married man living within the Croydon area of Surrey with his wife Annie Collett who was also 28.  It is not known at this time whether there were any children resulting from their marriage.

 

 

 

 

1O105

James Nathaniel Collett was born at Woodchester on Saturday 1st July 1837 at ten minutes before two o’clock in the afternoon.  He was baptised at Woodchester three weeks later on 23rd July 1837, the eldest child of Thomas Collett and his wife Elizabeth Rogers.  He was four years old in the Woodchester census in 1841 and was James N Collett, aged 13, when he was still living with his family at Selsey Road in Woodchester in 1851.  His father died during the cholera epidemic in 1854 and, with no further record of James Nathaniel Collett after 1851, it is possible that he too died from the illness.  His father’s death was recorded at Stroud where, in 1858, the deaths of two people named James Collett were recorded.

 

 

 

 

1O106

Adelaide Collett was born at Woodchester on Monday 17th September 1838 at twenty minutes past seven o’clock in the morning.  She was nearly one-month old when she was baptised at Woodchester on 14th October 1838, where she later married Isaac James on 2nd January 1857.  Adelaide was a dressmaker and Isaac was a baker by trade.  Prior to the marriage Adelaide was living at Selsey Road in Woodchester where, in 1851, she was listed as a dressmaker’s apprentice.  Isaac was born at Berkeley in Gloucestershire in 1835.  Selsey Road was also home to other members of the Collett family at the time of the 1851 Census – see Hannah Collett nee Land (Ref. 1M39) - Adelaide’s grandmother, her parents Thomas and Elizabeth Collett, Edwin Collett (Ref. 1N60) her uncle, Susannah Collett (Ref. 1N63) her aunt and Henry Albert Collett (below) her brother.

 

 

 

At the time of the Census of 1881 Adelaide and Isaac were still living in Selsey Road but the family had grown to six boys and four girls, all born at Woodchester.  There was also a seventh and eldest son William aged 20 who had left the family home before April 1881.  The only other surviving family member was Elizabeth Collett, Adelaide’s widowed mother.  She was listed as a retired landlady and was living next door to Adelaide and Isaac at The Lodge, which was also home to five other families.

 

 

 

The census recorded that Isaac was now a baker and a butcher, son Henry was a carpenter aged 18, daughter Louisa was a pupil teacher aged 16, and that son Edward aged 14 was a baker’s assistant – presumably working with his father in the family business.  The other children listed with them were Arthur 12, Charles 11, Lavinia (Minnie) who was nine, Catherine (Kate) who was six, Florence who was five, George who was three and Frank who was two years of age.  Also listed with the family was Charles Burford a 16 years old baker of Minchinhampton and 21 years old Ellen Sherborne of Tetbury who was employed as a general servant.

 

 

 

Just about a year after the census Adelaide and Isaac sailed from Liverpool to America on the ship Assyrian Monarch which arrived at New York on 20th May 1882.  Accompanying the couple on the journey were sons Edward, Arthur, Charles, George and Frank, and daughters Louisa, Minnie, Catherine and Florence.  Only their two eldest sons William and Henry stayed behind in England.  Also accompanying the family on the trip was 42 years old labourer Samuel James who was very likely Isaac’s younger brother.  It is also interesting to note that Jane James aged 29 completed the same journey on the same ship which docked at New York on 9th January 1882.

 

 

 

By the turn of the century the US Census of 1900 identified Adelaide and Isaac as living at San Antonio Ward 7 at Bexar in Texas and living with them were Charles aged 30, Minnie 28, Catherine 26, George 22 and Frank 20, none of whom were married.  As sons Edward and Arthur were missing from the list, it might be assumed that they had left home and were married.  The reason for the absence of daughters Louisa and Florence may have been more significant (see below).

 

 

 

Adelaide James nee Collett died on 14th August 1907 and was buried at San Antonio in Plot 39 in the north-north-east quadrant of the city cemetery.  Just about a month after her death Isaac passed away and was buried next to his wife, where two of their daughters were also buried.  They are likely to have been the missing Louisa and Florence (see above).

 

 

 

Back in the 1880s the couple’s eldest son William J James married Fanny Doel who was born near Trowbridge in 1858/59.  That marriage produced at least three children, one of which was daughter Ruby Adelaide James who was born around 1891.  Ruby later married Arthur Reeves and they had a daughter Valerie.  And it was Valerie’s son Bill Radford of Norbury in south-west London who kindly provided this new information relating to his ancestor Adelaide Collett (above).

 

 

 

 

1O107

Henry Albert Collett was born at Woodchester on Tuesday 1st March 1842 at five minutes past eleven o’clock in the morning.  It was also there that he was baptised on 27th March 1842, the third and last child of Thomas Collett and his wife Elizabeth Rogers.  In 1851 he was nine years old and living at home with his parents in Selsey Road.  He married Mary Ann Thomas in 1865 at Christchurch, Newport in South Wales.  Mary Ann Thomas was born in 1848, and up to 1876 their children were born at Newport and thereafter at Weston, near Bath in Somerset, although it is notable that the couple’s second son was born and baptised at Stonehouse, in the area were Henry was born, and where his family was recorded for a short time in 1871.  Over the years Mary Ann presented Henry with a total of thirteen children of which only twelve are listed below, the missing child presumably being an infant death.  The other three not to survive were James, who died at 18, Diana, who died shortly after 1881, and Maria who died before 1891.

 

 

 

According to the census that year, for the Stroud & Stonehouse district, the family comprised Henry A Collett, aged 29, his wife Mary A Collett, aged 24, and their two sons Henry T Collett, who was two, and James E Collett who had been born at the Noah’s Ark Inn in Stonehouse during that January.  The couple’s eldest child was Elizabeth H Collett, aged four years and born at Newport, who was staying with her widowed grandmother Elizabeth Collett nee Rogers at Selsey Road in nearby Woodchester.  This was very likely so that Mary Ann could give birth to her latest son without needing to worry about Elizabeth.

 

 

 

Despite returning to South Wales for the birth of their next two children around 1877 the family left finally Wales when they moved to the bath area of Somerset.  At the time of the next census in 1881 Henry and his family were living at 11 Alexandra Buildings in Weston with Mary’s widowed mother Anna Thomas aged 75, a retired grocer.  Henry Collett was listed as a railway porter of Woodchester aged 39, while his wife Mary was aged 33 and from Newport, and the absence of their son James may indicate that he had suffered an infant death.

 

 

 

Their children living with them at that time were Elizabeth Collett 14, Henry Collett 13, William Collett, who was nine, Robert Collett, who was six, Frances Collett, who was three, and Diana Collett who was just two months old.  The family was residing within the Batheaston district of Bath in 1891, when Harry Collett was 49, Mary A Collett was 42, and their seven children were Elizabeth aged 24, William aged 19, Robert aged 15, Frances aged 13, Ethel who was eight, Lillian who was five and Nellie who was under one-year old.

 

 

 

Twenty years later according to the census of 1901 Henry was aged 60 and was still working for the Midlands Railway Company as a ticket collector, Mary Ann was 54 and the couple still had living with them six of their children.  They were William 28, Frances 23, Ethel 18, Lillian 16, Nellie 13 and Rosaline W Collett who was eight years old.  Their son Robert was married and was also living in Weston at that time.  By the time of the census in 1911, the family still living with seventy-year old Henry Albert Collett at Weston near Bath, included his wife Mary Ann who was 64, son Robert Edward 35, and daughters Lillian May Collett who was 24 and Rosaline Winifred Collett who was 17.

 

 

 

Sometime after 1911 Henry Albert Collett passed away, while his widow Mary Ann Collett nee Thomas was still alive around 1932 when she was living with her youngest child Rosaline and her husband Edward George Townsend and their daughter Joan, at their home in Bath.  As the youngest of her grandchildren, Mary Ann would tell family stories to Joan, one such story related a noble ancestor who has a stained-glass window in the church near Stroud, although no memorial to an earlier Collett has been found during the many visits by the family to that area.  It is now believed that the person in question was actually a member of Mary Ann’s Thomas family, and not a Collett after all.

 

 

 

1P94

Elizabeth Hannah Collett

Born in 1867 at Newport, Wales

 

1P95

Henry Thomas Collett

Born in 1868 at Newport, Wales

 

1P96

James Edward Collett

Born in 1871 at Stonehouse

 

1P97

William Albert Collett

Born in 1872 at Newport, Wales

 

1P98

Robert Edward Collett

Born in 1875 at Newport, Wales

 

1P99

Frances Adelaide Collett

Born in 1878 at Weston near Bath

 

1P100

Diana Collett

Born in 1881 at Weston near Bath

 

1P101

Ethel Gertrude Collett

Born in 1883 at Weston near Bath

 

1P102

Maria Collett

Born in 1885 at Weston near Bath

 

1P103

Lillian May Collett

Born in 1887 at Weston near Bath

 

1P104

Nellie Edith Evelyn Collett

Born in 1888 at Weston near Bath

 

1P105

Rosaline Winifred Collett

Born in 1893 at Weston near Bath

 

 

 

 

1O108

Charles Collett was baptised on 3rd May 1846 at Frampton-on-Severn, the only known child of John Collett and his first wife Sarah Harrison.  In 1851 he was five years old and in 1861 he was 15 when, on both occasions, he was living with his parents at Frampton-on-Severn, within the Wheatenhurst & Frampton registration district.  After that he joined the navy and was presumably away at sea when the census was conducted in 1871. 

 

 

 

On 31st August 1868 at St Mary de Lodes in Gloucester Charles married Mary Catherine Boucher who was born in 1850 at Whitminster, near Gloucester.  Mary brought to the marriage her base-born daughter Martha Boucher who was also born at Whitminster, presumably when Mary was only sixteen.  She was also carrying Charles’ first child on their wedding day, with the birth of Henry Charles Collett happening less than two months after that day.  After they were married the couple settled in Frampton where all of their children were born and baptised, apart that is for their second child who was baptised at nearby Fretherne. In every case the children’s father was confirmed as Charles Collett, although his wife was named as Ann for the third and fourth child.  No record of the family has been found within the census of 1871, but tragically, three of the couple’s first four children died before 1881, three more passed away during the 1880s, and a further two in the 1890s.

 

 

 

According to the census of 1881 the greatly reduced family of Charles Collett was living at Leather Bottle Lane in Frampton.  As Chas Collett, aged 35 and from Frampton, his occupation was that of a mariner.  His wife was named as Catherine Boucher who was 30, and she was working as a char woman.  Living there with the couple was Matthew Boucher, aged 14 from Whitminster like his mother, and Margaret Collett who was two years old.  Five years later the couple’s last child was born, and in 1891 the family was still living in Frampton, but at Rosamunds Green.  On that occasion they were recorded in the census as Charles Collett who was 45 and a general labourer from Frampton, Mary Catherine Collett who was 43 and from Whitminster, Margaret Esther Collett who was 12, William George Collett who was four and Arthur Stanley Collett who was one-year-old.

 

 

 

On the same census return and boarding with the Collett family, but with the entry crossed out, was William Boucher from Whitminster who was 28 and a bachelor and an ostler.  His age suggests he may have been Mary Catherine’s younger brother.  Having already suffered the loss of six of his children, Charles Collett died and was buried at Frampton two years later during 1893.  Sadly, his youngest daughter Margaret Esther Collett and his wife Mary Catherine Collett both passed away in 1898 and were buried at Frampton-on-Severn with him and the six deceased children.  Nothing, so far, is known about what happened to the couple’s youngest son Arthur Stanley Collett. 

 

 

 

In addition to the burials of five known children of this family, plus those of parents Charles and Mary, and Charles’ mother Sarah Collett in 1874, there are also two other Colletts whose burial took place at Frampton-on-Severn around that time.  It seems highly likely that they too were the children of Charles and Mary, all suffering infant deaths. They were Albert Collett in 1882 and John Collett in 1883.  The dates of their passing would appear to sit comfortably within the known eight children listed below.

 

 

 

1P106

Henry Charles Collett

Born in 1868 at Frampton-on-Severn

 

1P107

Sarah Ann Collett

Born in 1870 at Frampton-on-Severn

 

1P108

Albert James Collett

Born in 1872 at Frampton-on-Severn

 

1P109

Louisa Elizabeth Collett

Born in 1874 at Frampton-on-Severn

 

1P110

Margaret Esther Collett

Born in 1878 at Frampton-on-Severn

 

1P111

Albert Collett - to be confirmed

Born in 1880 at Frampton-on-Severn

 

1P112

John Collett - to be confirmed

Born in 1882 at Frampton-on-Severn

 

1P113

Frank Collett

Born in 1884 at Frampton-on-Severn

 

1P114

William George Collett

Born in 1886 at Frampton-on-Severn

 

1P115

Arthur Stanley Collett

Born in 1890 at Frampton-on-Severn

 

 

 

 

1O109

William Henry Collett was very likely born in the Gloucestershire village of Amberley, but was baptised in the nearby town of Woodchester on 28th October 1849, the first child born to Edwin Collett and his wife Martha Ann Baston.  Sadly it was there also that he died during the first three weeks of 1851, following which he was buried at Woodchester on 19th January 1851.

 

 

 

 

1O110

William Edward Collett was born at Woodchester where he was baptised on 12th October 1851, the second child of Edwin and Martha Collett.  He was five years old when he and his parents arrived in Australia on 9th February 1857.  Nothing much more is known about him at this time, except that it is established that William Edward Collett died on 15th November 1937 at the age of 86, and was buried at Stone Quarry Cemetery within the Jeebropilly district of the City of Ipswich in Queensland, where his parents were buried forty years earlier.  The following obituary was published in the Richmond River Herald and Northern Districts Advertiser of New South Wales on 3rd December 1937.  This confirms that he was a married man but, so far, no details regarding his unnamed widow are known.  Furthermore, there is no mention of any further.

 

 

 

“WILLIAM E COLLETT - Died at Rosewood (Qld) on 15th ult, Mr William E Collett, 86, uncle of Mesdames D and S A Patch of Codrington, and the G O M of the district, wherein he has resided for almost half a century.  He came from England with his parents 80 years ago, 1887 was married at Ipswich and ten years later moved to Rosewood where, with his brothers, James and Wallace, he established a profitable sawmill.  Subsequently deceased - sold out of the mill and acquired a hall and shop, which he conducted so successfully that inside five years he was able to retire, and devote the rest of his life to the service of his fellow citizens.  Some 66 years ago he had joined the No 2 Company of Infantry at Ipswich, and at the end of five years was given a 50-acre land order, but he continued in the service till 1891, when retrenchment wiped out the organisation.  He was one of the founders of the Rosewood Rifle Club, and a splendid shot as his collection of cups, medals and other trophies attests.  In 1898 Mr Collett was created a J P and in 1911 he put up a local record by adjudicating 186 cases in the year.  He was also honorary Inspector for the Queensland S P C A.  He was a clever first-aid man, the first man in Rosewood to own a car, and a member of the P A F S O A, whose members formed a guard of honor at the church and graveside.  In addition to his, widow, one brother, Wallace, of Grandchester, survives.”

 

 

 

The PAFSOA is the Protestant Alliance Friendly Society of Australia, while Grandchester lies within the Lockyer Valley region of south-east Queensland, just west of Rosewood and Ipswich.

 

 

 

 

1O111

Wallace Edwin Collett was born at Ipswich in Queensland on 19th March 1857, just over a month after his parents Edwin and Martha Collett arrived in Australia from England.  He was also known within the family as Wallace Henry Collett, most likely in honour of his eldest brother who died six years before Wallace was born.  All of his early life was spent at Ipswich, although he later moved the few miles west to Rosewood.  On the occasion of the death of his brother William (above), Wallace Collett was referred to in his obituary as Wallace of Grandchester.  However, seven years later he was buried with his parents at Stone Quarry Cemetery in Jeebropilly, just a short distance from Rosewood.  He was also known to have been married to Harriet Perrem with whom he had at least the two children listed below.  Wallace H Collett died in Lockyer Hospital in Rosewood on 26th July 1944 at the age of 87.  His wife was also 87 when Harriet C Collett nee Perrem passed away on 11th March 1944.  Two adjacent headstones in Stone Quarry Cemetery mark their joint grave.  The last few months in the life of widower Wallace Collett were spent living at the home of his married daughter Mrs R Henning.

 

 

 

1P116

R Collett

Born in 1881 at Rosewood, Qld.

 

1P117

William Henry Collett

Born in 1885 at Rosewood, Qld.

 

 

 

 

1O112

James Fords Collett was born at Cadargra in Queensland on 27th April 1861, the last of the four sons of Edwin Collett and his wife Martha Ann Baston.  He was twenty-five when he married Elizabeth Elliott during 1886 with whom he had four children.

 

The photograph on the right was generously provided by Lyndsay Bauman and shows James in his army uniform, perhaps indicating that he served in South Africa.

 

James Fords Collett died in Queensland on 13th August 1936.

 

 

 

1P118

Leila Collett

Born in 1887 in Australia

 

1P119

Ivy Collett

Born in 1888 in Australia

 

1P120

Annie Collett

Born in 1893 in Australia

 

1P121

Hector Elliott Collett

Born in 1900 in Australia

 

 

 

 

1O113

Eliza Ann Collett was born at Coln Aldwyns, with her birth recorded as simply Eliza Collett at Northleach (Ref. 11 384) during the second quarter of 1842.  By the time she was baptised at Coln St Aldwyns on 15th May 1842, shortly after she was born, she was named as Eliza Ann Collett, the eldest child of Charles and Eliza Collett.  Again, as just Eliza, she was recorded with her family at Coln St Aldwyns in 1851 as being eight years old.  No positive record of Eliza Ann Collett has been found after that time.

 

 

 

 

1O114

Charles Christopher Collett may have been born at the end of 1843 or very early in 1884, since his birth, as simply Charles Collett, was recorded at Northleach (Ref. 11 409) during the month of January in 1844, following which he was baptised as Charles Christopher Collett on 10th February 1844 at Coln St Aldwyns, where he was born.  In the next two census returns for Coln St Aldwyns in 1851, when he was seven, and 1861 when he was 17, he was living with his parents Charles and Eliza Collett and the rest of the family, when he was described as being ‘afflicted from birth’.  His health issue, whatever it was, eventually caused his premature death at the age of 26, when the death of Charles Christopher Collett was recorded at Northleach (Ref. 6a 295) during the third quarter of 1870.

 

 

 

 

1O115

Francis Collett was born at Coln St Aldwyns, his birth recorded at Northleach (Ref. xi 353) during the last quarter of 1845.  It was a Coln St Aldwyns that he was baptised on 2nd November 1845, another son of Charles Collett and Eliza Higgins.  He was five years old in the census of 1851 and, by the time he was 15 in 1861 he was a carpenter working for his father at the family home in Coln St Aldwyns.  It was at Wells (Ref. 5c 881) in Somerset during the second quarter of 1869 when Francis Collett married Harriet Allen who was born at Butleigh Wootton, near Glastonbury, in Somerset.  Perhaps by a pure coincidence Harriet was related to the Higgins family of Butleigh Wootton, Higgins also being the maiden name of Francis’ mother.  All of the children of Francis and Harriet Collett were born at Coln St Aldwyns.

 

 

 

According to the Coln St Aldwyns census of 1871, Francis Collett was 25 and a carpenter and a grocer, his wife Harriet Collett was 29, and their daughter Alice Collett was one year old and had been born at Coln St Aldwyns.  Living with them was a cousin, Caroline Higgins aged 12, who was also born at Butleigh Wootton in Somerset.  Interestingly, Francis’ mother also had a member of her Higgins family living with them at Coln St Aldwyns in 1871, but both his mother Eliza and her nephew Thomas Higgins were both born at Haresfield in Gloucestershire.

 

 

 

During the 1870s, Francis gave up being a carpenter, when he became a draper, to coincide with his continued occupation as a grocer.  That situation was confirmed in the next census conducted in Coln St Aldwyns.  Francis Collett from Coln St Aldwyns was 35 and a draper and a grocer.  Living with him, at that time, was his wife Harriet Collett who was 40, Alice M Collett who was 11, Lydia M Collett who was nine, Charles W Collett who was seven, Herbert F Collett who was two and one-year old Walter L Collett.  Also living with the family was general servant Matilda Griffin 15 who may have been helping in the shop or the house.  After a further eight years, the death of Francis Collett was recorded at Northleach (Ref. 6a 263) during the first three months of 1889, when he was only 42.  His wife Harriet was described as a widow and a draper and a grocer in the Coln St Aldwyns census of 1891, indicating that she had taken over the family business from her late husband.  Also, that year, her eldest daughter Alice Collett was 21 and a school teacher, Lydia Collett was 19 and a draper’s assistant, Charles Collett was 17 and a carpenter’s apprentice, Herbert Collett was 12 and an errand boy for the post, Walter Collett was 11 and a scholar, and Percy Collett was eight years old.

 

 

 

By 1901 all of the male members of the family had left home and did not even appear in the census for that year anyway in Gloucestershire.  The only remaining members of the family still living in Coln St Aldwyns were widow Harriet Collett from Butleigh Wootton who was 60 and her unmarried daughters Alice M Collett who was 30 and Lydia M Collett who was 28, all three of them described as seamstresses.  Ten years later in April 1911 Harriet Collett was seventy when, the only member of her family still living with her at Coln St Aldwyns, was her eldest daughter Alice Maude Collett who was still a spinster at the age of 41.  The death of Harriet Collett was recorded at Northleach (Ref. 6a 490) during the first quarter of 1918, when she was 76 years old.

 

 

 

1P122

Alice Maude Collett

Born in 1870 at Coln St Aldwyns

 

1P123

Lydia M Collett

Born in 1872 at Coln St Aldwyns

 

1P124

Charles William Collett

Born in 1874 at Coln St Aldwyns

 

1P125

Herbert F Collett

Born in 1878 at Coln St Aldwyns

 

1P126

Walter Louis Collett

Born in 1879 at Coln St Aldwyns

 

1P127

Percy Allen Collett

Born in 1881 at Coln St Aldwyns

 

 

 

 

1O116

Eleanor Collett was born at Coln St Aldwyns, her birth recorded at Northleach (Ref. 11 379) during the first quarter of 1848.  It was at Coln St Aldwyns where she was baptised on 21st April 1848, a daughter of Charles and Eliza Collett.  On the day of the census in 1851, 1861 and 1871 she was three years of age, 13 years old and at school, and 23 and unmarried respectively, when living with her family at Coln St Aldwyns.  Eleanor Collett was 33 in 1881, when she was one of only two siblings still living with her parents at Coln St Aldwyns.  Upon the death of her mother in 1888, Eleanor took over the role as housekeeper for her father, as confirmed by the following census in 1891, just after which her father passed away.  That year she was still a spinster at the age of 43, as she was in 1901 when Eleanor was 53 and working as a seamstress.  She continued to live in Coln St Aldwyns for the rest of her life, where she was 63 years old in 1911. It was sixteen years later that the death of Eleanor Collett was recorded at Northleach register office (Ref. 6a 391) during the second quarter of 1927, when she was 79.

 

 

 

 

1O117

Aaron Thomas Collett was born at Coln St Aldwyns in 1850, whose birth was recorded at Northleach (Ref. xi 386) during the first three months of the year. He was also baptised used his full name on 28th April 1850 at Coln St Aldwyns, the son of carpenter and builder Charles Collett and his wife Eliza.  At the time of the census in 1851 Aaron was one year old and was 11 years of age in 1861, when he was recorded as Aaron Thomas Collett, who was still attending the local school in Coln St Aldwyns, while living there with his family.  Ten years later, at the age of 21, he was a carpenter very likely working with his father.  It was just over one year later that he became a married man.

 

 

 

It was as Aaron Collett that he married the slightly older Louisa Adams at Eastleach Turville in 1872, the marriage recorded at Northleach register office (Ref. 6a 659) during the second quarter of that year.  Louisa was born at Eastleach Turville around 1844, where the couple settled following their wedding day, and where all of their children were born.  In 1881 Aaron Collett, aged 31, was a carpenter by trade living at Eastleach Turville.  The census return that year listed the other members of his family as his wife Louisa who was 36, Eliza Collett who was eight, William Collett who was six, George Collett who was four and Francis Collett who was two years old. 

 

 

 

Aaron and Louisa were only married for ten years when Aaron Thomas Collett died at Eastleach Turville just over a year after the 1881 Census.  That tragic event was recorded at Northleach register office (Ref. 6a 227) during the second quarter of 1882, when Aaron’s age was once again recorded as being 31.  Around two and a half years later Louisa remarried when, during the last three months of 1882, she married Thomas Hall.  The wedding was recorded at Northleach (Ref. 6a 811) when the witnesses were named as Thomas Margetts and Sarah Mustoe.  It seems highly likely that Louisa was already with-child on the day of the wedding since the first of her two sons with the much younger Thomas Hall was born around the end of 1884 or during the early months of 1885.  The couple’s second son was born at Eastleach Turville in 1886.

 

 

 

The census of 1891 still placed Louisa Hall of Eastleach Turville living in the village and not just with her new husband, but also with their two young children, although none of her Collett children were with her on that occasion.  Thos Hall was 34, Louisa was 46, and their two sons were Fredk Thos Hall who was six, and Clement Wilfred Hall who was four, both of them born at Eastleach Turville.  On that same day Aaron’s son George Collett from Eastleach Turville, who was 14, was living with and working alongside his widowed grandfather Charles Collett at Coln St Aldwyns, when he was described as a carpenter’s apprentice.  His eldest son William was 16 and was living and working in Croydon by that time, while her eldest had become a school teacher, although not identified in the census of 1891.

 

 

 

By the time of the census in March 1901 Louisa Hall, aged 55 and from Eastleach Turville, was living at The Bell Inn at Langford in Oxfordshire.  Her husband Thomas Hall was only 45 and was a blacksmith with his own account who had been born at Westwell in Oxfordshire.  Her marriage to Thomas had produced a son who was born two years after the couple had married.  He was Clement W Hall who was 14 and born at Eastleach Turville.  Living with the Hall family was the stepson of Thomas Hall, he being Francis C Collett who was 23 and a labourer also born at Eastleach Turville.

 

 

 

Louisa’s eldest Hall son Frederick Thomas Hall was 15 years old and was already employed as a domestic page at a house in the village of Marcham near Abingdon-on-Thames.  It was around four and a half years after the 1911 census that Louisa Hall, formerly Collett nee Adams, died at the age of 70, her death being recorded at Gloucester register office (Ref. 6a 315) during the third quarter of 1951.

 

 

 

1P128

Eliza Jane Collett

Born in 1872 at Eastleach Turville

 

1P129

William Collett

Born in 1874 at Eastleach Turville

 

1P130

George Collett

Born in 1876 at Eastleach Turville

 

1P131

Francis Charles Collett

Born in 1878 at Eastleach Turville

 

 

 

 

1O118

Raymond John Collett was born in 1853 at Coln St Aldwyns and it was at Northleach (Ref. 6a 287) that his birth was recorded during the last quarter of that year.  In 1861 Raymond Collett was seven years of age and as Raymond J Collett aged 17 in 1871 he was a carpenter still living with his family in Coln St Aldwyns.  By the time of the 1881 Census he was still living at home with his parents, Charles and Eliza Collett, and his older sister Eleanor Collett (above), when Raymond J Collett was 27 and a carpenter.  However, just over six year later, he became a married man, when the marriage of Raymond John Collett and Emma Jones was recorded at Cirencester (Ref. 6a 706) during the final three months of 1887.  Emma had been born at Oaksey, south of Cirencester, in 1849. 

 

 

 

In the next census of 1891 Raymond was 37, whose occupation was still that of a carpenter, and his wife Emma was 42, where they were living in Coln St Aldwyns.  Absent was their son Oaksey Collett, named after his mother’s birth place in Wiltshire, who would have been around two years of age.  In addition to his employment in carpentry, Raymond Collett was also the census enumerator for the area of Coln St Aldwyns in 1891.  It was a similar situation ten years later, when the census conducted at the end of March in 1901 recorded the childless couple as Raymond Collett aged 47 and a builder and a timber merchant again living at Coln St Aldwyns with his wife Emma who was 52.

 

 

 

Ten years later the census in 1911 confirmed that Raymond Collett aged 57 and from Coln St Aldwyns, was still living there with just his wife Emma Collett who was 62.  The census return also confirmed that, by that time, he was a wheelwright, a carpenter, and an undertaker, that he and Emma had been married for twenty-four years and that their only child was not living.  It seems highly likely that his slightly older wife Emma died during the next decade, when he may have taken in his niece Alice Maud Collett (Ref. 1P122), the eldest child of his older brother Francis Collett (above).  No death of Emma Collett has been found, nor the marriage of Raymond to Alice Maud.  However, upon the death of Raymond John Collett of Coln St Aldwyns on 17th June 1928, his widow was named as Alice Maud Collett during the probate for his Will.  The Will was proved in London on 3rd August 1928, when his personal effects were valued at £426 1 Shilling 6d.  The death of Raymond J Collett was recorded at Northleach register office (Ref. 6a 440).

 

 

 

1P132

Oaksey Collett

Born in 1889 at Coln St Aldwyns

 

 

 

 

1O119

Victoria Maude Collett was born at Coln St Aldwyns in 1856, with her birth as the youngest child of Charles Collett and Eliza Higgins, recorded at Northleach (Ref. 6a 289) during the last three months of that year.  Perhaps for health reasons, her baptism was delayed until she was well over one year old, when she was baptised at Coln St Aldwyns on 11th February 1858.  As Victoria Collett she was three years old in the Coln St Aldwyns census in 1861, but was named as Maud V Collett aged 13 in 1871 when, on both occasions, she was living there with her family.

 

 

 

 

1O120

Thomas Collett was born at Eastington in 1845, the eldest child of George Collett and Harriet Frape.  Thomas was 15 when he was still living with his family in 1861 within the Wheatenhurst & Frampton registration district of Gloucestershire.  Not long after that it seems likely that it was his father’s work as a carpenter that was the cause of the family’s move to Wybunbury, just south of Nantwich in Cheshire, where Thomas’ family was recorded in the next census of 1871.  Whether Thomas initially travelled to Cheshire with his family is not known for sure, but by the time the census was conducted in 1871 Thomas was a married man living in London with his with Lucy and had taken up the same profession as his father, that of a joiner.  The census for Shoreditch St Leonards listed the couple as Thomas Collett from Eastington who was 25, while his wife Lucy A Collett was 30 and gave birth to the couple’s first child, in London, during the following year.  The birth of Mildred Louise Collett was recorded at Shoreditch during the first three months of 1872.

 

 

 

Lucy was a daughter of Samuel Andrews Hall and she was born around 1839 being seven years older than Thomas at the time of the marriage.  The record of their marriage has been found at Marylebone in London (Ref. 1a 934) which took place during the third quarter of 1871, when Thomas Collett married Lucy Andrews Hall in front of witnesses William Robert Bruce and Florence Helen Osborne.  Two years after the birth of the first child Lucy gave birth to a second daughter whose birth was recorded at Hackney during the third quarter of 1874.  Clara was one year old when Thomas and Lucy and their two daughters emigrated to New Zealand.  It was on 17th July 1875 that they sailed from England on the sailing ship Zealandia which arrived at Otago on the South Island on 27th October that same year.  The immigration documentation confirmed that Thomas Collett was married and from Gloucestershire, and that his occupation was that of a joiner.  The family initially settled in the North Valley of Dunedin and it was during the following year the Lucy presented Thomas with a son, and in following year their last child was born.

 

 

 

Tragically Thomas had only enjoyed less than two years in New Zealand when he died on 2nd May 1877 at the family home at Lambeth Road in Dunedin.  Two days later he was laid to rest in Plot 17, Block 115, in the Dunedin Northern Cemetery, where he was reunited with his eldest child almost exactly three years later.  His burial record confirmed he was a carpenter from England and a resident of New Zealand for just two years.  Buried in the same plot are Mildred Louise Collett, aged eight years in 1880, and Susan Harris who was only four months old when she died on 31st January 1878.  She was the daughter of Alexander Joseph Harris and Mary Ann Pearce of Union Street in Dunedin who was very likely related to Susan Harris from Ireland, the wife of Thomas Collett (below), the two Thomas Colletts being first cousins.  In 1880, at the time of the death of Mildred Louse Collett, the widow Lucy Andrews Collett and her three surviving children were residing within the Kelvin Grove area of Dunedin.

 

 

 

The short time Thomas was in Dunedin was not wasted as, at a dinner to celebrate the first anniversary of the Dunedin Branch of the Amalgamated Society of Carpenters and Joiners, where seventy members were present, it was Thomas Collett who occupied the position of chairman, which showcased his undoubted organisational skills.  Following his death Lucy continued to raise her three surviving children on her own, she remaining a widow for a further forty-one years.  Little is known about Lucy’s life after Thomas passed away, but at a meeting in January 1892 of creditors of the estate of Charles Allen senior, settler of North East Valley, Lucy Collett was amongst the unsecured creditors and was owed £74 15 Shillings.  Perhaps her income came from some sort of business venture.  In April 1917, less than two years before she died, Lucy was living in Stoke in Nelson, where she was recorded as the next-of-kin for her son Harry Bertram Collett in his Army Personnel File.  The death of Lucy Andrews Collett nee Hall, at eighty years of age, was recorded at Karori Cemetery in Wellington, New Zealand, on 6th January 1919, the same grave being used over twenty years later following the death of her son.

 

 

 

1P133

Mildred Louise Collett

Born in 1872 at Shoreditch

 

1P134

Clara Emmeline Collett

Born in 1874 at Hackney

 

1P135

Harry Bertram Collett

Born in 1876 at Dunedin, NZ

 

1P136

Thomasina Martha Harriet Collett

Born in 1877 at Dunedin, NZ

 

 

 

 

1O121

James Henry Collett was born at Eastington in 1853 and was seven years old at the time of the 1861 Census for the Wheatenhurst & Frampton registration district where he was living with his family.  During the next few months the family left Gloucestershire and moved to Cheshire where they were living in 1871.  James was 17 at that time and shortly after he left the family home and moved to Manchester to seek work.  According to the 1881 Census, James Henry Collett aged 27 of Eastington was living at 48 Warwick Street in the Hulme area of Manchester.  He was described as head of the house and lodger.  His occupation was that of an ironmonger’s shop-man which may indicate that the accommodation where he was lodging came with the job, and that he was living in rooms above the shop.

 

 

 

 

1O123

Emma Collett was born at Nantwich in 1862 and was eight years old at the time of the census in 1871 when she was living with her family in the Wybunbury area of Nantwich.  Ten years later she had left the family home at 35 Oxford Road in Altrincham and was living and working as a confectioner’s apprentice in Nantwich.  The 1881 Census placed Emma, aged 18 and from Nantwich, as living at the home of twenty-nine years old spinster Ann Fitton at 4 High Street in Nantwich.  Ann Fritton, whose occupation was that of a confectioner, had been born at Wybunbury so it seems likely that it was from there that she knew the Collett family and so arranged the work for Emma.

 

 

 

 

1O124

Reuben Henry Collett was born at Coln St Aldwyns in 1847 and was baptised there on 6th February 1848, the eldest child of Edward and Sarah Collett.  It was as Henry Collett aged three years, that he was recorded with his family at Hatherop in 1851.  It seems likely that he was still an infant when his family settled in Hatherop, since he later gave his place of birth as Hatherop, rather than Coln St Aldwyns.  Upon the death of his mother, following the birth of his sister Lucy (below), his father remarried and took the family to live in Ireland, and it was at Piltown in County Kilkenny that Reuben’s half-brother Edward William Collett was born.  Because the family was residing in Ireland in 1861, there was no record of any member of the family living on mainland Britain that year.  However, it is established that Reuben returned to England during the latter years of the 1860s, as did his brother Thomas Collett (below).

 

 

 

That return journey to England seems to the moment in his life from when he referred to himself simply as Henry Collett.  It was therefore as Henry Collett that his marriage to the much younger Elizabeth Roach was recorded at Highworth (Ref. 5a 9) during the third quarter of 1870.  Nine months later Henry Collett from Hatherop was 23, when he was living and working as a carpenter at Upper Stratton in Stratton St Margaret near Swindon.  His wife Elizabeth Roach, from Stratton, was only 17 and, on that census day, she was already with-child, the couple’s first child born later that same year and baptised at Swindon on 3rd September 1871.  It was around six months later that the death of Annie Maria Collett was recorded at Highworth in the second quarter of 1872.  During the next decade Elizabeth presented Henry with a further three children and all of them were born at Stratton St Margaret, where the family was still living in 1881.

 

 

 

The census that year listed the family living at Upper Stratton where Henry Collett, aged 33, was a carpenter from Hatherop, his wife Elizabeth was 27, and their three children were Annie who was six, Bessie who was five, and Amy who was one-year old.  All four female members of the family had been born at Stratton St Margaret, as had Elizabeth’s widowed mother Jane Roach, aged 54 and a laundress, who was living with the family.  The couple’s eldest daughter was christened Susan Annie Collett when she was baptised in Swindon on 7th January 1875, the child of Henry and Elizabeth Collett, as was Amy Collett who was baptised on 23rd May 1878.

 

 

 

Tragically, just over six years after the census in 1881, the death of Henry Collett was recorded at Highworth (Ref. 5a 1) during the last quarter of 1887, at the age of 40 years.  Three years later, his widow and two of his three daughters were still living at Upper Stratton on the day of the census in 1891.  Elizabeth Collett was 37, when she was described as living on her own means, when her two girls were listed as Susan A Collett who was 16 and Bessie Collett who was 11 years old.  Still living with the family, was Elizabeth’s mother Jane Roach who was 66 while, living nearby at the home of the very large Arkell family, on Highworth Road in Stratton St Margaret, was missing daughter Amy Collett who was 15, who was working for the family as a domestic servant and nursemaid.  

 

 

 

Just less than two years after that, widow Elizabeth Collett married the much older Henry Carter during the first three months of 1893, the event recorded at Highworth (Ref. 5a 27).  Just over one year later, Elizabeth gave birth to a son, Henry Charles Roach Carter, whose birth was recorded at Highworth (Ref. 5a 3) during the second quarter of 1894.  He was then baptised at Swindon on 5th July 1894.  When Henry junior was four years old, his elderly father passed away, the death of Henry Carter recorded at Highworth (Ref. 5a 3) during the last three months of 1898, aged 60.  In 1901 mother and son were living at Dores Lane in Stratton, close to where her eldest daughter Susan was living with her husband their son.  Elizabeth Carter was 47 and a grocer, son Henry being six years old.  They were still there in 1911, when Elizabeth was still a grocer at 57.  She died 21 years later, her death recorded at Swindon register office (Ref. 5a 3) during the third quarter of 1932, when she was 79.

 

 

 

It was also at Swindon, during the second quarter of 1899, when Susan Annie Collett was married to William Edward Franklin (Ref. 5a 73) from Wroughton, who was a chair moulder with the Great Western Railway.  That was how he was described in the census of 1901 when he was 28, by which time his wife Annie, aged 26, had already given birth to their first child, Norman H Franklin aged one year and born at Stratton, like his mother.  That day, the family of three was residing at Dores Lane in Stratton St Margaret.  One more child was added to their family and William also became a bread baker by 1911, when they were again living in Stratton St Margaret, where William was 38, Annie was 36, Norman was 11 and Stuart was nine.  The boys’ parents were still living there when their deaths were recorded at Swindon during 1953, when William was 80, and in 1957, when Susan A Franklin nee Collett was 83.

 

 

 

On the day of the census in 1901, the two youngest daughters of Henry and Elizabeth Collett were domestic servants and together, working at the Brentford, Ealing home of the Plaistowe family.  Amy Collett from Swindon was 25 and the cook at the house on Mount Park Road.  Her sister Bessie was 21 and employed as a parlourmaid.  What happened to Amy after that day is not known, while ten years later Bessie Collett aged 31 and from Upper Stratton was still working as a parlourmaid for the same family at Ealing.  The marriage of Bessie Collett and John W Oakley was recorded nine years later at Swindon register office (Ref. 5a 112) during the fourth quarter of 1920.

 

 

 

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Annie Maria Collett

Born in 1871 at Stratton St Margaret

 

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Susan Annie Collett

Born in 1874 at Stratton St Margaret

 

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Amy Collett

Born in 1876 at Stratton St Margaret

 

1P140

Bessie Collett

Born in 1879 at Stratton St Margaret

 

 

 

 

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Thomas Collett was born at the village of Hatherop, midway between Bibury and Fairford, during December 1850.  He was baptised at Hatherop on 2nd February 1851, and the baptism record confirmed that he was the son of Edward and Sarah Collett.  At the end of March 1851, the census return for Hatherop listed Thomas Collett as being four months old, when he was living there with his carpenter father, mother and older brother Henry (above).

 

 

 

When Thomas was around five years old his mother died and when he was seven years old his father remarried, following which the family left Gloucestershire and sailed to Ireland.  It was for that reason that no member of Thomas’ family has been found in England in 1861.  However, by 1871 when Thomas was 20, he had already joined the Royal Navy and was assigned to a vessel based at Plymouth.  It was also in Devon three years later that Thomas Collett married Susan Harris who had been born at Piltown in County Kilkenny, Ireland around 1850.

 

 

 

Once married Thomas and Susan made their way to Ireland, perhaps to be with Susan’s parents at Piltown, where their first child was born, but who tragically died shortly thereafter.  Susan’s surname was also used as a forename for one of the couple’s later children.  It is speculated that Susan Collett nee Harris may have been related to Alexander Joseph Harris and his wife Mary Ann Pearce of Union Street in Dunedin, since their four-month old daughter Susan Harris died on 31st January 1878 and was buried in the same grave as Thomas’ cousin Thomas Collett of Eastington (above) who died in Dunedin on 2nd May 1877.  Why else would a complete stranger being buried in the same grave, where Thomas’s eldest daughter Mildred was buried with him in May 1880.

 

 

 

Thomas and his wife Susan returned to England from Ireland after their loss of daughter Lucy during the latter half of 1870s and it was at Devonport in Plymouth that Thomas resumed his naval career.  Furthermore, it was while he was based at Devonport that his next three children were born, before the family settled in Swindon upon completion of his naval service some years later.  By the time of the census in 1881 Thomas was attached to HMS Royal Adelaide which was based at Devonport.  He was described as being 30 years old and a married man from Hatherop in Gloucestershire, although he was not living with his wife and their first child.  His rank at that time was that of Ship’s Corporal First Class.

 

 

 

On that same occasion his wife Susan Collett, who was 29, was living nearby at 23 Clowance Street in Stoke Damerel, a parish in Devonport, which was simply referred to as Stoke in later years.  She was described as an R N Seaman’s wife and living with her was her son Henry J Collett who was two months old.  During the next decade a further three children were added to the family.  The first two were also born at Devonport but, on leaving the Royal Navy around 1888, after having completed twenty years services, Thomas and his family moved to Swindon where their last child was born.  It was probably the promise of work and a house with the Great Western Railway that persuaded Thomas to make the move.

 

 

 

According to the census of 1891, the family was living at 4 York Terrace in Swindon, where Thomas Collett, aged 43 and of Hatherop, was a manager and a time-keeper.  The census also confirmed that his wife Susan, who was 39, was born in Ireland.  Their four children at that time were Henry J Collett aged 10, Thomas G H Collett who was eight, Herbert E Collett who was three, and Mabel E Collett who was one-year old.

 

 

 

Ten years later in March 1901 the complete family was still living together in Swindon where Thomas Collett, aged 50 and from Hatherop, was a railway clerk working for the GWR.  His wife Susan was 49 and, on that occasion, she stated that she was from Kilkenny in Ireland, where Thomas had lived as a child.  At that time their children were recorded as Henry Collett who was 20, Thomas G Collett who was 18, Herbert Collett who was 13, Mabel Collett who was 11, and Frances Collett who was six.

 

 

 

It was also in Swindon that the family was still living in 1911 when Thomas, aged 60 and from Hatherop, was still employed as a railway clerk, in addition to which he was described as a naval pensioner.  Susan from Kilkenny in Ireland was 59 and had been married to Thomas for thirty-six years.  The census returned also stated that the marriage had produced a total of eight children, or whom only five were still alive in 1911.  Two of those were still living with the couple, and they were Mabel, who was 21 and working as a draper’s clerk, and Frances who was 16, both of them born in Swindon.  Therefore, there are two children missing from the list below who did not survive, since all three named sons did.

 

 

 

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Lucy Anne Collett

Born in 1875 at Piltown, Ireland

 

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Henry James Collett

Born in 1881 at Stoke Damerel, Devonport

 

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Thomas George Harris Collett

Born in 1883 at Stoke Damerel, Devonport

 

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Herbert E Collett

Born in 1887 at Stoke Damerel, Devonport

 

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Mabel E Collett

Born in 1889 at Swindon

 

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Frances Collett

Born in 1894 at Swindon

 

 

 

 

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Lucy Maria Collett was born at Hatherop in 1855 and was baptised there on 22nd July 1855, the daughter of Edward and Sarah Collett.  Her birth was recorded at Cirencester (Ref. 6a 327) during the second quarter of the year.  It was previously thought that her mother may have died during the birth, but this has proved not to be the case, with the record of her passing recorded at Northleach in the first quarter of the following year.  Two years later, her father remarried.  Perhaps looking for a new life with his second wife, Lucy’s father took the family to Ireland, where they lived at Piltown where Lucy’s half-brother Edward William Collett (below) was born.  When Lucy and her two older brothers Henry and Thomas were old enough, all three of them returned to England and according to the census in 1881 Lucy Collett from Gloucestershire was 26 and was working as a live-in general servant at The Rectory at Ridley in Kent, the home of Thomas P Phelps of Oxford who was the Rector of Ridley.

 

 

 

 

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Edward William Collett, who was known as William, was born at Piltown in County Kilkenny in Ireland during 1859, the only known son of Edward Collett and his second wife Mary Ann Bracknell.  Piltown has a unique place in English history as it was the location of the only battle during the Wars of the Roses to take place on Irish soil.  The name Piltown means the town of blood, as it was the river there that ran red with blood after the battle.

 

 

 

In 1876 when Edward was 17 years old it seems likely that his uncle Samuel Collet (Ref. 1N71), his father’s younger brother, had written about how good life was in New Zealand, and that may have been enough for Edward to leave Ireland for a new life in New Zealand.  It is also interesting that when his uncle sailed from Gravesend to Lyttelton in 1858, among the other passengers on the sailing boat ‘Indiana’ was farmer Joseph Bates and his family, Edward’s future employer and father-in-law.  Another passenger on board the ‘Indiana’ in 1858 was George Checkley, who together with Joseph Bates and one other man named Newton, built the Church of St Peter in Akaroa which is still there to this day.

 

 

 

Edward sailed out of Gravesend aboard the three-masted sailing ship ‘Waitangi’ on 24th June 1876 bound for New Zealand.  An uneventful journey was enjoyed by all on board, the ship eventually arriving at Lyttelton on 16th September 1876.  The ship’s passengers numbered 337, the majority of whom were Irish.  Edward William Collett’s occupation was recorded as being that of a farm labourer, while his age upon departure was 17.  The ‘Waitangi’ was towed into Lyttelton by the steamship ‘Akaroa’.  Six days later, on 22nd September 1876, Edward made his way to Akaroa on board the ‘SS Akaroa’ which, along with its towing duties, was also used as a passenger service between Lyttelton and Banks Peninsula.

 

 

 

Upon Edward’s arrival in New Zealand he was offered a job working on Joseph Bates’ farm at Wainui, Banks Peninsula, just across the harbour from Akaroa.  It was therefore through that contact with the Bates family that Edward eventually married (1) Sarah Louisa Bates the daughter of Joseph Bates and his wife Annie Clarke.  Sarah was born at Akaroa on 21st February 1862 and the wedding took place at the home of her parents in Wainui, Akaroa on 13th June 1882.  Once they were married the couple made their home at Akaroa, to the south of Christchurch, where all of their children were born.  One year later, during June 1883, it was recorded that Mr Edward Collett assisted Mr Bussell and Mr Schmidt in the sports day events at Wainui School which commenced after lunch and continued into the evening with concert for the children’s parents.  At the start of the proceedings the children were presented with tin whistles, donated by Joseph Bates, which were described as instruments of torture by the adults who were present.

 

 

 

During the concert that same evening the parents were entertained by a number of musical turns including a duet entitled ‘Hunting Tower’ which was performed with great effect by Edward Collett and Miss Bates.  Although the record is not clear which Miss Bates she was, it is possible that she was the former Sarah Bates, and therefore Edward’s wife.  Exactly one year later in June 1884 Sarah’s parents left Wainui when they moved to Christchurch where they set up home at 450 Madras Street which they renamed ‘Wainui’.  And it was there that Joseph Bates died on 3rd October 1892, following which he was buried at Linwood Cemetery, Block 22, Plot 61.  The informant of his death was his son-in-law Edward William Collett, and four months later it was his daughter Jessie E Louise Collett who was buried in the same grave with her grandfather.  Jessie, who was also known as Vida, was just five years old.

 

 

 

After a time employed on the farm of his father-in-law, Edward was leased a block of land on the property as confirmed in the minutes of a meeting of the Akaroa and Wainui Road Board held in 1888, when Mr Bates of ‘Wainui’ 450 Madras Street, Christchurch stated that he had let his property in blocks to Messrs C. McDonald, Jno. Bullock, E. Collett, Jas. Wright and August Wilson.  Three years later, on 17th April 1891, a carriers’ licence was awarded to F. Renaud and on 10th December of that year Edward William Collett had acquired a business from the aforementioned Francois. Renaud.  Subsequently on 23rd June 1894 a carriers’ licence was granted to E. Collett by the Akaroa Borough Council and on 23rd November 1895 a carriers’ licence was awarded to Mrs Collett.  Less than two years after that, on 1st May 1897, two further carriers’ licenses were granted to Mr Collett by the Council, as reported in the Akaroa Mail and Star Newspaper.  It might be assumed from the above, that the business involved the carting of people and goods, but sadly nothing has been found to confirm this.  Instead it is possible that the business purchased by Edward William Collett from F. Renaud was a Drapery Shop, which later became Collett’s Store.

 

 

 

An unexpected event took place during 1893 when Edward disappeared, leaving Sarah Louisa on her own to support the family.  At that time, she was running a business on the corner of Rue Jolie and Selwyn Avenue in Akaroa, which sold mostly drapery lines, but also included knick-knacks and sweets.  The business had been established as early as 1891 and the operation was certainly known as Collett’s Store by 1896.  That year two adverts were placed in the Akaroa Mail stating that David Bates, Lawyer, had sums of money for investment at lowest rates and that Mr Bates could be consulted at Mrs Collett’s Store in Akaroa on the first Thursday in each month and at the Somerset Hotel in Duvauchelle the Friday following.  David Bates was the brother of Sarah Louisa Collett nee Bates.

 

 

 

Published in the Akaroa Mail on 10th December 1907 was the following notice.  “Sale of Drapery on my premises at Jolie Street, Akaroa.  I beg to announce that I have decided to offer my well-selected Drapery Stock at greatly reduced rates, and invite all residents to inspect the goods and note the bargains to be obtained.  The stock includes dress material and linings of all kinds, sateens, hollands, prints, ribbons, hats, flowers, laces, embroidery, flannelettes (white and coloured), Christmas cards, toys, etc, etc.  All new and well selected goods.  Sale now proceeding. — L. Collett, Drapery Store, Jolie Street, Akaroa.”  Just one month later on 14th January 1908 a further notice was published in the newspaper as follows.  “Drapery Sale: Mrs Collett, who is leaving Akaroa, is selling out at her drapery store in Jolie Street south.  As she wishes to dispose of all her complete stock of drapery and sundries, there is an opportunity for those who are anxious to get good materials for the most reasonable prices.  The sale, which is a bona fide clearing one is now proceeding and will be continued for the next few weeks”.

 

 

 

Three months later the following notice appeared in the newspaper on 10th April 1908.  Drapery Notice: Mrs Collett wishes to inform Peninsula residents that her Clearing Sale of Drapery at Jolie Street North is being continued.  Genuine bargains in all lines.  An inspection is cordially invited”, which was re-printed again in the same newspaper on 27th May 1908.  Sadly for Sarah, the sale was not successful and the shop eventually re-opened in September, following an announcement in the newspaper on 7th September 1909.  “Notice: Mrs Collett wishes to inform her many Peninsula friends that she will shortly re-open her shop in Jolie Street, and hopes all her old customers will give her their patronage.”  However, the shops closed two weeks later.

 

 

 

It was on 9th May 1911 that a final notice was printed in the Akaroa Mail on behalf of Mrs Collett by W. D. Wilkins & Sons which stated that there would be a public auction on May 18th at 12 noon on the premises at Jolie Street of the contents of the shop which included stock, furniture, a safe, etc, etc.  Many decades later a public notice in the Akaroa Mail on 18th March 1958 announced the satisfactory tender to demolish Collett’s Store on the corner of Rue Jolie and Selwyn Avenue, following which it became part of the Akaroa Area School playing field.

 

 

 

The marriage of Edward William Collett and his wife Sarah Louisa Bates ended when the Wellington Evening Post published the following announcement on Monday 20th December 1920.  The report stated that “Sarah Louisa Collett sought a dissolution of her marriage with Edward William Collett on the ground of desertion.  She stated that she married the respondent in 1882 and had continued to reside with him until 1893, when he had deserted her. There were three children of the marriage, all of whom were now grown-up.”  The reference to just three of Sarah’s five children was because her two eldest daughters Lucy and Jessie had both died by then.  Following the judgement at the Wellington Supreme Court, a report appeared in the local press which said “Sarah Louisa Collett (Mr. T. M. Wilford), asked for a divorce from Edward William Collett on the grounds of desertion.  The parties were married in June ’82, and they set up home at Akaroa.  Twenty-seven long and weary years ago it was since the day respondent biffed off.  The papers were served on him at Maranui (Manunui near Taumarunui), where he was living with a lady.  A decree absolute was granted on 10th November 1921.” 

 

 

 

It was at Wellington Supreme Court on Saturday 18th December that the case of Collett v Collett was heard, one of nineteen undefended petitions processed during a busy one-and-a-half-hour session.  In every case the petitioner was presented with the desired decree nisi.  At the conclusion of that particular case it was recorded that the papers were served on Edward William Collett at the home of Joseph Bates (deceased) with his sons David (Bates) and Joseph William (Bates).

 

 

 

It was five months after the divorce that Edward married (2) Mary Jane Hamley on 18th April 1922 at the registrar’s office in Taumarunui.  According to their marriage certificate Mary Jane was a spinster at 60 and had been born at Lifton in Devon, England, the daughter of farmer Richard Hamley and his wife Margaret Ann Hamley nee Uglow.  The certificate also confirmed that Edward, aged 63 and from Piltown was a timber worker and the son of carpenter Edward Collett and his wife Mary Ann Collett nee Bracknell.  The certificate also confirmed the date of his divorce.

 

 

 

Back in England in 1881 Richard Hamley, aged 46 and who was also born at Lifton, was a farmer.  His wife Margaret Ann Hamley from Egloskerry in Cornwall was 45, and their daughter Margaret (Mary Jane) Hamley was 16 and was one of eight children living with the family at Riscombe Farm in Lifton.  Her younger brother was named as Edwin Uglow Hamley, so confirming the link to Margaret Ann Uglow.

 

 

 

It can only be assumed that the marriage of Edward and Mary did not endure, since a few years later a message came to David Edward Leonard Collett of Lyttelton informing him that his father was living rough and was in poor health.  As a consequence, Leonard travelled to the North Island to see his ailing father and brought him back with him to Lyttelton where he and his wife Harriet nursed him until his death in 1929.  When it became known by his former wife Sarah Louisa Collett that her son Leonard was caring for the husband, who had deserted her and the family, she was extremely angry and never forgave him.

 

 

 

Exactly when Sarah Louisa left Akaroa is not known, although it is reasonable to assume that, as her three surviving children grew up and moved away, she would have wanted to be closer to them and so, together with unmarried daughter Eileen, she moved to Christchurch.  There she first purchased a valuable property at 30 Armagh Street and later also acquired 28 Armagh Street. The two adjoining properties were used as a Boarding House with Sarah Louisa and Eileen residing at No. 30.

 

 

 

Edward William Collett died at Lyttelton during 1929 and was buried in the Lyttelton Anglican Cemetery.  His first wife Sarah Louisa Collett nee Bates died at Christchurch on 29th May 1941 and was buried in Bromley Cemetery, Block 12, Plot 171, where her unmarried daughter Eileen Adele Collett was buried following her earlier death in 1936 at the age of 44.  All that is known about Edward’s second wife is that it is believed she died in New Zealand around 1955.

 

 

 

1P147

Lucy May Ann Collett

Born in 1883 at Akaroa, New Zealand

 

1P148

David Edward Leonard Collett

Born in 1884 at Akaroa, New Zealand

 

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Jessie E Louise Collett

Born in 1888 at Akaroa, New Zealand

 

1P150

Leslie Joseph Charles Collett

Born in 1890 at Akaroa, New Zealand

 

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Eileen Adele Collett

Born in 1892 at Akaroa, New Zealand

 

 

 

 

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Ernest Collett, who was one half of a set of twins, was born at Quenington in 1852, where he was baptised on 19th September 1852, the son of Samuel Collett and Elizabeth Gardner.  In 1858 Ernest’s family emigrated to New Zealand on board the barque ‘Indiana’, when he was simply recorded on the ship’s passenger list as Ernest Collett, aged five years.

 

 

 

Ernest later married the widow Martha Varcoe in 1874 who had been born Martha Main on 18th September 1848.  Six years earlier Martha had first married Alfred Varcoe in New Zealand during 1868, but tragically he died that same year.  One of the children of Ernest and Martha was Herbert Frank Collett, the grandfather of Brian Gregory Collett of Cairns in Australia, who kindly provided the details of his family during 2011.  Ernest had hoped to become a doctor and was apprenticed to several early medicos, including Doctor Turnbull in 1866, Doctor Foster in 1867, and in 1868 he assisted Doctor Christy who paid him Seven Pounds 16 Shillings the three months.

 

 

 

However, a career as a medic was not realised, following which Ernest took up the occupation of a maltster [a brewer], while later in his life he was a farmer, and even later still, a gardener.  He and his family lived at 15 Angus Street in Christchurch, but around 1900 Ernest and Martha were legally separated, following which Ernest was ordered to pay maintenance to Martha by the Court.  It was not long after that when Martha died in 1907, while Ernest survived for another thirty-two years, when he died on 15th May 1939, at the age of 86.

 

 

 

1P152

Ernest Walter Raymond Gordon Collett

Born in 1874 at Christchurch

 

1P153

Herbert Frank Collett

Born in 1876 at Christchurch

 

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Robert George Victor Collett

Born in 1878 at Christchurch

 

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Eleanor Mabel Collett

Born in 1879 at Christchurch

 

1P156

Arthur Samuel Gordon Collett

Born in 1882 at Christchurch

 

1P157

Harriet Clara May Collett

Born in 1884 at Christchurch

 

1P158

Leonard Ransom Collett

Born in 1886 at Christchurch

 

 

 

 

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Amanda Elizabeth Collett was born at Quenington in 1852 and was a twin with her brother Ernest (above).  She was baptised in a joint ceremony with her brother at Quenington church on 19th September 1852, the baptism record confirming that they were the children of Samuel Collett and Elizabeth Gardner.  Amanda and her twin brother Ernest were both recorded as being five years old when their parents emigrated to New Zealand on board the barque ‘Indiana’ in 1858.  When she was sixteen years of age, Amanda entered finishing school with Miss Thornton on 4th February 1868 at a cost of Seven Pounds Ten Shillings a quarter term, payable in advance. 

 

 

 

On completing her education and commencing employment it would appear that she was known as Amy Collett, with the following recorded in a book about the settlement at Broomfield.  "Amy Collett was employed April 10th 1869 to September 1870 at 20 pounds per annum.  She was supplied with seven pairs of boots in that time, of kid and of leather, priced between 10/6 and 16/-; a pair of slippers at 6/-; 18 yards of winsy; a dress 1 pound 3/4; braid 2/-; 2 dress pieces at 9/- and 7/-."  It was while she was working in Broomfield that she met Robert Wilson whom she eventually married on 16th January 1871.  The wedding took place at the Register Office in Mount Grey Downs, conducted by the Deputy Registrar, although an alternative source gives the date of their wedding as 20th March 1871.

 

 

 

The New Zealand ‘Intention to Marry’ register entry [Ref. BDM20/16 p439/66] states that Robert Wilson, occupation Station Manager, was aged 37 years old and was living at Leithfield for one month prior to his marriage to Amanda Elizabeth Collett, a spinster, occupation servant, aged 21 years old, who had been living at Broomfield [Amberley] for the previous two weeks.  Leithfield is a small town in North Canterbury, three miles south of Amberley to the north of Christchurch.  It is worth noting that Amanda was very likely persuaded to say she was 21, when in fact she was only 18 and therefore could not have married without her parents’ consent.  The couple’s first child was born nine months later and was baptised on 13th December 1871.  The child’s birth certificate confirmed that the parents of Esther Elizabeth Wilson were Amanda Elizabeth and Robert Wilson, although the baptism record named them Robert and Amy Wilson of The Terrace in Leithfield, Robert's occupation being that of a shepherd.  [The Terrace was later renamed Terrace Road]

 

 

 

The records also show that the name of Robert Wilson was included on a Jury List in 1860 as a stockholder at Waimakariri, as well as being on the 1860 Militia List.  He later lived at Oxford, a small town serving the farming community of North Canterbury, about 25 miles north-west of Christchurch in the Waimakariri District, and in the Ashley Electoral Roll for 1865-66 Robert Wilson was a leaseholder at Woodstock Run 109.  He remained on the Ashley Electoral Roll tight up until 1869, meaning that he was a land owner or lease holder, having land in that area, although there is no evidence that he was actually living there.  It was while he was at Woodstock that Robert was in partnership with another man, but in 1866 he left Woodstock and settled in Broomfield Station, next to Mount Grey Downs, where he apparently designed the Yards, and where he met his future wife. 

 

 

 

During the first three months of 1870 Robert Wilson was involved in two court cases.  The first was brought by Harriet Ann Edlin who claimed to have had a son by Robert Wilson who was born at Mount Grey Downs in December 1869.  He admitted intimacy with the young girl but produced another witness who also admitted intimacy with her.  That case was dismissed in February 1870, following which Robert then had Harriet charged with perjury, although the jury found her not guilty in March that same year. She was only 15 years old at the time and had her baby son with her in the court.  That son is now believed to be the great grandfather of Mrs Andrea Hill of New Zealand who kindly provided these new details.  Later that same year Harriet Ann Edlin was also involved in an inquest into the death of a baby, not hers, at Woodend in June 1870.

 

 

 

Robert Wilson was a very common name in Canterbury in the 1800's, with three easily identifiable in North Canterbury. However, Robert Wilson a shepherd, stockholder, and a farmer with connections to Woodstock Run, Broomfield, Glenmark, Mount Grey Downs, and Leithfield, looks the most likely.  The common thread with this Robert Wilson is that he is very difficult to trace.  So far, Andrea Hill has not been able to identify his parents or any siblings, when or where he was born or died, or even when he might have arrived in New Zealand.  The Collett family has no records of Amanda after her marriage to Robert Wilson, after which it seems very likely that she was known as Amy Wilson, while research continues on Robert Wilson, who was granted a slaughterhouse licence at Amberley in 1879.

 

 

 

 

1O130

George William Collett was born at Quenington on 11th December 1854 and was baptised there on 14th January 1855.  He was the third child of Samuel Collett and his first wife Elizabeth Gardner.  When he was only three years old his family sailed to a new life in New Zealand on board the barque ‘Indiana’ which arrived at Christchurch in 1858.  Later on, when George was nine years old, he attended Mr Jones’ Private School from February 1864 to August 1866, the weekly fee being Two Shillings.  Upon leaving school George went to work for a Mr Urquhart, where he learned to be a painter.

 

 

 

It was in Christchurch that he married Margaret Coutts on 26th October 1874, the marriage producing two children for the couple.  Their grandson was Grahame Collett who married Fay and visited England to research his family line.  Tragically George William Collett died in New Zealand during 1878 less than four years into his marriage and not long after the birth of his second child.  His widow Margaret, who was born on 25th November 1853 at Glenmuick in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, survived him by forty-four years, when she died at Dunedin on 7th June 1922, following which she was buried at Andersons Bay Cemetery in Dunedin two days later on 9th June.

 

 

 

On 26th March 1865, and nine years before her marriage to George Collett, Margaret Coutts had sailed from Scotland to Lyttelton in New Zealand on board the vessel ‘Rachel’ with her father and her three sisters.  Upon the death of her husband, Margaret continued to care for her baby daughter Amanda, while her son George was raised by his grandfather Samuel Collett and his second wife Esther Lennard. 

 

 

 

Previously written here, it was suggested that Margaret gave birth to a third son James Mann Collett who was born in 1887, when the parents were curiously recorded as George and Margaret Collett.  James, who was also known as James Howard, died in 1967 and may have been the illegitimate son of Henry Roger Howard.  Lorraine Rowe in New Zealand is currently pursuing this particular angle during 2014.  However, new details subsequently provided by Kelvin Parker and added here in early 2015 present a different story.  Firstly, he confirms that James M Collett and James M Howard are two different people who both served in World War One, with the latter being killed in action in France on 21st April 1918 aged 30.  Rifleman James Mann Howard, service number 52610, served with the 3rd Battalion of the New Zealand Rifle Brigade.  Curiously both of the James' had the same birth dates according to their respective Army Files, but different parents.  It is interesting that the James M Howard is also listed as John in his Army Record, while there is a John Mann Collett who was born in 1888 on New Zealand BDM Database, although his mother is named as Mary, rather than Margaret, with the father's name ‘Not Recorded’, perhaps suggesting he was base-born.

 

 

 

In addition to this, when James was married at Geraldine in South Canterbury on 2nd November 1915, he did so as James Mann Collett, his wife being Ina Myrtle Pierce, the daughter of Leonard Pierce and Elizabeth Ann Fifield who was born in New Zealand in 1895.  But then in the Army Personnel File of James Mann Howard, born on 18th December 1887, a self-employed coach painter residing at Geraldine prior to enlistment, his wife was named as Ina Myrtle Pierce.  All very confusing!  One solution might be that the illegitimate son of Mary Collett, who may have been Margaret, was raised by Henry Rogers Howard and his wife Eliza Hannah Kirby, with possibly Henry actually being the father of the child.

 

 

 

The corresponding Army Personal File for James Mann Collett can now be found under his own reference, as he has now been placed here as the third child of this family, even though he was not the son of George William Collett.

 

 

 

1P159

George William Collett

Born in 1875 at Christchurch

 

1P160

Amanda Elizabeth Collett

Born in 1877 at Christchurch

 

The following is the likely base-born son of Margaret Collett nee Coutts after she was made a widow:

 

1P161

James Mann Collett – father unknown

Born in 1887 at Christchurch

 

 

 

 

1O131

Thomas John Collett was born at Christchurch in New Zealand during the month of October in 1859, just eleven months after his parents Samuel and Elizabeth Collett had arrived in the country from England.  Tragically Thomas John Collett died on the 3rd March 1860, at the tender age of just four months.

 

 

 

 

1O132

Edith Amy Eleanor Collett was born at Christchurch on 22nd May 1872, the eldest of the two daughters of Samuel Collett and his second wife Esther Lennard, but sadly she died later that same year of 17th December 1872.

 

 

 

 

1O133

Alice Mabel Matilda Collett was born at Christchurch on 16th October 1873, the second of the two daughters of Samuel and Esther Collett.  It was during 1907 that Alice married William Benjamin Freeman who had been born around 1870 with whom she had three children.  George Randel Freeman was born in 1907, John Molloy Freeman was born in 1911 and Doris Esther Freeman was born in 1912, whilst it is possible the family was further extended after 1913. The only other known fact about Alice is that she died in 1954, having lost her husband twenty-two years earlier, when William Benjamin Freeman died in New Zealand during 1932 at the age of 62.

 

 

 

 

1O134

Charles Hook Collett was born at Kings Stanley in 1856.  It was as Charles Hook Collett that he was baptised at Kings Stanley on 26th October 1856, the son of John and Jane Collett.  Jane’s maiden name was Partridge, so it is unclear where Hook came from, possibly his grandmother’s maiden name.  It was simply as Charles H Collett aged four years old that he was listed in the census of 1861, when he was living with his parents at Bell Barn Road in the Parish of St Thomas in Birmingham.  In all of the subsequent census returns he was referred to as Charles H Collett.  He was fourteen in 1871 when still living with his family in Birmingham St Thomas.

 

 

 

During the 1870s his father’s work as a builder took the family the few miles south to Kings Norton in Worcestershire, where they were living in 1881.  Charles had obviously taken a keen interest in the type of work undertaken by his father, since at the age of twenty-four his occupation was that of an architect.  The census in 1881 confirmed that Charles H Collett from Kings Stanley was still living with his family at 59 Clevedon Road in Kings Norton.  By 1891, Charles H Collett was still a bachelor at the age of 34 when he was still living with his family at Priory Road in Kings Norton, from where he was employed as an agent.

 

 

 

Before the end of the century Charles left the family home in Kings Norton when he moved to nearby Kidderminster.  And it was there that he was living in March 1901.  He was still a bachelor at the age of 43 and was still working as an architect, his place of birth was once again confirmed as Kings Stanley.  It would appear that Charles Hook Collett never married since he was still a bachelor in April 1911, by which time he was living in the Shirley area to the west of Solihull at the age of 54.

 

 

 

Charles Hook Collett died just over four years later, his death recorded at Kings Norton register office (Ref. 6d 40) at the age of 58.  The address where he passed away on 4th September 1915 was 4 Coppice Road in Moseley while, during the processing of his Will, he was referred to as being of 16 Ashfield Road in Kings Heath and also an architect of Carlton House on the High Street in Birmingham.  Probate was granted at Birmingham on 17th December 1915 to Joseph Jennens, a mortgage and insurance broker, and Alfred Tidsall, a solicitor’s clerk.  His personal effects were estimated to be worth £2,440 8 Shillings 8d.

 

 

 

 

1O135

Amy Georgina Collett was born at Birmingham in 1861 and was baptised at the Church of St Thomas in Birmingham on 13th October 1861.  It was also in the Parish of St Thomas that she was living with her family in 1871 when she was nine years old.  A few years later her family moved to Kings Norton where they were living at the time of the census in 1881.  At that time in her life Amy was 19 and was living at 59 Clevedon Road in Kings Norton.  It was very likely at that address that her father died during the 1880s, and where her widowed mother Jane spent the rest of her life.

 

 

 

For some reason Amy G Collett was recorded at Stroud in the census of 1891, which was close to the area where her father’s family originated.  The census that year placed Amy as 29 and unmarried living with the older sister of her mother Jane Collett nee Hook.  Amy G Collett from Birmingham was the niece of Isaac and Emma Groves of Middle Yard on a farm in Kings Stanley, where Isaac was a farmer living on his own means.  Amy’s aunt Emma Groves nee Hook was sixty-five and born at Kingswood in Gloucester where her mother Jane had also been born.

 

 

 

By the start of the new century Amy was back living with her mother Jane and sister Florence (below) at Kings Norton.  The census in 1901 confirmed that Amy G Collett from Birmingham was unmarried at the age of 39.  Amy and her sister Florence were still living with their elderly mother Jane Collett in April 1911.  Apart from her baptism record, the census return that year was the only other time that her full name of Amy Georgina Collett was used.  By then she was 49 and still living at Kings Norton.

 

 

 

 

1O136

Hubert Edward Collett was born at Birmingham on 11th April 1864 and was baptised there in the Church of St Thomas on 26th June 1864, the son of John and Jane Collett.  Although he was baptised as Hubert Edward Collett his name was more often than not recorded in error by subsequent census enumerators as Herbert.  It was as Herbert C Collett aged six years that he was recorded with his family in the census of 1871 when they were still living at York Road in the St Thomas parish of Birmingham.

 

 

 

During the next decade his family left Birmingham and moved to Kings Norton where they were living at 59 Clevedon Road in 1881.  Herbert E Collett was 16 by that time and had left school and was working as a jeweller’s clerk, while he was living with his family at Kings Norton.  Over the next few years Hubert entered into a partnership with Frank Spencer and began trading as Collett & Company, wholesale jewellers and factors, working out of premises at 65 Caroline Street in Birmingham.  For whatever reason, the joint venture was not successful and, according to an item in the Birmingham Daily Post on Wednesday 20th July 1887 (issue 9067), the partnership of Hubert Edward Collett and Frank Spencer had been dissolved on 30th June by mutual consent.  The formal notice issued on 14th July stated that all debts due to and owing by the said later firm will be received and paid by the said Hubert Edward Collett.

 

 

 

It was almost two years later when Hubert Edward Collett married Susan (Susie) Eliza Cugley at St Luke’s Church in the City of Gloucester on 5th June 1889, where Susan had been born on 15th January 1865.  By the time of the census in 1891 Hubert and his wife had returned to Kings Norton where there were recorded living at 23 Woodstock Road.  Hubert Collett was 26, as was his wife Susan E Collett, and by then they were wealthy enough to employ a servant.  It would appear the couple never had any children; perhaps it was Hubert work as a diamond merchant that took up all of his time. 

 

 

 

Six months prior to the next census in March 1901 Hubert’s name was amongst those listed in the Application for Debtor’s Discharge published in The London Gazette.  The date of the hearing was 31st October 1900 at 11 am and it took place at the High Court of Justice in the Bankruptcy Buildings at Carey Street in London.  Hubert Edward Collett of 1 Holborn Circus in the City of London, residing at Ravenspurn in Finchley was described as a Diamond Merchant and importer of precious stones.  The following census recorded the childless couple as the only Colletts living in Finchley.  Hubert E Collett from Birmingham was 36, as was his wife Susie Collett from Gloucester.

 

 

 

Sometime during the next decade, the couple left London and set up home at Gerrards Cross in Buckinghamshire, and it was there at a property named Thorncroft on Parkhouse Road that they were living in April 1911.  On that occasion Hubert Edward Collett was 46 while his wife Susie Eliza Collett was 45.  Four years after that Kelly’s Directory listed Hubert Edward Collett as a resident at Uplands on Kingsway in Chalfont St. Peter, Buckinghamshire.  In 1933 Hubert was a member of the United Preceptory of Kemeys, Tynte and Temple Cressing – the Order of Knights Templar.  At the time of his death in June 1940 Hubert and Susan were living in Surrey, his passing recorded at the Surrey North Eastern register office.  And it was five years later that the death of Susan Eliza Collett was also recorded there in 1945.

 

 

 

Appendix - Alternative Herbert Edward Collett from Birmingham

 

 

 

Previously written here in error was information about another Herbert Collett from Birmingham who was married to Emily and with whom he had five children over the next fourteen years, all of them born in Birmingham, as was his wife.  Rather curiously no record of him and wife and family has been found anywhere in Britain in 1901.  By 1911 Herbert’s and Emily’s eldest son had left home to be married and had started a family of his own, also in the Aston district of Birmingham.  The rest of the family at that time comprised Herbert Collett, who was 47, his wife Emily, who was 48, and their children Jane Collett who was 22, Harold Collett who was 13, Beatrice May Collett who was 11, and Frederick Collett who was nine years old.  It was many years later that the death of Herbert Edward Collett was recorded at the Birmingham register office (Ref. 6d 119) during September 1945 under the name of Herbert Collett who was 81.

 

 

 

1P162

Jane Collett

Born in 1888 in Birmingham

 

1P163

Herbert Collett

Born in 1890 in Birmingham

 

1P164

Harold Collett

Born in 1897 in Birmingham

 

1P165

Beatrice May Collett

Born in 1899 in Birmingham

 

1P166

Frederick Collett

Born in 1901 after 31st March in Birm’ham

 

 

 

 

1O137

Florence Jane Collett was born at Birmingham in 1866.  It was on 17th February 1867 at St Thomas’ Church in Birmingham that she was baptised, the daughter of John Collett and Jane Hook.  Florence was four years old at the time of the Birmingham St Thomas census in 1871 and just after that it would appear that her family moved to Kings Norton, and it was there that Florence and her family were living in 1881.  Florence was 14 and was still attending school, while living with her family at 59 Clevedon Road.  She was still living with her parents in 1891 but at Priory Road in Kings Norton where Florence was 24 and with no stated occupation.  From the next two census returns it was apparent that Florence never married and remained living with her mother and her older sister Amy (above) until their mother passed away.  In the Kings Norton census records for 1901 Florence J Collett from Birmingham was 34 and ten years later she was listed as Florence Jane Collett aged 44.

 

 

 

 

1O138

John Harvey Collett was born at Birmingham in 1869.  He was baptised at the Church of St Thomas on 5th June 1870 and was one-year old in the Birmingham St Thomas census in 1871.  Shortly after his brother Arthur (below) was born John’s parents left Birmingham and moved to Kings Norton where his mother and two sisters lived for the remainder of their life.  According to the census in 1881, John H Collett from Birmingham was eleven and was living with his family at 59 Clevedon Road in Kings Norton.  He was still living in Kings Norton with his family in 1891, when the family was recorded at Priory Road where John H Collett was 21 and a joiner, possibly working with his father John who was a builder.

 

 

 

As the end of the century approached, John married Alice who was born in Staffordshire in 1871, and by March 1901 the marriage had produced the couple’s first child.  The census that year listed the family of three living at Kings Norton as John H Collett, aged 31 and from Balsall Heath in Birmingham, his wife Alice who was 30, and their son John C Collett who was not yet one-year old and born at Kings Norton.  Still living in Kings Norton at that time, was his mother and sisters Amy and Florence.  It would appear that John had obviously taken up the family business there, left by his father when he died, since he was described as a building contractor.

 

 

 

Four further children were added to the family over the following ten years, and by April 1911 John and his family had moved from Kings Norton south to Pershore midway between Worcester and Evesham.  At this time in his life, and for the first time in the census returns, John was identified by his full name of John Harvey Collett.  He was 37 and his wife Alice was 39.  Their five children living with them at Pershore were John Charles Collett aged 10 years, Rose Elizabeth Collett who was seven, Frank William Collett who was five, Bernard Stanley Collett who was two and William Edward Collett who was two months old.

 

 

 

1P167

John Charles Collett

Born in 1901 at Kings Norton

 

1P168

Rose Elizabeth Collett

Born in 1903

 

1P169

Frank William Collett

Born in 1905

 

1P170

Bernard Stanley Collett

Born in 1908

 

1P171

William Edward Collett

Born in January 1911 at Pershore

 

 

 

 

1O139

Arthur Ernest Collett was born at Birmingham in 1871.  However, by the time of the census in 1881, his family was living at 59 Clevedon Road in Kings Norton south of Birmingham where Arthur was listed as Ernest A Collett aged nine years.  Ten years later, in the Kings Norton census of 1891, Arthur E Collett from Birmingham was 19, whose occupation what that of a clerk, when he was again living with his family.

 

 

 

In 1901 Arthur was at Hornsey in North London, not far from Finchley, where his diamond merchant father was on that occasion.  With only three miles between their two locations it seems likely that both of them were on a business trip to the capital.  The census return described Arthur E Collett, aged 28 and from Birmingham, as a traveller for a brass foundry, which may indicate that he was a travelling salesman for the company that employed him.

 

 

 

It may have been while Arthur was on his travels that he met Ada whom he married during the first few years of the new century and with whom he had two children prior to the census in 1911.  At that time in April that year, Arthur Ernest Collett from Birmingham was 39, and his wife Ada Collett was 36.  They and their family were living within the Brentford registration district on that occasion, where their two sons were recorded as John Arthur Collett who was five, and Charles Thomas Collett who was three years old.  Arthur’s first son was named after his grandfather and his father, while his second son was named after Arthur’s eldest brother, the architect Charles Hook Collett (above).

 

 

 

1P172

John Arthur Collett

Born in 1905 in London

 

1P173

Charles Thomas Collett

Born in 1907 in London

 

 

 

 

1O140

Sarah Jane Collett was born at Summerside on Prince Edward Island on 5th September 1853, and was baptised in a joint ceremony with her brother William (below) on 18th June 1857, the daughter of James and Henrietta Collett.  From her younger brother’s death notice (below) we know that Sarah Jane had died before 1929.

 

 

 

 

1O141

William Charles Collett was born at Summerside on Prince Edward Island on 10th February 1855, and was baptised in a joint ceremony with his sister Sarah Jane (above) on 18th June 1857, the son of James and Henrietta Collett.  By 1881 William C Collett, aged 25, was working as a carpenter, while residing at Lot 27 in the Queens district of Prince Edward Island.  That same year he travelled to Boston in Massachusetts, where he remained for the rest of his life.  Later in his life William Charles Collett became an accomplished architect in Boston.  He may also have been involved in the design and building of two properties on Hanover Street in Summerside which were owned by the Collett family and occupied by William Charles and his father James.  Those same two houses were both destroyed by fire in 1906.

 

 

 

During the previous year the following article was published in the Agriculturist magazine on 19th August 1905.  “The Boston Sunday Herald of Aug. 6th has the following regarding a former Summerside boy:

William C. Collett of Boston, leading candidate for the office of grand warden, was born in Summerside, P.E.I. in 1856 [sic] of English parentage.  He received his early education in the common schools of that place, and afterwards went to work on a farm.  He was not more than eighteen when he began the study of various branches of the building trade.  In 1881 he came to Boston to work as a carpenter.  The next year he was advanced to the position of foreman.  He attended evening drawing school for three terms and came out at the head of the class.  In 1887 he went into the office of Charles Brigham, the well-known Boston architect.  He had the supervision of several important public buildings in Maine, and some of the more important of the H. H. Rogers memorial building in Fairhaven.  Mr. Collett began business for himself a few years ago, with offices of Bromfield Street.  His architectural work includes the magnificent home of Mrs. E. Carlisle of Brookline, the school at Fairhaven, almshouse at Essex, Sherbourne and Fairhaven, the largest apartment house of J. W. Woodward, Mt. Pleasant Avenue, and the Rhodes Bros. building, Warren and Copeland Streets, Roxbury.  Mr. Collett is a past grand of Tremont lodge of Odd Fellows, past chief patriarch of Massosoit encampment, I.O.O.F.; is a member of Washington lodge of Rebekahs, and grand herald of the grand lodge I.O.O.F. of Massachusetts

 

 

 

William Charles Collett died at his home in Boston on 25th January 1929, and a month later the following tribute was printed on page eight of the Summerside Journal on 25th February 1929.

 

 

 

Tribute to Memory and Talents of Gifted Son of P.E. Island Who Has Gone to His Rest

 

William Charles Collett, noted architect, passed away at his beautiful home on Commonwealth Avenue in Boston, Massachusetts on January 25th.  He was born in Summerside on Prince Edward Island on February 10th 1856, and removed to Boston on May 27th 1881.  Soon after he entered the office of Charles Brigham, architect, where he was soon advanced to the position of Supervising Architect.  The early struggle of successful men is always intensely interesting, and by some instinct they seek the field in which their ability will find the sphere of action to which they are best adapted. 

 

 

 

Mr. Collett occupied an honoured position in his chosen vocation and the addition to the Maine State Capital at Augusta was constructed under his able supervision, as well as the Rogers Memorable Library and other prominent buildings at Fairhaven in Massachusetts.  In Boston and Montreal, the Walton Restaurants are lasting monuments to his skill and ability.  The beautiful scenery on the tiles of the Boston Restaurant are sketched from the Lynn Marshes down to Maine, and in the Montreal Restaurant the scenery is taken from the banks of the St. Lawrence River and all carefully sketched to a scale. 

 

 

 

In banking circles, he occupied the position of Vice-President of the Wiley Savings Bank of Boston and was the valued appraiser of real estate for the various Boston banks.  No man ever had keener eyes or surer judgment of men; a mind so keen, so alert, so penetrating in the affairs that engaged his thoughts.  He was, indeed, very human, but he was also very true and gracious.  Prominent in fraternal circles, a Past Master of the Grand Lodge of Oddfellows of Massachusetts and a Past Grand Officer of the Sovereign Grand Lodge of Oddfellows; in Masonry, a respected member of Columbian Lodge and an officer of the same at the time of his death.

 

 

 

His funeral was held at the chapel at Mount Auburn on January 27th and was one of the largest for many years, the service being conducted by Rev. Frank G. Potter, a Past Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Oddfellows and a Past Master of Columbian Lodge A.F. & A.M. of Boston.  In a very real sense he was a credit and an honour to his native town of Summerside and departing has left behind him footprints in the sands of time.  The immortality of his influence lives on as an inspiration and cheer to others.  He leaves to mourn his loss one brother, Mr. J. Artemas Collett of Bedeque, the only surviving member of the old family circle.

 

 

 

 

1O142

James Artemas Collett was born at Summerside on Prince Edward Island in 1859, although unlike his two older siblings, no baptism record for James has been located.  James married Eveline who was much younger than James, having been born in 1870, their wedding day being around 1890.  The marriage produced three known children, the first two prior to the end of the century.  In the Prince Edward Island census of 1901, the family of four were recorded as James A Collett who was 42, his wife Eveline Collett was 31, son Harry Collett was nine years old and son Earl Collett was five.  Ten years later, the family living in the Prince Edward Island sub-district no. 7-48 comprised James A Collett who was 52, Eveline Collett who was 41, Harry Collett who was 19, Earl Collett who was 15 and Ila Collett whose age was not included on the census form.

 

 

 

From his later life, the only other detail known about James is that he was still alive at the time of the death of his brother William Charles Collett (below) in 1929, when Mr J Artemas Collett of Bedeque was described as his only surviving family member.  Bedeque was also where Harry Collett, the eldest child of James and Eveline died and was buried in 1948.  He was 56 and was buried in Lot 26 at Lower Bedeque Cemetery.

 

 

 

1P174

Harry Collett

Born in 1892 at Prince Edward Island

 

1P175

Earl Collett

Born in 1896 at Prince Edward Island

 

1P176

Ila Collett

Born in 1902 at Prince Edward Island

 

 

 

 

1O143

William Henry Collett was born during 1857 at Westmorland Settlement on Prince Edward Island, and was baptised at Crapaud on 4th May 1858, the first child born to Aaron and Eliza Collett.  In other records his mother was referred to as Margaret and she tragically died around the end of the 1860s or even during the birth of her fourth child in 1867.  By the time of the Canadian census in 1881 William H Collett, aged 23, was one of the four children still living with his widowed father, when he was working with his father on their farm at Lot 29 in the Queens district of Prince Edward Island.

 

 

 

It was after the census in 1891 that William married Alice who was born on Prince Edward Island, with whom he had a daughter and an adopted son by March 1901.  The census that year recorded the family of four residing at Prince Edward Island, where William H Collett was 42, his wife Alice was 35, their daughter Aggie E Collett was six years old, while their adopted son was Arthur Simmons who was 12.  What happened next remains a mystery, perhaps William Collett died, because in 1910 Alice and her daughter were living in Township 1 in Inyo County, California, where Alice Collett from Canada was the housekeeper working for Willie and Flora Chalfont from Nevada.  With Alice was her daughter Aggie E Collett who was 15.  New information now reveals that Alice Collett became Alice Trowsdale sometime between 1910 and 1915.

 

 

 

1P177

Arthur Leigh Collett, formerly Simmons

Born in 1888 at Prince Edward Island

 

1P178

Aggie Eliza Collett

Born in 1894 at Prince Edward Island

 

 

 

 

1O147

Sarah Jane Collett was born at Richmond, west of Summerside, on Prince Edward Island during 1862, where she was baptised on 14th April 1862, the eldest of the five children of Charles Collett and Annie McLeod.  The baptism record incorrectly gave the family name as Cillett.  Sarah was nine years old when her mother died and was ten years of age when her father passed away, in whose Will she was named together with her four younger siblings.  Upon being made an orphan she and her brothers and sisters were placed in the care of other families, and according to the Canadian Census in 1881 Sarah Jane Collett, aged 19, was staying with the McKinon family at Lot 29 in the Queens district of Prince Edward Island.

 

 

 

 

1O148

Eliza Caroline Collett was born at Richmond near Summerside on Prince Edward Island and was baptised on 21st October 1864, the second child of Charles and Annie Collett.  Her mother died in 1871 and her father died exactly one year later during February 1872, and it was in his Will that Eliza was named as one of his five children.  What immediately happened to her and her four siblings when they were made orphans is not known, as no record of Eliza or her sister Harriet and her youngest brother James has been found within the census of 1881.  However, her other two siblings, Sarah Jane and Charles Frederick, were living with two separate families in the Queens district of Prince Edward Island where Eliza and her missing siblings are also thought to have been residing.

 

 

 

Seven years later on 25th August 1888 Eliza married Thomas Simmons who was born on Prince Edward Island around 1862.  It was at Queens that she and her husband were living in 1891 when she was expecting the couple’s first child.  A total of four children were born into the family, although by the time of the census in 1901 only three were listed with Eliza and Thomas at Lot 29 Canton Township on Prince Edward Island.  The couple’s last child was born towards the end of that same year. 

 

 

 

By 1911 the complete Simmons family was living at Queens, Prince Edward Island, and they were Thomas, his wife Eliza, and their four children Wasel M Simmons (1891-), Mildred S Simmons (1895-), Everet B Simmons (1898-), and Lona P Simmons (1901-).  After thirty-two years of married life Eliza Simmons nee Collett died on 28th September 1920.

 

 

 

 

1O149

Harriet Peters Collett was born at Summerside on Prince Edward Island during the first four months of 1866.  She was also baptised there on 6th May 1866, the third daughter of Charles and Annie Collett.  She was made an orphan upon the death of both her parents in 1871 and 1872, following which no record of her or two of her four siblings has been located in the census of 1881, even though she is believed to have been living on Prince Edward Island on that occasion.  Harriet was however confirmed as one of the five children of Charles Collett in his Will of 1871.

 

 

 

New information received in March 2014 from Pat Finkle, the great granddaughter of Harriet Peters Collett who was known as Hattie, has revealed that upon the death of her parents Hattie went to live with Walter Maxfield Lea, within whose family she was raised.  It would therefore appear that it was through her association with the Lea family that she met her future husband.

 

 

 

Harriet eventually left Prince Edward Island in the autumn of 1885 and arrived at Boston in Massachusetts on 12th October 1885.  It was just over six years later that she married John Reid Lea on 15th February 1892.  He had been born in 1863 and he died in 1943.  During the first eight years of the married life together Hattie presented John with three sons.  They were Herbert Rexford Lea, the grandfather of the aforementioned Pat Finkle, Harry Windsor Lea and Crilly M Lea.  Tragically it was just one year after the birth of her third son that Harriet Peters Lea nee Collett died during 1901.

 

 

 

Herbert Rexford Lea, known as Rex, married Gertrude Murray and had three daughters.  They were Edith Marie Lea, Dorothy Harriet Lea, and Marjorie Gertrude Lea.  Harry Windsor Lea, known as Hal, had no children even though he was married twice, the first time to a Mary and after to a Marion.  Hattie’s youngest son Crilly M Lea was born in 1901 and he died in 1967.  During his life he was twice married, with the first marriage producing a son Jack.  Upon later being made a widower Crilly married Mary MacLennan.

 

 

 

Both Rex and Hal served during World War One, for which Rex won the Distinguished Conduct War Medal.  Hal served some of his time as a pilot with the Royal Flying Corps.  Both survived the campaign and both returned home after the conflict.  Hal graduated from McGill’s engineering School in Montreal and became a civil engineer who, in 1942, was appointed Director of the Maritime Bureau of Technical Personnel from his position as the bureau’s Chief Executive Officer.

 

 

 

 

1O150

Charles Frederick Collett was born at Prince Edward Island during August 1869 and possibly at Summerside where his three older sisters (above) were both born.  Tragically it was just five days prior to the death of his mother that he was baptised at Crapaud on 9th February 1871, the eldest of the two sons of Charles and Annie Collett.  Like his four siblings, Charles too was taken into care following the deaths of his parents in 1871 and 1872, when he too was named in his father’s Will.  However, unlike three of his siblings Charles, and his sister Sarah Jane, have been identified within the Canadian census of 1881.  He was 12 years old and was living at Lot 29 in the Queens district with elderly Esther Pearson from England, aged 75, who also had living with her Mary McKinon, aged 14, who was the eldest child of Angus McKinon.  Both Charles and Mary McKinon were still attending school within the Queens area of Prince Edward Island.  The McKinon family was living nearby and had living with them Charles’ sister Sarah Jane Collett (above). 

 

 

 

Ten years later the census in 1891 included Charles Collett from Prince Edward Island at the age of 21, when he was still unmarried and residing in the sub-district of Lot 29 in Queens County.  Not long after that census day, and later that same year Charles Collett married Ella Mae MacPhee who had been born at Prince Edward Island on 13th November 1869.  Once married the couple followed Charles’ sister Harriet to Massachusetts, where they settled in Norfolk in 1893, just in time for the birth of the couple’s first child. 

 

 

 

A further five children were added to the family before the end of the century, although it seems curious that the same christian name was used for more than one child.  Even more curious, was the fact that five of them were recorded in the census of 1920 in the Boston Ward 23, Suffolk in Massachusetts, with only Florence M Collett missing.  She was alive at the time of the census in 1910, so it is possible that she was married by 1920.

 

 

 

According to the census in 1910 the family was living in the Hyde Park area of Norfolk, Mass.  Charles died there three years later in 1913, and seven years later the remainder of his family, less his daughter Florence M Collett, was recorded living within the Boston Ward 23 in Suffolk in 1920.  Charles’ widow Ella lived a very long life and died on 29th January 1967 at Weymouth, Norfolk, Massachusetts.

 

 

 

1P179

Edla Collett

Born in July 1893 at Massachusetts

 

1P180

Edla Collett

Born circa 1894 at Massachusetts

 

1P181

Daisy Collett

Born in May 1896 at Massachusetts

 

1P182

Florence M Collett

Born in November 1897 at Massachusetts

 

1P183

Florence Collett

Born circa 1898 at Massachusetts

 

1P184

Florence Collett

Born circa 1899 at Massachusetts

 

 

 

 

1O151

James Bradford/Beaufort Collett was born at Prince Edward Island on 13th December 1870, the youngest child of Charles and Annie Collett.  Sadly, before he was two years old, he was an orphan following the death of his mother in 1871 and his father in 1872, as a result of which he was then raised by his uncle Aaron Lot Collett, his father’s older brother.  Curiously in his father’s Will of 1871 James was named as James Beaufort Collet, rather than James Bradford Collett.  This then raises the question as to whether he changed Beaufort for Bradford later in his life.

 

By the time he was nineteen James had left Prince Edward Island, when he moved to California on 3rd February 1889, where he took up American citizenship in 1896.  He was a blacksmith and it is believed that he made the cycle, he is shown riding here, in his workshop.

James Bradford Collett

 

 

 

It was two years later at Bishop, Inyo in California on 16th March 1898 that he married Janey Truscott, the daughter of Sidney and Sabina Truscott, who had been born at Gold Hill in Nevada on 9th October 1873.  The marriage is known to have produced four children for the couple.

 

 

 

At the time of the US Census in 1900 James and his wife and their first child were living in Township 1 in Inyo, where he was also living in 1910 with his family completed by then.  After a further ten years, the 1920 census placed the family as living at Warms Springs in Inyo, although some time between then and 1936 James and Janey eventually moved to Sacramento, where they lived out the remainder of their lives. 

 

 

 

James Bradford Collett died while a resident of Sacramento, California on 23rd December 1944, when his parents were confirmed as Charles Collett and Annie McLeod.  It was rumoured within the family that he died at sea – his father being a ship builder/owner, although there was no stated cause of death on his death certificate.  His wife Janey died at Sacramento fifteen years later on 14th July 1959.  He was the great grandfather of Cherie Mosher, the granddaughter of his own daughter Beatrice Evelyn Collett, who was still alive and living in America in 2011.  Cherie is the mother of Sarah Ahlstrom who grew up in North California but who now lives in Utah.  Sarah kindly provided additional information that was used in updating this family line in July 2012, while in 2015 she completed research into the Colletts of Prince Edward Island which we hope to publish here sometime in the future.  A travelogue written by James, and now in the possession of Cherie Mosher, mentions his visits to Prince Edward Island to see his Uncle Aaron Collett, his sisters Eliza and Hattie, and his brother Charles Collett (all above).

 

 

 

1P185

Maudie Leona Collett

Born in 1898 in California

 

1P186

Florence H Collett

Born in 1903 in California

 

1P187

Mabel Berniece Collett

Born in 1906 in California

 

1P188

Beatrice Evelyn Collett

Born in 1908 in California

 

 

 

 

1O152

Hannah Lowther Collett was born at Prince Edward Island on 6th April 1857 and was baptised at Bedeque on 22nd November 1857, the eldest daughter of Anthony and Mary A Collett.  It is possible her mother’s maiden name was Lowther, after whom Hannah was named.

 

 

 

 

1O153

William Collett was one half of a set of twins born in 1866 at Prince Edward Island, to parents Anthony Collett and Mary A Lowther.  He and his twin sister Elizabeth were both 14 at the time of the census in 1881 when they were still attending school from their home at Lot 29 in the Queens district of Prince Edward Island.  William later married Margaret in his early twenties, and by the time of the census in March 1901 their marriage had produced five children for the couple living with the Queens district.  Wm Collett was 66, Margaret was 26, and their Prince Edward Island born children were George A Collett who was nine, Wm Brady Collett who was seven, Emma J Collett who was five, Jesse F Collett who was three and James Allin Collett who was only seven months old.  It is possible that Margaret’s maiden name was Brady, the second forename of her second son.

 

 

 

1P189

George A Collett

Born in 1891 on Prince Edward Island

 

1P190

William Brady Collett

Born in 1893 on Prince Edward Island

 

1P191

Emma J Collett

Born in 1895 on Prince Edward Island

 

1P192

Jesse F Collett

Born in 1897 on Prince Edward Island

 

1P193

James Allin Collett

Born in 1900 on Prince Edward Island

 

 

 

 

1O155

Charles William Collett was born at Summerside on Prince Edward Island, where he was baptised on 10th March 1860, the son of Mary Matilda Collett from England who shortly after married Henry Croswell, or Chaswell as she was named in her father’s Will of 1861.  The lack of a named father, coupled with the fact that Mary was only 19, may suggest that he was base-born.  Once his mother was married to Henry the couple settled in Summerside where their large family was living in 1881 when Mary’s first-born child was named as William Charles Crowell.

 

 

 

 

1P1

Frederick Collett was born at Highworth, either late in 1878 or very early in 1879, and was baptised at Highworth on 27th February 1879, the only known child of Frederick Collett by his second wife Harriet Herbert, whose birth was recorded at Highworth (Ref. 5a 9).  He was two years old at the time of the 1881 Census when he was living with his parents at Westrop in Highworth.  Ten years later Frederick was still living at Westrop in Highworth when he was 12 years old, although by then his father had died a few years earlier and his mother had married Charles Warren, with whom he was living.  It would appear that, on leaving school, he joined the Royal Navy and, by March 1901, when he was 22, he was an able seaman based at Portland near Weymouth in Dorset.  Fred Collett from Highworth was a crew member.

 

 

 

Less than two years later, the marriage of Frederick Collett and Annie Louisa Martin took place at Maiden Newton, north-west of Dorchester in Dorset, on 24th December 1902.  Frederick was 23 and the son of Frederick Collett and Annie was 27 and the daughter of John Martin, and it was at Dorchester register office that the event was recorded (Ref. 5a 822).  Over the next twelve years, Annie Collett gave birth to five children, the first three of which were living with her at Maiden Newton in 1911.  Annie was 33 and had been born at Marston Magna in Somerset, her daughter Margery was seven, Percy was five and Stanley was two years of age.  Whilst Annie was confirmed as married for eight years, the census return stated that the head of the household was at sea.

 

 

 

However, on that day her husband Frederick Collett from Highworth in Wiltshire was 31 and recorded at an institution referred to as the Royal Sailor’s Rest in Portsmouth.  His rank in the Royal Navy was that of a Petty Officer First Class.  Although away from his family that day, he had been home very recently, because Annie was already pregnant with the couple’s fourth child, who was born at Maiden Newton later that same year.  Over three years after that, the last child was added to his family.  It appears that the family later settled in Cornwall, maybe after Frederick was transferred to Plymouth, since four of their children were married at Penzance.  Upon retiring from the navy, Frederick and his family returned to Wiltshire, with the death of Fred Collett recorded at Swindon register office (Ref. 7c 435) during the third quarter of 1948, when he was 70 years old.

 

 

 

1Q1

Margery Annie Collett

Born in 1903 at Maiden Newton, Dorset

 

1Q2

Percy Frederick J Collett

Born in 1905 at Maiden Newton, Dorset

 

1Q3

Stanley Martin Collett

Born in 1908 at Maiden Newton, Dorset

 

1Q4

Eileen Gladys Louisa Collett

Born in 1911 at Maiden Newton, Dorset

 

1Q5

Kenneth C H Collett

Born in 1914 at Maiden Newton, Dorset

 

 

 

 

1P2

Edith Emily Collett was born at Highworth, most likely towards the end of 1878, or very early in 1879, and within only a few months of the wedding day of her parents Thomas Collett and his wife Sarah Ann Comley.  Her birth was recorded there (Ref. 5a 8) during the first three months of 1879.  It is possible that Edith suffered an infant death shortly after she was born, because she was not listed with her family in the census conducted at the start of the month of April in 1881, nor at any other time.  Furthermore, the next daughter born to the couple was also given the name Edith, again yet another indication that their first child had died within nine months of being born.

 

 

 

 

1P3

Annie Edith Collett was born at Highworth in 1879, with her birth recorded there (Ref. 5a 9) during the third quarter of the year, her second forename most likely a tribute to her deceased older sibling.  It was simply as Ann Collett, that she was baptised at Highworth on 2nd November 1879, the daughter of Thomas and Sarah Collett.  The census in 1881 recorded her as Annie E Collett, aged one year, when she was living with her parents at 21 Eastrop Cottage in Highworth.

 

 

 

 

1P4

Harriet Ellen Collett was born at Highworth in 1882, the third of the four children of Thomas Collett by his first wife Sarah Ann Comely.  Her birth was recorded at Highworth (Ref. 5a 2) during the third quarter of the year.  It was also under her full name that she was baptised at Highworth on 17th July 1882, when she was confirmed as the daughter of Thomas and Sarah Collett.  The family was living at The Gardens in Highworth in 1891, when Harriet E Collett was eight years old and, in 1901, as Ellen Collett who was 19, with no occupation. 

 

 

 

 

1P5

Sarah Ann Collett was born at Highworth in 1884, where her birth was recorded (Ref. 5a 10) during the second quarter of the year, the last child of Thomas and Sarah Collett.  She was still under one year old when Sarah Ann Collett died at Highworth on 18th March 1885, where she was buried on 23rd March with her mother, who was buried there earlier that same year.

 

 

 

 

1P6

William Thomas Collett was born at Highworth in 1886, the eldest child of Thomas Collett by his second wife Doras Cockhead.  His birth was recorded at Highworth (Ref. 5a 9) during the first three months of 1886.  It was at The Gardens in Highworth that he was living with his family in 1891, when William T Collett was five years of age and was 15 years old in 1901, when he was working as an ordinary agricultural labourer with his father Thomas Collett, while still with his family at Highworth.

 

 

 

 

1P7

Ada Emily Collett was born at Highworth in 1887, her birth recorded there (Ref. 5a 3) during the third quarter of the year.  Ada E Collett was three years of age in 1891 and was 13 in 1901.  She had left the family home in Highworth by 1911, while it is known that she never married.  She was 37 when the death of Ada Emily Collett was recorded at Devizes register office (Ref. 5a 95) during the second quarter of 1925.

 

 

 

 

1P8

Florence Rose Collett was born at Highworth, either at the end of 1888 or during the first few weeks of 1889.  Her birth, using her full name, was recorded at Highworth (Ref. 5a 8) during the first quarter of 1889.  Florence R Collett was two years of age in the Highworth census in 1891 and as Florence Collett she was 12 years old in 1901, when she was still living with her family in Highworth.  It is possible that she was married prior to the next census in 1911.

 

 

 

 

1P9

Ernest Frank Collett was born at The Gardens in Highworth, where his birth was recorded (Ref. 5a 9) during the third quarter of 1890.  He was listed as Ernest F Collett, who was under one-year-old, in 1891 when living with his family at The Gardens in Highworth.  Sadly, he was two years old when he died at Highworth on 13th September 1892, following which he was buried in Highworth four days later on 17th September.

 

 

 

 

1P10

Dorcas Mary Collett was born in 1892 at The Gardens in Highworth and was named after her mother Dorcas Collett nee Cockhead.  Her birth was recorded at Highworth (Ref. 5a 2) during the second quarter of the year.  Within the census of 1901 she was listed with her family at Highworth as Mary Collett who was nine years old.  On leaving school, Dorcas travelled south to secure work as a domestic servant and it was at East Meon to the west of Petersfield in Hampshire that she was living and working in 1911.  Dorcas Mary Collett from Highworth was 19 years of age and employed as a scullery maid.  Although proved, Dorcas many have found herself with-child during the following year, so recorded to Swindon.  And it was there that the birth of Dorcas E Collett was recorded (Ref. 5a 11) during the last three months of 1912.  The mother’s maiden name was confirmed as Collett.

 

 

 

1Q6

Dorcas E Collett – not proved

Born in 1912 at Swindon

 

 

 

 

1P11

Eva Ethel Collett was born in 1894 at Highworth, where her birth was recorded (Ref. 5a 1) during the third quarter of the year.  By 1901, Eva E Collett was seven years of age when living at Highworth with her family.  Having completed her education, she entered domestic service and in 1911 she was living and working in nearby Swindon with the family of butcher Fred Duedney Smith from Hampshire, where Eva Ethel Collett from Highworth was 16 and a general domestic servant.  It is interesting that, on that same day, Eva’s older sister Dorcas (above) was also working for a Hampshire family, but near Petersfield in that county.  Coincidence perhaps, but more likely the position was arranged by the same source.

 

 

 

Eleven years after that, the marriage of Eva E Collett and William A Cole was recorded at Swindon (Ref. 5a 79) during the second quarter of 1922.  That marriage produced five children who were all born at Swindon, when their mother’s maiden name was confirmed as Collett.  They were Ronald E Cole (born very soon after their wedding day), Beatrice B Cole (born 1924), Winifred P Cole (born 1926), Raymond A Cole (born 1928) and Dennis R Cole (born 1929).

 

 

 

 

1P12

Louisa Naomi Collett was born at Highworth during the second quarter of 1896, where his birth was recorded (Ref. 5a 6).  As Louisa Collett she was five years of age in 1901 and it was as Louisa Naomi Collett, aged 14, that she was still living with her parents, Thomas and Dorcas Collett, at Highworth in April 1911.  Just over seven years later, the marriage of Louisa N Collett and Percival W Paul was recorded at Devizes register office (Ref. 5a 234) during the third quarter of 1918.  It seems likely that Louisa left Highworth and travelled to Devizes with her older sister Ada (above) who died there seven years later.

 

 

 

 

1P13

Matilda Ruth Collett was born at Highworth on 2nd September 1898, her birth recorded at Highworth register office (Ref. 5a 1).  It was as Matilda Collett, aged two years, that she was recorded with her family in 1901 and as Matilda Ruth Collett, aged 12, that she was still living with her parents Thomas and Dorcas Collett at Highworth in April 1911. It was on 21st May 1923 at Sydenham in Kent that Matilda Ruth Collett married Henry William Stroud, the base-born son of Emily Stroud.  The original marriage record was corrected on 24th September 1924, when W H Warren, an authorised person for the Wesleyan Chapel, High Street in Sydenham, wrote “for Stroud read Hobden”.  It is now evident that Emily Stroud married Henry William Hobden after the birth of her son.

 

 

 

The marriage was recorded at Lewisham register office (Ref. 1d 2012) during the second quarter of 1923, when Matilda Ruth Collett, a spinster and domestic servant residing at 34 Bishopsthorpe Road in Sydenham within the London Borough of Lewisham, whose father was Thomas Collett, a farm labourer, married grocer’s assistant Henry William Hobden.  It was also at Lewisham register office that the birth of Henry William Stroud was recorded during the third quarter of 1900 (Ref. 1d 1176).

 

 

 

By the time of the census in 1911 Henry was the eldest child of the Hobden family of Henry and Emily living in Sydenham.  Henry William Hobden was 42, Emily was 39, while their children were Henry who was 10, Walter who was nine, Cyril who was six, Arthur who was four and Leonard who was five months old.  Also living with the family was eighty-year old Jane Hobden, the mother of Henry William.  However, it is apparent from the later records (below) that Henry William Hobden the younger eventually reverted to his birth name.

 

 

 

As a result of that name change the marriage of Matilda Ruth Collett and Henry William (Hobden) Stroud produced two children, and they were Bernard Stroud and Ruth Stroud.  In addition, the death of Henry William Stroud aged 73 years was recorded at Lambeth register office (Ref. 5d 154) during the final three months of 1973, when his date of birth was confirmed as 18th July 1900.  Matilda Ruth Stroud nee Collett only survived her husband by a few months, when her death at the age of 75 was recorded at Lewisham register office (Ref. 5d 813) during the first three months of 1974.

 

 

 

 

1P14

Bernard Charles Collett was born at Highworth in 1900 and was less than a year old at the time of the 1901 Census of Highworth, his birth having been recorded at Swindon register office (Ref. 5a 4) during the second quarter of the year.  Tragically, he was just six years old when he was kicked by horse while out playing one day in the fields near Highworth and died of his injuries on 15th October 1906, after which Bernard Charles Collett was buried at Highworth on 22nd October.  After that sad event, Bernard’s mother Dorcas insisted that, whenever Bernard’s youngest brother, Victor Jesse Bernard Collett (below), went out to play, that he wore something red so that she could see him from the house.  Victor was also given the third forename of Bernard in memory of the brother he never knew.

 

 

 

 

1P15

Alice Belinda Collett was born at Highworth towards the end of 1901 or early in 1902, while her birth was also recorded at Swindon register office (Ref. 5a 8) during the first quarter of 1902.  It was as Alice Belinda Collett, aged nine years, that she was still living with her parents Thomas and Dorcas Collett at Highworth in 1911.  In her account of life in rural Wiltshire, she stated she was born in a thatched cottage at Fresden while, previously, the family had lived at Starvall Farm.  Fresden was apparently two isolated cottages a mile and a half from Coleshill to the east of Highworth.  A little later, she recalled living at Eastrop Hill in Highworth.  The abridged account of her early life story is presented at the end of this section. 

 

 

 

The marriage of Alice B Collett and Mr Winchester was recorded at Epsom registry office (Ref. 2a 93) during the third quarter of 1923.  The fact that Alice was married a great many miles from where she was born, may be the result of the fact that she was heavily pregnant on her wedding day.  Her daughter and only known child, Zena M A Winchester, was also born during the third quarter of the same year, her birth also recorded at Epsom (Ref. 2a 11), when the mother’s maiden name was confirmed as Collett.  The family of three initially lived at Pound Street in Carshalton, where they had two rooms in the house of widow Mrs Simmons. 

 

 

 

 

1P16

Gladys Elsie Collett was born at Highworth in 1903, her birth recorded at Swindon (Ref. 5a 7) during the third quarter of the year.  Surprisingly, her existence was not known to the more recent members of the family members until the release of the 1911 Census.  That census return recorded her as Gladys Elsie Collett of Highworth who was seven years old, when she was living at Highworth with her parents Thomas and Dorcas Collett.  Why there was an obvious lack of any knowledge of her is very curious, since she did not suffer an infant death, as first thought but, in fact, was married many years later.  It was at Swindon during the first quarter of 1943 that the marriage of Gladys Elsie Collett and Leslie J Wheatly was recorded (Ref. 5a 43). 

 

 

 

 

1P17

Beatrice Maria Collett was born at Highworth, with her birth recorded at Swindon (Ref. 5a 4) during the third quarter of 1905.  She was later known as Beatie and Auntie Beatie by the younger members of the Collett family, although in the story told by her sister Alice Belinda Collett (below), reproduced in the Appendix at the end of this file, she was named as Ri, a shortening of Ma-RI-a.  It was as Beatrice Maria Collett, aged five years, that she was still living with her parents Thomas and Dorcas Collett at Highworth in April 1911.  While still very young Beatrice and her brother Jesse (below) were taken by their mother Dorcas, when she left the children’s father to make a new life with a coalman at Rodbourne on the other side of Swindon. 

 

 

 

Beatrice was twenty-five years of age, when the marriage of Beatrice Maria Collett and Percival William Edmonds was recorded at Swindon register office (Ref. 5a 70) during the third quarter of 1928.  Percival was a clergyman and it was he who officiated at the Swindon funeral of Beatrice’s younger brother Jesse (below) in 1977.  However, by that time Percival was a widower, following the death of Beatrice M Edmonds, whose passing was recorded at the Essex register office in Brentwood (Ref. 4a 436) during the last quarter of 1963, when she was 59.  Percival William Edmonds was born at Swindon on 26th July 1906, the son of Robert and Emily Edmonds.  Upon his retirement, possibly after the death of his wife, Percival settled in a village in Oxfordshire, which was renowned as a community for retired vicars.  The death of Percival William Edmonds was recorded at the Oxfordshire Bullingdon register office (Ref. 20 2109) during the summer of 1986, when he was 80 years old.

 

 

 

 

1P18

Victor Jesse Bernard Collett was the youngest and last child of Thomas Collett and Dorcas Cockhead and was given the additional name of Bernard in memory of his brother (above) who died two years earlier.  He was born on 30th July 1908 at Highworth, when his birth was recorded at Swindon register office (Ref. 5a 7).  He was two years old in the Highworth census of 1911 when he was still with both of his parents and the rest of his family, and was listed simply as Victor Jesse Collett.

 

 

 

In the story of village life in Highworth, written by his sister Alice (above), she referred to him as Jess and during his later life he was known as Jesse, pronounced Jessie.  Apart from his early days at Highworth, he and his sister Beatrice (above) were brought up by their mother Dorcas who left the children’s father to live with a coalman in Rodbourne.  It may be of interest that Jess always referred to the fact that he was “brought up on the wrong side of the tracks”, his reference to Rodbourne.

 

 

 

At some time in his life Jesse was a fireman with the Great Western Railway and used to drive the fire engine to crash scenes and accidents.  It was early in 1931 when he became a married man, the wedding of Victor J B Collett and Daisy E Woodward being recorded at Swindon register office (Ref. 5a 36) during the first quarter of 1931, their only child born around nine months later.  Daisy was born at Purton, which lies approximately four miles north-west of Rodbourne, her birth recorded at Cricklade register office (Ref. 5a 101) during the second quarter of 1913.  Their daughter Valerie is thought to be the couple’s only child, and was born at Swindon, where the death of Victor Jesse B Collett was recorded (Ref. 21 2395) during the last months of 1977, when he was 79.  Following his death, Victor’s funeral was conducted by his brother-in-law Percival Edmonds, the husband of his sister Beatrice (above).

 

 

 

1Q7

Valerie Joyce Collett

Born in 1931 at Swindon

 

 

 

 

1P19

Frederick John James Collett was born at Berkeley in Gloucestershire during 1895, the eldest of the four children of John and Elizabeth Collett.  His birth was recorded at Thornbury (Ref. 6a 234) during the third quarter of 1895.  By March 1901 he and his family were living at Tortworth near Wotton-under-Edge, where Frederick was five years old.  During the second half of the next decade the family moved again, when they returned to Coleford, where Frederick’s brother William had been born, where the family was living in April 1911.  The census return included Frederick J J Collett who was still living there with his family at the age of 15, when he was a carpenter and a joiner with a local builder/contractor.  Three year later at the outbreak of the First World War Frederick was eighteen when he enlisted with the army.  He was eventually assigned to the 2nd/8th Battalion of the Worcestershire Regiment where he became Corporal Collett 242131.

 

 

 

During the period from July to October 1917 Frederick and his battalion were involved in the conflict in the area of the Ypres Salient.  And it was there on 28th August 1917 that he died at the age of 22.  His army records confirmed that he was the son John and Elizabeth Collett of the Post Office Christchurch near Coleford in the Forest of Dean in Gloucestershire.  The name of Frederick John James Collett appears on the Wieltje Farm Memorial, reference B17, which is situated within the Wieltje Farm Cemetery and which was established and used by fighting units, in particular by the 2nd/4th Gloucestershire Regiments.

 

 

 

There are only 115 Commonwealth servicemen from the First World War buried or commemorated at this small cemetery.  Ten of the burials are unidentified and there are special memorials to twenty casualties whose graves were destroyed by shell fire.  The site also contains the grave of one German soldier.  An obituary for Corporal Frederick John James Collett was printed in the Gloucester Journal on 15th September 1917, which indicated that he was 22 and from Cheltenham, and had died on 27th August 1917, one day earlier than the date stated in his military records.

 

 

 

 

1P22

Charles Ernest Collett was born at Tortworth in Gloucestershire during 1904, the son of John and Elizabeth Collett, whose birth was recorded at Thornbury register office (Ref. 6a 290) during the second quarter of 1904.  Not long after he was born his father, a nightwatchman and former policeman, accepted the job of sub-postmaster at Christchurch, near Coleford in the Forest of Dean, where Charles’ mother had been born. And it was there that the family was residing in 1911, when Charles Ernest Collett from Tortworth was six years old.  It was also at Christchurch that the family was still living at the post office in 1917, where the family received the tragic news of the death of Charles’ older brother Frederick (above).

 

 

 

Also living in Coleford was Charles’ cousin Isabel Ellen Collett, the daughter of his uncle Albert Collett, the younger brother of Charles’ father John.  As intimate relationships between cousins were not socially acceptable, it seems likely that the couple ‘ran away to Wales’ to be together, since it was at Monmouth register office (Ref. 11a 45) that their marriage was recorded during the third quarter of 1928.  That record confirmed Charles E Collett married Isabel E Collett, the daughter of police inspector Albert Collett and his wife Elizabeth Cullis.

 

 

 

During 2012 the Will of the aunt of Charles Collett was discovered, in which he was named.  That document, proved in Gloucester on 20th April 1948, revealed that spinster Rosa Emma Collett of 31 Staunton Road in Coleford, and younger sister of Charles’ father, named motor engineer Charles Ernest Collett as her sole executor.

 

 

 

It was just over two years later that Charles Ernest Collett died, his death recorded in the City of Gloucester register office (Ref. 7b 444) during the last three months of 1950.  Following his death on 4th November 1950 at the Royal Hospital in Gloucester, administration of his personal effects, valued at £4,440 9 Shillings 2d, was granted to his widow Isabel Ellen Collett and Simon Vincent William Thomas, a motor mechanic.  The couple’s address at the time of the passing of Charles Ernest Collett was, The Post Office in Christchurch near Coleford, Gloucestershire, and it was at Christchurch that he was laid to rest.

 

 

 

 

1P23

Isabel Ellen Collett was born at Coleford after 1902, the year that her parents Albert Collett and Elizabeth Cullis were married there.  In 1928 she married her cousin Charles Ernest Collett (above).

 

 

 

 

1P27

Arthur Dudley Collett, whose date of birth is not known but was likely to be around the turn of the century, was born in Australia where his only son was also born. 

 

 

 

1Q8

John D Collett

Born on 31.05.1940 in Australia

 

 

 

 

1P30

Emily Collett was born at Picton in New Zealand on 31st December 1874, the eldest child of William Giles Collett from Cirencester and Janet McLean from Dunedin in New Zealand.  It would have been around the end of the century that she married Robert Wallace who was born at Glasgow in Scotland on 27th July 1878.  Emily and Robert had four children before she died at Napier in 1936, and was followed much later by Robert who passed away on 27th April 1959.

 

 

 

Emily presented Robert with five children including sons Peat, Robert and James Bruce who are all living in 2012.  The couple’s two daughters were Myrtle Isabella Wallace, who was born at Whakapapa in King Country NZ, on 24th July 1904, who died at Napier on 10th October 1978, and Olive Wallace who was born on 24th February 1912, who died at Dunedin on 17th February 2007.

 

 

 

 

1P31

Janet Collett, who was known as Jessie, was born in New Zealand on 18th December 1876 the second child of William Collett and his wife Janet McLean.  Jessie later married Harold Percy Charles McLean who was born at Kaituna in New Zealand on 16th September 1885, the son of Peter McLean and Kate O’Dell.  It seems highly likely that Harold was in some way related to Janet’s mother’s family.  Janet and Harold had three known children, Peter Frederick McLean born in 1905, Harold Bernard McLean born in 1906 and Janet Emmie McLean born in 1910, all three being born in New Zealand, and perhaps had more children after 1913.  The following article appeared in the Auckland Star on 12th July 1918, with the heading “Mail Contractor Bankrupt”.

 

 

 

“Harold Percy Charles McLean, mail contractor and motor-car proprietor, of Te Kuiti, in a statement furnished to the Official Assignee in Bankruptcy, says he took up a Crown section about nine years ago, and at the end of five years he was practically insolvent, and had to sell his farm to a brother.  With the proceeds, he paid off his liabilities excepting sums of £20 and £23, and with £100 left leased a boarding house.  He could not make this pay and was left with £80 when he went out, being owed also about £27.  Since then he had run a motor mail car between Te Kuiti and Pio Pio for £3 12 Shillings per week.  He bought a Daimler car for £300 in Auckland, and of that money about £80 was still owing.  That was before the mail car started.  He had paid another man £57 cash for his share of the mail contract in January this year, and took over an Overland car.  He had been unable to pay £93 instalments due on this car.  The contract was in an unsatisfactory state, and the Government subsidy was being paid to another man for good and sufficient reasons.”

 

 

 

Following this, in 1920, at the Hamilton Supreme Court among the “Motions for Discharge” listed was Harold Percy Charles McLean and it is interesting that William Henry Collett (below), Harold’s brother-in-law, was also applying for a Discharge, both parties being represented by Mr Hine.  Harold Percy Charles McLean died during June 1947 and was buried at Omaka Cemetery in Marlborough on 1st July 1947.  His widow survived for a further twenty-five years, when Janet McLean nee Collett passed away in New Zealand during 1972 at the ripe old age of 95.

 

 

 

 

1P32

William Henry Collett was born in New Zealand on 11th February 1879, the eldest son of William Giles Collett from Cirencester and Janet McLean from Dunedin in New Zealand.  Thanks to new information received from Betty Florence Hobday during the summer of 2013 it is now confirmed that William Henry Collett married Ellen Elizabeth Nettell early in 1906.  William was Betty’s grandfather, with his eldest daughter Florence Verbena being Betty’s mother.  Betty has confirmed the names of the four original children credited to William and Ellen, but also recalls an Uncle Dan Collett, whose year of birth has been confirmed by Kelvin Parker in 2014.

 

 

 

As with his brother, Francis Albert Collett (below), William had trouble financially and in a report in the King Country Chronicle on 23rd April 1910 under Local and General News it is mentioned that “William Henry Collett, labourer, of Six-Mile Peg, near Te Kuiti, a bankrupt, states that his liabilities amount to £76 1s 6½d and assets £6 10s, leaving a deficiency of £69 11s 6½d. There was litigation between the brothers [himself and Francis Albert] between December 1908 and July 1909, and bankrupt was successful on the third occasion they went to court — once for money due to him on account of board and lodging, then in defending an action brought by the brother for money due on an alleged account, and again in obtaining an order on a judgment summons.  The amount due to him was £27 4s, of which he had received no part.  Then his wife had suffered from a continuous illness, and this was a source of additional expense.  He was employed on road work at 8s a day.  His failure he ascribed to the loss of money owing by his brother, who became bankrupt on being pressed to law costs in connection therewith, and to his wife's illness”.

 

 

 

Over six years later the New Zealand Herald, published on 13th September 1916, reported that “The case of William Henry Collett, a farmer of Tangitu would be further held over to enable the official assignee to obtain more evidence”.  His honour commented that the bankruptcy was a bad one as Collett had twice been bankrupt in five years and that his assets were nil and liabilities were £156”.  No further information has been found on this case.

 

 

 

Later in her life William’s wife was known as Nellie and the New Zealand Herald of 19th May 1919 reported on a libel case over a postcard sent by some residents to Mr W Collett, Squatter, Mokauiti, a small settlement near Te Kuiti in which it was inferred that Mrs Collett had been unfaithful to her husband.  Evidence given was that feelings in the settlement at the time were strained and, as one of the residents had had an argument with Mrs Collett, that the sending of the postcard would be a way of getting one back on her.  The magistrate ordered judgment in favour of Mrs Collett against all the defendants for £100 and costs of £23.

 

 

 

After another four years, the New Zealand Truth of 24th November 1923 included an article headed "Curious Collett Case" in which "Hubby Pleads Destitution" and "Wants Wife To Support Him”.  This related to William H Collett, a farmer of Mokauiti, who had applied for a maintenance order against his wife, Nellie Collett, on the grounds that he was destitute and she had the means to support him.  He also applied for the custody of their 16-year-old daughter [that would be Alice Evelyn].  He claimed that he was unable to do more than two days work a week owing to his health and, while his wife was in the Hamilton Hospital, he had managed the farm.  While in hospital, his wife had written to him intimating that she did not intend to return.  Nellie, in telling her story, said she was milking 27 cows but could not afford to employ any labour until she had paid off the debts and, that during the past few years, she had been forced to do all the work, including fencing and scrub-cutting.  Under cross-examination she admitted that her husband had done a good deal of work about the farm.  The Magistrate said the case was a difficult and unhappy one, but dismissed the case and, as the husband had claimed he was destitute, he would be refused custody of the child.

 

 

 

In 1927 Mrs Nellie Collett applied for and was granted a divorce from William and later that year married Albert Edward Williams.  The only other detail known about William Henry Collett senior was that he died during 1969 when he was 90.

 

 

 

1Q9

Florence Verbena Collett

Born in 1906 in New Zealand

 

1Q10

Alice Evelyn Collett

Born in 1907 in New Zealand

 

1Q11

Nellie Dorothy Collett

Born in 1909 in New Zealand

 

1Q12

Daniel David Collett

Born in 1911 in New Zealand

 

1Q13

William Henry Collett

Born in 1917 in New Zealand

 

 

 

 

1P33

Francis Albert Collett was born in New Zealand on 1st September 1881, the fourth child and second son of William and Janet Collett.  When Francis was in his late teenage years or early twenties, and perhaps after his mother had deserted the family, he left New Zealand for the homeland of his father in England, where he married Rhoda Charlotte Simons during 1905 at West Ham in Essex.  Rhoda was also known as Rose and was born at West Ham during 1885, the third child of William and Emma Simons.  In the census of both 1891 and 1901 the Simons family was still living in the West Ham area of London when Rhoda Charlotte was six years of age in 1891 and was 16 years old in 1901 when she was a factory worker with an India Rubber Company.  In that latter census return her place of birth was recorded as Silvertown in Essex, a district of West Ham.  The marriage of Francis and Rhoda produced just one child, who was born at Hamilton in New Zealand but many years after the couple had married.  Those first fifteen years of their life were fraught with financial troubles, which may have been the reason for the delayed start of their family.

 

 

 

Francis was plagued with money problems and he, along with older brother William Henry (above) was adjudged a bankrupt, as was their brother-in-law Harold McLean.  At a meeting of creditors held at Te Kuiti in August 1909 Francis Albert Collett of Aria, labourer, had two unsecured creditors.  They were his brother William Henry Collett, a farmer of Te Kuiti, to whom he owed £27 4 Shillings, and his father William Giles Collett, a farmer of Aria, to whom he owed £30 15 Shillings.  Francis returned to New Zealand from England in June 1908 (having worked his passage out there) without paying a fare.  On his return he worked with his brother post-splitting for which he received no wages.  That did not help them pay their way, so they then took on bush-felling.  Later that same year, in December, his brother William sued him for 17 weeks board at £1 per week, and when Francis countered sued his brother for £6 the judgment went against him.  Also, during that time, Francis had been sending £3 a month to his wife, who was still living in England (possibly at West Ham with her parents), and that money, together with legal and living expenses represented all he earned.

 

 

 

At some time after that, Francis returned to England to be with his wife and, in April 1911, he and his wife were recorded residing in the Woolwich district of London, just across the River Thames from West Ham.  The census that year confirmed that Francis Albert Collett was 29 and had been born at Woodville (to the east of Palmerston North) and that Rhoda Charlotte Collett of West Ham was 26.  It must therefore have been during the next nine years that Francis and Rhoda sailed to New Zealand where, it would appear, they settled in Hamilton, as it was there where their only known child was born.  Rhoda Charlotte Collett nee Simons died at Hamilton on 10th July 1945 and was buried at Hamilton East Cemetery three days after.  Eight years later Francis Albert Collett was still living in Hamilton when he died on 20th November 1953 aged 72, following which he was buried with his wife.

 

 

 

1Q14

Maud Alice Collett

Born in 1920 at Hamilton, New Zealand

 

 

 

 

1P34

Florence Abenia Collett was born at Koromiko in New Zealand on 8th May 1884, the daughter of William and Janet Collett. 

 

She was 24 when she married Robert Riddle on 28th April 1909 at the home of her father in Aria.  Robert was 28 and was the eldest brother of Patrick Alexander Riddle who married Florence’s younger sister Alice (below).  He was born at Southland on 9th November 1879, the son of Walter Riddle and his wife Marian Campbell Stevens. 

 

 

 

Florence and Robert had five children and they were (a) Robert Walter Campbell Riddle (born on 2nd June 1912, died on 1st January 2003) married Vera Eunice Sharples (born on 9th August 1922, died on 2nd January 1998), (b) John Riddle (born on 17th August 1915, died 10th May 1993) married Isabella Hodge (born 31st December 1913, died 1st July 2005), (c) Jean Lucy Riddle (born 29th September 1917, died 25th January 2012) married William Albert Henderson who died on 5th December 1995, (d) Myrtle Ruby Albenia Riddle married Thomas Martin Aichison, and (e) Tui Riddle married Bertram Hall.

 

 

 

Florence’s son John Riddle and his wife Isabella had a son John Riddle who was born in 1941 who later married Patricia Ethel Prestage (1946-1992), and it was the younger John Riddle from Whitianga in New Zealand who kindly provided much of the detail for the latest edition of this Collett family line in 2013.

 

 

 

Robert Riddle died at Papakura on 2th April 1971, and just seven months later his wife Florence Abenia Riddle nee Collett also passed away on 14th November 1971.

 

The headstone shown here is at their grave in the grounds of Papakura Cemetery where they were buried together.  The baby Robert Sanders who was buried with them five years later on 12th August 1976 aged just three months was very likely one of their grandchildren.

 

 

 

 

1P35

Sarah Catherine Collett was born in New Zealand on 17th September 1886 the sixth child of William and Janet Collett.  She was only three years old when she died on 3rd March 1889, although an alternative source suggests that the year was in fact 1899, which may be just a typing error.

 

 

 

 

1P36

Mary Rebeccah Collett was born in New Zealand on 22nd November 1888, the daughter of William and Janet Collett.  She married Joseph Webster Alker during 1905 when she was only seventeen, with whom she had four children.  They were Richard Seddon Alker (born 21.06.1906), Ida Alker (born in 1907), Joseph Alker (born 04.11.1908, died 14.08.1993), and William Robert Alker (22.11.1910).  Mary Rebecca Alker nee Collett she died at Hamilton, Waikato in 1977 at the age of 89.  Her husband Joseph, who was ten years older than Mary having been born at Pemberton in Lancashire, England during 1878, had died over twenty years earlier, when he passed away at Hamilton during 1956.

 

 

 

 

1P37

Alice Collett was born in New Zealand on 27th September 1891, the eighth of the nine children of William Giles Collett from Cirencester and Janet McLean from Dunedin in New Zealand.  She later married Patrick Alexander Riddle who was born at Pahia in Southland New Zealand on 30th August 1886 with whom she had seven children.  Patrick, the brother of Robert Riddle who married Alice’s sister Florence (above), died in Auckland on 14th November 1964.  Their children were Alexander Riddle, Eric Keith Riddle, Marian Riddle (born 16.05.1912), Doris Riddle (born 09.08.1915), Dora Riddle (born 18.02.1920), Audrey Riddle (born 03.02.1923), and Jack Riddle (born 10.12.1924).  Alice Riddle nee Collett passed away in New Zealand during 1968 at the age of 76.

 

 

 

 

1P39

Sarah Jane Collett was born at Swainswick, near Bath, in 1865, the eldest child of Charles Collett and Elizabeth Sainsburys.  It was at Bath where her birth was recorded (Ref. 5c 699) during the third quarter of 1865, with her baptism conducted at The Church of St Mary the Virgin in Swainswick on 6th August 1865.  On the day of the census in 1871 Sarah was five years of age and living with her family in the Walcot district of Bath, while ten years later in 1881, and after leaving school, Sarah J Collett was 15 and a servant at the home of elderly Emily Piercy on Cleveland Place West in Walcot.  

 

 

 

The later marriage of Sarah Jane Collett and Charles Harding was recorded at Bath (Ref. 5c 1115) during the fourth quarter of 1890.  Just a few months later, the recently married couple was living on The Paragon, a street of grand Edwardian houses in Bath.  Charles Harding was a blacksmith at the age of 25, the same age as his wife Sarah who gave birth to five children during the last decade of the old century.  In the next census of 1901 Charles and Sarah were both 35, he being an engine smith who had been born at Yate in Gloucestershire.  Their Bath born children were listed as Emily aged nine, Mary aged seven, Daisy aged five, Alice aged two and Beatrice who was under one year old.  

 

 

 

Two sons were added to the five daughters over the following years and, in the Bath census of 1911, the family comprised engine smith Charles, who was 45, as was his wife, Daisy Harding was 13, Alice Harding was 11, Beatrice Harding was 10, Charles Harding was eight and Ernest Harding was four years of age.  The family continued to live in Bath where, nearly twenty-one years later, the death of Sarah J Harding was recorded at Bath register office (Ref. 5c 782) during the first three months of 1932, when she was 66 years old.

 

 

 

 

1P40

James Collett was born at Bath, where his birth was recorded (Ref. 5c 670) during the third quarter of 1867.  He was three years of age in the Walcot census of 1871 and was 13 years old in 1881, by which time he and his family were residing at Cornwall Terrace in the Walcot district of Bath.  In the weeks before the census was conducted in 1891, the marriage of James Collett and Rosa Roberts was recorded at Bath (Ref. 5c 933) during the first three months of that year.  In the census that year James was 23 and a painter living at Fairfield in Bath with his wife Rosa who was 21.

 

 

 

Their first two children were born at Bath but, thereafter, the remainder of the children were born in Bristol, to where the family moved around 1895.  It was at Florence Terrace on Devon Road in Bristol that the family was residing in 1901.  James Collett from Somerset was 33 and a house painter, Rosa was 30, and their six children were Eliza Collett who was nine and May Collett who was eight, Albert Collett who was six, Charles Collett who was five, Rose E Collett who was three and George Collett who was two years of age.  

 

 

 

The family was again recorded as living in Bristol in 1911 when, once again, James Collett from Bath was 43 and house painter and his wife Rosa was 40.  Still living at the family home were five of their children and they were May Collett who was 18, Albert Collett who was 16, Charles Collett who was 15, Gertie Collett who was nine and Lily Collett who was six years of age.  The two eldest children were confirmed as having been born at Bath, while the three younger ones had been born after the family had settled in Bristol.

 

 

 

Once their family had grown up and left home, it would appear that James and Rosa returned to Bath since, it was there on 4th July 1934, that James Collett passed away.  The death of James Collett was recorded at Bath register office (Ref. 5c 520) when he was 67 years old.  The obituary for Mr James Collett was printed in the Bath Chronicle & Herald on 7th July and stated that he had been born at Bathwick.  The birth of his widow, Rosa Sarah Roberts, was recorded at Bath (Ref. 5c 700) during the second quarter of 1870, the daughter of Thomas and Georgina Roberts.  It seems very likely that it was her death at Bath that was recorded there (Ref. 5c 1490) during the last three months of 1940, when she was 70 years old.  The only caveat is that the name given for the deceased was Rosina Collett, rather than Rosa Collett.

 

 

 

1Q15

Elizabeth Florence Collett

Born in 1891 at Bath

 

1Q16

May Herma Collett

Born in 1892 at Bath

 

1Q17

Albert James W Collett

Born in 1894 at Bath

 

1Q18

Charles Henry Collett

Born in 1896 at Bristol

 

1Q19

Rose Emily Daisy Grace Collett

Born in 1898 at Bristol

 

1Q20

Thomas George Collett

Born in 1899 at Bristol; died 1910

 

1Q21

Gertrude Victoria Collett

Born in 1901 at Bristol

 

1Q22

Lily Matilda Collett

Born in 1904 at Bristol

 

 

 

 

1P41

Henry George Collett was born at Bath in 1869, possibly in the Walcot area of the town where Henry was one year old in 1871.  His birth was recorded at Bath (Ref. 6c 567) during the last three months of 1869.  The next census in 1881, placed Henry, aged 12, living with his family at Cornwall Terrace in Walcot.  After a further ten years, Henry Collett was the only child still living with his parents at Sydenham Road in Bath.  By then he was 21 and was employed as a smith’s labourer.  Five years later he married Harriet from Pawlett, just north of Bridgwater in Somerset, after which she gave birth to their only known child.  It was at Bath (Ref. 5c 1001) that the wedding of Henry George Collett and Harriet Jane Haggett was recorded during the third quarter of 1896.

 

 

 

One the day of the subsequent census in 1901, the family of three was settled in Bath where Henry G Collett was 30 and a foreman at a local dairy.  His wife Harriet J Collett was also 30 and their son Charles J Collett was three years old.  It was the same situation ten years later when Henry George Collett was employed by the Bath & Somerset Dairy Company as a dairy foreman at the age of 41.  Harriet Jane Collett was 41 and their son Charles James Collett was 13.

 

 

 

Henry and Harriet were still residing in the Bath area of the country when they passed away.  The death of Henry G Collett was recorded at Bath register office (Ref. 5c 605) during the final quarter of 1937, when he was 68.  After just over twelve years as a widow, the death of Harriet J Collett was also recorded there (Ref. 7c 21) during the second quarter of 1950, when she was 80 years of age.

 

 

 

1Q23

Charles James Collett

Born in 1898 at Bath

 

 

 

 

1P42

Mary Elizabeth Martha Collett was born at Walcot in Bath, with her birth recorded at Bath (Ref. 5c 719) during the first quarter of 1872.  It was as Martha Collett, aged nine years, that she was living with her family at Cornwall Terrace in Walcot in 1881.

 

 

 

 

1P43

Fanny Collett was born at Walcot in 1874 and it was at Bath that her birth was recorded (Ref. 5c 61) during the second quarter of the year.  She was the youngest child of Charles Collett and Elizabeth Sainsburys and was seven years of age in 1881 when Fanny and her family at Cornwall Terrace in the Walcot district of Bath.

 

 

 

 

1P44

George Collett was born at Gloucester in 1854, the eldest child of William and Jane Collett.  He was six years old in 1861 and was 16 in 1871.  According to the next census in 1881 George Collett was living at the home of his parents at 33 Barlow Street in the Barton St Mary district of Gloucester and was a general labourer aged 26.  He was still living with his elderly parents at 33 Barlow Street in Barton St Mary ten years later in 1891.  However, the census that year also revealed that he had been married during the 1880s, but that tragically, his wife had died before the fifth of April in 1891.  The census return recorded George Collett, aged 36, was a widower and a plate layer with the Great Western Railway.  It therefore seems highly likely that his wife probably died during childbirth, from which the child also did not survive.

 

 

 

With the deaths of both of his parents during the 1890s, George took responsibility for his two much younger siblings Laura and Joseph, who were still living with him and his parents at 33 Barlow Street in 1891.  According to the Gloucester census of 1901, George Collett was 46 and a railway porter with the GWR, and living with him was his younger brother Joseph Collett (below) of Gloucester who was a railway labourer with the GWR at the age of 27.  By April 1911 George was 57 and was living alone in Gloucester.

 

 

 

 

1P45

Elizabeth Collett was born in Gloucester in 1856 and was four in 1861 and 14 in 1871 when she was living with her family in the South Hamlet district of Gloucester.  At the age of 24 she was living with her family at 33 Barlow Street in the Barton St Mary area Gloucester from where she was working as a dressmaker.  It is possible that she later married into the Apperley family.

 

 

 

 

1P46

Mary Jane Collett was born at Gloucester in 1859.  She was recorded as Mary J Collett in both 1861, when she was one-year old, and again in 1871 when she was 11.  Ten years later she was 21 at the time of the 1881 Census.  Her occupation at that time was that of a domestic servant when she was living with her parents at 33 Barlow Street in Gloucester.

 

 

 

Shortly after the 1881 Census, Mary married Frank Ashmead and the couple settled in East Dean where all of their children were born.  In 1901 the Ashmead family was still living at East Dean and was made up of Frank, aged 44, who was a coal miner and hewer from Upton St Leonards, Mary Jane who was 42, Harriet, aged 16, Horace who was 13 and an office boy, Bessie who was six, and George who was five.  By 1911 the couple were living still at East Dean where Mary Jane Ashmead from East Dean was 52, her husband Frank was aged 54, and the two children still living with them were Harriet, aged 26, and Bessie who was 16.

 

 

 

 

1P47

William Henry Collett was born at 33 Barton Street in Gloucester towards the end of 1862, his birth recorded at Gloucester (Ref. 6a 271) during the first quarter of 1863.  It was as William H Collett that he was eight years old in the Gloucester Hamlet South census in 1871.  By the time he was 18 he was an engine cleaner, most probably with the Great Western Railway, when he and his family were still living at 33 Barton Street in Gloucester.  Nine years later the marriage of William Collett and Elizabeth Hill was recorded at Gloucester (Ref. 6a 493) during the third quarter of 1890.  Elizabeth Martha Hill was the daughter of tailor George Hill and his wife Elizabeth and was baptised at Chickerell, just west of Weymouth on 8th January 1871.  However, she was around one year old on that day, with her birth recorded at Weymouth (Ref. 5a 347) during the first quarter of 1891.  The census in 1881 revealed that she and her brother Henry John Hill had been born in Bermuda, but were described as British Subjects.  It would also appear that the family returned to Bermuda during the 1870s and, when Elizabeth was around seven years of age, her parents made a final return to England and settled at Newent in Gloucestershire, where her father had been born.  And it was at Watery Lane in Newent that they were living in 1881.

 

 

 

According to the next census in1891, William Collett was 27 and working as a mason and when he and his young wife Elizabeth Collett, aged 20 and a tailoress, were living at 14 Nettleton Road within the Gloucester parish of Barton St Mary.  Elizabeth was very likely with-child on the day of the census, since later that year she gave birth to the first of the couple’s two known child.  Ten years later, in March 1901, William and his wife and their two children were living on Oxford Street in Gloucester, where William’s occupation was that of a pavior.  William from Gloucester was 36, his wife Elizabeth from Weymouth was 30, their daughter Lilian Collett was nine and their son William Collett was three years old, both born in Gloucester.  Staying with the family that day was Elizabeth’s younger sister Alice Hill from Newent who was 21 and a laundress.

 

 

 

The birth of their son, William Collett, at 14 Nettleton Road, was recorded at Gloucester (Ref. 6a 274) during the first quarter of 1898.  Tragically, he was only seven years old, when the death of William Collett was recorded at Gloucester register office (Ref. 6a 205) during the last three months of 1905.  At the end of that decade, in April 1911, the family was still living at 14 Nettleton Road in Gloucester, where William Henry Collett from Gloucester was 46 and a paver with the Works Department of the Midland Railway Company.  His wife Elizabeth Martha Collett from Weymouth was 40, and their daughter Lillian Violet Collett, with no occupation, was 19 and confirmed as having been born at 14 Nettleton Road.  It was just over nine years after that day, when William died in Gloucester, the death of William H Collett being recorded there (Ref. 6a 274) during the third quarter of 1920, when he was 55 years old.

 

 

 

1Q24a

Lilian Violet Collett

Born in 1891 at Gloucester

 

1Q24b

William Collett

Born in 1898 at Gloucester

 

 

 

 

1P48

Laura Jane Collett was born in 1871 but after the census day on the second of April.  There is a slight confusion over where she was born and even who her parents might have been.  At the time of the 1881 Census, Laura was nine years old and was described as being from Cheltenham, while she was living at 33 Barlow Street in Gloucester with the family of William and Jane Collett, where she was listed as niece.

 

 

 

Ten years later, when she was 19, she was still living with the same family at 33 Barlow Street in Gloucester from where she was working as a laundress.  On that occasion her place of birth was given as Gloucester and she was referred to as the daughter of William Collett, although by the time of the next census in 1901, Laura Collett from Gloucester, aged 30, was living in Birmingham where she was a laundress.

 

 

 

Shortly after that Laura returned to Gloucester where she married law student Francis Hawkins Bretherton, who was born at Gloucester in 1870.  Over the following years the marriage produced two sons for the couple at Gloucester, where the family was living in 1911.  Laura was listed as Laura Jane Bretherton, aged 39, while her husband was 40, and their two sons were Wilfred George Bretherton, who was four, and Leonard Francis Bretherton who was just one-year old.

 

 

 

 

1P49

Joseph G Collett was born in 1873 and was the brother of Laura Collett (above).  By the time he was seven years old he was living at 33 Barlow Street in Gloucester where he was described as the nephew of the head of household William Collett, and his place of birth was given as Cheltenham.  Ten years later in 1891 when he was 17, he was still living with the same family at 33 Barlow Street in Gloucester.  However, on that occasion he was described as son the son of William Collett, and his birthplace was Gloucester.  His occupation was that of a wagon fitter, probably on the railway.

 

 

 

In 1901, and following the death of William Collett and his wife Jane, Joseph’s assumed parents, he was living with his older brother George Collett (above) and was working with him on the Great Western Railway as a labourer at the age of 27.  Once again, his place of birth was given as Gloucester.  No record of Joseph Collett of Gloucester or Cheltenham has been found living anywhere in the United Kingdom in 1911.

 

 

 

 

1P50

Esther Collett was born at Clydach, Llanelly in 1858 and was the eldest of the three children of George Collett from Gloucestershire and Rachel Edmunds from Clydach, Llanelly.  It seems highly likely that she was named after her late maternal grandmother Esther Edmunds.  Her birth was recorded at Crickhowell (Ref. 11b 127) during the third quarter of 1858.  Esther was two years old in the census of 1861 when she and her family were living at Cuckoo’s Nest in Llanelly.  Ten years later the family was still residing at Cuckoo’s Nest when Esther was 13.  On leaving school she became a dress-maker and in 1881 at the age of 22 she still living with her family which, by then, was recorded at the Railway Inn at Clydach.  Tragically it was over four and a half years later that she died, the death of Esther Collett recorded at Crickhowell (Ref. 11b 92) during the last three months of 1885.

 

 

 

 

1P51

James Collett was born at Clydach, Llanelly in 1860, the only known son of George and Rachel Collett.  He and his family lived their early life at Cuckoo’s Nest in Llanelly, where they were living in 1861 when James was one-year old, again in 1871 when he was 11 years old.  By the time of the census in 1881 James was 21 years of age and was working as a coal miner when he was living with his family at the Railway Inn at Clydach.  By the end of that same year he was a married man, with the marriage of James Collett and Sarah Ann Morgan being recorded at Crickhowell (Ref. 11b 236) during the last three months of 1881.  According to the following census in 1891, James Collett from Clydach was 31 and a coalminer, his wife Sarah Ann Collett from Gloucestershire was 33 and their son Beignalt James Collett was one-year old.  On that day, it was at Railway Side in Llanelly where the family was living.  His son was just eight years old when the death of James Collett was recorded at Crickhowell (Ref. 11b 77) during the final quarter of 1898, at the age of 38.  Thereafter, nothing is known about what happened to his wife and their son.

 

 

 

1Q25

Beignalt James Collett

Born in 1890 at Llanelly

 

 

 

 

1P52

Harriet Collett was born at Clydach, Llanelly in 1862, the youngest of the three known children of George Collett of Painswick and Cirencester and his wife Rachel Edmunds from Clydach.  It was at Cuckoo’s Nest in Llanelly that the family was living in 1871, when Harriett Collett was eight years old.  Rather curiously, ten years later in 1881, when Harriet’s parents were living at the Railway Inn in Clydah, Harriet Collett, aged 18 and from Llanelly, was working as an inn keeper at 27 New Market Inn in nearby Brecknock St John Evangelist.  Head of the household was unmarried Elizabeth Collett (Ref. 1N15) from Cirencester who was also described as an inn keeper.  However, the relationship between the two was given as sisters, which they definitely were not.

 

 

 

 

1P53

Edward Haines Collett was born at Siddington on 27th October 1861, the base-born son of unmarried Sarah Ann Collett.  Where he and his mother were in 1871 has not been discovered, while it was around 1881 that he became a married man.  All records after that time named him simply as Edward Collett.  Possibly because he was illegitimate, no baptism or marriage record has been found, but it does seem highly likely that he married Eliza Adams who was baptised at nearby Great Barrington on 17th April 1859, the daughter of William and Elizabeth Adams.  Their first two children were born in or near Cirencester, before the family travelled north to Staffordshire and Derbyshire, where their subsequent children were born.  By the time the census was conducted in 1891 Edward and Eliza had four children living with them at North Street in Winshill, just east of Burton-on-Trent.

 

 

 

Edward Collett from Gloucestershire was 30 and an agricultural labourer and his wife Eliza was 31 and also from Gloucestershire.  Their two eldest children that day were Francis E Collett who was nine and Ellen M Collett who was seven, the births of whom were recorded at Cirencester.  The two younger children, both born at Winshill, were Edith A Collett who was five and William Collett who was one year old.  To supplement their income, Eliza had taken in a lodger Joseph Norton aged 65 from Shropshire.  Four more child were added to the family, all of them born at their North Street dwelling in Winshill, Burton-on-Trent, where they were still residing in 1901.

 

 

 

By that time in his life, Edward was 39 and working as maltster at a local brewery.  Eliza was 40, Frank Collett was 19 and a labourer at the maltings where his father was employed, Ellen Collett was 17, Edith Collett was 15, William Collett was 11, George Collett was nine, Harry Collett was three and Albert Collett was two years old.  One more child was born into the family, either a few days before the 1901 census day, or immediately afterwards.  Although no record of the death of Edward Collett has been revealed, by 1911 Eliza Collett from Cirencester was a widow at the age of 51, her income coming from the working members of the family still living with her at Winshill.  However, a Francis Edward Collett, aged 45 and therefore born during 1861, was buried at Winshill on 19th September 1906, his death as Francis Edward Collett was recorded at Burton-on-Trent (Ref. 6b 245) during the third quarter of that year.

 

 

 

On the day of the Winshill census of 1911, two of Eliza’s children were absent from the family home and they were her eldest son Francis, who was married and living in Winshill with his family, and her daughter Edith, who may also have been married by that time.  The other children were listed as Nellie Collett from Cirencester who was 27, William Collett who was 21, George Collett who was 19, Harry Collett who was 14, Albert Collett who was 12 and Alfred Collett who was 10 years old.  All of the five youngest children were recorded as having been born at Winshill.

 

 

 

1Q26

Francis Edward Collett

Born in 1881 at Cirencester

 

1Q27

Ellen Martha Collett

Born in 1883 at Cirencester

 

1Q28

Edith Annie Collett

Born in 1886 at Winshill

 

1Q29

William James Collett

Born in 1889 at Winshill

 

1Q30

George Robert Collett

Born in 1892 at Winshill

 

1Q31

Henry Collett

Born in 1897 at Winshill

 

1Q32

Albert Stanley Collett

Born in 1899 at Winshill

 

1Q33

Alfred Ernest Collett

Born in 1901 at Winshill

 

 

 

 

1P54

Robert Collett was born at Taibach near Port Talbot in Wales in 1867 and it was there also that he was baptised on 15th September 1867, the eldest child of Charles Iles Collett and his first wife Catherine.  It was at 5 Minus Road in Taibach that Robert, aged three years, was living with his family in 1871, and by 1881 he and the family were living at 1 Woodfield in Taibach, when he was 13.  At the age of 23 he was working as a labourer while still living with his parents at Cwmdu.  After a further ten years he was still unmarried at 33 when he was a colliery labourer living at 44 Castle Street in Cwmdu with his parents.  It was later that same year when his mother passed away, following which his father re-married around 1905.  By 1911, when he was 43, he was with his father and his stepmother when the three of them were staying with the Davies family at 51 Maesteg Road in Maesteg in 1911.  It would therefore appear that Robert never married.

 

 

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