PART ONE

 

The Gloucestershire Main Line - 1880 to 2008

 

This is the fourth of four sections of the first part of the Collett family line

 

Updated July 2017

 

The information used to update this file in the past has been kindly provided

by Alan Collett (Ref. 1R26) and Rob Collett (Ref. 1R39), and it is the latter

who provided substantial details for his family for the Sept 2011 update

 

Prior to this, other information has been received from Don Cameron (Part 62)

 

 

THE JOINING OF TWO COLLETT LINES

 

 

1P54

ALICE LOUISA COLLETT was born at Bisley on 17th May 1880, the daughter of Robert and Rosanna Collett.  The census in 1881 recorded her living with her family in Church Road at Ashton Keynes, just across the boundary in Wiltshire.  At that time Alice Louisa Collett was just ten months old, while her place of birth was given as Eastcombe which is near Bisley.  Ten years later Alice Louisa was 10 years old, by which time her family was settled in the village of Siddington near Cirencester.  By the time of the next census in March 1901 Alice Collett was recorded as being 22, when she employed as a domestic housemaid living at Ryeford Hall, a school at Stonehouse near Stroud in Gloucestershire.  This photograph of Alice was taken after 1901 and prior to her wedding day eight years later.

 

 

 

She married HARRY JAMES COLLETT (Ref. 2P29) on 13th March 1909 at St Mark's Church in New Town Swindon.  Harry was the fifth child of William Collett of Bibury, near Cirencester, and his wife Caroline Ruth Watts.  Immediately prior to the wedding Alice was in service with the Morse family and lived-in at The Croft, a very large house on Croft Road in Old Town Swindon.  Once married, the couple set up home at 7 Bathampton Street (formerly Bath Street) in New Town Swindon, where the Collett family lived until 1959.  Harry James Collett, referred to as HJ by the family, was born at 16 Exeter Street in Swindon on 9th January 1879, and his occupation was that of boilermaker with the Great Western Railway.  By April 1911 Alice had presented Harry with the first of their eight children, as confirmed in the Swindon census that year. 

 

 

 

According to the census return Harry James Collett, age 32 and from Swindon, was a boilermaker in the loco department at the Swindon GWR Works.  His wife Alice Louisa Collett, age 30 and from Siddington, Glos, had been married to her husband for two years, and their son William Henry John Collett was one year old and had been born at Swindon.  There address was 7 Bathampton Street, where all of their remaining children were born.

 

 

 

Immediately after Christmas Day in 1937 Harry was taken into the Radium Institute at No.1 Riding House, Posttana Place in London W1, for an operation on his eye.  Upon his arrival at the Institute, a branch of the GWR Hospital in Paddington, he sent a postcard to his eldest son William dated 29th December 1937 to say he had arrived safely.  However, he never recovered from the operation that took place on 1st January and died the following day.  The cause of death was given as ‘carcinoma of the jaw’.   He was buried at the Whitworth Cemetery (Plot F780) in Swindon on 8th January 1938.

 

 

 

Harry owned an 1899 pocket book in which his address was given as 111 Dixon Street, the same address where dressmaker Miss W Iles lived in 1936 and who it was that made the wedding dress for his eldest son’s bride Noreen Harman.  Curiously enough the names Iles has cropped up on more than one occasion.  First there was Charles Iles Collett (Ref. 1O78) who was baptised in 1846.  Then there was John Iles, Harry’s great-grandfather.  And finally, there was Elsie Iles who married Noreen Harman’s brother George in 1930 at Swindon.

 

 

 

Alice Louisa Collett died on 31st March 1969 of a cerebral thrombosis, while she was living at 25 Swindon Road with her married daughter Ellen Goddard and her family.  She was buried in the same plot as Harry at Whitworth Cemetery.

 

 

 

Details of the family of Harry James Collett can be found in Part 2 - The Secondary Line leading up to the reference 2P5

 

 

 

1Q11

WILLIAM HENRY JOHN COLLETT

Born on 01.12.1909 at Swindon

 

1Q12

Ellen Agnes Collett

Born on 22.05.1911 at Swindon

 

1Q13

Harry James Collett

Born on 29.11.1913 at Swindon

 

1Q14

Alice Louisa Collett

Born on 23.09.1915 at Swindon

 

1Q15

Rose Phyllis Louvain Collett

Born on 19.10.1916 at Swindon

 

1Q16

Albert Edward Collett

Born on 19.03.1918 at Swindon

 

1Q17

Arthur Stephen Walter Collett

Born on 29.04.1922 at Swindon

 

1Q18

Caroline Ruth Collett

Born on 20.12.1924 at Swindon

 

 

 

 

1P55

John Levi Collett, who was referred to as Jack by the family, was born at Siddington on 21st January 1883, the third child and eldest son of Robert Collett and his first wife Rosanne King.  He was listed with his family at Siddington in 1891 when he was nine years old, but by 1901 when he would have been 19 he had already left home and he may have been abroad with the army, since no record of him has been found.

 

 

 

It is known that during his early working life he did serve with the British Army.  Ten years later he was listed in the 1911 Census as John Levi Collett, age 29, when he was living and working in the Southampton area, when his place of birth was given as North Cerney in Gloucestershire.  At that time he was still in the army, from which he was eventually rejected three years later in 1914.  On leaving the army he moved to Buckinghamshire where he joined the Buckinghamshire police force as a special constable.  He did that from 28th August 1914 to 1st September 1919 while still living at Ivor in Buckinghamshire, where Jack married Lucy Elizabeth King around 1915.

 

 

 

He later became a butler to G.T.S.Stevens, a Middlesex County Cricketer, and afterwards was in service to a gentleman by the name of Hebbert.  Later in his life he worked for Lady Murray who was reputed to be the person who first introduced the Pekinese breed of dog into England.  He eventually gave up his occupation as a butler to work at the Bell Punch & Ticket Company in Uxbridge, where he was employed as a service electrician.  He served for thirty-two years with the company until his retirement on 25th April 1952.

 

 

 

During his retirement Jack worked as a tea boy in the local toy factory producing Darleks made famous in the BBC television programme Doctor Who.  His wife Lucy suffered from phlebitis in her legs and for almost thirty years of her life never went outside the house. 

 

 

 

Before moving to Uxbridge around the turn of the century, Jack was a choirboy in the church at Cirencester and returned there late in his life with his son Lewis, hoping to find some record of his days in the choir, but was unsuccessful.  Jack and Lucy spent most of their life at 78 Rockingham Road, Uxbridge in Middlesex where the two younger boys were born, the first son having been born while they were still living in Ivor.  Lucy Elizabeth Collett nee King died on 6th June 1973, and Jack Levi Collett died five years later on 7th December 1978.

 

 

 

1Q19

John Henry Collett

Born on 09.10.1916 at Ivor, Bucks

 

1Q20

Ronald James Collett

Born on 01.01.1924 at Uxbridge

 

1Q21

Lewis Frank Collett

Born on 04.11.1926 at Uxbridge

 

 

 

 

1P56

William Robert Collett was born on 2nd December 1883 at Siddington.  He was seven years old in 1891 and by the time of the census of 1901 he was 17 and a domestic groom still living at home in Siddington.  It is known that William was under 20 years old when he married the slightly older Jane Julia Harvey who was born at Cirencester during 1881, the daughter of John and Matilda Harvey.  Within the first year of their married life together Jane presented her husband with a son William who was born at Cirencester, where the three of them were still living in 1911.

 

 

 

The census that year listed the three of them in error as William Collet, age 26, his wife Jane Julia Collet, age 29, and their son William Collet, who was seven years old.  Also living with the family on that occasion was William’s younger brother Walter Collet who was 21.  Jane and her son William were living at 171 Gloucester Street in Cirencester during the first year of the Great War, and it was there that Jane received the tragic news of the death of her husband while fighting for his King and Country in Belgium.

 

 

 

He was Private William Robert Collett service number 7790 of 1st Battalion of the Gloucestershire Regiment, which he joined on 13th August 1914.  Less than three months later he was critically injured, while in frontline action, and died on 1st November 1914 during the First Battle of Ypres.  During the battle he suffered gas exposure and was badly wounded and died as a result of his injuries.  His name appears on the Ypres Menin Gate Memorial at Ieper, West Vlaanderen in Belgium.  After the war, his family was presented with three medals, The Victory Medal, The British War Medal and the 1914 Mons Star, to which was attached the 1914 Clasp.

 

 

 

The military records for the days before he died indicate the regiment was had a quiet night over the 29th and into 30th October.  At 9.30am the first attack on the British frontline troops at Zandvoorde took place and that by 10.30 the Seventh Division had been forced to fall back.  That position was then held under artillery fire until 4.30 pm, at which time two platoons were placed south of the road to Chazuvelt.  The report for the previous day (29th) revealed that one officer had been killed, with two missing, and two injured, while ten other men had been killed, 77 had been injured and 132 were missing.

 

 

 

The 3rd Brigade was heavily attacked during the night, and at 6 am on the morning of 31st October the troops of the Welsh Regiment were heavily attacked and retreated from their trenches on the barricade at Chazuvelt.  At 10.30 the Gloucestershire Regiment were ordered to hold the line running north and south through the O of Veldhoek and there collect every officer and man coming back.  By midday the Welsh and Queens Regiments had been driven back by the enemy and were re-grouped behind the Gloucestershire Regiment.  During the afternoon the battalion entrenched themselves on both side of the Veldhoek crossroads.  The remnants of the 3rd Brigade formed up on this line and, despite very heavy and continuous German attack, the line was held by the brigade until the evening of 1st November when they were relieved by the 1st Brigade and allowed to re-organise in Heronthage Wood.  It is therefore estimated that William Robert Collett was no longer alive by then.

 

 

 

1Q22

William Collett

Born in 1903 at Cirencester

 

 

 

 

1P57

Bertram Henry Collett, referred to as BH by the family, was born on 15th October 1885 at Siddington, and was five years old in the Siddington census of 1891, when he was recorded living there with his family as Bertie Henry Collett.  Sometime after leaving school Bertram initially worked for James Clifford at Brinkworth in Gloucestershire, where he learnt the trade of a farrier, and by 1901 James had married Bertram’s eldest sister Lily Harriet Collett, by which time James and Lily were living in Bristol.  It was also in Bristol that Bertram was apprenticed to a blacksmith at Brislington, prior to joining the Army Service Corp as a Sergeant Farrier at Woolwich Barracks, where he served for twenty-one years. 

 

 

 

It was while he was in the army that he was posted to Ireland, where he met his future wife.  The story within the family was that he was sent to Ireland at the time of the Dublin uprising and it was then that he was married.  This cannot be the case, as the uprising took place at Easter in 1916, over five years after they were married.  However, this does not discount the fact that he was sent to Dublin in 1916 as part of the peace-keeping force.

 

 

 

What is known for certain is that Bertram Henry Collett married Elizabeth Lillian Fuller on 20th December 1910 at Dublin.  Curiously no record of him has been found in the census of 1901 when he would have been around 16 years old, so he may have already been serving with the army.  By the time of the next census in 1911 Bertie Henry Collett, age 24 and from Siddington, was married to Elizabeth Collett, also 24, when the childless couple was living at Woolwich Barracks, south of the River Thames in London. 

 

 

 

On leaving the army after the Great War, Bertram then took up the post of Stud Groom & Farrier with Sir Edward Durrand at his Ashton Keynes Estate in Gloucestershire.  Sometimes he would even travel with Sir Edward to events in France and Belgium with a string of polo ponies.  Initially, while working for Sir Edward, the family lived at Somerford Keynes in a tithe cottage, until that property was sold.  After which they moved to Langley, near Winchcombe in Gloucestershire.  Bertram worked for Sir Edward Durrand until he retired in the mid-1950s.

 

 

 

Elizabeth presented Bertram with a total of three children, the first of whom was born at Woolwich, the second during Bertram’s posting to Dublin, while their daughter was born at Langley after Bertram had left the army.  Bertram Henry Collett died on 23rd February 1962 at Cheltenham and Elizabeth, his wife, died sixteen years later on 11th March 1978.

 

 

 

1Q23

Harry Collett

Born on 05.06.1913 at Woolwich

 

1Q24

Bertram John Collett

Born on 14.03.1915 in Dublin

 

1Q25

Lily Rose Collett

Born on 08.08.1919 at Langley, Glos.

 

 

 

 

1P58

Ernest Collett was born on 10th August 1887 at Siddington and was three years old in the Siddington census of 1891.  In 1901 when he was 13 he was still living at home with his family, by which time he had left school and was working as a pantry boy and domestic servant in Siddington. 

 

He later married Lily Louisa Holborn around 1909 at Bradford-on-Avon, when his occupation had changed to that of a groom and gardener. 

 

By the time of the census in April 1911, the marriage had produced the first of the couple’s three children. 

 

 

 

The family of three at that time was recorded as living within the Chippenham registration district, where Ernest Collett of Siddington was 23, his wife Lillie L Collett was 26, and their daughter Cynthia Q Collett was one year old.  Judging by the age of their son Ronald and his sister Cynthia, the photograph above was very likely taken in Bradford-on-Avon around 1916, and just prior to Ernest leaving England to join the British Army in France.  He often referred to himself as a 'Gloucestershire Monkey', while he referred to his wife, who was from Freshford in Somerset as a 'Somerset Cuckoo', and his two Wiltshire born sons as 'Wiltshire Moonrakers'.

 

 

 

Towards the end of the Great War he was badly wounded during 1918.  After the war, and due to the limitations placed on him by his injuries, Ernest and his family eventually moved to Trowbridge, where he took up work in the Dye House of the local Cloth Mill.  The couple’s second child was also born at Bradford-on-Avon, while the third child was born after the family had moved to Trowbridge.  It was originally understood that later in their life Ernest and Lily went to live in Swindon, apparently to be near other members of Ernest’s family, but new information received in 2014 from Sue Chillcott nee Collett, their granddaughter, states that they continued to live in Trowbridge for the rest of their lives.  Lily Louisa Collett nee Holborn passed away first, and was followed by her husband who died on 28th December 1967.

 

 

 

1Q26

Cynthia Queenie May Collett

Born in March 1910 at Bradford-on-Avon

 

1Q27

Ronald Ernest Collett

Born on 12.10.1912 at Bradford-on-Avon

 

1Q28

Robert William George Collett

Born on 17.08.1919 at Trowbridge

 

 

 

 

1P59

Walter Collett was born on 3rd December 1889 at Siddington.  In the Census of 1901 he was 11 and was described as a domestic pantry boy while living at Siddington with his family.  Following the death of his mother in 1902 Walter went to live with his married brother William Robert Collett (above) in Cirencester, as confirmed by the Cirencester census in 1911 when Walter Collett (Collet) was 21.

 

It was just after the census that year that Walter and his younger brother Robert Percy Collett (below) had a big disagreement with their father Robert Collett, following which the two young men ran away from their family in Cirencester.  The brothers eventually settled at Cinderford in the Forest of Dean, where they lodged with Mary Ann Matthews at Newtown Steam Mills.  The separation from his father was permanent, as a result of which Walter was never reunited with him, although the elderly and infirmed Robert Collett he did attend Walter’s funeral in 1945.

 

 

 

Shortly after his arrival in Cinderford, Walter married the widowed Mary Ann Matthews on 27th May 1912 at Holy Trinity Church at Drybrook in the Forest of Dean.  Mary Ann was originally born as Mary Ann Haile in 1872.  His occupation at that time was that of miller and he later served with the Royal Horse Artillery as a horse driver in the Great War.  During the war he was gassed and was invalided out of the army.  Upon returning home he became a coalminer at the local gas works and was promoted to shift foreman at the Northern United Colliery in Cinderford.

 

 

 

His wife, Mary Ann, who was seventeen years older than Walter, already had three children when he married her.  They were Frederick William George Ryder Haile (base-born), and Olive Ann Matthews and Mary Lucinda (Molly) Matthews, both daughters being from Mary’s first marriage to Thomas Matthews.  It has since been discovered that it was Olive Ann Matthews, the youngest daughter of Walter’s wife, who actual gave birth to Walter’s only child who, to the outside world, was brought up by Walter and Mary Ann Collett as their own, even thought he was Mary Ann’s grandson.  The child was born at Cinderford, where Walter Collett died on 7th July 1945 at the age of 54, and when his only son was just fifteen years old.

 

 

 

1Q29

Frederick Walter Thomas George Collett

Born on 21.03.1930 at Cinderford

 

 

 

 

1P60

Robert Percy Collett, who was referred to as Bob within the family to avoid confusion with his father, was born at Siddington on 3rd January 1892, the son of Robert Collett and Mary Ann Dent.  He was nine years old in March 1901 when he was still living with his family in Siddington.  His mother died during the following year, and in 1903 his father remarried.

 

It was with his father Robert and his stepmother Annie that he was living in 1911 at 49 Baunton in just a mile north of Stratton, Cirencester.  Robert junior was 19, and the only other member of the household was Percy Collett who was 15 months old.

 

 

 

It is speculated that young Percy, who was born at Stratton, was the base-born son of Robert Percy Collett, the mother of the child not surviving the birth.  Whatever happened to Percy Collett is not known, but it is established that there was a major upset between Robert Collett senior and his son Robert Percy.  This may have centred around who should be responsibility for raising his son Percy, which perhaps Robert junior was not prepared to do, preferring to enlist with the army, as indicated by him picture in uniform above.

 

 

 

Following the dispute with his father Robert Percy Collett left Cirencester in 1911 and was apparently never reunited with his father or his son.  It was to Cinderford, in the Forest of Dean, that he travelled with his brother Walter (above) and where his brother was married in 1912.  It was another eleven years later that Robert married Ann Kibblewhite on 14th May 1923 in the Registry Office at Newnham on Severn when he was 33.

 

 

 

Once they were married the couple resided at Harrow Hill in Drybrook, near Cinderford, where both of their daughters were born.  Robert’s occupation was that of master baker at the Cinderford Co-operative & Industrial Society.  He later retired in very poor health, caused by flour dust in his lungs.  Robert Percy Collett died at Drybrook on 29th September 1961.

 

 

 

1Q30

Percy Collett

Born in 1909 at Stratton

 

The following are the two children of Robert Percy Collett and his wife Ann Kibblewhite:

 

1Q31

Gladys Collett

Born on 15.01.1923

 

1Q32

Hilda Collett

Born on 20.10.1925

 

 

 

 

1P61

Mabel Rose Collett was born at Siddington on 28th September 1894, the last child born to Robert Collett and his first wife Rosanna King.  And it was at Siddington that she was living with her family in March 1901 when she was Mabel R Collett who was six years old.  One year later her mother died and during 1903 her widowed father Robert Collett married Annie and moved the short distance to live in nearby Stratton.  That also may have coincided with ever member of the family living Siddington, some of whom moved into the town of Cirencester.

 

 

 

Mabel was one of only three members of her family still living in Cirencester in 1911.  The census that year recorded Mabel Rose Collett, age 16 and from Siddington, living and working there, although no with any other member of the Collett family.  Over the next couple of years Mabel left Cirencester and moved to Stratton St Margaret, just east of Swindon.  And it was at Swindon where she married George Bramble on 25th December 1919.  After the wedding the couple lived at Stonehouse in Gloucestershire, where their first two children were born.

 

 

 

At some time during 1922 the family moved to Wanborough, again just outside Swindon.  As a couple, they were well known for travelling everywhere on a tandem, which even included trips to see Mabel’s estranged brothers Walter Collett and Robert Percy Collett at their respective homes in the Forest of Dean.  Mabel was a large jovial lady and George, by comparison, was a short, slightly built man.

 

 

 

Mabel Rose Bramble nee Collett died at Swindon on 26th November 1972, while her husband George Bramble had died five years earlier on 29th September 1967.  According to their son Peter Bramble, there were three other children in addition to those listed below, two of which were twins who died in infancy.  Peter’s younger brother George Bramble was living at 37 Graham Street in Swindon during the 1990s.

 

 

 

Of particular interest in the Mabel Collett and George Bramble family was their eldest daughter Irene Rosanna Bramble who was born at Stonehouse on 2nd July 1920.  She married later married to become Irene Rosanna Page and she and her husband lived at 150 Rodbourne Road in Swindon where their daughter Pamela was born in 1955.  Pamela Page eventually went on to marry Robert Martin Collett (Ref. 28R44) at Swindon from whom she was later divorced. 

 

 

 

Robert Martin Collett was born at Swindon in 1955, the son of Anthony Roy Collett (Ref. 28Q53)

Details of this family are provided in Part 28 – The Faringdon Line

 

 

 

The second eldest child in the family of Mabel Collett and George Bramble was their son Claude Bernard Bramble was born on 4th December 1921 at Stonehouse.  In the 1990s he was living at 20 Frasers Close, Nythe in Swindon and his son Robert Bramble was living at 56 Nyland Road in Swindon.

 

 

 

The other known children of Mabel and George Bramble were Thomas Bramble (born on 04.06.1923), Eileen Bramble (born on 26.04.1925), Dorothy Bramble (born on 23.11.1927), Peter Bramble (born on 27.12.1929), George Bramble, Betty Bramble, Elizabeth Bramble (born on 09.01.1937), and Ann Bramble (born on 24.07.1941).

 

 

 

 

1P62

Alice Mary Collett was born at Alvescot during the third quarter of 1887, the birth being registered in Witney.  In the Bampton & Witney area census of 1891 she was recorded as being four years old while living with her parents and younger sister Elsie.  Following the birth of her next sister in late 1891, the family moved to Cirencester, but by the start of the next century the family was living in the Almondsbury area north of Bristol.

 

 

 

She later married Herbert John Golledge at Bristol in 1909.  Herbert was the son of Charles Golledge and Hannah Needham of Stapleton in Bristol.  It may be interesting to note that the Needham family, through their Hulin family connection, are linked to the Collett family described in Part 35 – The Melksham Line.  By the time of the Bristol census of 1911 Alice had given birth to a son.  Herbert John Golledge was 22, Alice Mary Golledge of Alvescot was 23, and their son Hubert Eric John Golledge was nine months old.

 

 

 

Interesting note:  Herbert John Golledge was the second cousin twice removed of Don Cameron in Australia, through his mother Hannah Needham.  Hannah's mother was Priscilla Brooks of Stapleton in Gloucestershire who was Don’s great great great aunt.  Don’s actually Collett family can be found in Part 62 – The Trowbridge to New Zealand at Ref. 62O1.

 

 

 

 

1P68

John Henry Collett was born at Gloucester in 1876 and was four years old in April 1881 when he living with his family at 2 Hawkesbury Villa, Weston Road in the Longford St Mary district of Gloucester.  In 1891 John Collett, age 14, was attending a school at Axminster in Somerset, where his younger brother Gilbert (below) was also recorded in that year’s census.  Just after the start of the new century he was working with his father as a chemical manufacturer in Gloucester.

 

 

 

John H Collett, age 24, was still a bachelor living at his parents’ home at Hillfield, 101 Great Western Road in Gloucester and the census record for 1901 indicated that he was educated with a Masters Degree in Science, although so far no record of his attendance at university has been found, unlike his brother Gilbert who received his masters degree at Cambridge in 1905.

 

 

 

Not long after the census day in 1901, it would appear that John Henry Collett, who was also known as Harry, joined the Territorial Army and, on 3rd March 1909, when he was already Captain John H Collett, he was promoted to the rank of Major.  An announcement to this effect was confirmed in The London Gazette on 25th May 1909.  The same article also mentioned that his brother Gilbert F Collett had been promoted to the rank of Captain, also on the third of March 1909.

 

 

 

It was during the previous year that John Henry Collett married Dorothy Elizabeth Foster, the event being recorded at Cheltenham register office (Ref. 6a 937) during the second quarter of 1908.  The witnesses at the wedding were William Aston, Jane Elizabeth King, and Newman Lockwood.  Over the following three years Dorothy presented John with two children, although there may have been other children added to their family after the census in 1911.

 

 

 

According to the census that year the couple and their two sons were living in the Stroud area of Gloucestershire.  The census return revealed that John Henry Collett was 34, and his wife Dorothy Elizabeth Collett was 32.  Of their two children, only the eldest one was named, presumably because the younger one had only just been born, and no name had yet been decided upon.  John Nelson Collett was one year old, while his brother was simply listed as a male of no age, not even in terms of days.  Also staying with the family on the day of the census was John’s unmarried younger brother Leopold George Collett.

 

 

 

Upon the start of hostilities between England and Germany in 1914, John and his brother Gilbert both enlisted as officers with 5th Battalion of the Gloucestershire Regiment.  An article published in The London Gazette on 7th June 1917 referred to Lieutenant Colonel John Henry Collett, the same rank that his brother also held by the end of The Great War.  During the 1930s, and very likely around the time of his retirement, John and Dorothy settled in Cheltenham when they lived at Pittville Circus from where John was a Justice of the Peace.

 

 

 

In 1925 John Henry Collett and two of his brothers, Gilbert and Seymour, were named as the joint executors of their father’s estate amounting to £88,291 14 Shillings 2d, when the probate service described him as John Henry Collett CMG [i.e. Companion of the Order of St Michael & St George], a chemical manufacturer.

 

 

 

Towards the end of 1942 the home address for John Henry Collett CMG, DL, JP was of 7 Pittville Crescent in Cheltenham but sadly on 8th November 1942 at the age of 66 he died at the Imperial Nursing Home, his death being recorded at Cheltenham register office (Ref. 6a 503) during the month of December that year under the name of John H Collett.  Probate of his considerable estate of £18,794 13 Shillings 9d was granted jointly to the National Provincial Bank and the Reverend Seymour Collett, John’s younger brother (below).

 

 

 

Published in the London Gazette at that time was the following notice.  “In the Estate of Colonel John Henry Collett, deceased.  Pursuant to the Trustee Act, 1925.  All persons having claims against the estate of John Henry Collett late of No. 7 Pittville Crescent, Cheltenham in the County of Gloucester C.M.G., D.L., J.P., a Colonel retired in H.M. Army who died on the 8th day of November 1942, and whose Will dated the 15th day of September 1941, appointed National Provincial Bank Limited the executor thereof jointly with the Rev. Seymour Collett, are required to send written particulars to the undersigned by the 15th day of February 1943 after which date the executors will distribute the deceased's estate having regard only to valid claims then notified.  Dated this 9th day of December 1942.  Madge Lloyd and Gibson, 20 Bell Lane, Gloucester, Solicitors for the Executors.”

 

 

 

1Q33

John Nelson Collett

Born in 1910 at Gloucester

 

1Q34

Anthony Foster Collett

Born in 1911 at Gloucester

 

 

 

 

1P69

Agnes Sophia Collett was born at Gloucester in 1878 and was listed as being two years old in the 1881 Census when she was living with her parents at 2 Hawkesbury Villa in Weston Road in Gloucester.  She was still living with her parents ten years later in 1891 when she was 13 and the family home was in the South Hamlet registration district of Gloucester.

 

 

 

After a further ten years Agnes, age 23, was living at Hillfield, 101 Great Western Road in Gloucester, the home of her parents John Martin and Sarah Ann Collett.  Also still living with the family was Agnes’ older brother John and her younger brother Leopold, and they and their father were involved in the family business of J M Collett & Co Ltd, chemical manufacturers of Gloucester.

 

 

 

According to the next census in April 1911 Agnes Sophia Collett was recorded as being younger than she actually was at 30, and was two years younger than her younger brother Gilbert (below) who was correctly listed as being 32.  Her place of birth was confirmed as Gloucester and she was still a single lady still living with her parents and her brother at Kimsbury House in Upton St Leonards, Gloucester, where the family was supported by three servants.

 

 

 

It would appear that she never married, and died on 5th September 1963 while she was living at Sussex Lodge, Claverton Down in Bath.  At the time of her passing she owned a number of properties, including land opposite Sussex Lodge, a lock-up shop at 40-42 Eastgate Street in Gloucester, and a shop at 174 High Street in Cheltenham.  The property situated adjacent to her back garden at Sussex Lodge was occupied by her younger brother, the Reverend Seymour Collett (below), until his death in 1972.

 

 

 

 

1P70

Gilbert Faraday Collett, named after the physicist, was born at Gloucester on 19th July 1879, the second son and third child of chemical manufacturer John Martin Collett and his wife Sarah Ann.  Gilbert was one year old by the time of the census in 1881, when he was living with his family at 2 Hawkesbury Villa on Weston Road in Gloucester.  Ten years later he and his brother John (above) were attending a school in Axminster in Somerset, when Gilbert Faraday Collett was 11 years old.  He later attended Cheltenham College, where he was educated from 1893 to 1898, when he matriculated.

 

 

 

It was during October 1898 that Gilbert was accepted at Pembroke College in Cambridge, where he obtained his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1901 and his Masters Degree in 1905.  His university entry record confirmed that he was the second son of John Martin Collett of Guy’s Cliff, Wolton, Gloucester, later of Wynstone Place near Gloucester.  While he was at Cambridge Gilbert won a rugby blue in Varsity Match of 1898.  It was during the following year that he was invited to join the touring Barbarians team.  Around the time that he received his MA, or shortly thereafter, Gilbert was a founding member of the Gloucester Fire Brigade.

 

 

 

During his time at Cambridge it would appear he was visiting friends or relatives in the Cheltenham area, since at the time of the census in March 1901 Gilbert F Collett, age 21 and from Gloucester, was recorded in the village of Cowley, just south of Cheltenham.  After completing his university education Gilbert joined his brother in the Territorial Army, and on 3rd March 1909, when his brother John was promoted from Captain to Major, Gilbert was made given the rank of Captain, all as published in The London Gazette on 25th May 1909.

 

 

 

Less than two years later, according to the census in April 1911, Gilbert had returned to Gloucester to live with his family, where he was recorded under the full name of ‘Gilbert Farady Collett’ (sic).  He was further described as being 32 and a chemical manufacturer living with his parents and sister Agnes (above) at Kimsbury House in Upton St Leonards, to the east of Gloucester City.  Rather curiously his ‘older’ sister Agnes was listed as being two years younger than Gilbert, whereas in all of the previous three census returns he was the younger sibling by two years.

 

 

 

Out the outbreak of hostilities, Gilbert enlisted with the British Army and served with 5th Battalion of the Gloucestershire Regiment during The Great War of 1914-1918.  He was promoted to Captain on 12th August 1914, when he was stationed at a training camp near Colchester.  He travelled to France towards the end of 1915 and later became a Major.  He was made an acting Lieutenant Colonel from 1917 until he was invalided out of frontline duties with trench fever during 1918, by which time he had already achieved the rank of Lieutenant Colonel.  He was mentioned in despatches on three occasions and was awarded the Distinguished Service Order medal in 1918.  It was only in 1934 that he retired from the army, when he was 55.

 

 

 

In 1925 Gilbert Faraday Collett and two of his brothers, John and Seymour, were named as the joint executors of their father’s estate amounting to £88,291 14 Shillings 2d, when the probate service described him as Gilbert Faraday Collett DSO, a chemical manufacturer.

 

 

 

It some years after The Great War, that in 1926, when Gilbert was around 47 years of age, he married Dorothy Lawrence Miller M B, from Dundee Scotland.  It seems very likely that Dorothy was much younger than Gilbert since, within two years of their wedding day, she presented Gilbert with a son and heir.  When the child was just a few years old Gilbert and Dorothy moved to a large house at Battledown Gates in Cheltenham, on the corner of Hales road and Battledown Approach.  This moved followed a similar move by his brother John, who had already settled in Cheltenham and was living nearby at Pittville Circus.  While in Cheltenham, Gilbert was a member of the Cheltenham Race Course and a mason with the Old Cheltonian Lodge.

 

 

 

Gilbert, Dorothy and their son were living at Hucclecote near Barnwood to the east of Gloucester when Gilbert died on 26th February 1945, when his son was just seventeen years old.  Following the death of her husband, Dorothy married William Hubert Cullis of Balcarras Court in Charlton Kings near Cheltenham.  And it was at Cheltenham that Dorothy died during June 1982, which may further indicate that she was very likely around ten to twenty years younger than Gilbert.

 

 

 

Within the records of the Cambridge Alumni, Gilbert Faraday Collett was described as being the Managing Director of J M Collett & Co Ltd, Gloucester, the company founded by his father.  The same records also confirmed that he was married and had issue, including a son to carry on the Collett name, and at some time in his life he lived at Battledown Gates in Cheltenham.  His name also appeared in the 1939 version of Who’s Who.

 

 

 

During his younger days he was a keen rugby (union) player and, in addition to his Cambridge Blue and The Barbarians Tour, he also played on the wing for Cheltenham RUFC, and in 1903 he won three caps playing for the British Isles team in a tour of South Africa, but sadly was never selected to play for the English National team.  During the South African Tour, Gilbert played in 20 of the 22 matches, including all three Test games against the South African national team. He was a prolific scorer during the first half of the tour, with a dropped goal in his first match against Western Province Country team, followed by eight tries over the next eleven games, including two tries in both games against King William's Town and Griqualand West.  He also played first class cricket for Gloucestershire County Cricket Club, and in 1924 he was President of the Gloucestershire Golf Union.

 

 

 

1Q35

Gerald David Martin Collett

Born in 1928 at Gloucester

 

 

 

 

1P71

Leopold George Collett, who was known as Lee within the family, was born at Gloucester during 1882.  It was as Leopold G Collett aged eight years, that he was living with his family in the South Hamlet district of Gloucester at the time of the census in 1891, and ten years after that he was still living with his parents at Hillfield, 101 Great Western Road in Gloucester, at the age of 18.  By March 1911, under his full name of Leopold George Collett, he was still a bachelor at 28, when he was staying at the Gloucester home of his married brother John Henry Collett (above) and his family. 

 

 

 

It seems curious that Leopold was the only one of the four sons of John Martin Collett not to be named as a joint executor of his father’s Will in 1925.  It was five years later in 1930 that Leopold, then aged 48, married Joy Mona Luis Fernandes who was an accomplished artist.  The couple was married for twenty-nine years when Leopold died in 1959 at the age of 76.  His death was recorded at Cirencester register office (Ref. 7b 522) during the first quarter of that year.  Probate for Leopold George Collett of Wolds Cottage of Chedworth Laines near Cheltenham, who had died on 15th March 1959, was granted to his widow Joy Mona Luis Collett, when his personal effects were valued at £559 11 Shillings.

 

 

 

 

1P72

Seymour Collett was born at Gloucester in 1883, the last child born to John Martin and Sarah Ann Collett.  Seymour was seven years old at the time of the census in 1891 when he was recorded with his family in the South Hamlet district of Gloucester.  He was educated at Cheltenham, where he was recorded on the day of the census in 1901 when he was 17.  Ten years later in April 1911, he was a boarder staying at 55 Victoria Grove in Bridport, Dorset, the home of elderly Emily Hodder.  The census return described him as Seymour Collett, age 27 years and from Gloucester, who was a bachelor and a clergyman of the established church.

 

 

 

The only other known details regarding the Rev Seymour Collett are that he remained a bachelor all his life and that he retired to Little Stoke, Claverton Down, to the east of Bath, where he died in 1972.  His final place of residence at Little Stoke may have been purchased at the same time as the adjacent property since it was there that his sister Agnes had lived and died nine years prior to his passing, their two gardens backing onto each other.  During his life the Reverend Seymour Collett officiated at various family events, including the christening of the granddaughter of his brother Gilbert Faraday Collett.

 

 

 

In 1925 Seymour and two of his brothers, John and Gilbert (above), were named as the joint executors of their father’s estate amounting to £88,291 14 Shillings 2d, when the probate service described him as the Reverend Seymour Collett, a clerk.  He was also named jointly with the National Provincial Bank regarding the Will of his older brother John Henry Collett who died at Cheltenham in November 1942.  His brother’s personal estate was valued at £18,794 13 Shillings 9d and was the subject of a notice in the London Gazette that year.

 

 

 

 

1P73

Walter Charles Collett was born in 1869 at Ham in Surrey, just north of Kingston-upon-Thames, the eldest child of Charles George Collett and his wife Ann.  At the age of two years, Walter G Collett was living at Ham with his parents and younger brother Edward, who tragically died shortly after the census day in 1871.  At the time of the 1881 Census Walter was 12 years old and was living with his family at Acre Road in Kingston, and ten years he was still living there with his parents at the age of 22.

 

 

 

It was at Kingston-upon-Thames in Surrey, during the first three months of 1899, that Walter Charles Collett married Charlotte Emily Tovey, as recorded at the Kingston register office (Ref. 2a 472).  The witnesses at their wedding were George William Bishop and Elizabeth O’Rourke.  Charlotte was born in the Hammersmith area of London and in March 1901 the census conducted that month revealed that the childless couple was living at Surbiton in Surrey.  The census return listed the couple as Walter C Collett, age 32 from Ham in Surrey, who had taken up his father’s occupation as a carpenter, while his wife Charlotte from Hammersmith was 26.

 

 

 

By April 1911 Charlotte had given birth to a son who was born in the Surbiton area, where the family was still living at that time.  Walter Charles Collett from Ham was 42, Charlotte Collett was 35, and their son Walter Vincent Collett was just four years old, his middle name being taken from his grandfather’s second wife’s maiden name.  The marriage of Walter and Charlotte sadly end just over five years later when the death of Walter C Collett was recorded at Kingston register office (Ref.2a 566) during the month of December in 1916 when he was only 48.

 

 

 

1Q36

Walter Vincent Collett

Born in 1906 at Surbiton

 

 

 

 

1P74

Edward Collett was born at Ham in Surrey during 1869, and was baptised at Petersham in Ham on 19th December 1869, the second child of Charles George Collett and his wife Ann.  Edward was one year old in the census of 1871 when he was living at Ham with his parents and older brother Walter (above).  Sadly it was not long after that when he died.

 

 

 

 

1P75

Alice Collett was born at Ham in 1872, the eldest daughter of Charles and Ann Collett.  She was nine years old in 1881 when she was living at Acre Road in Kingston-on-Thames.  Ten years later she was still living with her family in Kingston when she was 19.  Whether through her father’s business as a carpenter or not, Alice later met and married Horace W Daysh, a carpenter from Fareham in Hampshire who was twenty years older than Alice.  Just after the start of the new century, according to the census conducted in March 1901, Alice Daysh, age 29 and from Ham, was living in Kingston-upon-Thames with her carpenter husband Horace, who was 49, and their daughter Annie S Daysh who was two years old.

 

 

 

Ten years later in April 1911, the same Daysh family was still living in Kingston at 78 Gordon Rd (78 Canbury Avenue), but had living with them at that time Alice’s widowed mother Ann Collett, age 74, and Alice’s youngest sister Louisa Collett (below).  According to the census return Horace Daysh was 37, his wife of twelve years Alice Daysh from Ham in Surrey was 39, and their daughter Annie Daysh was 11.

 

 

 

 

1P76

Lucy Collett was born at Ham in 1873 and was eight years old in the census of 1881, when she was living with her family at Acre Road in Kingston-on-Thames, where she was listed as Lucey Collett.  Ten years after that she was recorded as Lucie Collett, age 18, when she was still living in Kingston with her family.   It has not been discovered where her parents were in 1901, but at that time unmarried Lucy Collett, age 28 and from Ham, was a tailoress and a boarder at the home of spinster Sarah Gooddy at 27 St James Road in Kingston.  Also boarding at that same address was Lucy’s sister Louisa (below).

 

 

 

 

1P77

Louisa J Collett was born at Kingston in 1876, the last child born to Charles George Collett and his wife Ann.  In the census of 1881 she was her family were living at Acre Road in Kingston, where Louisa was five years old.  It was as Louisa J Collett, age 14, that she was still living with her parents in Kingston in 1891.  On leaving school she lived and worked with her older sister Lucy (above) in Kingston where they both employed as tailoresses.  Where her parents were in 1901 has not yet been revealed, but on the occasion of the census that year Louisa Collett, age 23 and a tailoress from Kingston, was boarding with her sister Lucy at 27 St James Road in Kingston, the home of Miss Sarah Gooddy.  Following the death of her father Louisa returned to live with and support her elderly mother, and in 1911 the two of them were staying with Louisa’s older sister Alice Daysh (above) at her home in Kingston.  At that time in her life unmarried Louisa Collett was 34.

 

 

 

 

1P79

Percy George Collett was born in 1888 at Bromley where the birth was recorded (Ref. 2a 409) during the last quarter of the year.  He was the second of the three children of George and Lucy Collett and as Percy Collett he was two years old in 1891 and was 12 in 1901 when on both occasions he and his family were still residing in Bromley.  After a further ten years, when he was described as being unmarried Percy George Collett who was 22 and from Bromley in Kent, he was living in Cranbrook fifteen miles south of Maidstone.

 

 

 

 

1P81

Herbert William Collett was base-born at Clerkenwell in 1888, the eldest child of Herbert William Collett, formerly Herbert William McCann, by Elizabeth Lile Mills who were not husband and wife at that time.  His birth was recorded at Holborn register office (Ref. 1b 712) during the last quarter of 1888, which was two years before his parents were actually married.  In 1891 he was named as Herbert Wm Collett, aged two years, when he was living with his family at 21 Rounall Buildings in Clerkenwell.  Three years later in 1894 Herbert Collett of 9A Rosamund High Street at Clerkenwell in the Holborn district of London was attending Great Ormond Street Children’s Hospital.  By 1901 he and his family were residing at 12 Easton Street in Clerkenwell when Herbert Collett was 13.  Tragically Herbert and his five surviving siblings were made orphans during the following year, as a result of which the six children were taken in by Doctor Barnados. 

 

 

 

What happened to Herbert William Collett after that is not known for sure, while there was a William Collett from London who was 23 and serving overseas with the British Army at the time of the census in 1911.  Seven years earlier in 1904, and two years after they had lost their parents, Herbert’s two siblings Ada and Frank both sailed to Canada, where they were joined by sisters Louisa May and Jessie in 1911.

 

 

 

 

1P82

Ada Elizabeth Collett was born at Clerkenwell on 12th December 1891, and was baptised at St James’ Church in Clerkenwell on 24th January 1892, the daughter of pastry cook Herbert William Collett and his wife Elizabeth who were living at 5 Wherlin Street at that time.  Nine years later, at the time of the census in 1901, Ada Collett was 10 years old and was living with her family at 12 Easton Street in Clerkenwell.  It was during the following year that her father died, and his death was followed not long after by the passing of Ada’s mother.

 

 

 

As a result of being orphaned Ada and her five surviving siblings were taken in by the Doctor Barnados Children’s Home in 1903 and during 1904 she and her younger brother Frank (below) were shipped off to Canada.  Once in Canada she was placed in the care of a family in Kent County who eventually adopted her, when her name was changed to Ada Florence McKerracher.  In 1913 she married Ira Ross who was born in 1884, with whom she had three children, Sanford Ross, Dorothy Ross, and Helen Ross.  Upon the death of her husband in 1950, Ada later married Hollie Ellis.  Ada Florence Ellis was happily reunited with her two sisters Louisa May and Jessie (below) and they lived close to each other in the same Kent County town in Ontario for much of their later life.  And it was there that she died in 1981.

 

 

 

 

1P83

Frank Collett was born at 9A Rosamund High Street in Clerkenwell towards the end of 1893 and his birth was recorded at Holborn register office (Ref. 1b 715) during the first three months of 1894.  By 1901 the family had moved house two times and was residing at 12 Easton Street in Clerkenwell where Frank was eight years old, having previously been living at 23 Rawstorne Street, just of Goswell Street, in 1898.  Tragically in 1903 Frank and his sibling were orphaned by the death of their parents who died within a short time of each other.  As a result of their loss all of the children were taken into a Doctor Barnados Children’s Home from where Frank and his sister Ada (above) were taken by the organisation to Canada during the following year.  It is known that his sister was adopted by the family in Ontario with whom she was placed, while it is not known what happened to Frank.

 

 

 

 

1P85

Louisa May Collett was born at Clerkenwell on 24th January 1898, the birth being registered by her mother on 9th March 1898 at Holborn register office (Ref. 1b 726).  At that time her parents, Herbert and Elizabeth Collett, were living at 23 Rawstorne Street, just of Goswell Street.

 

By the time of the census in March 1901 the family was living at 12 Easton Street in Clerkenwell where May Collett was three years old.  With both of her parents dying during the next two years, Louisa and her five siblings were taken into care with the Doctor Barnados Children’s Home, and it was through that organisation that she and her sister Jessie (below) eventually sailed to a new life in Canada during 1911.

 

 

 

The above photograph of Louisa May Collett, provided by her granddaughter Marilee Rylett Magder, was taken in Canada possibly on the occasion of her wedding day, since she was holding a posy of flowers and had a ring on the wedding finger of her left hand.  The larger picture from which it was extracted also includes her younger sister Jessie, whose portrait from the same photo is presented below.

 

 

 

Louisa May Collett married (1) Charles Ernest Rylett in Kent County, Ontario during March 1922.  Charles was eight years older than Louisa, having been born in 1890.  It was also at Kent County that Louisa and her sister Jessie were reunited with their older sister Ada Elizabeth (above).  The marriage of Louisa and Charles produced a son for the couple, Leslie Rylett (1923-2006) who in 1949 married Mary Ellen Bruegeman who was born in 1927.  However, after twenty-eight years together they were divorced during 1977.

 

 

 

After enjoying only seventeen years together Charles Ernest Rylett died in 1939, following which his widow Louisa May Rylett married (2) Alvin Campbell.  Later she was made a widow for a second time, after which she then married Preston Smith.  Louisa May Smith nee Collett died in 1989.  It was the marriage of Leslie Rylett and Mary Ellen Bruegeman that produced a daughter Marilee Rylett Magder, and it was Marilee of Whitby in Ontario who kindly provided all of the details for the January 2012 update of this family line.

 

 

 

 

1P87

Jessie Collett was born at Clerkenwell during December 1900, and was just three months old on the day of the census in March 1901 when she was living at 12 Easton Street in Clerkenwell with her family.  She was still only a baby when first her father Herbert Collett died in 1902, and he was followed shortly after by the death of his wife.

 

That double tragedy left their six children as orphans, who were then taken under the care of the Doctor Barnados Children’s Home.  In 1911 Jessie, together with her sister Louisa May (above) were taken to Canada to live, and the picture here was taken with the same sister around the time that she was married in 1922.

 

 

 

It was a few years later that Jessie Collett married Harold Barker (1904-1976) in Kent County, Ontario, just across the Canada/US border from Detroit.  Harold was born in 1904 and he and Jessie had three daughters, Mary Louise Barker, Doreen Barker, and Nancy Barker.  At some time during her life at Kent County that Jessie and her sister Louisa were reunited with their other sister Ada Elizabeth who had been adopted after arriving in Canada in 1904.  Harold Barker died in 1976 leaving Jessie to live a widow’s life for the next fifteen years, before she passed away in 1991.

 

 

 

 

1P88

Arthur William L Collett was very likely born at Hampstead on 10th July 1912 while his parents Arthur Charles Collett and his second wife Beatrice Isobel Manchester were living at 18 Gardnor Road, their address when they were married in October 1911.  His birth was recorded at Hampstead register office (Ref. 1a 1092) during the third quarter of 1912, when his mother’s maiden name was confirmed as Manchester.  It was during the second quarter of 1946 when Arthur W L Collett married Vera D Jarvis at Islington in London (Ref. 1b 287) – the same year his father died.  Their marriage is understood to have produced just the one son for the couple.  During the Second World War Arthur served with the British Army, possibly in Palestine, but was eventually invalided out of the army with ear problems.  His mother’s sister, Vera Frances Louise Penn nee Manchester made her Will in 1962 in which Arthur Collett of 20 Church Lane in East Finchley was bequeathed £100.  Very little else is known about the family at this time, except that Arthur William L Collett died at the age of 89, his death being recorded at Ross-on-Wye during October 2001.

 

 

 

1Q37

Michael A R Collett

Born in 1948 at Islington

 

 

 

 

1P89

Elizabeth Hannah Collett was born at Newport in Wales in 1867, the eldest child of Henry Albert Collett and his wife Mary Ann Thomas.  For some reason when she was four years old her family had returned to Gloucestershire where her second brother was born at Stonehouse in January 1871, and where they were still living two months later at the time of the census that year.  On that occasion though, Elizabeth H Collett who was four was not living with her family.  Instead she was staying with her grandmother, the widow Elizabeth Collett, at her home in nearby Woodchester.

 

 

 

Not long after that Elizabeth’s parents took the children back to Newport where two more children were born, before they moved to the Bath area of Somerset in 1877.  So by the time of the census in 1881 the family was living at 11 Alexandra Buildings in the Weston district of Batheaston, where Elizabeth was 14.  Ten years later she was still living there with her parents and six of her siblings in 1891 when she was unmarried at the age of 24.  With no record of her as a single lady after that time it is assumed that she was married by 1901.

 

 

 

It is possible but not proved, that Elizabeth may have married Samuel George Wood, and in 1901 they were living in Newport, but by 1911 they had taken their family to live in Wolstanton in Staffordshire.  Elizabeth Wood was 33 in 1901, although in 1911 she was recorded as Harriet Elizabeth Wood, age 44 and from Newport, when her husband was 49, and her children were Elsie Maude Wood, age 17, Dorothy Madge Wood, age 13, Clara Wood, age 11, and Harry James Wood who was nine.  However, this does seem likely to be the right Elizabeth, because her brother Henry (below) also ended up living in Staffordshire.  Elizabeth Hannah Wood nee Collett was more commonly known within the family as Lizzie or Auntie Lizzie.

 

 

 

 

1P90

Henry Thomas Collett was born at Newport during the fourth quarter of 1868, the eldest son of Henry and Mary Ann Collett.  He was two years old in the census of 1871, when he was listed as Henry T Collett who was staying at Stonehouse in Gloucestershire with his parents.  Shortly after that, the family returned to Newport where two more children were added to the family, before they moved to Somerset.  By 1881 he and his family were living at 11 Alexandra Building at Weston near Bath, where Henry was 13 and was still at school, but on leaving school he appears to have left Somerset and followed his older sister Elizabeth to Staffordshire.

 

 

 

Later in his life he followed his father’s example and was employed on the railways, a job that took him to Burton-on-Trent where he met and married Bertha around the turn of the century.  According to the census of 1901 Henry was 31 and was working as a railway engine driver.  His wife Bertha was 26 and their only child at that time was Winifred, who was not yet one year old, who had been born at Burton where the family was living.  No more children were added to the family, and by 1911 the family of three was still living in Burton-on-Trent, where Henry Collett was 42, Bertha Collett, was 37, and Winifred Collett was 10 years old.

 

 

 

Joan Murton nee Townsend (Ref. 1Q43) recalls her Uncle Harry Collett and Auntie Bertha Collett, together with their daughter, and Joan’s cousin, Winnie Collett.

 

 

 

1Q38

Winifred Collett

Born in 1900 at Burton-on-Trent

 

 

 

 

1P91

James Edward Collett was born on 2nd January 1871 at Noah's Ark in Stonehouse and was baptised on 16th July 1871 at Kings Stanley, when he was confirmed as the son of Henry Albert and Mary Ann Collett.  The family was recorded in the Stonehouse census of 1871 when James E Collett was two months old.  He was no longer living with his family in 1881 when they were recorded at 11 Alexandra Building in Weston, nor has he been located elsewhere in that year’s census, or the next one in 1891.  However, it was at St Olave’s in London during 1897 that he died at the age of 18.

 

 

 

 

1P92

William Albert Collett was born on 24th October 1872 at Newport where he was baptised on 17th November 1872.  It was around 1877 that his family left South Wales, when they moved to Weston near Bath and the census of 1881 recorded the family as residing at 11 Alexandra Building in Weston, where William was nine years old.  Ten years later as simply William Collett he was still living with his family in 1891 when he was 19.

 

 

 

It was during the mid-1890s that William Albert married Clarissa Frances Beatrice with whom he had two children, the first children being born before the end of the century and the second well after the start of the new century.  According to the census of 1901 William was 28 and an iron moulder living at Weston with his wife Clarissa 25, and their son William who was two years old and born at Bath.  Ten years later in April 1911 the family was living in Bath and had been added to by the birth of the couple’s second son.  William A Collett was 38, Clarissa F Collett was 35, and the two sons were William P H Collett who was 12, and Ernest L Collett who was two years old.  Joan Murton nee Townsend (Ref. 1Q43) recalls her Uncle Bill Collett, Auntie Rissa Collett, and her cousins William and Ernest Collett.

 

 

 

The death of William A Collett was recorded at the Somerset register office in Bath (Ref. 7c 42) during the month of December in 1952, when he was 80 years of age.  He left no Will, so the administration of the personal effects of William Albert Collett of 5 Lyndhurst Road, Oakfield Park in Bath amounting to £961 was granted to his widow Clarissa Frances Beatrice Collett.  She survived her husband by just less than eight years, when Clarissa died at Woodland Grove, Weston Park in Bath on 25th March 1960.  The Will of Clarissa Frances Beatrice Collett was proved at Exeter on 3rd May 1960, when her youngest son Ernest Leonard Collett, a buyer, was named as the executor of her estate of £953 11 Shillings 6d.

 

 

 

1Q39

William Percival H Collett

Born in 1898 at Bath

 

1Q40

Ernest Leonard Collett

Born in 1909 at Bath

 

 

 

 

1P93

Robert Edward Collett was born at Newport in 1875 and he was six years old in 1881 while living at 11 Alexandra Building in Weston near Bath with his family.  He was still there in 1891 when he was 15, and after a further ten years Robert Collett from Newport was 25 and a tailor’s presser who was still living with his parents in Weston.  Furthermore he was still a bachelor ten years later in 1911, at the age of 35, when he was still living at Weston with his parents.  However, according to the memory of his niece Joan Murton nee Townsend (Ref. 1Q43) she clearly remembers her Uncle Bob Collett, his wife Katherine, who was Auntie Kate Collett, who had two sons, her cousins Cecil and Stanley.

 

 

 

New information received from Jennie Cordner in August 2013 confirms that Robert E Collett married Kate E Pickett at Bath, where the register office recorded the event (Ref. 5c 1103) during the third quarter of 1912.  The same record listed the witnesses at the wedding as Annie Anstey and Edward Gillard.  In addition to this, the birth of their son Cecil also confirmed the child’s mother’s name as Pickett.

 

 

 

Robert Edward Collett was residing at a property referred to as Moorlands in Englishcombe Lane in Bath when he died as a patient in St Martin’s Hospital in Bath on 19th July 1957 at the age of 82.  The death of Robert E Collett was recorded much later at Bath register office (Ref. 7c 17) during September that year.  He left a Will in which his eldest son Cecil Edward Collett, a foundry foreman, was named as the sole executor of his estate of £129 12 Shillings 11d.

 

 

 

1Q41

Cecil Edward Collett

Born in 1914 at Bath

 

1Q42

Stanley George Collett

Born in 1917 at Bath

 

 

 

 

1P94

Frances Adelaide Collett was born at Weston near Bath on 3rd January 1878 and was listed as being three years old in the Weston census of 1881, and was 13 in 1891.  By 1901 she was 23 and was working as a dressmaker with her sister Ethel (below) while still living with her parents at Weston.  Frances was the grand-mother of Merryl Wells of Hemel Hempstead.  Shortly after the census that year Frances married Thomas Henry Gullick of Bath, with whom she had four children, the first two being Vera May Gullick, who was born at Bath in 1904, who was six years old in 1911, and Francis Albert Gullick, who was born in London during September 1910, who was only seven months old in April 1911.  At that time the family of four was residing in the Paddington area of London in 1911, and over the following years the family was added to with the births of Lesley Gullick and Victor Gullick.  This coincides with the memory of Joan Murton nee Townsend (Ref. 1Q43) who recalls her Uncle Tom, Auntie Frances, and cousins Vera, Frank, Lesley and Victor.

 

 

 

 

1P95

Diana Collett was born at Weston near Bath during January 1881 and was listed as being two months old on 3rd April that year when she was living at 11 Alexandra Building in Weston with her family.  Sadly Diana was the second of the four children of Henry Albert Collett and his wife Mary Ann Thomas to suffer a premature death, the first being her older brother James (above, the third being her younger sister Maria, together with a fourth unidentified child mostly likely born into the family after the death of Maria.

 

 

 

 

1P96

Ethel Gertrude Collett was born at Weston near Bath on 10th May 1883.  According to the next two census returns she was still living with her family at Weston in 1891 and 1901.  In the first of these she was recorded simply as Ethel Collett, age eight, while ten years later she was Ethel F G Collett who was 18 and employed as a dressmaker, like her older sister Frances (above).  By 1911 Ethel was married, but the only Ethel Gertrude from Bath was Ethel Gertrude Whercat who was 26 and living in the Pontypridd district of Glamorgan with her husband Worthy Whercat who was 33, and their first child Reginald John Irving Whercat who was one year old.  This conflicts with the memory of Joan Murton nee Townsend (Ref. 1Q43) who recalls the family as Uncle Ted Weaving, Auntie Etty, and their four children Disa, Aubrey, Raymond and Ralph, the family eventually emigrating to South Africa after the war in 1919.

 

 

 

 

1P98

Lillian May Collett was born at Weston near Bath on 6th February 1887 and she was five years old in the Weston census of 1891 when she was listed as Lillian Collett.  Upon leaving school she worked in a tobacconist’s shop as confirmed by the 1901 Census for Weston when she was 16 (sic) and still living with her parent as Lilian M Collett.  Lillian was unmarried ten years later when she was still living with her parents in Weston where she was described as Lillian May Collett of Weston who was 24.  She later married Sydney Garraway and they had a son, James Garraway, according to the memory of Lillian’s niece Joan Murton nee Collett who remembers her Auntie Lily, Uncle Syd, and cousin Jim.

 

 

 

 

1P99

Nellie Edith Evelyn Collett was born at Weston near Bath on 19th August 1888, the daughter of Henry Albert and Mary Ann Collett nee Thomas, and was strangely recorded in the census of 1891 as Nellie Collett who was under one year old, rather than two years of age.  However, in the Weston census of 1901 she was more accurately described as Nellie E E Collett, age 13.  It is now known that she later married George Leonard Fisher and that they had a son Harold after the census in 1911, when Nellie Fisher from Bath was 22 and was living at Bath with her husband George Leonard Fisher age 25 and also born at Bath.  Joan Murton nee Collett has a clear memory of her Auntie Nelly, her Uncle Len and their son, her cousin Harold.

 

 

 

 

1P100

Rosaline Winifred Collett was born at Weston near Bath on 29th May 1893, the last child of Henry Albert Collett and Mary Ann Thomas, and was listed with her family as Rosaline W Collett age eight years in 1901.  Ten years later she was described using her full name of Rosaline Winifred Collett, when she was 17 and confirmed as having been born at Weston, where she was still living with her family.  Towards the end of 2012 contact was made with the only child of Rosaline Winifred Collett, she being Joan Murton nee Townsend who now lives in South Africa.  And it is thanks to Joan that we now know a little more about her mother Rosaline and other members of this family line.  Rosaline Winifred Collett was married to Edward George Townsend at Bath on 31st January 1924.  It was also at Bath where the couple was living when their daughter was born during the following year.  Sometime after the marriage of their daughter in Bath, Rosaline and Edward left Bath and settled in Cheltenham where the couple’s two grandchildren were born, and Rosaline Winifred Townsend nee Collett died on 7th May 1971.  Her husband survived her by six years, and when Edward George Townsend died at Cheltenham during 1977, following which he was buried there with his wife.

 

 

 

1Q43

Joan Edna May Townsend

Born in 1925 at Bath

 

 

 

 

1P101

Henry Charles Collett was baptised at Frampton-on-Severn on 2nd November 1868, the same year that his parents Charles Collett and Mary Catherine Boucher were married.  Within the baptism register he was named as the son of Charles and Catherine Collett but, only two weeks after he was baptised, he died at Frampton on 16th November 1868, where he was buried.

 

 

 

 

1P102

Albert James Collett was baptised at Frampton-on-Severn on 8th September 1872, the son of Charles Collett and Mary Catherine Boucher.  He was less than four years old when he died at Frampton on 3rd April 1876, where he was buried with his older brother Henry (above).  On the day of his baptism his father was correctly named as Charles, while his mother was named as Ann, as she was two years later for the baptism of his sister Louisa (below).

 

 

 

 

1P103

Louisa Elizabeth Collett was baptised at Frampton-on-Severn on 20th December 1874, the eldest daughter of Charles and Ann Collett.  It seems highly likely that whatever illness or ailment ended the life of her brother Albert James (above), also affected Louisa since a second burial record at Frampton recorded the death of Elizabeth Louisa Collett in 1876.

 

 

 

 

1P104

Margaret Esther Collett was born at Frampton-on-Severn during 1879 the youngest daughter of Charles and Mary Catherine Collett.  She was two years old in the census of 1881 when she was living with her parents at Leather Bottle Lane in Frampton, and they were still there ten years later in 1891 when Margaret was 12.  Her father died at Frampton in 1893 and five years later both Margaret and her mother passed away in 1898 and were buried at Frampton.

 

 

 

 

1P105

Arthur Stanley Collett was born at Frampton-on-Severn in 1880 and was the fifth child of Charles Collett and Mary Catherine Boucher.  His family was living at Leather Bottle Lane in Frampton at the time of the census in 1881 although Arthur was not included on the census return, and where he was is still not known.  Ten years later Arthur Stanley Collett from Frampton was 11 years old when he was listed with his family, which was residing at Rosamonds Green in Frampton, according to the census of 1891.  Over the next five years his father, his mother, and his sister Margaret (above) all passed away, after which no trace of Arthur has been found.

 

 

 

 

1P106

William George Collett was born at Frampton-on-Severn in 1886, the last child born to Charles Collett and Mary Catherine Boucher.  And it was at Leather Bottle Lane in Frampton that four-years-old William George was living with his parents in 1891.  He was only seven years old and still living at Frampton when his father died, although after that sadly event it is unclear what happened to William.  It would appear that he eventually moved north to Lancashire, but this has not been proved.  However, at the Church of St Andrew in Eccles on 23rd June 1933 widower William George Collett, the son of Charles Collett, deceased, was married by licence for the second time to Mary Ellen Ashurst, a widow of 43 from 529 Barton Road in Eccles.  Mary was the daughter of Thomas Blinkhorn deceased, a former cotton polisher, while the witnesses were John William Egan and Ellen Egan.

 

 

 

 

1P111

R Collett, full name not known, was the daughter of Wallace Edwin at Rosewood in Queensland.  From a later family story told by her married daughter Edna Sunner, we know she was married and that her married name was Mrs R Henning.  The story, reported as a magazine article, and told during an interview with Edna Sunner, is re-produced in full below but with additional information in brackets [ ] which, in one case, marked* replaces incorrect information about the village of Amberley close to where he was born at Woodchester in Gloucestershire.  This overrides the original assertion that Amberley was a town in Sussex.

 

 

 

“The name Amberley was given to the area [of Queensland] by Mr James Edwin Collett [Ref. 1N58], a farmer who arrived from England in the 1850s to settle on a property at 3 Mile Creek west of Ipswich.  He called the property ‘Amberley’ after his home at *[Amberley in Gloucestershire].  Mr Collett originally commenced growing cotton, cutting timber and general farming on the property.  However, with the restoration of American grown cotton after the Civil War to the British spinning mills, the cotton growing declined.  The area then remained as primarily dairy farming up until 1938.

 

 

 

Forty years later, on 25th July 1978, Mrs Edna Sunner of Ipswich retold the history of her pioneer family.  With F-111s slicing the air above her Ipswich home, the swift aircraft provided a personal link with the past.  Four generation of one family’s history lie in their flight path.  Taking off from RAAF Base Amberley, they leave land once tilled by Mrs Sunner’s great grandfather James [Edwin] Collett.  The planes climb over farmland and swing over her mother’s childhood home.  The family’s history encapsules the development of the Ipswich area – from the slab hut days of James Collett to the urban prosperity of Mrs Sunner’s modern brick home in Horan Street.

 

 

 

Her family’s Ipswich story began in the 1850s when James Edwin Collett and his wife Martha, arrived with their four sons and one daughter to begin general farming.  Mrs Sunner is unsure how long the Collett family remained at Amberley – but they left lasting monuments behind them.  The local Congregational Church building was named Amberley Church to honour the family’s religious work.  The family’s links with the area were weakened after 1881 when Mrs Sunner’s grandfather, Wallace Henry Collett, and his wife Harriet Perrem, moved to Rosewood.  Wallace Henry lived in the area until 1944, when he died in the Lockyer Hospital at the age of 87.  The spent his final years living with his daughter, Mrs R Henning – Mrs Sunner’s mother.”

 

 

 

 

1P112

William Henry Collett was born at Rosewood in Queensland on 30th April 1885, the only known son of Wallace Edwin Collett, who was also known as Wallace Henry Collett, and his wife Harriet C Perrem.  It was at Rosewood on 19th August 1908 that he married Ethel Lydia Shelton who was born on 6th June 1886 in the English village of Hucknall Torkard in Nottinghamshire, today simply known as Hucknall.  Their marriage produced six daughters, as listed below, the first of them being born only three months after the couple’s wedding day.  William was a fruiterer, a carrier and a shop proprietor during his working life.  William Henry Collett died on 19th March 1958 at the age of 73 years, following which he was buried at Tallegalla to the north of Rosewood.  It was just over four years later when his widow Ethel Lydia Collett nee Shelton passed away on 14th May 1962 when she was 75, after which she too was buried at Tallegalla Cemetery.

 

 

 

1Q44

Charlotte Caroline Collett

Born in 1908 at Rosewood, Qld.

 

1Q45

Ivy Elizabeth Perrem Collett

Born in 1911 at Rosewood, Qld.

 

1Q46

Lydia May Collett

Born in 1917 at Rosewood, Qld.

 

1Q47

Leila Maude Collett

Born in 1920 at Rosewood, Qld.

 

1Q48

Enid Joyce Collett

Born in 1924 at Rosewood, Qld.

 

1Q49

Valmai Doreen Collett

Born in 1926 at Rosewood, Qld.

 

 

 

 

1P116

Hector Elliott Collett was born at Rosewood in Queensland, Australia on 26th May 1900, the only son and youngest of the four children of James Fords Collett and his wife Elizabeth Elliott.  He later married Rose Margaret Krebs and they had two daughters.  Rose Krebs was born on 10th December 1900 at Englesburg, which today is Kalbar near Fassifern in Queensland. 

 

It would appear from this photograph that he served with the army during the Second World War.  Hector Elliott Collett died in Queensland on 12th September 1956, just twenty years after his father died, and it was almost exactly ten years later that his wife Rose Margaret Collett nee Krebs died there on 6th November 1966.

 

 

 

His army service record reveals that he served with the Australian Army, Service Number QX8676, and that his date of enlistment was 7th June 1940 when he was living at East Ipswich in Queensland.  The enlistment office was at Kelvin Grove in Queensland, and his next-of-kin was recorded as his mother Rose Collett, following the death of his father in 1936.  He was discharged from duty on 27th September 1945 with the rank of Warrant Officer Class 1.

 

 

 

1Q50

Joyce Fords Collett

Date of birth unknown

 

1Q51

Hazel Elliott Collett

Born on 27.12.1925 at Brisbane

 

 

 

 

1P117

Alice Maude Collett was born at Coln St Aldwyns where she was baptised on 27th February 1870.  As Alice M Collett she was eleven years old in the Coln St Aldwyns census of 1881 when she was living with her draper and grocer father Francis Collett and the rest of the family.  It would appear that she never married and lived all of her life at the family home in Coln St Aldwyns.  In 1891 Alice was 21 and a school teacher and was living with her widowed mother Harriet Collett and the rest of the family.  By March 1901 Alice was then working as a seamstress at the age of 30, while living with her mother and sister Lydia both of whom were also seamstresses.  Ten years later according to the census of 1911, Alice Maude Collett of Coln St Aldwyns was still living there with her seventy years old mother when Alice was 41.

 

 

 

 

1P118

Lydia M Collett was born in 1872 at Coln St Aldwyns and like her sister Alice Collett (above) she never married.  She first appeared in the census of 1881 when she was nine years old and living with her family at Coln St Aldwyns.  She was still living there with her widowed mother Harriet Collett ten years later when Lydia was 19 and a draper’s assistant, helping her mother manage the family business.  By 1901 her mother had given up the family draper business and instead Lydia 28, her mother Harriet, and her sister Alice were all working as seamstresses while still living at Coln St Aldwyns.  Sometime during the next ten years Lydia left Coln St Aldwyns and moved north to Stow-on-the-Wold where she was living alone in April 1911.  At that time she was a spinster aged thirty-eight and her place of birth was confirmed as Coln St Aldwyns.

 

 

 

 

1P119

Charles William Collett was born at Coln St Aldwyns in 1874 and was seven years old in the census of 1881.  Ten years later he was still living with his widowed mother at Coln St Aldwyns when he was seventeen and employed as a carpenter, while by March 1901 he was recorded as Chas W Collett age 26 who was living and working in the Wells area of Somerset.  By April 1911 Charles was married and was living at Axbridge in Somerset where his two children up to that time had been born.  The census returns listed the family as Charles William Collett, age 39 and from Coln St Aldwyns, his wife Jessie Catherine, who was 29 and from Wells, and their two children Clifford William Collett age three years, and Francis Edgar Collett who was one month old.

 

 

 

Charles’ wife was Jessie Catherine Brown, the daughter of carpenter William Henry Brown and Annie Brown of South Street in Wells, whose birth was recorded at Wells (Ref. 5c 520) during the second quarter of 1881.  It was also in Wells, at St Cuthbert’s Church, that she was baptised on 23rd June 1881.  Her marriage to Charles William Collett was recorded at Wells register office (Ref. 5c 994) during the last three months of 1907.  On the day of the census in 1901 Jessie K Browne (sic) was 19 years old and working as a dressmaker, while still living with her family at South Street in Wells.

 

 

 

It is now established that at least one more child was added to the family after 1911 and he was known as Jessie Collett.  He enlisted with 4th Battalion of the Somerset Light Infantry and was Private Jesse Stanley Jack Collett, service number 5676458, and when he was 27 he was killed in action on 29th June 1944 and was buried at the St Manvieu War Cemetery.  His military service record confirmed that he was the son of Charles William Collett and his wife Jessie Catherine Collett.

 

 

 

1Q52

Clifford William Collett

Born in 1908 at Axbridge

 

1Q53

Francis Edgar Collett

Born in 1911 at Axbridge

 

1Q54

Jesse Stanley Jack Collett

Born in 1917 at Axbridge

 

 

 

 

1P120

Herbert F Collett was born at Coln St Aldwyns in 1878 and was two years old in 1881.  His father Francis died during the next few years so by the time of the census of 1891 Herbert was an errand boy at the age of 12 when he was living with his widowed mother Harriet at Coln St Aldwyns and the rest of his family.  Herbert later became a groom and a gardener and in 1901 he was living and working at Little Faringdon, just north of Lechlade.  No record of a Herbert Collett born at Coln St Aldwyns around 1879 has been found in the census of 1911 and it is possible that he had died by then, and this may be the reason why his brother Walter (below) named his first child after him.

 

 

 

 

1P121

Walter Louis Collett was born at Coln St Aldwyns during 1879 and was one-year old in the 1881 Census for Coln St Aldwyns when he was living there with his draper and grocer father Francis Collett and the rest of his family.  Tragically his father died during the next decade, at which point his mother took over the running of the family business.  That was confirmed in 1891 when Walter was eleven and was still living at Coln St Aldwyns with his widowed mother Harriet and the rest of his family.  By 1901 Walter L Collett was 21 when he was living and working in the neighbouring village of Hatherop within the Cirencester registration district.  However, within the next few years he married Ruth and in 1908 she presented Walter with their first child.  According to the census conducted in April 1911, Walter Louis Collett of Coln St Aldwyns was 31 when he and his young family were still living in Hatherop, where his wife Ruth was 28 and their son Herbert Louis Collett was two years old.  It seems likely that further children were added to the family after that day.

 

 

 

1Q55

Herbert Louis Collett

Born in 1908 at Hatherop

 

 

 

 

1P122

Percy Allen Collett was born at Coln St Aldwyns, his birth recorded at Northleach (Ref. 6a 383) during the third quarter of 1881.  He was last child born to Francis and Harriet Collett, and was baptised at Coln St Aldwyns on 31st July 1881.  On living school he entered into domestic service and by the turn of the century he was working as a footman at Cricklade.  Whilst no obvious record of Percy has so far been found anywhere in Britain on the day of the census in April 1911, it was towards the end of that year when Percy Allen Collett married Florence Selah Horler at St John’s Church in Frome, Somerset, on 22nd November 1911.  In March 1901 Florence S Horler was living with her parents William and Emily Horler at Vicarage Street in Frome, when Florence was working as a milliner at the age of 19.  The birth of Florence Selah Horler was recorded at Frome (Ref. 5c 488) during the fourth quarter of 1881.

 

 

 

It is possible that the marriage resulted in the birth of one or more children, although none were named at the time of the death of Percy Allen Collett, nor was his wife named during the probate process.  This in itself is curious and perhaps raise the issue that the couple had separated before then.  What is known for sure is that Percy and Florence eventually settled in Lincolnshire and, on the occasion of the death of Percy Allen Collett from Coln St Aldwyns on 30th July 1957 he was residing at The Cottage in Brocklesby, just four miles from Immingham, north of Grimsby.  He was buried in the churchyard of All Saints Church in Brocklesby, when his wife was confirmed as Florence Selah Collett.  His Will was proved at Lincoln on 11th September that same year, when George Harry Borrill, a retired carpenter, was named as the sole executive of his personal effects valued at £1,366 7 Shillings 11d.

 

 

 

By the time of the death of his widow, eight years later, Florence Selah Collett nee Horler was living at 397 Pelham Road in nearby Immingham when she passed away on 1st April 1965.  The probate process was concluded at Lincoln on 21st July 1865 when settlement of her estate amounting to £2,045 was handled by designated executor Margaret Annie Catherine Thorndyke, a married woman, who may have been her married daughter.

 

 

 

 

1P123

Eliza Jane Collett was born at Eastleach Turville in 1872, the first child of Aaron and Louisa Collett.  She was eight years of age in the Eastleach Turville census of 1881, but only fifteen months or so after that her father died.  Her mother remarried in 1884 and none of her four Collett children were living with her at Eastleach Turville in 1891.  In fact no record of Eliza has been found so far in that year’s census returns.  It is however known that she became a school teacher and that she was married by the time of the census in 1901.

 

 

 

Eliza Jane Collett married Michael William Minchin from Northleach, the son of Jane Minchin from Coln St Aldwyns, where the three of them were living together in March that year.  Jane Minchin was 53, her son Michael W Minchin was 30, and his wife Eliza J Minchin from Eastleach was 28.  Michael was a tiler and a plasterer, while Eliza was described as being a teacher in a Co Eng School.  No children were born to the couple, and in April 1911 the same three people were still living in Coln St Aldwyns, when Jane was 63, Michael was 40, and Eliza Jane was 38.

 

 

 

 

1P124

William Collett was born at Eastleach Turville in 1874, the second child and eldest son of Aaron Thomas Collett and his wife Louisa Adams.  He was six years old in the census of 1881 when he and his family were still living in Eastleach Turville.  However, following the death of his father during the following year and then the remarriage of his mother near the end of 1884, William eventually left the home of his mother and his stepfather and by 1891 he was living and working in the Croydon area of Surrey.  William Collett from Eastleach was 16 years old and was a harness maker and a boarder at the home of thirty-two years old Emily M Corley from Eastleach and her husband David W Corley who was 33 and a coachman groom.  It is very likely that Emily was familiar with William’s family and arranged for him to work with her husband at 4 Crosland Road in Croydon.  No further record of him has been found in any later census.

 

 

 

 

1P125

George Collett was born in 1876 at Eastleach Turville according to the later census records, the son of carpenter Aaron Thomas Collett and his wife Louisa Adams.  In the first of the census returns, in 1881, George was four years old and on that occasion he was living with his family at Eastleach Turville.  Sadly his father died just over a year after that and, during the last three months of 1884, his mother was remarried.  On leaving school George went to live with his widowed grandfather Charles Collett at Coln St Aldwyns, and it was with him that he was living at the time of the census in 1891.   By that time George was 14 and was working alongside his grandfather as a carpenter’s apprentice.  The housekeeper was his aunt Eleanor Collett (Ref. 1O108) who was 43, and the enumerator for the census was his uncle Raymond Collett (Ref. 1O110).

 

 

 

According to the next census in March 1901 George’s grandfather had passed away and his remarried mother was living in Oxfordshire.  On that occasion George was living and working in Swindon where he was referred to in the census as George Collett, age 24 and from Eastleach, whose occupation was that of a carpenter.  George Collett was still not married by census in April 1911 which confirmed that he was a carpenter from Eastleach who was 34, who was living as a boarder at The Marsh in Wanborough, the home of widower Solomon Beasley of Wanborough and his son Albert.  Nothing more is known about George after that time.

 

 

 

 

1P126

Francis Charles Collett was born at Eastleach Turville in 1878 and he was listed as being two years old in the Eastleach Turville census of 1881 when he was living there with his parents Aaron and Louisa Collet and his three older siblings.  Francis was only three or four years old when his father died at Eastleach Turville during the second quarter of 1882, and it was during the last quarter of 1884 that his mother married for a second time when she wed Thomas Hall.  Curiously no record of Francis has been found in the census of 1891 when he was not living with his mother and stepfather at Eastleach Turville.

 

 

 

However, by the time of the next census in 1901 Francis C Collett, age 23 and from Eastleach Turville was once again living with his mother who, by that time was residing at The Bell Inn at Langford in Oxfordshire.  He was working as a labourer and was referred to as the stepson of head of the household Thomas Hall.  When or where Francis was married has not been determined.  What is known is that by April 1911 he and his older wife were living in the Windsor area.  Because of the obvious difference in their ages, Francis inflated his age by three years, making him older than his brother George (above).  The Windsor area census in 1911 recorded that Francis Collett from Eastleach in Gloucestershire was 35, instead of 32, while his wife Martha Collett was 45.  Probably because of Martha’s advanced years, it would appear that there were no children arising from the marriage.

 

 

 

 

1P128

Mildred Louise Collett was born at Shoreditch in London (Ref. 1c 64) during the first quarter of 1872, the first of the children of joiner Thomas Collett and Lucy Andrews Hall.  It was during the autumn of 1875 that she and her family left England on board the Zealandia for a new life in New Zealand, and upon their arrival they settled in North East Valley.  Sadly, she was only eight years old when she died on 11th May 1880 when living at Kelvin Grove in Dunedin with her widowed mother and three siblings.  She was buried three days later on 14th May at Northern Cemetery in the same grave where her late father was buried following his premature death in 1877.

 

 

 

 

1P129

Clara Emmeline Collett was born at Hackney in London (Ref 1b 454) during the third quarter of 1874, the second child of Thomas and Lucy Collett.  Clara was just one year old when her family emigrated to New Zealand on the sailing ship Zealandia and it was at Dunedin that both her father and older sister Mildred died, only two years and five years after settling there in North East Valley.  At the time of the death of her father in 1877 the family was residing at Lambeth Road in Dunedin, while three years later the reduced family was living within the Kelvin Grove area of Dunedin. 

 

 

 

It has not been proved, but it is likely, that Clara Emmeline Collett was the same person as Clara E Collett who was mentioned in an article in The Otago Witness on 23rd March 1893, which reads: “The labour commissionship for women has been given to Miss Clara E. Collett, who holds the degree of M A from London University, and whose sympathy for the poor is well-known.  Some of the best-written articles in our magazines and reviews, especially in The Nineteenth Century on the Labour problem, have emanated from her pen.”

 

 

 

Another article published in The Star on 12th November 1898 with the heading ‘Miss Colonia in London Confidences to her Cousins Across the Sea’ also made reference to Clara Collett, as follows: “Dear Cousin, it is almost a truism now to say that there is scarcely any field into which woman will not find her way, by gate or stile, if there be one, if not by boldly leaping hedge and ditch.  In the British Association which has just closed its meeting at Bristol, women were well represented, both as lecturers and hearers.  One of the papers that interested me most was that of Miss Clara Collett, of the Labour Department of the Board of Trade, who is quite one of the leading experts on women's work.”

 

 

 

A Ladies Page and Cosy Corner with an Emmeline as its writer and president, featured in The Otago Witness from around 1893 until 1909 and this is believed to be the pen-name of Clara Emmeline Collett. A typical weekly page would include Answers to Correspondents, Table Talk, a Weekly Article on a Subject of Interest to Women, Ladies' Gossip, Fashion Gossip, Country Entertainments, Weddings, and Home Interests.  Also within that same timescale The Otago Witness also published details of the marriage of Clara’s sister Thomasina (below) which took place in Australia in 1908 and which may have been instigated by Clara.

 

 

 

Another family living in the North East Valley at the time of the Collett family, was that of the Honourable William Mouat Bolt who had a son William Mouat Bolt who Clara Emmeline later married.  The Hon William Mouat Bolt took a prominent part in the Free Thought movement, acting as secretary of the first association and was a member of the Dunedin Schools Committee for four years, part of which time he was chairman, while also being actively engaged with the first trades council, of which he became vice-president.  In 1880 Mr. Bolt propounded a scheme of co-operative settlement on which he has lectured in various parts of the Colony.  It is there likely that it was the Hon. William Bolt who was an influence on the young Clara who obtained her Master of Arts Degree at the London University in the city where she born.

 

 

 

The Otago Witness of 31st October 1900 reported on the marriage of Clara Emmeline Collett and William Mouat Bolt in the following way.  “On Wednesday last the little church in Woodhaugh Valley was enlivened by a wedding party, the first marriage celebrated in the building, which was very tastefully decorated for the occasion.  The young couple were Mr William Mouat Bolt, fourth son of the Hon W M Bolt, and Miss Clara E. Collett of North-East Valley.  The presents, received from a large circle of friends, were rare, numerous, and valuable.  They included a beautifully bound volume of the Scriptures and a copy of Wesley's Hymns from the trustees of the church, and a handsome over-mantel from their fellow employees in Messrs A & T Inglis.  At the conclusion of the ceremony the party adjourned to the residence of the bride’s mother, and shortly afterwards the happy couple took a train for the north on their wedding tour.”

 

 

 

William and Clara Emmeline Bolt had three children.  Lucy Lois Thomasina Bolt was born in 1906 and in 1929 she married Gordon Herbert Beale who was born in 1902.  William Mouat Bolt was born on 13th April 1908 and on 23rd October 1933 at the Wesley Church in Taranaki Street, Wellington, he married Marjory Eleanor Halford who was born on 1st March 1912.  William Mouat Bolt (junior) died during 1972 and his wife Marjory passed away in 2002.  The last of Clara’s three children was Harry Collett Bolt who was born in New Zealand during 1910, while her husband, William Mouat Bolt (senior), died in New Zealand in 1932.  What happened to Clara Emmeline Bolt nee Collett after the death of her husband is not known at this time.

 

 

 

As can be read in the paragraph above, the Bolt family was prominent in early New Zealand history in parliamentary circles and a nephew of Clara’s husband was a leading early aviator in New Zealand about whom much has been written.  At Auckland Airport passengers will most likely travelled along George Bolt Memorial Drive to enter or leave to complex.  In addition to this some members of the Bolt family were good friends with members of the Brittenden family, Doreen Marie Agnes Brittenden having married Edward Carnarvon Collett (Ref. 4N12) at Dunedin, while Leslie Joseph Charles Collett (below) married Gertrude Louise Brittenden at Napier in 1912. 

 

 

 

 

1P130

Harry Bertram Collett was born at Lambeth Road in Dunedin (Ref. 1876/3539) during 1876, the son of Thomas and Lucy Collett, his family having only arrived in New Zealand from England during the previous year.  Tragically his father died when Harry was only one-year old and his eldest sister Mildred passed away three years later when she was only eight years of age. 

 

 

 

In 1917, at forty-years of age, unmarried Harry was employed as a presser by a company producing army uniforms for the First World War when he was living at 127 Elizabeth Street in Wellington.  It was during March that year that he made an appeal before the Wellington Military Service Board, as reported in the Evening Post on 14th March 1917, regarding enlistment in WW1 army service on the grounds that his occupation was in the public interest saying that he was a presser and examiner of military clothing.  Mr Crombie, for appellant, stated that Collett was 42 years of age and had been passed as fit, providing he underwent an operation.  His employer, an army contractor, had a great deal of military work on hand and Harry had twenty years' experience as a presser and two years as examiner and was the only presser he had.  During the past two years the witness had supplied about 50,000 garments to the Defence Department.  The appeal was dismissed and one month’s leave of absence was granted.

 

 

 

On 25th April 1917 Private Harry B Collett, service no 53694, was assessed before the Medical Board at Featherston Military Hospital who found he was suffering from hammer toe and was therefore unable to march or do drill and the Board recommended that he be discharged.  Harry Bertram Collett of 22 Konini Road in Hataitai was sixty-six years of age when he died on 23rd May 1942 and was buried at the Karori Cemetery in Wellington on 26th May 1942 in Plot 313J where his mother had been buried twenty-three years early.

 

 

 

 

1P131

Thomasina Martha Harriet Collett was born at Lambeth Road in Dunedin (Ref. 1877/13728) during 1877, the four and last child of joiner Thomas Collett and Lucy Andrews Hall.  Her father died on the second day of May that same year, so it has not been determined at this time whether or not he was still alive at the time of her birth.  The marriage of Thomasina was announced in The Otago Witness on 25th November 1908 when she was thirty-one.  The ceremony of the marriage of Frank A Coombs, the second son of John Coombs, and Thomasina M H Collett, the youngest daughter of the late Thomas Collett, both of Dunedin, was conducted on 4th November 1908 at the Wesley Church in Chippendale, Sydney, New South Wales, by the Reverend A J Burt.

 

 

 

 

1P135

Lucy Anne Collett was born at Piltown in County Kilkenny in Ireland on 12th December 1875, the first child of Thomas Collett from Hatherop and his wife Susan Harris from Piltown.  Sadly, she died not long after she had been born and was also buried at Piltown.

 

 

 

 

1P136

Henry James Collett was born at Stoke Damerel in Devonport in January 1881 the eldest surviving child of Thomas and Susan Collett.  Today Stoke Damerel is simply known as Stoke, a district within Plymouth.  At the time of the census in early April that year, Henry J Collett was two months old and living at 23 Clowance Street in Stoke Damerel with his mother Susan Collett from Kilkenny in Ireland.  His father Thomas Collett was a Corporal First Class with the Royal Navy and was away from home at that time.  Upon his father completing twenty-year’s service around 1888, the family moved to Swindon and in 1891 they were living a 4 York Terrace where Henry was ten years old.

 

 

 

The family was still altogether in Swindon by March 1901 when Henry was twenty and was employed by the Great Western Railway as a carriage body maker.  A few years later Henry married Amelia with whom he had a daughter.  All of this was confirmed in the census of 1911 when Henry James Collett aged 30 and from Devonport was living in Swindon with his thirty years old wife Amelia, and their four years old daughter Gwendoline Frances Collett.  It is not known at this time, whether or not any other children were added to the family during the following years.

 

 

 

1Q56

Gwendoline Frances Collett

Born in 1906 at Swindon

 

 

 

 

1P137

Thomas George Harris Collett was born at Stoke Damerel in Devonport in 1883, and was named after his father Thomas Collett and his mother Susan Harris.  He was eight years old in 1891, by which time his family have left Devonport and were living at 4 York Terrace in Swindon.  In 1901 Thomas G Collett of Devonport was eighteen and was working as a brass locksmith, while still living with his family in Swindon.  Ten years later Thomas was recorded in the census return of 1911 as Thomas George Harris Collett, age 28 and unmarried from Devonport, and at that time in his life he was living in the village of Langley Burrell near Chippenham in Wiltshire.

 

 

 

 

1P138

Herbert E Collett was born at Stoke Damerel in Devonport in 1887.  Shortly after he was born his father completed his service with the Royal Navy and the family moved to Swindon.  In 1891 Herbert was three years old and was living with his family at 4 York Terrace in Swindon.  They were still there ten years later when Herbert was thirteen.  Upon leaving school in Swindon, Herbert moved to the south-east of England and in April 1911 he was living and working in Steyning in Sussex.  He was twenty-four, unmarried, and he stated that he had been born in Devonport.  Although there were other Colletts living in Steyning at that time, none of them was with Herbert or related to him.  One of them was Anthony Collett from Combe in Oxfordshire (Ref. 38o37) who appears in Part 38 – The Oxfordshire Stonemasons Line.

 

 

 

 

1P141

Lucy May Ann Collett was born at Akaroa, south of Christchurch New Zealand during 1883, the first of the five children of Edward William Collett and his first wife Sarah Louisa Bates who were married during the summer of the previous year.  When Lucy was only four years old she and her family attended the Wainui School Annual Prize Giving celebrations held on 22nd December 1887.  During the day there was a picnic and athletic sports events, and a dance was held later in the evening.  In the sports, young Lucy Collett took second place in a boys’ and girls’ under six-year’s race, while her uncle, Joseph Bates, took first place in the youth’s 12-16 race. Lucy’s father Edward William Collett assisted in the organisation of the sports events, and upwards of forty couples attended the dance in the evening which was said to have been one of the most enjoyable and successful gatherings that had ever been held in Wainui.

 

 

 

Lucy obviously inherited her parents’ interest and talent in music and at the age of sixteen she successfully passed her Trinity College of Music (London) examination under the tutelage of her piano teacher Miss Davidson of Akaroa, as reported in the local newspaper on 14th November 1899.  Lucy then went on to play the organ during the services at her local church.  Sadly it was exactly eight years later, when Lucy was only 24, that she died at Akaroa on 31st October 1907.  An obituary printed in the newspaper on 5th November 1907 stated that “There was a very large attendance at the funeral of Lucy May Ann Collett on Sunday afternoon.  Many friends from Wainui and Bays, as well as Akaroa residents, followed in the cortège”.

 

 

 

The obituary continued by saying that “The Rev. Pringle read the burial service very impressively, and in the evening, at the Presbyterian Church, he made reference to her many good qualities, and the many good services that had been rendered by her.  The organ was draped and the pianist played the ‘Dead March in Saul’ and the ‘Vital Spark’.  There were numberless floral tributes”.

 

 

 

 

1P142

David Edward Leonard Collett, who was known as Leonard, was born at Jolie Street in Akaroa on 24th December 1884, the eldest son of Edward and Sarah Collett.  His early schooling was undertaken in Akaroa and he later attended Christchurch Boys’ High School.  He was 25 years old when he married Harriet Rebecca Andrews at Lyttelton during 1909.  Once married the couple made their home in Lyttelton where all of their children were born.  Harriet was born at Christchurch in 1885, and was the daughter of Thomas Andrews and his wife Rebecca Craze. 

 

 

 

Ten years before Leonard was born there was a chemist shop at the corner of London Street and Oxford Street in Lyttelton.  Although small it was well stocked with a large variety of patent and proprietary medicines and chemists’ sundries, and had a dispensing department and office at the back. The business originally established by Dr Macdonald was sold to Mr Vangioni in 1902.  Mr Vangioni was born at Akaroa in 1875 and was a son of Mr Joseph Vangioni, an old colonist of Akaroa.  He was also educated at Christchurch Boys’ High School and it was after that when David Edward Leonard Collett bought the business, who later passed it onto his son Bruce.  Father and son entered into a partnership, but eventually Bruce took over on his own account.  In addition to being a chemist, Leonard was also Deputy Mayor of Lyttelton for some time and built an impressive architecturally designed home at 25 Sumner Road in Lyttelton.  It was also at Lyttelton that Leonard and Harriet died, when first Harriet passed away during 1941, and was followed twenty-six years later when David Edward Leonard Collett died there during 1967.

 

 

 

1Q57

Joyce Elaine Collett

Born in 1913 at Lyttelton, New Zealand

 

1Q58

Ronald Leonard Collett

Born in 1917 at Lyttelton, New Zealand

 

1Q59

James Bruce Collett

Born in 1920 at Lyttelton, New Zealand

 

1Q60

Douglas Alister Collett

Born in 1923 at Lyttelton, New Zealand

 

1Q61

Eliot David Collett

Born in 1925 at Lyttelton, New Zealand

 

1Q62

Margaret Rebecca Collett

Born in 1928 at Lyttelton, New Zealand

 

 

 

 

1P143

Jessie E Louise Collett, who was known as Vida, was born at Akaroa around 1888, the daughter of Edward and Sarah Collett.  Vida was only four years old when she died at the North-East Belt of Akaroa on 8th February 1893.  She was buried at Linwood Cemetery on Butterfield Road in Christchurch with her grandfather Joseph Bates who had died just four months earlier on 3rd October 1892, the grave reference being Block 22, Plot 61.  It was also there that Vida’s grandmother Annie Bates was laid to rest following her death on 2nd January 1912.  The informant for the passing of her grandfather in 1892 was her own father Edward William Collett.

 

 

 

 

1P144

Leslie Joseph Charles Collett was born at Akaroa on 6th October 1890, the youngest son of Edward and Sarah Collett.  In the sports events at the Annual Wainui School Picnic held in March 1900 Leslie Collett was first in the Boys’ 10-12 race and his sister, Eileen Collett (below) was first in the Girls’ 8-10 race.  A Children’s Fancy Dress Ball was held in the Oddfellows Hall, Akaroa in June 1901 in which Leslie Collett was dressed as a sailor and Eileen Collett was a French Peasant.  Leslie was also the best man at the wedding of Millie Wright, the fourth daughter of Alex Wright of Akaroa who married William Bridgeman of Manawaru, Auckland on 16th July 1909.  In October 1907 a conversazione evening was held in the Oddfellows Hall in Akaroa for an evening of music and including a euchre tournament.  Leslie Collett was the successful gentleman in the euchre (card-game).

 

 

 

It was on 20th November 1912 when he married Gertrude Louise Brittenden at St Augustine’s Church in Napier (Ref. 1912/8538).  Gertrude had been born at Deal in Kent, England on 3rd September 1881, the daughter of William Brittenden and Hannah Jane Rodolph Dunn.  Gertrude excelled at sewing and drawing while attending the George Street School in Dunedin, gaining Standard III and IV Certificates in 1894 and 1895.  She was also one of the principal prize takers for girls in the events at a school picnic in 1896.  Leslie and Gertrude were still living in Napier when their first two children were born, but later moved to Christchurch where their last child was born, and where the couple was still living at the time of their deaths many years later.  New information recently received from Malcolm Moffitt in Perth, Australia, states that Leslie had a building partner, Bill Cross, and that they had worked together on the St Albans and Papanui Seventh Day Adventist Churches in Christchurch, and also the Ashburton Bridge in Mid-Canterbury.  Gertrude was a devout Seventh Day Adventist and it was perhaps inevitable that both Leslie and Bill also converted to the Seventh Day Adventist faith around that time.

 

 

 

Leslie built the family home at McFaddens Road in St Albans and, also took over sole ownership of the properties at 28 and 30 Armagh Street previously owned by his mother Sarah Louisa Collett who died in May 1941.  The two adjoining houses had been left to Sarah’s two sons Leslie and Leonard, but according to Nola Gertrude Moffitt nee Collett their sister, Leslie Collett purchased his brother’s share, only for the two properties to be later sold to Ogilvie Clifford.  Sadly Leslie Joseph Charles Collett died just over a year after his mother, when he died in tragic circumstances on 21st June 1942, just prior to his fifty-second birthday.  The report of his death read as follows:

 

 

 

“One man was drowned and two are missing and believed to have been drowned through a yacht capsizing at the mouth of the estuary at Sumner late last night.  The man drowned was Ernest William Dobbie, aged 23, an airman of 247 Fitzgerald Street, and those missing are Percy Benjamin Dobbie, aged 25, motor mechanic of the same address, and L. Collett, builder, of McFaddens Road.  The only known survivor is H. Collett (Harold Ernest Leslie Collett), of 139 Matsons Road.  He reached the home of Mrs Thomas Newburgh, in Sumner, about 11.45 p.m. in a very exhausted condition, and said he and his companion had been washed overboard when the tide came in.  The yacht was the ‘Pera’, which sailed from Lyttelton to Sumner, and became stranded in the mouth of the estuary.  The four men stayed on board, hoping to float the boat off when the tide came in.  The yacht was completely wrecked.  The wheelhouse and a large amount of debris was washed ashore by 1.30 a.m. today, and Mr. Dobbie’s body was washed ashore at about midnight.”  The two Dobbie boys were sons of William Dobbie and his wife Mabel Brittenden, who was Leslie Collett’s sister-in-law, she being Gertrude’s sister.

 

 

 

Gertrude Louise Collett nee Brittenden survived her husband by twenty-four years when she passed away on 7th September 1966.  Apart from being a devout Seventh Day Adventist, Gertrude also enjoyed playing and singing hymns on the piano with her grandchildren.  She had a gentle nature but when her grandchildren ganged up on her to stop her winning whilst playing Ludo, her raised voice was apparent to show her displeasure.

 

 

 

1Q63

Harold Ernest Leslie Collett

Born in 1913 at Napier, New Zealand

 

1Q64

Mavis Louisa Collett

Born in 1918 at Napier, New Zealand

 

1Q65

Nola Gertrude Collett

Born in 1920 at Christchurch

 

 

 

 

1P145

Eileen Adele Collett was born at Akaroa near Christchurch in New Zealand on 25th February 1892, the youngest child of Edward William Collett and his first wife Sarah Louisa Bates.  When Eileen was seven years old she attended the Wainui School Picnic and Sports Day.  In addition to each scholar being presented with a book, the following prizes were handed out by Mrs Collett, one of which was given to her own daughter Eileen for the Girls’ Handicap Race for 6 to 8 year olds.  Eileen was only 54 when she died in Christchurch on 28th August 1936.

 

 

 

 

1P146

Ernest Walter Raymond Gordon Collett was born at Christchurch in New Zealand on 10th September 1874, the eldest child of Ernest Collett and his wife Martha Varcoe.  He was a miller and in 1905 he married Agnes Gertrude Pearce who was born on 1st August 1876.  From the time they were married the couple lived at 17 Strickland Street in Christchurch for many years, together with four other Collett relatives, including Ernest’s brother Herbert (below), who lived next door at 15 Strickland Street.  A total of nine children were born to Ernest and Agnes over thirteen years, but sadly the last two, born in 1917 and 1919 were stillborn.  The brothers and sisters were very close, with many of them living in two adjacent houses.  Agnes Gertrude Pearce was born in New Zealand and died there in 1958 at the age of 81.

 

 

 

1Q66

Edna Ernestine Collett

Born in 1906 at Christchurch

 

1Q67

Raymond Leonard Collett

Born in 1906 at Christchurch

 

1Q68

Ruby Catherine Collett

Born in 1908 at Christchurch

 

1Q69

Constance Martha Collett

Born in 1909 at Christchurch

 

1Q70

Frances May Collett

Born in 1911 at Christchurch

 

1Q71

Arthur Stanley Collett

Born in 1913 at Christchurch

 

1Q72

Norma Gertrude Collett

Born in 1915 at Christchurch

 

 

 

 

1P147

Herbert Frank Collett was born at Christchurch on 29th January 1876, the second son of Ernest and Martha Collett.  Herbert later married Sarah Burrows who was born during 1878, with whom he had three children.  During his life Herbert was a cabinet maker and in 1906 he and his family lived next door to his brother Ernest (above) at 15 Strickland Street in Christchurch.  It was later in their life that Ernest and Sarah moved the short distance to Stourbridge Street in Spreydon, a suburb to the south-west of Christchurch.  Sarah Collett nee Burrows died in New Zealand during 1949, when she was 71.  After the death of his wife Herbert lived just four streets away from Stourbridge Street, when he moved in with his daughter Gladys Sutton and her husband Tom at their home in Conway Street, Spreydon.  Herbert Frank Collett was the grandfather of Brian Gregory Collett who kindly provided some of the details which has enabled his family to be included here.

 

 

 

1Q73

Gladys Mary Collett

Born in 1906 at Christchurch

 

1Q74

Leslie Herbert Collett

Born in 1908 at Christchurch

 

1Q75

Ernest George Collett

Born in 1914 at Christchurch

 

 

 

 

1P148

Robert George Victor Collett, who was known as Vic, was born at Christchurch on 21st February 1878.  Upon leaving school he moved around Christchurch a lot, presumably seeking work where he could find it.  Apart from a brush with the law and drinking after hours in a New Brighton Hotel, not a great deal is known about him.  It has not been established whether or not he was ever married.

 

 

 

 

1P149

Eleanor Mabel Collett was born at Christchurch on 15th September 1879, the eldest daughter and fourth child of Ernest and Martha Collett.  It would appear that she was known within the family as Ellen and Nell, and in 1917 she was unmarried and living at 20 Chancellor Street in Christchurch.  It was in fact within the First World War military records of her brother Arthur Samuel Gordon Collett (below) that Miss Ellen Collett (sister) was mentioned as his next-of-kin. 

 

 

 

Some years after that she was known to have lived at 448 Madras Street in Christchurch, and once again that address was referred to in the military records of her brother Arthur.  Other than that, no other information relating to Eleanor has so far been found, except it is known that she was very close to her brother Arthur, that she never married, and that she died in 1954.

 

 

 

 

1P150

Arthur Samuel Gordon Collett was born at Christchurch on 21st April 1882, another son of Ernest Collett and his wife Martha Varcoe.  Upon leaving school he learned his trade as machinist, a fitter and a turner, and worked at Hastings on the North Island prior to the First World War.  With the Great War raging in Europe, Arthur enlisted with the New Zealand Expeditionary Force on 21st February 1917 at Hastings.  At that time he was described as being 35 years old and single, being 5 feet 8 inches tall and weighing 158 lbs, with dark hair, grey blue eyes, and a medium complexion.  His occupation was that of a machinist, a fitter and a turner, with the company of R Holt & Sons of Hastings, which was also his last known address.

 

 

 

The other details on his entry form confirmed that his father was Ernest Collett, who had been born in Gloucestershire, England, and that his mother was Martha Collett deceased, who had been born in Norfolk, England, and that they had been residing in New Zealand for the last 60 years.  To the question, if single how many persons are absolutely dependent on you, Arthur had only inserted the name of his sister Ellen Collett.

 

 

 

He was accepted into the New Zealand Engineers 29th Reinforcement Regiment as Sapper A Collett 54311 on 1st May 1917, when his next-of-kin was named as his sister Miss E Collett of 20 Chancellor Street in the Shirley district of Christchurch.  That address was later amended to 448 Madras Street in St Albans, which was later changed to Lyndhurst in Christchurch.

 

 

 

It was on 13th August 1917 that Arthur sailed out of Wellington on the troopship Mokoia Evellington, bound for Glasgow in Scotland, where he arrived on 2nd October 1917.  From Scotland, the troops travel to the south coast of England where they undertook basic training, following which they then crossed the English Channel into France, arriving in Etaples on 13th June 1918.  Just over one year later, on 2nd July 1919 Arthur was in Liverpool boarding the ‘SS Somerset’ for the return journey to New Zealand.  Three days later he was admitted into the ship’s hospital, where he spent the next three days.

 

 

 

By the time peace was declared and Arthur had been discharged from the New Zealand Engineers on 17th September 1919 he had served a total of two years and one hundred and thirty-eight days, of which 2 years and 8 days had been spent overseas in Western Europe.  For his service during the war, he received the British War Medal and the Victory Medal which he received ay Lyndhurst, Canterbury during March 1921.

 

 

 

Arthur never married and in 1938 was recorded on the electoral rolls as living with his family at 17 Strickland Street in Christchurch.  Arthur Samuel Gordon Collett died while he was living at Burwood in Christchurch on 12th December 1958, aged 76.  His next-of-kin at that time in his life was named as Mrs C M Nicholls of 52 Puriri Street in west Christchurch, who was described as his niece, the daughter of his brother Ernest Walter Raymond Gordon Collett (above), she being Constance Martha Nicholls nee Collett (Ref. 1Q69) 1909–1989.

 

 

 

 

1P151

Harriet Clara May Collett was born at Christchurch on 8th March 1884, only the second daughter of Ernest and Martha Collett.  It was in 1912 that she married Thomas Lester Anderson Osborne.  Thomas was born in 1884 and died in New Zealand during 1963.

 

 

 

 

1P152

Leonard Ransom Collett was born at Christchurch on 15th March 1886, the youngest child of Ernest Collett and his wife Martha Varcoe.  Leonard, who was a printer and a storeman, married Elsie Kennedy Fleming in 1907, and their marriage produced two sons.  The electoral rolls in both 1935 and 1938 placed Leonard and his family living at 17 Strickland Street in Christchurch.  A later address was 62 Sinclair Street in Christchurch.  Leonard died on 5th September 1946, while Elsie died almost exactly five years after, on 15th September 1951, at the age of 66.  Both of them were buried at Bromley Cemetery in Christchurch.  Elsie Kennedy Fleming was born in the county of Devon in England during 1885.

 

 

 

1Q76

Clifford Collett

Born circa 1908 at Christchurch

 

1Q77

Ralph Collett

Born circa 1910 at Christchurch

 

 

 

 

1P153

George William Collett was born at Christchurch on 28th October 1875, the eldest of the two children of George William Collett and his wife Margaret Coutts.  He was barely two years old when his father died, leaving his mother to raise two very young children on her own.  However, George was eventually raised by his widowed and re-married grandfather Samuel Collett who, shortly after taking over the care of the boy, moved to Waimate, midway between Christchurch and Dunedin to the south.

 

 

 

George was greatly influenced by living with his grandfather and as a result followed his grandfather’s example by becoming a builder, a brewer, and an undertaker, eventually taking over all of his grandfather’s business interests upon his retirement in 1899.  Three years later in 1902, when George was twenty-seven years old, he married Christina Sevicke Jones who was also 27, having been born in 1875. 

 

 

 

The couple had four children, the youngest one of whom later visited England to conduct research into his earlier ancestors, although it was their eldest son who wrote the story of the family’s life in his book entitled “The History of Two Families”.  George William Collett died on 5th March 1953, and both he and his wife are buried in Waimate Cemetery, where his grandfather and his second wife were also buried.

 

 

 

It was originally report here, that one of his sons was named Grahame, and that it was he who travelled to England to research his family’s origins.  However, the name of Grahame Collett does not appear in the very latest information used to update this family line in January 2012.  There is therefore a chance that Grahame has been confused with George, although the details for both indicate that they married different women.  As a result of this uncertainty, his name has been retained here as the fifth child of George and Christina, until such time as it can be categorically proved that he was not a child of their marriage.

 

 

 

1Q78

May Thompson Collett

Born in 1903 at Waimate

 

1Q79

Hori Coutts Collett

Born in 1906 at Waimate

 

1Q80

Edgar Harold Collett

Born in 1908 at Waimate

 

1Q81

Geoffrey Sevicke Collett

Born in 1912 at Waimate

 

1Q82

Grahame Collett

Date of birth unknown

 

 

 

 

1P154

Amanda Elizabeth Collett was born at Christchurch on 9th July 1877, the youngest of the two children of George William Collett and Margaret Coutts.  Following the death of her father not long after she was born, Amanda was raised by her mother, while her brother George (above) was taken into the care of the children’s grandfather.  Amanda later married Richard William John Maffey during 1901, and she died on 10th January 1969, following which she was buried with her late husband in Wellington Cemetery.  Richard, who was the son of John and Elizabeth Maffey and had been born in 1869, had died ten years earlier during 1959.

 

 

 

 

1P155

James Mann Collett was born at Christchurch on 18th December 1887, the base-born son of Mary Collett (previously Margaret Coutts), the widow of George William Collett who had died ten years earlier.  James married Flora Mildred Bell, the daughter of Charles and Ann Eliza Bell, on 28th August 1911 in Wellington, New Zealand.  Their known children, extracted from James’ World War One military records below were Jessie Guthrie McDonald Collett who was born on 25th May 1912 and Flora Barbara Collett who was born on 26th September 1914.

 

 

 

The Army Personal File for James Mann Collett included the following details:  Assigned to the 4th Battalion of the New Zealand Rifle Brigade, as a rifleman service number 38939, date of birth 18th December 1887, occupation carpenter employed by Mathews of Ashburton, next-of-kin his wife Mrs F Collett of 112 Cox Street in Ashburton, discharged on 27th June 1919.  The details relating to his marriage and his family stated that he had married Flora Bell, a spinster, at Wellington on 28th August 1911 and that he had two children, both born at Ashburton where James Man Collett died in 1967.

 

 

 

As with many soldiers returning from the Great War, James had trouble settling down into family life and in 1924 he set himself a prohibition order which he later broke when he left his home in Ashburton in May that same year with the intention of visiting Methven, and was found in Wellington shortly thereafter.  On 31st May 1924 he was charged in the Magistrates Court in Ashburton for a breach of prohibition order and was fined 20 shillings.  Flora Mildred Collett nee Bell died on 8th August 1954 at Ashburton and was buried in the Ashburton Cemetery, while thirteen nearly years later James Mann Collett died on 23rd March 1967, when his next-of-kin was named as Mrs R M Chambers of 156 Walnut Avenue in Ashburton.

 

 

 

1Q83

Jessie Guthrie McDonald Collett

Born on 25.05.1912 at Ashburton, NZ

 

1Q84

Flora Barbara Collett

Born on 26.09.1914 at Ashburton, NZ

 

 

 

 

1P156

Jane Collett was born in Birmingham in 1888, the eldest child of Herbert Edward and Emily Collett.  Her birth was recorded at the Aston register office (Ref. 6d 303) during the last quarter of that year.  Where she and her family were in both 1891 and 1901 has still not been determined, although by 1911 Jane Collett was 22 when she was living with her family in the Aston region of Birmingham.

 

 

 

 

1P157

Herbert Collett was born at Birmingham in 1890 and was 21 years old and married by April 1911.  He was referred to as Herbert Collett junior to avoid confusion with his father Herbert Edward Collett.  Herbert junior, his sibling and his parents, have not been located within the census returns of 1891 or 1901.  Herbert would have been under twenty years old when he married Nellie Elizabeth, who was a year younger than him.  Not long after they were married Nellie presented Herbert with a daughter whom he named jointly after his mother and his wife.

 

 

 

According to the April census in 1911, Herbert Collett junior was twenty-one, his wife Nellie Elizabeth was twenty, and their daughter Emily Nellie Elizabeth was seven months old.  At that time the young family was living in the Aston area of Birmingham, not far from where Herbert’s parents were living.  Other children were very likely born into the family during the years after 1911, but the only one who is known about at this time is a son, Albert Edward Collett, who was born fifteen years later.  From his military record it is also known that Herbert and Emily were living in the Kingstanding area of Birmingham in 1945 when they were informed of the death of their son.

 

 

 

1Q85

Emily Nellie Elizabeth Collett

Born in September 1910 at Birmingham

 

1Q86

Albert Edward Collett

Born in 1926 at Birmingham

 

 

 

 

1P161

John Charles Collett was born in early 1901 and was baptised at the parish church in Kings Norton on 17th April, when he was recorded as the son of Charles Collett, a farmer, and his wife Alice Collett.  At that time in the family’s life, they were residing at Redhouse Farm in Kings Norton.

 

 

 

 

1P168

Aggie Eliza Collett was born on Prince Edward Island on 4th June 1894, where she was baptised on 18th October 1894, the only known child of William and Alice Collett who was six years old in the census of 1901.

 

 

 

 

1P175

Maudie Leona Collett was born in California on 13th December 1898, the eldest of the four children of James Bradford Collett and his wife Janey Truscott.  She married Robert H Mum who was born at Wisconsin around 1897.  Up until the US Census in 1920, Maudie was living with her parents at their home in Warms Springs, Inyo.  It was shortly after that when she and Robert moved to Berkeley in California.  She and Robert had a son, Sidney Mumm who was born in Sacramento on 30th August 1928, following which the family of three was living at Woodland, Yolo, California in 1930.  Maudie Leona Mumm nee Collett died at Tulare in California on 14th April 1987, while her son Sidney Mumm died there on 29th June 2003.

 

 

 

 

1P176

Florence H Collett was born at Bishop, Inyo on 24th July 1903, the daughter of James and Janey Collett.  Her early life was spent living with her family at Township 1 in Inyo, and at Warm Springs in 1920.  It was during the early 1920s that she married Walter Ancel Ray who had been born at Greenfield, Adair in Iowa on 23rd December 1899.  On 11th March 1925 Florence presented her husband with a daughter, Barbara Ray, and by 1930 the family of three was living at Caliente, Lincoln in Nevada.  Florence H Ray ne Collett was still living at Caliente when she died during December 1986, while her daughter Barbara was living in San Diego when she died on 31st August 2008.

 

 

 

 

1P177

Mabel Berniece Collett was born in California on 18th February 1906, the third daughter of James and Janey Collett.  Like her three sisters, ‘Mable’ was living with her parents at Township 1 in Inyo up to 1910, and by 1920 the family was living at Warm Springs in Inyo.  Also like her sisters, ‘Mable’ was married during the 1920s, when she wed Leonard L Parish who was born in Texas on 15th September 1901.  Once married the couple settled in Sacramento where their two daughters were born.  Virginia Ruth Parish was born on 14th July 1926, and Beatrice Lea Parish was born on 11th October 1927.  The family was living in Sacramento in 1930, and it was there also that Mable Berniece Parish nee Collett died on 10th May 1985.  Her husband Leonard had died there over twelve years earlier on 13th January 1973.  Sadly their two daughters both died in 2005; Virginia on 19th April at Sacramento, and Beatrice on 29th November at Roseville, Placer in California.

 

 

 

 

1P178

Beatrice Evelyn Collett was born at Bishop, Inyo in California on 12th June 1908, the youngest of the four daughters of James Bradford Collett and his wife Janey Truscott.  Up until the time of her marriage Beatrice lived with her family at Township 1, Inyo, and later at Warms Spring.  It was possible at Warms Springs in Inyo that she married Aarian Sydney Cakebread on 17th November 1927.  He was the son of William Cakebread and Henrietta Marie Schwendel and was born in California on 19th September 1903.

 

 

 

Following their wedding day, the couple settled in San Jose, Santa Clara in California, where their one child, William Keith Cakebread was born on 21st February 1930.  Beatrice Evelyn Cakebread nee Collett died at San Jose on 4th December 1988, her husband having died there two years earlier on 21st February 1986, the day of their son’s 56th birthday.  William Keith Cakebread also lived most of his life in San Jose, where he died on 2nd December 2005.  He was the father of Cherie Mosher who put together the history of this branch of the Collett family, although it was through contact with Andrew Collett (Ref. 3Q18) that it now appears in this family line.

 

 

 

 

1Q1

Valerie Joyce Collett, whose date of birth is not known, married Cyril Dunsby with whom she had two children.  They were Steven, who was born in 1951, and Diane, who was born in 1955.  Steven is married and has a son Christopher, while Diane is now Diane Humphreys and has three daughters, Rebecca, Danielle and Sarah.  All three girls are married and have presented their mother with two grandchildren, they being Danielle who was eight and Angel who was three in July 2008.  After being divorced from her husband Cyril later in her life Valerie reverted back to her maiden name and is once again known as Valerie Collett.  Thanks go to Diane and her mother Valerie, who kindly provided the information that has resulted in the update of their family’s information.

 

 

 

 

1Q2

John D Collett was born in Australia on 31st May 1940, where his three sons were also born.  It was John from Notting Hill in Victoria, who kindly provided information relating to his direct line of Collett ancestors.  In 2010 John is still Managing Director of Anglo Italian Concrete, and it is with the company that his two sons Simon and Chris both work.

 

 

 

1R1

Simon John Collett

Born on 11.10.1970 in Australia

 

1R2

Christopher Andrew Collett

Born on 08.11.1972 in Australia

 

1R3

Jonathan Saville Collett

Born on 01.02.1977 in Australia

 

 

 

 

1Q3

Florence Verbena Collett was born in New Zealand during the later months of 1906 and was the first child born to William Henry Collett and Ellen Elizabeth Nettell who were married earlier that same year.  Although no details are currently known about Florence after she was married, it is known that she gave birth to a daughter Betty Florence who was born in 1930 and who was Betty Florence Hobday, aged 83, in 2013 when she confirmed the names of her mother’s four siblings.  At that time Betty was living in Auckland, New Zealand.

 

 

 

 

1Q6

Daniel David Collett was born in New Zealand on 12th April 1911, the fourth child of William and Ellen (Nellie) Collett.  It would appear that he never married and the only other known aspect of his life is that he died in New Zealand during 1996.

 

 

 

 

1Q8

Maud Alice Collett was born at Hamilton in New Zealand on 3rd July 1920, the only known child of Francis Albert Collett and Rhoda Charlotte Simons.  Around the time of the Second World War she was married Hector George Whyte who was born at Christchurch in 1921 and who died at Hamilton on 4th December 2012.  It is established that there was at least one child born into the family and that was Roger Whyte.  Today Roger, and his wife Lesley, own and operate the apple orchard at Hamilton that was original set up by his parents.  The only other detail known about Maud Alice Whyte nee Collett is that she had died eight years before her husband during 2004.

 

 

 

 

1Q11

WILLIAM HENRY JOHN COLLETT was referred to as Willie when a boy; as Will by his close family for all of his life; and as Bill by his wife, her family, and his work-mates.  He was born on 1st December 1909 at 7 Bathampton Street in Swindon and he married Noreen (Nora) Alice Maud Harman on 26th September 1936 at St Paul's Church in Swindon.        The photograph was taken in his early twenties.

 

Bill and Nora, who was born on 15th September 1910 at Borehamwood in Hertfordshire, lived all of their married life at 140 Whitecross near Abingdon-on-Thames, where all four of their children were born.

 

William’s occupations were those of boilermaker with the Great Western Railway, car-body builder with the Ford Motor Company at Dagenham and public service vehicle driver with Abingdon Coaches.  He had the unfortunate distinction of being made redundant from every job of work he every turned his hand to.  In the late 1950s he was made redundant yet again when Abingdon Coaches was taken over by Tappins Coaches of Wallingford.

 

 

 

However, undaunted, he drew on his past experience as a boilermaker to apply for the post of stoker with the Ministry of Public Buildings & Works at the Royal Air Force base at Abingdon.  This, at fifty years of age, required him to embark on a course of study in heating engineering.  His hard work on the correspondence course was rewarded when he gained a City & Guilds qualification.

 

 

 

Almost inevitably he was again made redundant, but this time it would be his last.  His newly acquired qualification enabled him to become a heating engineer with the Oxford Universities Laboratories, where he stayed until his retirement in 1975.  For many years he travelled the seven miles to and from work in Oxford on a pedal-cycle, until he eventually treated himself to the luxury of a motor car.  Ironically this was an old upright black Ford Popular of the type that he had helped build while at Dagenham in the 1930s.  It was the first mass-produced car that in 1937 cost £100 and, according to Henry Ford, ‘you could have in any colour as long as it was black’.

 

 

 

Before being married, the young William was a regular member of the Territorial Army.  During World War Two he was a ‘desert rat’ with the Royal Kent Yeomanry of the Royal Artillery and was awarded the North Africa Star and bar, plus four other medals.  He travelled extensively with his regiment throughout the war years, sailing to Iraq via Cape Town, travelling overland down through Palestine and across into Egypt to join the forces involved in the battles between Montgomery and Rommel.  He eventually sailed across the Mediterranean to advance up through the length of Italy and into Europe.  Within a few days of arriving in Venice the peace treaty was signed to mark the end of the war in Europe. 

 

 

 

While in Egypt in 1943, and by a sheer coincident which surprised then all, William was reunited with his two younger brothers Bert and John (below) during a period of leave in Cairo.

 

 

 

His GWR apprenticeship certificate was signed by C B Collett (Ref. 4N28) the Chief Mechanical Engineer responsible for the design of the Kings and Castles classes of locomotive.

 

 

 

Details of the family line of Charles Benjamin Collett can be found in Part 4 - The Great Western Line leading up to the reference 4N28.

 

 

 

William Henry John Collett died of a carcinoma of the pancreas on 15th November 1990 at the Marcham Road Hospital at Abingdon in Oxfordshire, while Noreen Alice Maud Collett nee Harman, who suffered for fifteen years with Alzheimer’s Disease, passed away on 31st January 2004.

 

 

 

1R4

Patricia Collett

Born in 1937 at Abingdon

 

1R5

Joyce Collett

Born in 1940 at Abingdon

 

1R6

Brian Clifford Collett

Born in 1946 at Abingdon

 

1R7

Mary Susan Collett

Born in 1950 at Abingdon

 

 

 

 

1Q12

Ellen (Nell) Agnes Collett was born on 22nd May 1911 at 7 Bathampton Street in Swindon.  She married Leslie Goddard (a photographer) on 27th July 1946 and died on 18th September 1989 at 25 Swindon Road.  They lived most of their life in the family home at 7 Bathampton Street, where the two sons were born, looking after Nell’s mother Alice Louisa Collett.

 

In 1959 the whole family moved to 25 Swindon Road in Old Town Swindon.  Today Bathampton Street and the surrounding roads and buildings are designated as a conservation area as a mark of respect for Swindon’s great railway traditions of the past.                                                      This photograph was taken in April 1937.

 

 

 

1R8

Philip Goddard

Born on 02.08.1947 at Swindon

 

1R9

Richard Goddard

Born on 05.02.1949 at Swindon

 

 

 

 

1Q13

Harry James Collett was born on 29th November 1913 at 7 Bathampton Street in Swindon.  He married Frances Norris on 15th July 1939.  They spent the majority of their married life in Swindon where all three the children were born.  Photographs of Harry are rare.  This one was taken in January 1938.

 

Harry’s original occupation was that of a brass worker with the Bell Foundry in Croydon.  However, on his return to Swindon after the Second World War in which he saw active service with the British Army, Frances' father, who was a 1st Class Engine driver, secured Harry a job as a steam raiser with the GWR

 

 

 

He later became a brass moulder with the GWR which shortly after became British Rail.  His increasing blindness eventually forced a move to a less demanding job, that of transport cleaner with Howard Tennens Transport Company from where he retired.  Blind and in poor health, he lived his final years with Frances at 27 Beaulieu Close at Toothill in Swindon.  Harry James Collett died on 14th October 1991 and Frances died six months later in April 1992.

 

 

 

Following a chance meeting with Harry’s daughter Jane at the funeral of Albert Edward Collett (Ref: 1Q16) in August 2000, it was revealed that Harry had brought Jane up as his own child although it was only discovered when she was thirty-two years of age that he was not her real father.  Her mother Frances had conceived the child as a result of an extra-marital affair.  This was known by the extended Collett family who severely ostracised Frances but managed to keep it a secret within the family until Jane was informed by her father on her wedding day.

 

 

 

1R10

David Norris Collett

Born on 08.08.1942 at Swindon

 

1R11

Alan Francis Robin Collett

Born on 23.03.1947 at Swindon

 

1R12

Jane Collett

Born on 31.03.1956 at Swindon

 

 

 

 

1Q14

Alice Louisa Collett was born on 23rd September 1914 at 7 Bathampton Street in Swindon.  She married Stanley Dixon on 5th January 1935.   The children were both born in Swindon and this photograph was taken at the christening of their daughter on 12th September 1937.

 

Alice Louisa Dixon nee Collett lived her twilight years at Prospect Hospice in Swindon but passed away peacefully in hospital on 18th April 2014 following a stroke earlier that same week.  Alice was just five months short of her one-hundredth birthday, while her husband Stan had died many years earlier, when he passed away in April 1977.

 

 

 

1R13

Laura Dixon

Born on 05.08.1937 at Swindon

 

1R14

Derek Dixon

Born on 05.07.1942 at Swindon

 

 

 

 

1Q15

Rose Phyllis Louvain Collett was born on 19th October 1916 at 7 Bathampton Street in Swindon.  Her occupation was that of florist in a shop in the centre of Swindon.

 

She married (1) Stanley Goddard on 3rd June 1944 and (2) Jack Webb on 8th April 1978, both in Swindon.  The photograph was taken in July 1940.

 

Stan Goddard is believed to have been a distant relative of Leslie Goddard who married Rose’s sister Nell (above).  Neither marriage produced any children.

 

Rose Phyllis Louvain Webb died in Swindon during 1989 from cancer of the colon.

 

 

 

 

1Q16

Albert Edward Collett, referred to as Bert by the family, was born on 19th March 1918 at 7 Bathampton Street in Swindon.

 

He married (1) Freda Irish on 21st July 1941 at Mirfield in Yorkshire and (2) the widow Heather Frances Wall on 23rd November 1974 at Swindon.  His occupation was that of postman and he served with the Royal Army Service Corp at Westbury in Wiltshire before the Second World War, in which he saw active service. 

 

143 Redcliffe Street in Swindon was the permanent address for the family, where both daughters born.  Albert Edward Collett died in Swindon on 3rd August 2000 from bone cancer.  This photograph was taken prior to his first wedding in 1941

 

 

 

Bert’s second wife was born Heather Frances Holden and she was the daughter of an officer in the Gurka Regiment and was born in India on 2nd September 1923.  Tragically she died quite suddenly from a heart attack on 21st December 2008 just days after writing out all of her family Christmas cards.

 

 

 

1R15

June Collett

Born on 28.11.1944 at Swindon

 

1R16

Linda Rose Collett

Born on 26.03.1948 at Swindon

 

 

 

 

1Q17

Arthur Stephen Walter Collett, referred to as John by the family, was born on 29th April 1922 at 7 Bathampton Street in Swindon, where he married Lucy Lane on 11th June 1949 at Swindon.  They lived at 14 Stanley Street in Swindon where the two boys were born. 

 

John’s occupation was that of builder-labourer with the Great Western Railway.  He also saw active service during the Second World War with the Royal Wiltshire Yeomanry.  Early in the war he was thrown from a cavalry horse in Palestine, causing him permanent injury.

 

 

 

Arthur Stephen Walter (John) Collett died on 13th December 1987 and Lucy, who was born in Swindon on 17th March 1922, died a few months later of a broken heart on 11th April 1988.

 

 

 

1R17

Stephen Collett

Born on 09.04.1950 at Swindon

 

1R18

John Collett

Born on 21.02.1959 at Swindon

 

 

 

 

1Q18

Caroline Ruth Collett, referred to as Carrie by the family, was born on 20th December 1924 at 7 Bathampton Street in Swindon, where she married Walter Easter on 25th August 1945.  In their early days, Walt had been a garage owner in Swindon where both Carrie and their son Michael worked.  The two children were born while the family was still living in Swindon.

 

 

 

They later moved out of Swindon to live most of their married life at Cotswold Lodge in Great Coxwell near Faringdon in Oxfordshire, formerly in Berkshire until the boundary change in 1974.  However, due to Walt’s failing health and the need to be closer to the health care facilities that he now relied on, the couple moved back to Swindon in 1996.  During the early half of 2006 Walt suffered three strokes which later in the year resulted in the need for twenty-four-hour care.  He was therefore admitted into a nursing home at Wanborough where he died on 13th December 2006.

 

 

 

1R19

Carol Anne Easter

Born on 31.05.1946 at Swindon

 

1R20

Michael Easter

Born on 07.04.1950 at Swindon

 

 

 

 

1Q19

John Henry Collett, who was referred to as Jay by the family, was born on 9th October 1916 at Uxbridge where he married Ellen Irene Norton on 12th December 1943.  For work, he followed his father into the Bell Punch & Ticket Company in Uxbridge where he put the glass linings into steel barrels.  Both of their daughters were born at Uxbridge.  Later in life he worked for Fairey Aviation, after which he worked for Freddie Laker of Laker Airways.  In the 1990s John and Ellen were living at 412 Obelisk Drive in Northampton. 

 

 

 

It was at Market Harborough in Leicestershire that john Henry (Jay) Collett passed away on 20th July 2009 and his funeral was attended amongst others, by his nephew Alan Collett (Ref. 1R26), who provided the details of this sad event.

 

 

 

1R21

Linda Irene Collett

Born on 03.02.1951 at Uxbridge

 

1R22

Sharon Ann Collett

Born on 30.03.1962 at Uxbridge

 

 

 

 

1Q20

Ronald James Collett was born on 1st January 1924 at Uxbridge where he married Amy Louise Goodbody on 4th April 1946.  His occupation was that of works manager at a trade shop tool-room until the depression of 1981, after which he became chief inspector at an engineering works until his retirement in 1988.  The children were born in Uxbridge and during the 1990s the family home was 34 The Grove, Pott Row at Grimston in Norfolk.  Ronald James Collett died from cancer while still living at Pott Row on 27th May 1999.

 

 

 

1R23

June Collett

Born on 04.08.1952

 

1R24

Tony Collett

Born on 08.10.1954

 

 

 

 

1Q21

Lewis Frank Collett was born on 4th November 1926 at Uxbridge.  He married Ellen Williams on 9th May 1950 at Middleton in County Cork, Eire.  Ellen, who was known as Helen, was born on 11th November 1925.  As a single man he was severely injured in a motorcycle accident at Waterloo in Hampshire while on holiday at Portsmouth.  He was taken to Portsmouth Hospital where he lost the sight in one eye, but was tended to by an Irish nurse whom he later married.  He also changed his religion to become a Roman Catholic at this time.  His occupation was that of engineering draughtsman with the recording company HMV (His Master’s Voice) and after with Fairey Aviation which was later taken over by Westland Helicopters.

 

 

 

Prior to his retirement in 1991 he took up teaching engineering drawing at the local college of further education.  They lived at ‘Lewellen’ 163B Long Lane in Hillingdon in Middlesex where all four of their children were born.

 

 

 

Lew and Helen celebrated their Diamond Wedding Anniversary on Sunday 9th May 2010. 

 

Their received their card from the Queen and were taken out to lunch with their four children, their nine grandchildren and one great grandchild, plus of course their wives, and partners.

 

There were also three special guests, one of whom was a second cousin of Helen’s who went to school with her.

 

 

This picture of the happy couple was taken during their

special day, and was kindly supplied by their son Alan.

 

 

 

1R25

Elaine Collett

Born on 22.03.1951 at Hillingdon, Middx

 

1R26

Alan Collett

Born on 19.05.1953 at Hillingdon, Middx

 

1R27

Joan Collett

Born on 06.06.1956 at Hillingdon, Middx

 

1R28

John Joseph Collett

Born on 25.06.1964 at Hillingdon, Middx

 

 

 

 

1Q23

Harry Collett was born on 5th June 1913 at Woolwich.  He never married and worked with his father Bertram Henry Collett on Sir Edward Durrand's Estate at Langley near Winchcombe in Gloucestershire.  Harry Collett died on 15th November 1985.

 

 

 

 

1Q24

Bertram John Collett, referred to as Bert by the family, was born on 14th March 1915 in Dublin.  Like his brother Harry, he too never married.  His occupation was that of Registrar of Births, Deaths and Marriages at Winchcombe.  Upon his retirement he moved into a property that backed onto the garden of the house in which his sister Lily Bishop (below) lived in Cheltenham.

 

 

 

 

1Q25

Lily Rose Collett was born on 8th August 1919 at Langley near Winchcombe.  She married George Henry Bishop at Cheltenham.  Lily worked with her brother Bertram Collett (above) and was often used as a witness at registry office weddings.  George, her husband, was a solicitor in Cheltenham.

 

 

 

Their son David worked at Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) in Cheltenham, while younger brother Paul worked with his father George as a solicitor's clerk.  Neither of the sons ever married and all four of them were living at 15 Fairhaven Road in Cheltenham at the turn of the century.  George Henry Bishop died at Cheltenham on 30th January 2007.

 

 

 

1R29

David Bishop

Born in 1947 at Cheltenham

 

1R30

Paul Bishop

Born in 1952 at Cheltenham

 

 

 

 

1Q26

Cynthia Queenie May Collett was born in March 1910 and it was originally thought that this event had taken place at Bradford on Avon where her parents were married in 1909 and where her brother Ron (below) was born, although she was living in Chippenham with her parents in April 1911.  She later married Alfred Pickering around 1931 and 1932.

 

 

 

1R31

David was adopted and died while still young

 

1R32

Cynthia Pickering

Date of birth unknown

 

 

 

 

1Q27

Ronald Ernest Collett, referred to as Ron by the family, was born on 12th October 1912 at Bradford on Avon.  He married Zillah Lily Hayward at Swindon around 1932.  His occupation was that of accountant and later manager of the Co-op Bank in Swindon.  He was an accomplished landscape painter and some of his paintings were displayed in the bank.  In the 1990s he was living at 63 Plymouth Street in Swindon, his wife having died in 1981.

 

 

 

1R33

Margaret Jean Collett

Born on 06.06.1935

 

1R34

Sheila Collett

Born on 18.11.1938

 

 

 

 

1Q28

Robert William George Collett, who was referred to as Bob by the family, was born on 17th August 1919 at Trowbridge, where he married Joan Palmer on 18th February 1942.  He was a sales manager for Unigate Dairies and his hobby was copper plate writing.  At the time of the birth of his first child Bob and Joan were living in Devizes but later moved to the village of Holt just north of Trowbridge, with their second child being born in Trowbridge.  In the 1990s he was living at Flat 24 Raleigh Court, Pole Barn Road in Trowbridge.

 

 

 

1R35

Susan Collett

Born on 01.10.1949 at Devizes

 

1R36

Nicholas Collett

Born on 27.06.1953 at Trowbridge

 

 

 

 

1Q29

Frederick Walter Thomas George Collett, who was referred to as Tom by the family, was born at Cinderford on 21st March 1930.  He married Phyllis Dorothy Pound at Cinderford on 7th July 1951 and it was there that both of their children were born.  Tom did his national service at Woolwich Barracks in 1948 and later worked at the Cinderford branch of the Co-operative & Industrial Society.  Tom was the son of Walter Collett and Olive Ann Matthews, the daughter of Walter’s wife Mary.  It was Mary that played the part of mother to her grandson while Olive went on to marry first John Bennett and later Fred Bignall.

 

 

 

1R37

Andrew Keith Collett

Born on 04.09.1956 at Cinderford

 

1R38

Denise Lesley Collett

Born on 12.10.1960 at Cinderford

 

 

 

 

1Q31

Gladys Collett was born on 15th January 1923 at Drybrook where, on 23rd September 1946, she married John Griffiths.  In the 1990s they were living at Edge End in Coleford in Gloucestershire.

 

 

 

 

1Q32

Hilda Collett was born on 20th October 1925 at Drybrook where she married Thomas Baldwin on 28th April 1951.  They lived at 6 Prospect Place in Cinderford where their two daughters were born.  Elaine Baldwin was born on 28th March and Joyce Baldwin was born on 12th June 1957.

 

 

 

 

1Q33

John Nelson Collett was born in Gloucester on 9th March 1910, the eldest of the two known sons of John Henry Collett and his wife Dorothy Elizabeth Foster.  He was one year old in the census of 1911, when he and his family were living within the Stroud area of Gloucestershire.  It is established that John Nelson Collett never married and followed in his father’s footsteps by pursuing a career with the army and was later referred to as Lieutenant Commander John Nelson Collett.

 

 

 

John Nelson Collett was 88 years of age when he died on 30th July 1998 at Penzance in Cornwall, where his death was recorded (Ref. 53c 188) during August that year.  The notice in the Western News read as follows:  COLLETT - John Nelson 30/7/1998 aged 88 born in Cheltenham, funeral 7/8/1998 at Penmount Cemetery.”

 

 

 

 

1Q34

Anthony Foster Collett was born in Gloucester on 4th March 1911, and was the youngest of the two sons of John Henry Collett and his wife Dorothy Elizabeth Foster.  By the time of the census on the second of April 1911, Anthony’s parents had still to decide upon a name for their son, since he was simply recorded as a male of no age, while living with his family in the Stroud area of Gloucestershire.

 

 

 

During the Second World War Anthony was a submariner and was a Lieutenant Commander with the Royal Navy, for which he was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross on 21st November 1941, and the Bar to the DSC on 25th August 1944.  His naval record shows that he was made a Sub-Lieutenant on 16th January 1932, was promoted to Lieutenant on 16th March 1934, and obtained the rank of Lieutenant Commander on 16th March 1942.  He retired from the navy on 29th January 1948, having been based out of Sheerness and Chatham during his naval career.

 

 

 

During the war years he saw active service with the following submarines: HMS H34 from 26th April 1940 to 18th September 1940; HMS Unique from 19th September 1940 to 18th June 1942; HMS Upright from 1st July 1942 to 11th December 1942; and HMS Tactician from 12th December 1942 to 1st October 1944.  A diary record of some of the events of his war years can be found in Appendix One at the end of this file.  Towards the end of the war he was awarded and the Legion of Merit, a decoration bestowed by the President of the United States of America, which was announced in The London Gazette on 30th March 1945 in the following way:

 

 

 

“The King [George the Sixth] has been graciously pleased to give unrestricted permission for the wearing of the following decoration bestowed by the President of the United States of America for outstanding service in operations in the Far East.  The Legion of Merit, Degree of Commander, to Lieutenant Commander Anthony Foster Collett, DSC, Royal Navy.”  It seems highly likely that the award was made for the following event in 1944, recorded by a member of the crew of HMS Tactician.

 

 

 

The submarine Tactician was on patrol in the region of Sabang.  The Captain, "Farmer" Collett, had orders to proceed to Sabang, but to remain on the surface after dawn, to act as an air sea rescue boat.  Reason being that the combined Fleet Air Arm, namely H.M.S. Victorious and U.S.S. Saratoga were to raid the oil installations at Sabang. We, the Tactician, were on station; Oerlikon gunner (me), Vickers gunners, extra lookouts were ready and waiting.  Dead on time they came, the combined Fleet Air Arm; British and Yanks.  What a grandstand view we had of a most successful operation; it must have blazed for weeks.  Our job was to pick up any pilots shot down; the Japanese treatment of shot down pilots was indescribable.  All the pilots had been given our position and told that, should they have to ditch, to try to do it near us, to be picked up.  One American, Lt. Klahn, found his stern piece was alight, so he had no alternative but to ditch in the drink, regardless. 

 

 

 

Tactician's lookouts were all about, a bearing was taken, 380 revs passed to the engine room post haste to do as was our orders.  The fact that the boat came under fire from shore batteries did not deter our Captain, Lt. Cdr. Collett, from carrying out his orders.  Ably assisted by Lt. Klahn's fellow pilots, we hoved to under fire from shore batteries. 

 

 

 

We came alongside, almost, our stern swung away, Jimmy and Second Coxswain P.O. McNally were in a fix, target (the pilot) drifting away by this time.  P.O. McNally tied one end of a heaving line to his body, passed the gash end to Jimmy and me, then dived into the "ogin" to drag said pilot, who, hampered by his Mae West, was making little headway toward us.  On reaching the pilot, he had the combined efforts of Jimmy and me.  Still under fire from shore batteries, McNally achieved a "Johnny Weissmuller" and soon we had them both aboard - "Rev up Stokes, let's get the hell out of here!"  We got everyone below and then dived.  The operation was complete, the planes had returned to their carriers, some 300 miles distant.  Tactician on the surface that night (charging) had a super view of the burning oil - well, the officers and the lookouts did, no doubt.  In passing, it's time to say who we picked up; none other than Lt. Klahn, son of the Commander of the Saratoga.  The rest of the patrol was uneventful, some three weeks later we returned to Trinco.  A certain Commander U.S. Navy was first over the plank, followed by cartons of "Lucky Strikes" and ice cream.  He shook hands with the entire crew.  There followed an invitation to all (bar duty watch) aboard U.S.S. Saratoga.  The hospitality abounded (no drinks of course; U.S. ships are dry).  The grand finale of an unusual patrol was when watching a film on the vast deck, after big eats, the Captain of Saratoga spoke: "Men of the Saratoga, sitting among you tonight are some of the bravest men of the British Submarine Service, who snatched our Lt. Klahn from certain death by torture from the Japs at Sabang."

 

 

 

The aforementioned rescued US pilot Lt. Klahn, made his own comment on the event in the following way.  Imagine being rescued by a loin-cloth wearing captain of a submarine.  Knowing Collett as I did (he sold us this house 29 years ago and moved to a small place locally) I can vouch for his eccentricities.  In his final years, he used to drive around in one of those electric battery powered wheel-chairs. He often got stuck as he ran out of power on the hills here, and once was taken home by a farmer friend, still sitting in the wheelchair, which the farmer had picked up in his front loader”.

 

 

 

Anthony married ex-wren Margaret Frances Henson at Hexham Abbey in Northumberland on 25th November 1944.  Margaret, who was known as Wendy, was born on 27th August 1918, and was the daughter of Pease Henson and Rosemary Portman.  The marriage lasted for only four years, during which time there was no issue.  Margaret later married Demetrios Issaias and they had three children, Michael Demetrios, Barbara Helen Frances, and Timothy John.

 

 

 

After they were divorced Anthony later lived at Maisemore Park in Maisemore, to the north-west of Gloucester, up to the mid-to-late 1950s, and it was just short of his eightieth birthday, when Anthony Foster Collett was living in Wales that he died during the month of February in 1991.  In his later life he was a gentleman of leisure and collected orchids.

 

 

 

 

1Q35

Gerald David Martin Collett was born on 11th February 1928, when his father Gilbert Faraday Collett was approaching his forty-ninth birthday, which suggests that his mother, Dorothy Lawrence Collett nee Miller, was some years younger than his father.  The birth very likely took place in Gloucester and before his parents settled in Cheltenham.

 

 

 

He was educated at Cheltenham Collett from 1941 to 1945, following which he went to Trinity College in Oxford from 1945 to 1948, where he received his Bachelor of Arts degree in law with honours.  After being a flying officer instructor with the Royal Air Force Education Branch in 1949 and 1950, he became a barrister-at-law at the Inner Temple, and was called to the Bar on 26th January 1951.  From 1953 to 1960 he held the position of Crown Counsel for the Nyasaland Protectorate.

 

 

 

It was also at the end of 1953 that Gerald David Martin Collett married (1) Jill Hodder on 10th December 1953 in Nyasaland.  Jill was from Fountainstown, Ballea, Carrigaline in County Cork, Ireland, where she was born on 4th October 1932.  During the nine years following their wedding day two children were born to Gerald and Jill.  Around the time of the birth of their daughter in Cambridge, Gerald had been working there for the John Hilton Bureau as a legal advisor, following which he was appointed Solicitor General to the Bahamas in 1963, a post he held until 1970, when he became Attorney General in the Bahamas.

 

 

 

After three years as Attorney General, for the next seven years from 1973 until 1980 he was Queen’s Counsel for the Bahamas, Bermuda and Guyana, at the end of which he became a senior litigation counsel for the private legal practice of Dill & Pearman in Bermuda, where he worked during 1981-1983.  From 1983 to 1987 he was Puisne Judge at the Supreme Court of Bermuda, and from 1987 to 1989 he was the Chief Justice in the Cayman Islands.

 

 

 

With a break in his career after 1989, he eventually took up the appointment of Justice of Appeal in the Cayman Island, apposition he held from 1995 until 2004.  It was in 1991 that Gerald and Jill settled in Cork in Ireland, and ten years later on 28th April 2001 it was there that Jill passed away.  During her life Jill had been a garden historian and author – see Appendix Two for details of her two books.  Following the death of his wife, Gerald then married (2) Mollie Huth in 2003, but sadly she died that same year.  It was one month after he finally retired that Mr Justice Gerald David Martin Collett, CBE, QC, FCArb, BA, died in Ireland on 8th March 2005.

 

 

 

It was against his father’s wishes that Gerald became a lawyer, with his father Gilbert Faraday Collett always hoping that he would take over the Gloucester-based family business in chemical manufacturing set up by his grandfather John Martin Collett in 1869.  After working almost entirely abroad during his working life, serving largely as a Government Legal Officer in the rapidly diminishing remnant of the British Colonies, Gerald eventually had the satisfaction of achieving his ambition to become a judge. The Law was his vocation.  Justice, for him, was one of life’s fundamentals, the bedrock of civil life and human freedom, so consequently, justice should be done, and seen to be done, really mattered to him.

 

 

 

For a more detailed look at his life, see Appendix Two at the end of this file.

 

 

 

1R39

Robin Andrew Collett

Born in 1954 in Nyasaland

 

1R40

Lucy Deborah Collett

Born in 1962 at Cambridge

 

 

 

 

1Q36

Walter Vincent Collett was born at Surbiton in Surrey during 1906, the only known child of Walter Charles Collett and Charlotte Emily Tovey, who was four years old in the Surbiton census of 1911 and who was only nine years old when his father died during December 1916.  Walter Vincent Collette (sic) was 24 years old when he married Winnie Daisy Dale at the Church of Holy Trinity and St Peter in South Wimbledon on 4th April 1931.  Winnie was 21 and was named as the daughter of Frederick Edward and Mary Dale, while Walter’s father was confirmed as Walter Charles Collett, deceased.  By that time in his life Walter was an electrician.  It is not known whether Walter and Winnie had any children, nor where they settled after they were married.  What is known is that Walter V Collette (sic) died at the age of 60 in 1967, his death being recorded at the Greater London register office in Merton (Ref. 5d 454) during March that year.

 

 

 

 

1Q37

Michael A R Collett was born in 1848, the only son of Arthur William L Collett and Vera D Jarvis who were married at Islington.  And it was there also that his birth was recorded (Ref. 5c 1455a) during the last three months of that year, when his mother’s maiden name was confirmed as Jarvis.  Michael is known to have married and had at least one son.

 

 

 

 

1Q39

William Percival H Collett was born at Bath on 7th November 1898, the first of the two sons of William Albert Collett and his wife Clarissa Frances Beatrice Collett.  His birth was recorded at Bath register office (Ref. 5c 529) during the last three months of 1898 under the name of William Percival H Collett.  In 1901 the family of three was living in the Weston district of Bath when William was two years old.  Sometime thereafter the family moved into Bath where they were living when William’s brother (below) was born and where the family was living in 1911 when William P H Collett was 12. 

 

 

 

Nothing more is known about him at this time, except that his death was recorded at Bath register office (Ref. 22 0017) during September 1975 when he was listed as William Percival H Collett aged 75.  However, the marriage of a William P H Collett has been found in Dorset in 1928, when William P H Collett married Florence M Partridge in Bournemouth where the event was recorded (Ref. 2b 1868) during the third quarter of that year.

 

 

 

 

1Q40

Ernest Leonard Collett was born at Bath on 8th January 1909, the second son of William and Clarissa Collett, who was two years old in the Bath census of 1911.  Upon the death of his mother in March 1960 it was Ernest Leonard Collett, a buyer, who was made sole executor of her estate of £953 11 Shillings 6d.  Why he was not named as a joint executor with his older brother William (above) remains a mystery.  It was in 1938 that Ernest married Joyce May Poole, the wedding being recorded at Bath register office (Ref. 5c 1440) during the second quarter of that year.

 

 

 

It would appear that the couple spent their entire married life at Bath, since it was there that first Joyce passed away in 1986, and was followed nine years later by her husband.  The record of the death of Joyce May Collett nee Poole, aged 71, at Bath register office (Ref. 22 164) was during the month of June in 1986, when her date of birth was noted as being 16th May 1915.  Ernest Leonard Collett also died at Bath, where his passing was recorded (Ref. C51c 139) at the age of 86.

 

 

 

 

1Q41

Cecil Edward Collett was born at Bath on 15th July 1914, the son of Robert and Kate Collett, the event being recorded under the name of Cecil E Collett at Bath register office (Ref. 5c 847) during the third quarter of 1914, his mother’s maiden name confirmed as Pickett.  The only other known fact about Cecil at this time is that he was a foreman at a foundry in 1957, when he was named as the sole executor of his mother’s Will at Bath, and that he died during July 1997.  His death was recorded in Berkshire at Bracknell register office (Ref. 21a 35) at the age of 83.

 

 

 

 

1Q42

Stanley George Collett was born at Bath on 1st October 1917, the youngest of the two sons of Robert Edward Collett and his wife Kate E Pickett.  His birth was registered at Bath register office (Ref. 5c 602) as Stanley G Collett during the last three months of that year, when his mother’s maiden name was recorded as Pickett.  He later married Jessamine Saunders in 1940, the event recorded at Bath register office (Ref. 5c 1891) in the third quarter of the year.  It was under his full name of Stanley George Collett that his death was recorded at Bristol register office (Ref. 22 570) during February 1991 when he was 73.

 

 

 

 

1Q43

Joan Edna May Townsend was born at Bath on 30th March 1925, the only child of Edward George Townsend and his wife Rosaline Winifred Collett.  Joan was nearly twenty-three when she married Walter Murton on 7th February 1948 at Holy Trinity Church, Combe Down near Bath.  Walter was born on 9th July 1924 at, Sandal, Wakefield in Yorkshire and during his life with Joan she presented him with a son and a daughter.  Norrison Philip Murton, known as Philip, was born at Cheltenham on 2nd April 1952, while Hilary Collette Murton was born on 10th July 1956 when the family was still living in Cheltenham.  Walter Murton was a glider pilot in the Royal Air Force during the Second World War.  After the war he obtained degrees in Physics and Engineering which ultimately enabled him and his wife, together with their teenage child, to move to South Africa, when Walter was offered a senior position with ISCOR, SA. (Government Iron and Steel Corporation) in 1970.  At that time in their lives the family was residing in the village of Southam, just north of Cheltenham.  After thirty-six years in South Africa it was at Johannesburg on 13th July 2006 that Walter Murton died.

 

 

 

Joan’s and Walter’s son Philip studied at the University of Cape Town where he obtained a Bachelor of Science degree in Industrial Chemistry and more recently achieved an LL.B from UNISA in Pretoria.  He married Barbara Heydenryck of Johannesburg on 9th February 1980.  Joan’s and Walter’s daughter Hilary attended the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, obtaining a Diploma in Oncology Radiography (Radiation Therapy).  She was married to John Harrison of South Africa on 10th February 1979.  Their marriage produced three children while they were living in Johannesburg, and they were Timothy John Harrison, who was born on 19th July 1986, Christopher James Harrison, who was born on 22nd December 1988, and Nicholas Giles Harrison who was born on 22nd January 1992.

 

 

 

 

1Q44

Charlotte Caroline Collett was born at Rosewood in Queensland, Australia on 15th December 1908, the eldest of the six daughters of William Henry Collett and Ethel Lydia Shelton who were only married four months earlier.  Charlotte later married Norman Sparks and they had two children, Keith Sparks and Fay Sparks.

 

 

 

 

1Q45

Ivy Elizabeth Perrem Collett was born at Rosewood on 15th March 1911, the second daughter of William and Ethel Collett. Her third forename was the maiden name of her grandmother. Just prior to the Second World War, Ivy married Stanley Drew and they had two children, Judith Drew, known as Judy, who was born on 12th September 1941 and Gregory (Greg) Drew who was born on 23rd May 1946.  Ivy Elizabeth Perrem Drew nee Collett died on 30th March 1994 and was buried with her husband at Hemmant Cemetery in Brisbane.

 

 

 

 

1Q46

Lydia May Collett was born at Rosewood on 13th March 1917 and was known as Bub, another daughter of William and Ethel Collett.  She later married Colin Clifford Windle who was born on 17th October 1915 and who died on 26th July 1976.  Five years earlier Lydia May Windle nee Collett had passed away on 1st May 1971, both of them buried at Hemmant Cemetery in Brisbane. 

 

 

 

Lydia and Colin had two sons.  Bruce Windle was born on 3rd December 1949 and died on 13th March 2007 (his ashes interred at Hemmant Cemetery Brisbane with his parents.  He was married to Heather Godsall, and they had Shelley Miree Windle, Heather Colleen Windle and Calvin John Windle.  Bruce cherished Heather’s children from her previous marriage, and they were Lorna Mary (May) Cody and Kayti Elizabeth (originally Kathryn) Cody.

 

 

 

The second son of Lydia and Colin was Ross Windle who was born on 1st June 1954, who kindly provided all the new family details for the 2017 upgrade of this family line.  Ross married Ann Margaret Wilson, who was born on 3rd February 1955, and they have two daughters.  Liza Ann Windle was born on 3rd February 1982 and she retained her maiden name when she married Bradley Jon Childs who was born on 22nd September 1982.  Liza’s son Asher John Law was born on 1st March 2016.  The second daughter of Ross and Ann, Emma Kate Windle, was born on 10th June 1984 who is partnered with Christopher Murphy.

 

 

 

 

1Q47

Leila Maude Collett was born at Rosewood on 9th August 1920, another daughter of William and Ethel Collett.  Tragically, she was only three years and four days old when she perished in a terrifying house fire in Rosewood.  That terrible event was reported in the Queensland Times, Ipswich edition, on Wednesday 15th August 1923, as re-produced below, in which the child’s father was referred to by his second forename.  The death of her baby spurred Ethel Collett into raising money for an ambulance centre in the small town of Rosewood.

 

 

 

BURNING FATALITY.  CHILD BURNT IN BED.  MOTHER SEVERELY INJURED.  ROSEWOOD

A sad fatality occurred at Rosewood last night, when Leila Maud Collett the three-year-old child of Mr and Mrs Henry Collett, was the victim of a fatal burning accident.  The mother had put the child safely to bed in the front bedroom of the house, the lamp light was turned down.  About 8.30 she was ironing in the rear of the shop, which adjoins the residence.  Hearing a cry, she sent one of the children in to see if the baby was all right.  The child ran out screaming, and the mother, on reaching the room, was horrified to find the bed, in which she had placed the child, was in flames.  She rescued her little child from the flames and, although severely burnt herself, carried the child from the room.  The screams of the unfortunate child, and the glare of fire, had attracted the attention of the neighbours.  Dr Wallace, who was living opposite, and the two local chemists were immediately on the scene.  The child was found to be very badly burnt.  Everything possible was done by those present to alleviate its suffering.  At 11.30 p.m. it was conveyed by car to the lpswich Hospital.  She died at 2 a.m. this morning.  The fire in the house had meanwhile been extinguished by other workers.  The origin of the fire is attributed to the bursting of the lamp, which stood on the duchess, through which the curtains were evidently ignited.  Very great sympathy is felt for the bereaved parents in the sad loss of their child.”

 

 

 

 

1Q48

Enid Joyce Collett was born at Rosewood on 17th November 1924, the fifth of the six daughters of William and Ethel Collett.  Soon years later Enid married Noel Trevor, their marriage producing two children, Ross Trevor and Glen Trevor.

 

 

 

 

1Q49

Valmai Doreen Collett was born at Rosewood on 31st May 1926, the youngest of the six children of William Henry Collett and Ethel Lydia Shelton.  She married Francis Bradley, known as Bill, with whom she had three children.  They were Alan Bradley, Paula Bradley and Gary Bradley.  Valmai Doreen Bradley nee Collett died on 9th October 2007 and was buried at Kalgoorlie in Western Australia.

 

 

 

 

1Q50

Joyce Fords Collett, whose date of birth is not known, was the elder of the two daughters of Hector Elliott Collett and his wife Rose Margaret Krebs.

 

Very little is known about her; nor has it been discovered from where her second forename originated.

 

It seems highly likely that she was born in Brisbane, where her sister Hazel (below) was born, and it was there also that she died, although the year of her death is not known.

 

 

 

 

1Q51

Hazel Elliott Collett was born at Brisbane on 27th December 1925, the youngest daughter of Hector Elliott Collett and his wife Rose Margaret Krebs. 

 

Hazel married Dugald Ian Winton Cameron and they had just the one daughter, Wendy Lynne Cameron, who was born on 30th March 1952. 

 

Dugald was born in Tonga during 1921 the son of Alexander Donald Cameron and Clara Elizabeth Cocker.  Dugald and Hazel are still living in Australia in 2012.

 

 

 

Their daughter Wendy married (1) Mervyn Charles Bauman, who was born in 1936, and they had two girls who were both born in Brisbane.  They are Kimberley (Kim) Anne Bauman, who was born on 29th March 1974, and Lyndsay Elliott Bauman, who was born on 3rd August 1978.  Wendy later married (2) Vern Johnson with whom she had previously attended high school, and today Wendy Lynne Johnson is the editor of a newspaper in Queensland, while it was her daughter Lyndsay, who is a website/graphic designer on the Gold Coast in Queensland, who kindly provided the details of her family back to Edwin Collett (Ref. 1N58).

 

 

 

 

1Q52

Clifford William Collett was born at Axbridge in Somerset during the first three months of 1908, his birth recorded at Axbridge register office (Ref. 5c 409), the eldest child of Charles William Collett and his wife Jessie Catherine Brown.  In the Axbridge census of 1911 Clifford William Collett was three years old.  At the moment, no details of his life are known, except that his death was recorded at the Mendip register office in Somerset (Ref. 23 1301) during March 1982 when he was 74.  The death certificate also confirmed his date of birth as 17th February 1908.  His Will was proved in Bristol on 29th July 1982 and confirmed that he was living at 3 Portway in Wells when he passed, and that his personal effects were valued at £28,521.

 

 

 

 

1Q53

Francis Edgar Collett was born at Axbridge on 27th February 1911 and was recorded as being just one moth old in the Axbridge census in 1911.  He was the second child of Charles and Jessie Collett.  Like his brother Clifford (above), nothing is so far known about his life, only his death certificate revealed that he resided at 48 Summerlands Road in Weston-super-Mare.  Probate of his estate, not exceeding £40,000, was resolved at Bristol on 6th April 19 84, following his death on 21st February that same year.

 

 

 

 

1Q55

Herbert Louis Collett was born at Hatherop, near Coln St Aldwyns, on 20th April 1908, the birth being recorded at Cirencester register office.  He was again listed under his fill within the Hatherop census of 1911 when he was two years old, the only known child of Walter Louis Collett from Coln St Aldwyns and his with Ruth.  Nothing further is known about his life at this moment in time, but it is believed that it was he who died in Devon towards the end of 1976.  Recorded at the Torbay register office (Ref. 21 2312) during the month of December that year is the death of Herbert Louis Collett aged 68

 

 

 

 

1Q59

James Bruce Collett, who was known as Bruce, was born at Lyttelton in New Zealand on 29th July 1920, the third child of David Edward Leonard Collett and Harriet Rebecca Andrews.  He was educated at Lyttelton Main School and his later occupation was that of a pharmacist.  He was 29 when he married Barbara Hodges on 8th October 1949 at Christchurch, with whom he had three children.  It is believed that all three children were born at Lyttelton, although this, and the year in which they were born, have still to be confirmed.

 

Barbara Hodges lived at Francis Avenue in St Albans not far from where Bruce’s cousin Mavis Louisa Parker nee Collett lived with her family in Carrick Street, and also quite close to the home of his uncle Leslie Collett and his wife Gertrude in McFaddens Road and also Nola Moffitt nee Collett’s two properties in nearby Esperence Street.  Barbara’s mother was descended from amongst the early settlers to Akaroa who arrived before the “First Four Ships” came to Canterbury.

 

James Bruce Collett followed in his father’s footsteps when he entered into a partnership with him to manage the chemist’s shop on the corner of London Street and Oxford Street in Lyttelton.  Bruce eventually took over the sole running of the shop where he continued the business for many years. 

 

 

 

While his father was Deputy Mayor of Lyttelton, Bruce later held the position of Mayor (see above photo) and fondly recalls meeting Queen Elizabeth II several times.  On one occasion he had lunch with the Queen, and on another he received an invitation to meet Her Majesty on board the Royal Yacht Britannia.  He also met the Queen Mother on another occasion who advised him to save the quaint old buildings and not to let Lyttelton get too large.  Among some other of the duties Bruce performed during his term as mayor were (a) having to preside over the official opening ceremony of the Third Lyttelton Railway Station, which was held on 14th October 1963, and (b) being among the guests of honour at the Centennial Celebrations at the historic Church at Rapaki in July 1969 along with the Maori Queen, Te Atairangikaahu and her husband Mr Whatumoana Paki, three local members of Parliament, Mr N. Kirk, Mrs W. Tirikatene-Sullivan and Mr H. J. Walker.

 

 

 

Bruce and Barbara built their home at Lyttelton and lived there for fifty-seven years, where they raised their three children and enjoyed the company of the nine grandchildren.  By the end of that time they found that their home in Sumner Road was too large for them to manage, as a result of which they moved to Ferrymead in Christchurch, where they were living in June 2010 when Bruce celebrated his 90th birthday.  It was just over two years later that James Bruce Collett died on 10th August 2012.  Bruce and his father were both pharmacists, a profession continued by one of his sons and then taken up by one of his granddaughters, completing a line of four generations in pharmacy.

 

 

 

Earlier in his life he had been a vestryman and a vicar’s warden at the local Anglican church, had chaired the Lyttelton Main School Committee, and reached high office in the Masonic Lodge.  He founded Lyttelton Rotary Club and was an active member of the Chemists’ Guild.  Bruce also enjoyed his leisure pursuits, and loved racing yachts on Lyttelton Harbour, singing bass in the Christchurch Liedertafel Choir, and playing golf.  He was also the President of the Woolston Brass Band for eighteen years.  Following his death, a tribute was posted on the website of the Woolston Brass Band, which is reproduced below.

 

 

 

Bruce Collett QSO JP (Former Mayor of Lyttelton)

We’ve received some sad news – James Bruce Collett has passed away.

Although Bruce was never a playing member of the band, he was a devoted supporter who served on our Management Committee for many years. Bruce was first elected to the office of Band President 1971. The nephew of RJ Estall, Bruce was at the time the Mayor of Lyttelton, and his experience in administration and his personal contacts in the city were to prove invaluable over the years.  Bruce was one of the architects of our band’s legendary1975 tour to Great Britain. Without Bruce’s faith and effort, it is doubtful this tour would ever have taken place. His contribution in terms of leadership, motivation and sheer hard work cannot be over-emphasised in what was one of the most ambitious projects in our history.  Bruce Collett was named in the New Year’s Honours List of 1977 as a recipient of the Queen’s Service Order for Community Service.  As Tour Manager Bruce oversaw another ground-breaking venture in 1980. Without his indefatigable work and painstaking attention to detail, the tour to the Australian Championships in Mt Gambier would not have been the success that it was.  Our band has been very well served by Bruce, without whom we would not have made two overseas tours within five years.  Bruce was accorded the honour of Life Membership in 1989.  A funeral service for Bruce is to be held at Naval Point in Lyttelton at 2.30pm on Saturday 18th August.2012

 

 

 

1R41

Hugh Bruce Collett

Born circa 1950 at Lyttelton

 

1R42

John Grant Collett

Born circa 1955 at Lyttelton

 

1R43

Ann Rebecca Collett

Born circa 1959 at Lyttelton

 

 

 

 

1Q63

Harold Ernest Leslie Collett was born at Napier, New Zealand on 19th November 1913, the eldest child of Leslie Joseph Charles Collett and Gertrude Louise Brittenden, and was baptised at St Augustine’s Church during 1914.  He was 24 when he married Hazel Winifred Setchfield-Smith on 21st February 1938.  Hazel was born at Balclutha, Otago, New Zealand on 29th July 1916, the daughter of Frederick Nelson Smith and Jane Wilkins, and she presented he husband with five children. 

 

 

 

Harold was an engineer who spent almost all of his working life employed by the Sanitarium Health Food Company.  However, for approximately four years he was at Longburn, a satellite town of Palmerston North, where he worked in a Basket Factory that was associated with the SDA College there.  During the Second World War cane became hard to procure in New Zealand and the factory had to close.  Harold Ernest Leslie Collett died at Napier on 1st July 2002, while his wife Hazel also died at there on 1st December 2009.

 

 

 

1R44

Averill Beverley Collett

Born in 1938 in New Zealand

 

1R45

Lynette Jane Collett

Born in 1941 in New Zealand

 

1R46

Sandra Hazel Collett

Born in 1943 in New Zealand

 

1R47

Darryl Leslie Nelson Collett

Born in 1948 in New Zealand

 

1R48

Anthony Harold Nicholas Collett

Born in 1959 in New Zealand

 

 

 

 

1Q64

Mavis Louisa Collett was born at Napier on 10th August 1918, the eldest daughter of Leslie and Gertrude Collett.  It was in Christchurch on 25th July 1940 that she married John Graham Parker who had been born at Pirinoa near Martinborough in New Zealand on 30th January 1906, the son of Horace Stanley James Parker and Margaret Gillies (Makere Kiriti).  And it was at Christchurch that their children were born, and they were Audrey Alice Parker, who was born on 2nd August 1941, Verona May Parker, who was born on 8th October 1942, Kelvin Harold Parker, who was born on 23rd February 1945, Carolyn Rose Parker, who was born on 11th December 1948, Morris Graham Parker, who was born on 21st July 1951, Yvonne Louisa Parker, who was born on 15th November 1955, and Lawrence Martin Parker who was born on 18th July 1959.

 

 

 

Mavis Louisa Parker nee Collett died at Christchurch on 18th March 1985, and was followed by her older husband who passed away on 7th February 2004 just two years short of his one hundredth birthday.  And it was their son Kelvin who kindly provided all of the details relating to this branch of the family which resulted in the July 2012 update of the file.

 

 

 

 

1Q65

Nola Gertrude Collett was born at Christchurch on 14th January 1920, another daughter of Leslie and Gertrude Collett.  She married Walter Joseph Moffitt at Christchurch on 27th November 1947, Walter having been born at Gore in New Zealand on 4th April 1919, the son of Joseph Turnbull Moffitt and Minnie Ethel Smith.  Their Christchurch born children were Alistair Joseph Moffitt, born on 22nd October 1949, Malcolm Leslie Moffitt, born on 10th May 1951, Kevin Alvyn Ernest Moffitt, born on 3rd July 1956, and Bronwyn Margaret Moffitt who was born on 24th December 1960.  Walter Joseph Moffitt died at Hastings, Hawkes Bay on 4th January 1986.  It was on 23rd July 2012 that Nola Gertrude Moffitt nee Collett passed away in Perth, Western Australia, when she was in her ninety-third year.

 

 

 

 

1Q66

Edna Ernestine Collett was born at Christchurch, New Zealand in 1906 and most likely within the first few weeks of that year.  She was the eldest child of Ernest Walter Raymond Gordon Collett and his wife Agnes Gertrude Pearce.  Edna later married Israel Wallace Grenfell in 1928, and died thirty-one years later in 1959 when she was only 53, following which she was buried on 2nd November 1959 at Ruru Lawn Cemetery in Christchurch, New Zealand.

 

 

 

 

1Q67

Raymond Leonard Collett was born at Christchurch on 25th September 1906, the second child and eldest son of Ernest and Agnes Collett.  He attended Canterbury University in Christchurch during 1922 and graduated in 1930 with a Bachelor of Commerce degree.  He practised as an accountant and, according to the Rolls Record he lived at 17 Strickland Street in Christchurch from 1928 to 1938.  However, records can be wrong, since it is known that in 1929 he set sail out of Auckland on the ship the Aorangi, bound for the New York and a job with Ross Brothers, Lybrand and Montgomery, today now Pricewaterhouse Coopers.

 

 

 

And it was while he was working in America that he met Beatrice Maude Foan whom he married on 10th June 1931 at St Johnsbury in Vermont.  Four years later, in December 1935, the couple moved to San Francisco, but it was in New York that Raymond Leonard Collett died during June 1965.

 

 

 

 

1Q68

Ruby Catherine Collett was born at Christchurch on 8th June 1908, the third child of Ernest and Agnes Collett.  Ruby was twenty-two when she married Norman Kenneth Neil in 1930.

 

 

 

 

1Q69

Constance Martha Collett was born at Christchurch on 5th November 1909, the daughter of Ernest and Agnes Collett.  She was married on 31st December 1938, when she became Constance Martha Nicholls, and it was as Constance Nicholls that she died just over fifty years later on 8th March 1989 and was buried on 16th March 1989 at the Waimairi Cemetery in Christchurch, New Zealand.

 

 

 

 

1Q70

Frances May Collett was born at Christchurch on 10th November 1911, another daughter of Ernest and Agnes Collett.  She later married Harry Keenan, and died on 17th April 1989.

 

 

 

 

1Q71

Arthur Stanley Collett was born at Christchurch on 13th May 1913, the youngest surviving son of Ernest and Agnes Collett.  Despite two different christian names, he was known as Tom and, for much of his early life, he lived at 17 Strickland Street in Christchurch with his older brother Raymond (above).  After he married Beatrice Anne McDowell he left the house in Strickland Street when he set up a new home for him and Beatrice at 96 Neville Street, where they lived for many years.  During his life his occupations included fitter, turner, engineer, and farmer.  Arthur Stanley (Tom) Collett died at Rolleston, eight miles west of Christchurch, on 12th January 1997.

 

 

 

 

1Q72

Norma Gertrude Collett was born at Christchurch on 20th June 1915, the last surviving child of Ernest Walter Raymond Gordon Collett and his wife Agnes Gertrude Pearce.  It was in 1936, when Norma was 21, that she married Robert Ernest Taylor during 1936.  Norma Gertrude Taylor nee Collett died in New Zealand during 2008, while her husband Robert, who was born in 1911, died there in 1971.

 

 

 

 

1Q73

Gladys Mary Collett was born at 15 Strickland Street in Christchurch on 21st October 1906, the eldest of the three children of Herbert Frank Collett and his wife Sarah Burrows.  She later married Thomas (Tom) Roberts Sutton during 1928 and they lived at Conway Street in the Spreydon district of south Christchurch.  Upon the death of her mother, her father lived with Gladys and Tom.  Gladys Mary Sutton nee Collett died in New Zealand in 1986, and was a widow for nearly forty years following the death of her young husband in 1947 when he was only 26 years old.

 

 

 

 

1Q74

Leslie Herbert Collett was born at 15 Strickland Street in Christchurch on 9th July 1908, the son of Herbert and Sarah Collett.  During his working life Leslie was described as a coppersmith.

 

 

 

 

1Q75

Ernest George Collett was born at 15 Strickland Street in Christchurch on 29th September 1914, the last child born to Herbert Frank Collett and his wife Sarah Burrows.  Ernest later married (1) Joyce Houghton and they lived at 104 Conway Street, where his married sister Gladys (above) also lived.  The marriage produced two children for the couple, who later moved south to settle in Dyers Pass Road, within the Cashmere Hills area of south Christchurch.  Ernest was a plumber by trade, but also enjoyed growing Dahlias as a profitable hobby.  A few years after Joyce died he married (2) Florence Butterfield.  Ernest George Collett died on 4th February 1982.  No details are currently available about his two children, although it is thanks to his son Brian that more details about other members of this family are now recorded here.

 

 

 

1R49

Brian Gregory Collett

Date of birth unknown

 

1R50

a Collett daughter

Date of birth unknown

 

 

 

 

1Q78

May Thompson Collett was born in 1903 and this may have been at Waimate where her father, George William Collett, was raised by his grandfather.  May was the eldest child and only daughter of George and his wife Christina Sevicke Jones and, in 1927, when she was 24 she married Alexander Allan Scott who was born on 30th May 1896.  They were married for only twenty-eight years, when May Thompson Scott nee Collett died on 25th September 1955 at Waimate in South Canterbury, New Zealand.  Alexander was 84 when he died at Waimate on 22nd July 1980, following which he was buried with May in the Old Waimate Cemetery.

 

 

 

 

1Q79

Hori Coutts Collett was born at Waimate, South Canterbury, on 26th February 1906, the eldest son of George William Collett and his wife Christina Sevicke Jones, his second forename being the maiden name of his grandmother.  Hori spent much of his early life living in Waimate, but spent his later years residing in Christchurch when he was married to Alva.  Upon his death in Waimate on 15th September 2001 Hori Coutts Collett was buried at Waimate Lawn Cemetery.  His wife Alva Leonore Moyse Cadle was born in 1906 and she was the daughter of Sidney Cadle (1863-1908) and Mary Louise Walker (1873-1911).  And it was Hori Collett who researched and wrote the book “The History of Two Families”, which was published in 1999 when he was 93, just two years before he passed away.

 

 

 

 

1Q80

Edgar Harold Collett was born at Waimate in 1908, the son of George and Christina Collett.  Tragically he was only eight years old when he died in 1917.

 

 

 

 

1Q81

Geoffrey Sevicke Collett, previously named here in error as George Sevicke Collett, was born at Waimate on 23rd March 1912, the fourth and probably the last child of George William Collett and his wife Christina Sevicke Jones.  He was 27 when he married Kathleen Blank during 1939 and, following his death at Waimate on 19th July 2004 he was buried at the Old Waimate Cemetery like many of his ancestors before him.

 

 

 

 

1Q82

Grahame Collett, whose date of birth is not known, was the grandson of George William Collett.  It is possibly that he was the fifth child of George William Collett and his wife Christina Sevicke Jones, even though the latest information suggests that they only had four children.  All that is known about him is that he later married Fay and spent some time in England researching his ancestors.

 

 

 

 

1Q86

Albert Edward Collett was born in Birmingham during 1926, the son of Herbert and Nellie (Emily) Collett.  Albert was near 20 years old when he was killed during the Second World War.  He was a sapper [service no. 14326077] with the 89th Field Company of the Royal Engineers and he died on 21st April 1945.  In addition to being buried at Witton Cemetery on Moor Lane near Perry Common, a plaque bearing his name is on the wall of The Council House in Victoria Square in Birmingham.

 

 

 

 

1R3

Jonathan Saville Collett was born in Australia on 1st February 1977, the youngest of the three sons of John D Collett.  Jonathan, who works in Melbourne as a senior analyst with Goldman Sachs, is married and in 2010 he and his wife had a son.

 

 

 

1S1

Angus John Collett

Born on 19.08.2010 at Melbourne

 

 

 

 

1R4

Patricia Collett, referred to as Pat by the family, was born in 1937 at 140 Whitecross near Abingdon.  She married Raymond (Ray) John Haines of Botley in Oxford on 6th September 1958 at St Peter’s Church in Wootton, Oxfordshire formerly Berkshire. 

 

The family lived the majority of their life at two addresses in Stanion in Northamptonshire, Manor Road and later at 3 Grays Drive.  Pat’s ultimate occupation was that of secretary, but she initially started her career with the Ministry of Public Buildings & Works at RAF Abingdon. 

 

After her children had grown up she worked for many years as school secretary at a junior school in Corby.

 

 

 

Ray Haines originally started out as an engineer with the Southern Gas Board that took him from Oxford, where he worked prior to the wedding, to Reading.  He then secured a job with Stewart & Lloyds the manufacturers of rectangular hollow steel tubes at Corby in Northamptonshire, where the children were born, before later being transferred to Scotland. 

 

 

 

The family returned to Corby where Ray set up his own precision engineering business.  Over the following years he manufactured steel hulled longboats, trailers, fitted tow-bars, and repaired fairground equipment.  At one stage he opened a shop selling radio-controlled and die-cast metal model toys.  Later in his life he worked for his son-in-law, Robert Lockley (Ref. 1S2).

 

 

 

1S2

Claire Susan Haines

Born on 03.02.1961 at Corby

 

1S3

Dawn Elizabeth Haines

Born on 19.05.1963 at Corby

 

1S4

Sally Ann Haines

Born on 28.08.1965 at Corby

 

 

 

 

1R5

Joyce Collett was born in 1940 at 140 Whitecross near Abingdon. 

 

She married Edward (Ted) Windsor James of Gosport in Hampshire on 17th June 1958 in Ceylon where Ted was serving with the Royal Air Force. 

 

After leaving the RAF in the early 1970s Ted worked at Marconi in Leicester and was transferred to the Plymouth site around 1980, finally being transferred to Milton Keynes where they lived at 7 Colley Hill in Bradwell Village.  

 

Their first son Stephen was born while the couple was living in Aden, and their second son Adrian was born during a posting at Edith Weston in Rutland.