PART ELEVEN

 

The Welford-on-Avon Line - 1680 to 1870

(including a branch line to Canada)

 

Updated February 2017

 

This is the first of two sections of this family line

 

 

Whilst primarily set up as the Welford-on-Avon Line, this line now

contains many references to the Collett families of the hamlet of Admington.

The original details in this family line were supplied by Bob Collett (Ref. 11R28)

of Cheshire via Stephen Collett of Solihull and are marked #1.

This was developed further by Brian Collett and marked #2.

 

Further contributions received from Desmond Hancox (Ref. 11R34) of Australia are

marked #3, with the associated photographs having been kindly supplied by his cousin

Anita Jeffrey (Ref. 11R41).  Additional information marked #4 has been provide by

Desmond’s sister Dawn Wood (Ref. 11R36).

 

The new information added for the June 2010 update was generously

provided by Daniel Richard Sylvester (Ref. 11Q55) in Canada and is marked #7.

 

Other contributors have been:

Yvonne the wife of John Collett (Ref. 11R29), the additional details being marked #5; and

Les Bradshaw (see Ref. 11P25) whose contributions are denoted by #6

 

The December 2010 update included new information received from Paul Boreham of

Arkell in Canada (marked #8), whose mother is Gwen Boreham nee Collett (Ref. 11R13),

and Doreen North whose late husband Tony North was the grandson of

Florence Gertrude Ann Hall Collett (Ref. 11P12), the new details being marked #9

 

In February 2011 new material was gratefully received from Linda and Paul Collett of

Wolstanton, whose grandfather was Cecil John Collett (Ref. 11P69), about whom

nothing was previously written.  That new information is denoted by #10

 

Additional new information included during December 2011 was kindly supplied by

Joan Fay Robertson nee Collett (Ref. 11R27) in Canada, as denoted by #11.

 

New information and photographs inserted during June 2012 were

gratefully received from Linda Phelpstead and are identified by #12,

while other details have been supplied by Bob Collett and Doreen North

 

The information marked #13 was kindly provided by Pauline Every

from Port Macquarie in New South Wales, Australia

 

The bulk of the information for the January 2014 version of this family line

has been very generously provided by Jennie Cordner who has been helping

and supporting webmaster Brian Collett for many years, denoted by #14

 

Ian McCallum is a military researcher and in the autumn of 2014 he made contact

with the news that he has the medals and death plaques for the brothers

Frederick Collett (Ref. 11P47) and Edmund Collett (Ref. 11P52).  The new details provided by Ian are denoted with the nomenclature #15

 

To date no connection has been made to any other of the Collett family lines.

However, it has should be noted that Mary Collett (Ref. 4G2),

who was born in 1616, married John Holtham at Welford-on-Avon.

This is detailed in Part 4 – The Great Western Line

 

 

 

Today Welford-on-Avon lies just a few miles west of Stratford-on-Avon in Warwickshire.  In the very early records the village was listed as being in the County of Gloucestershire.  The aforementioned Admington in Warwickshire completes a triangle, being equal distant from Stratford and Welford.

 

 

 

 

 

 

11J1

This family line starts with THOMAS COLLETT who is believed to have been born around 1686 at Welford-on-Avon, often spelt as Whelford-on-Avon.  He married Mary Holtham (or Holtam or Holtom) on 15th July 1711 at Welford-on-Avon, where Mary is believed to have been born in 1690.  Mary was obviously with-child on their wedding day, since their first child was born towards the end of that same year.  Just over two years later Thomas and Mary produced a son who was born in 1714 who was given the name Thomas Collett and he, like his father, also married a girl by the name of Mary Holtham.

#1

#2

 

#1

 

 

 

 

His place of birth, like that of the first four children of the family was Weston-on-Avon which is the village closest to Welford-on-Avon.  Thomas’ and Mary’s fifth and sixth children were both baptised after the family had moved to Welford-on-Avon.  It seems rather curious that the baptism record for the couple’s last children listed the child’s name as Elizabeth Holtam or Collett, even though the parents were confirmed as Thomas Collett and Mary Holtam.

#1

 

#2

 

 

 

It would be logical that further children were born into the family during the 1720s, where there is a ten year gap between the fourth and fifth child.  His youngest child was only five years old when Thomas Collett died on 24th January 1739 at Welford-on-Avon but, to date, no record has been found of the death of his wife Mary.

#1

 

 

 

11K1

Susannah Collett

Born in 1711 at Weston-on-Avon

#1

 

11K2

Thomas Collett

Born in 1714 at Weston-on-Avon

#1

 

11K3

Ann Collett

Born in 1717 at Weston-on-Avon

#1

 

11K4

Anthony Collett

Born in 1720 at Weston-on-Avon

#1

 

11K5

Mary Collett

Born in 1730 at Welford-on-Avon

#1

 

11K6

Elizabeth Collett

Born in 1733 at Welford-on-Avon

#2

 

 

 

 

11K1

Susannah Collett was baptised at Weston-on-Avon on 7th December 1711.  She later married Edwards Wells on 26th December 1732 at Welford-on-Avon.

#1

#2

 

 

 

 

11K2

What happened next is very interesting in that THOMAS COLLETT who was born at Weston-on-Avon in 1714 married Mary Holtham (or Holtam or Holtom) of Welford-on-Avon who was presumably his cousin by marriage, she being the niece of his mother Mary Collett nee Holtham (above).

#1

 

 

 

Thomas and Mary were married on 28th October 1735 at Welford-on-Avon, having already produced their first children some seven months before they were married.  Mary is understood to have died in August 1772 at Welford-on-Avon but, to date, no record has been found of Thomas’ death.  There is yet a further reference to the Holtom name later in this family line.

#2

#1

 

 

 

11L1

Ann Collett

Baptised on 21.03.1735 at Welford

#1

 

11L2

Richard Collett

Baptised on 30.04 1738 at Welford

#1

 

11L3

Thomas Collett

Baptised on 22.02.1739 at Welford

#2

 

11L4

Mary Collett

Baptised on 23.05.1742 at Welford

#1

 

11L5

John Collett

Baptised on 13.02.1745 at Welford

#2

 

 

 

 

11K3

Ann Collett was baptised at Weston-on-Avon on 26th May 1717 and it was there that she married Richard Pacey on 1st January 1744.

#2

 

 

 

 

11K4

Anthony Collett was baptised at Weston-on-Avon on 12th December 1720 and he married Anne Brain of Quinton at St Swithun’s Church in Quinton on 16th February 1747.  It was also there that their children were baptised, their only known son being named after his grandfather.

#1

#2

 

 

 

It may be of interest to note that, over many years, there had been previous occasions when the Collett name had been linked with that of the Brain family, although all of them had taken place in Gloucestershire.  The earliest recorded event took place at Little Rissington in 1717 when Mary Collett married Thomas Brain, followed in 1828 when Henry Collett (Ref.33L2) married Margaret Brain at Upper Slaughter, again in 1881 when Hannah Reeson Collett (Ref. 37O4) was in service with retired farmer William Brain of Oxford.

#2

 

 

 

11L6

Mary Collett

Baptised on 02.04 1749 at Quinton

#1

 

11L7

Anne Collett

Baptised on 28.06.1752 at Quinton

#2

 

11L8

Thomas Collett

Baptised on 18.05.1755 at Quinton

#1

 

 

 

 

11K5

Mary Collett was baptised on 30th December 1730 at Welford-on-Avon where she died just over a year later on 13th February 1732.

#1

 

 

 

 

11K6

Elizabeth Collett was baptised at Welford-on-Avon on 13th September 1733, the youngest and last child of Thomas Collett and his wife Mary Holtham.

#2

 

 

 

 

11L2

Richard Collett was born in 1738 at Quinton south of Stratford-on-Avon, but was baptised on 30th April 1738 at Welford-on-Avon.  Richard married Mary Freeman on 3rd August 1773 at Willersey some miles south of Welford-on-Avon near Broadway, Willersey being the place where Mary was born in 1752.  Shortly after the wedding the couple produced what would have been a honeymoon baby in the form of son Robert Collett who was also born at Willersey, as was their second son.

#1

 

#2

 

 

 

11M1

Robert Collett

Baptised on 27.05.1774 at Willersey

#2

 

11M2

Edward Collett

Baptised on 30.11.1776 at Willersey

#1

 

 

 

 

11L4

Mary Collett was baptised on 23rd May 1742 at Welford-on-Avon, where she died a few months later on 13th August 1742.

#1

 

 

 

 

11L5

John Collett was baptised on 13th February 1745 at Welford-on-Avon.  This is the family line of John Collett of Australia who, in 2004, was living at Mount Albert in Victoria and with whom contact has been made in an attempt to extend this line into the 21st Century.  Although not proved to be this particular John Collett, there was the marriage of a John Collett to an Elizabeth Butler recorded at Mickleton on 17th October 1778.

#2

 

 

 

 

11L8

Thomas Collett was baptised at Quinton on 18th May 1755 and he later married Anna.  It seems very likely that they lived at Welford-on-Avon where their son John was baptised and where their son Richard was married in 1819 and raised his own family, as did their eldest son Thomas.

#2

 

 

 

11M3

Thomas Collett

Date of birth unknown

#1

 

11M4

William Collett

Date of birth unknown

#2

 

11M5

John Collett

Baptised on 14.01.1793 at Welford

#2

 

 

 

 

11M1

Robert Collett was baptised at Willersey on 27th May 1774, the parish register confirming him as the son of Richard and Mary Collett.  He was 23 when he married Ann Hughes at St Swithun’s Church in Quinton on 31st October 1797.  Ann had been born at Quinton on 1st September 1776, the daughter of George Hughes and Anne Rogers.  See later connections between the Collett family and the Hughes and Rogers families.

#9

#2

#1

 

 

 

The couple settled in the hamlet of Admington, close by the village of Quinton where all of their children were baptised, since there was no church in Admington at that time.  Robert, who was a blacksmith in 1841, died at Admington in 1848 and was buried in the grounds of the parish church of St Swithun’s in Quinton on 25th April 1848, at the age of 71.  Presumably it was his wife who gave his age as being 71, which was actually her age at that time.  Ann died less than three years later in 1851, when she was buried with her husband on 23rd February 1851.

#1

#3

 

#9

 

 

 

The inclusion of Robert’s son Thomas, who was born in 1812, is the result of an entry on the website www.familysearch.org.  However, already included under the family of William and Ann Collett is their son Thomas who, according to the IGI, was also baptised at Quinton on the same day.  The family search website also acknowledges the IGI record, so it is possible both are correct.

#1

 

#2

 

 

 

11N1

Richard Collett

Baptised on 18.03.1798 at Quinton

#2

 

11N2

Mary Collett

Baptised on 13.10.1799 at Quinton

#2

 

11N3

Nancy Collett

Baptised on 13.10.1800 at Quinton

#2

 

11N4

Robert Collett

Baptised on 05.04.1801 at Quinton

#2

 

11N5

Ann Collett

Baptised on 25.12.1802 at Quinton

#2

 

11N6

John Collett

Baptised on 14.10.1804 at Quinton

#1

 

11N7

Peggy Collett

Baptised on 03.08.1806 at Quinton

#2

 

11N8

Rachel Collett

Baptised on 19.09.1808 at Quinton

#2

 

11N9

Elizabeth Collett

Baptised on 11.09.1810 at Quinton

#2

 

11N10

Thomas Collett

Baptised on 25.10.1812 at Quinton

#1

 

11N11

GEORGE COLLETT

Baptised on 09.04.1817 at Quinton

#2

 

11N12

William Joshua Collett

Baptised on 28.11.1819 at Quinton

#2

 

11N13

Maria Collett

Baptised on 30.12.1821 at Quinton

#2

 

11N14

Sarah Collett                 twin

Baptised on 12.10.1823 at Quinton

#2

 

11N15

Elizabeth Collett              twin

Baptised on 19.10.1823 at Quinton

#2

 

 

 

 

11M3

Thomas Collett, whose date of birth is not known, married Elizabeth just before the turn of the century and their two children listed below were born and baptised at Welford-on-Avon.

#2

 

 

 

11N16

Thomas Collett

Baptised on 29.09.1800 at Welford

#2

 

11N17

Mary Collett

Born circa 1803 at Welford-on-Avon

#2

 

 

 

 

11M4

William Collett, whose date of birth is not known, married Ann and their son was born at Admington and baptised at Quinton.  Although the birth of their son has been included here since the initial compilation of this family line and was obtained from the IGI, more recent information suggests that the Thomas Collett baptised at Quinton on 25th October 1812 was the son of Robert and Ann (above).  However, the same source for the new information, the website www.familysearch.org, also confirms the IGI entry, which states that Thomas’ parents were William and Ann Collett.

#2

 

 

 

11N18

Thomas Collett

Baptised on 25.10.1812 at Quinton

#1

 

 

 

 

11M5

John Collett was baptised at Welford on 14th January 1793, the son of Thomas and Anna Collett. 

#2

 

 

 

 

11N1

Richard Collett was born at Admington and baptised at the parish church of St Swithun’s in Quinton on 18th March 1798, the son of Robert and Ann, whose surname was recorded as Collit.  It was also at Quinton that Richard later married Hannah Fletcher on 7th June 1819, Hannah coming from Preston-on-Stour, just two miles north of Quinton.  Their marriage produced ten children who were all baptised at St Swithun’s Church in Quinton. 

#2

 

 

#9

 

 

 

By the time of the first national census in June 1841 the family was living at Admington Farm Fields.  Richard Collett, with a rounded age of 40, was a farm worker, while his wife Hannah’s rounded age was 45.  Still living with the couple were six of their ten children.  Missing from the family was Richard’s eldest daughter Martha, age 20, who was living nearby in the same registration area, and daughter Eliza who, at the age of 14, was also working as a domestic servant by then.  However, it seems more than likely that the other absent child, Richard’s son John, who would have been 16, may have not survived beyond childhood.

#2

#9

 

 

 

The children who were still living with their parents were Robert Collett, who was 20, Richard Collett, who was 15, George Collett, who was 11, Elizabeth Collett who was seven, William Collett who was five, and Jane Collett who was two years old.  For whatever reason, their daughter Ann, age nine, was living close by at the home of elderly Ann Savage on the day of the census, perhaps to ease the over-crowding in the farmer worker’s cottage.  It is understood that Admington Farm Fields was very likely later referred to as Admington Grounds. 

#2

 

 

 

Over the next ten years many of the children left the family home, so by 1851 Richard was 51, Hannah was 54, and on that occasion the children still living with them were Richard, who was 28, Ann who was 19, and William who was 14.  It was six years later during the second quarter of 1857 that Hannah Collett nee Fletcher died, so by the time of the census in 1861 widower Richard, at the age of 64, had moved to Upper Admington where he was living on his own, and from where he was working as a carter, possibly on a local farm.

#2

 

#11

 

 

 

According to the next census in 1871, Richard Collett, age 73 and a former agricultural labourer, was living at The Milking Pail beer house at 5 Sheep Street in Mickleton with his youngest son William with his wife Ann, and with them Richard’s first three grandchildren.  It was just two years later that Richard Collett died at Mickleton in 1873.

#2

 

#11

 

 

 

11O1

Robert Collett

Born in 1819 at Admington

#2

 

11O2

Martha Collett

Born in 1820 at Admington

#2

 

11O3

Richard Collett

Born in 1821 at Admington

#2

 

11O4

John Collett

Born in 1823 at Admington

#2

 

11O5

Eliza Collett

Born in 1826 at Admington

#2

 

11O6

George Collett

Born in 1829 at Admington

#2

 

11O7

Ann Collett

Born in 1831 at Admington

#2

 

11O8

Elizabeth Collett

Born in 1833 at Admington

#2

 

11O9

William Collett

Born in 1835 at Admington

#2

 

11O10

Jane Collett

Born in 1838 at Admington

#2

 

 

 

 

11N4

Robert Collett was born at Admington in 1800 and was baptised at Quinton on 5th April 1801.  There is a mystery surrounding Robert’s early adult years, but it seems very likely that he married (1) Mary when he was 21 years of age.  Their marriage is known to have produced at least one child who was born at Welford-on-Avon in 1822, although there may have been others.

#2

 

 

 

It seems likely that Mary died during the birth of a subsequent child, since it is established that that almost ten years later Robert, at the age of 32, married (2) Mary Hughes at St Swithun’s Church in Quinton on 26th October 1832.  This Mary was born at Ilmington in 1812, so could not have been the Mary that presented Robert with his daughter Ann Collett in 1822.

#2

 

 

 

The second marriage produced a further eleven children for Robert, and all of them were born at Admington and baptised at Quinton.  It should be noted that Robert’s father Robert Collett senior (Ref. 11M1) married Ann Hughes at Quinton parish church in 1797.  So it seems very likely that Mary Hughes may have been her niece.

#2

 

 

 

By the time of the census in 1841, Robert’s rounded age was 35 and Mary’s was 30.  The only children listed were them at that time were Daniel who was eight, Rachel who was six, Dinah who was four, and Siena (Selena) who was two years old, the whole family living in the village of Admington where the children were all born.

#2

 

 

 

By 1851 the family living at Admington within the parish of Quinton in the Shipston-on-Stour & Chipping Campden census registration district.  Head of the household was agricultural labourer Robert, who was 50 and from Admington.  Living there with him was his wife Mary who was 41, and their eight children, Daniel age 17, Dinah age 13, Lena (Selena) age 11, Jn (John), who was nine, Mark, who was seven, Ann, who was five, Joe (Joseph), who was two, and Jane who was just three months old.  Not with the family, but living nearby was their daughter Rachel who was 16.

#2

 

 

 

Ten years later in 1861, the family was still living within the Shipston-on-Stour & Campden registration district where Robert was 61 and his wife Mary was 49.  The children still living with them at Admington on that occasion were Daniel 28, Rachel 25, Leanah (Selena) 21, Joseph 12, and George who was eight years old.

#2

 

 

 

By 1871 the family was living in the Campden & Shipston-on-Stour where Robert was 70 and Mary was 61.  Still listed with them were daughter Susannah, age 31, and sons Mark 26, Joseph 22 (with his wife Anne 24), and George who was 17.  Also living with them was the couple’s granddaughter Mary F Collett who was under one year old and the first child of Joseph and Anne.  Robert Collett died when he was 73 years of age, following which he was buried in the grounds of St Swithun’s Church in Quinton on 5th February 1873.

#3

 

 

 

So by the time of the 1881 Census Mary was a widow aged 71 living at Lower Admington with her two unmarried children Selina and George.  In addition to her two children, Mary had taken a lodger, 23 years old Walter Hughes, an agricultural labourer of Admington who was very likely her nephew or the son of her nephew.  On the day of the national census on 3rd April 1881 there were twenty-four people with the surname of Hughes living in the village of Admington, of which twenty-one of them had been born there.  Widow Mary Collett was still living at Admington in 1891 at the age of 82 and living with her was seventeen-year old Mary A Collett who may have been her granddaughter Mary F Collett referred to above.

#2

 

 

 

11O11

Ann Collett

Born in 1821 at Welford-on-Avon

#2

 

The following are the children of Robert Collett by his second wife Mary Hughes:

#2

 

11O12

Daniel Collett

Born in 1832 at Admington

#2

 

11O13

Rachel Collett

Born in 1834 at Admington

#2

 

11O14

Dinah Collett

Born in 1836 at Admington

#2

 

11O15

Sarah Collett

Born in 1838 at Admington

#2

 

11O16

Selena Collett

Born in 1839 at Admington

#3

 

11O17

John Collett

Born in 1841 at Admington

#2

 

11O18

Mark Collett

Born in 1844 at Admington

#2

 

11O19

Ann Collett

Born in 1846 at Admington

#2

 

11O20

Joseph Collett

Born in 1849 at Admington

#2

 

11O21

Jane Collett

Born in 1851 at Admington

#2

 

11O22

George Collett

Born in 1853 at Admington

#3

 

 

 

 

11N6

John Collett was born at Admington and was baptised at St Swithun’s Church in Quinton on 14th October 1804, the sixth child of Robert Collett and Ann Hughes.  It is possible, although not proved, that it may have been this John Collett who married Ann Webster at nearby Alderminster, just north-east of Admington, on 28th February 1824.

#1

 

#2

 

 

 

 

11N9

Elizabeth Collett was born at Admington in 1806 according to later census records.  However, within the Gloucestershire IGI there are two entries for the baptism of Elizabeth the daughter of Robert and Ann at Quinton parish church.  The first took place on 11th September 1810, and the second a year later on 11th October 1811.  In addition to those two entries, there is an unreliable pedigree on the internet that gives her date of baptism as 19th September 1809.

#2

 

 

 

It seems very unlikely that Robert and Ann would have had two consecutive daughters named Elizabeth, unless the first had died while still an infant, particularly since a further Elizabeth was born into the family in 1823.  From the similarity in the dates it has therefore been assumed that the two IGI entries relate to the same child, the actual date not clearly written in the original parish register.

#2

 

 

 

On 9th November 1829 Elizabeth married John Gilkes by banns, John having been born at Great Rollright in Oxfordshire in 1803.  Their wedding certificate carried the mark of her father Robert Collett.  The marriage produced ten children for Elizabeth and John, all of whom were born at Great Rollright between 1831 and 1852.

#5

 

 

 

They were Thomas (1831-before 1844), John (1833-1919), Henry (see below), George (1837-1910), Mary (1840-1900), Catherine (1842-1932) who may also have been known as Teresa, Thomas (1844-1895), Joseph (1847-1869), Ann (see below), and Martin (1852-1932).

#5

 

 

 

Elizabeth and John spent the whole of their married life together at Rollright where John died between January and March in 1881.  By the time of that year’s census Elizabeth was described as a widow aged 75 and born at Admington.  The only member of her family still living with her at Great Rollright was her daughter Teresa (Catherine) who was a spinster at 38.

#2

 

 

 

Curiously there was a visitor staying with Elizabeth and Teresa, and she was spinster Eliza Ann Holtom, age 33 and from Long Compton in Warwickshire.  See earlier references to the Holtom name and its connection to the Collett family.  There was no reference to Elizabeth in the 1891 Census so it must be assumed that she had died sometime after the census of 1881.

#2

 

 

 

During the summer of 2012 Pauline Every from Port Macquarie in New South Wales, Australia, made contact with information regarding Henry Gilkes (1835-1917), her great great grandfather.  Henry married Amanda Eden with whom he had a number of children, one of which was Rose Gilkes who was born at Great Rollright in 1866.  She later married printer’s compositor Sidney Court from Mile End in London with whom she had at least three sons who were all born in London.  They were Stanley Court (born in 1897), Frank Court (born in 1904), and Eric Court (born in 1906).  Following the premature death of her husband, Rose took the family to live in Newport, South Wales, where they were recorded in 1911.  It was Frank Court, the grandfather of Pauline Every, who was married at Newport in 1924, who emigrated to Australia in 1927 two years after his unmarried younger brother Eric had moved there in 1925.  Frank’s daughter, Pauline’s mother, was born in Wales and travelled to Australia with her mother to be reunited with her father in 1929.

#13

 

 

 

11O23

Ann Winifred Gilkes

Born in 1849 at Great Rollright

#2

 

 

 

 

11N10

Thomas Collett was born at Admington in 1812 and was baptised at St Swithun’s Church in Quinton on 25th October 1812, the tenth child of blacksmith Robert Collett and his wife Ann Hughes. While the IGI gives the father’s name as William Collett, Thomas was living with Robert and Ann Collett in 1841.  He later married Elizabeth who was born at Great Wolford near Moreton-in-Marsh in 1808, although the date does not coincide with her age in the census returns, when she may have said she was younger than her actual age.  It would also appear that the marriage may have taken place during the early half of the 1840s, when both Thomas and Elizabeth were into their thirties, particularly since their only known child was born around 1846.

#2

 

 

 

At the time of the Admington census in 1851, Thomas Collett was 37 and his occupation was that of a blacksmith.  Living in the village with him was his wife Elizabeth from Woolford who was also 37 (sic), and their son Josiah who was four years old and born at Admington.  In the same census return, and listed next to the Collett family entry, was that of county magistrate Corbett H Corbett of Admington Hall, whose kitchen maid was Elizabeth Collett, age 19 and from Ilmington – see Appendix for more details. 

#2

 

 

 

Ten years later, in 1861, the Collett family was still living at Admington within the parish of Quinton, by which time Thomas was 47, Elizabeth was 47 (sic), and their son Josiah Collett was 14.  It was the same situation again in 1871, except that William and Elizabeth were then both 57 and Josiah was 24.  It was during the following decade that Thomas Collett died, leaving his widow Elizabeth and his son Josiah still living in Admington in 1881.  According to the census that year, Elizabeth Collett of Great Wolford, near Moreton-in-Marsh, was a widow and a grazier at the age of 57.  Living with her at Upper Admington was her unmarried son Josiah Collett whose occupation was that of a blacksmith, like his father before him.  He was 34 years old and his place of birth was confirmed as Admington.

#2

 

 

 

11O24

Josiah Collett

Born in 1846 at Admington

#2

 

 

 

 

11N11

GEORGE COLLETT was born at Admington and baptised on 9th April 1817 at nearby Quinton.  He later married Maria Jennings at St Swithun’s Church in Quinton on 20th November 1843.  Maria, who was recorded as of Snowshill, was born in 1821 at Snowshill near Broadway, and was the daughter of Thomas Jennings an agricultural labourer who was also born at Snowshill in 1798.  George’s and Maria’s first four children were born at Admington, but baptised at Quinton, following which the family appears to have moved the five miles south to Chipping Campden, where their next four children were born.  Her absence from all of the census records may indicate that the couple’s eldest daughter suffered an infant death.

#2

 

 

 

The move took place around 1850, since by March 1851 the family was living at Back Ends in Chipping Campden.  Back End still exists as a road today, although the area and the old property there has since been the subject of redevelopment.  The census that year recorded George Collett from Admington as a blacksmith at the age of 33, while his wife Maria was 27. Ten years later in 1861 the family was still living in Chipping Campden, but had moved from Back Ends to Cow Fair.  Cow Fair is now known as Upper High Street and the terrace cottage ‘The Old Bakehouse’ is reputed to be the former home of the Collett family. 

#1

 

 

 

 

 

At that time in April 1861, George gave his age as 40, rather than 43, Maria was 38, and their children still living with them were Robert Collett 12, Walter Collett who was nine, Mark Collett who was six, George Collett who was three, and Charles Collett who was one year old.  By that time George’s eldest son John had already left the family home and was living and working in the Rugby area at the age of 16.  It would appear that sometime after 1861 another family move took place and on that occasion it was just two miles north to Mickleton where the couple’s last two children were baptised.  It may be of interest that the two children gave their place of birth as Admington within later census records. 

#2

 

 

 

Also within the next ten years some of the older children had left the family home, so by 1871 the family living at The Butts in Mickleton was reduced to just George, who was 53, Maria who was 47, Walter 19, George 13, Charles 11, and the couple’s two youngest children Sarah, who was seven, and Thomas who was under one year old.  Sometime during the next ten years George and Maria moved even further north, that time to Staffordshire, to where their sons Walter and Mark had also moved sometime earlier.

#2

 

 

 

According to the Census of 1881 George, age 64, was an inn keeper and blacksmith from Admington ‘in Gloucestershire’.  He was ‘head of the house’ at The Swan Inn on Small Lane in Eccleshall which lies eight miles north-west of Stafford.  Living with him was his wife Lydia, age 60, their daughter Sarah 17 and their son Thomas 11, all three described as having been born at Admington.  Was the reference to George’s wife as Lydia just a transcribing error?  A thorough search of the 1881 Census has revealed no Maria of the right age who was born in Gloucestershire.  Furthermore there is no appropriate Lydia Collett in any of the other census records, so this points towards an error in translation.

#2

 

 

 

Ten years later, at the time of the next census in 1891, George had retired and was by that time residing alone at Cornwallis Street in Stoke-on-Trent.  George Collett from Admington was a widower of 74 who was described as a retired blacksmith.  It was at 8 Cornwallis Street that his son Henry George Collett had been living up to 1889.  George’s wife Maria had already passed away earlier that same year in 1891 when the couple had been living at Wolstanton near Newcastle-under-Lyme.  It was five years later that George Collett died at Stoke-on-Trent during 1896.

#2

 

#1

 

 

 

11O25

John Collett

Born in 1844 at Admington

#2

 

11O26

Jane Collett

Born in 1845 at Admington

#1

 

11O27

Louisa Collett

Born in 1847 at Admington

#2

 

11O28

Robert Collett

Born in 1849 at Admington

#1

 

11O29

Walter Collett

Born on1851 at Chipping Campden

#2

 

11O30

Mark Collett

Born in 1854 at Chipping Campden

#2

 

11O31

HENRY GEORGE COLLETT

Born in 1857 at Chipping Campden

#2

 

11O32

Charles Collett

Born in 1859 at Chipping Campden

#2

 

11O33

Sarah Ann Collett

Born in 1863 at Mickleton

#2

 

11O34

Thomas Collett

Born in 1869 at Mickleton

#2

 

 

 

 

11N12

William Joshua Collett was born at Admington in 1819 and was baptised at St Swithun’s Church in Quinton on 28th November 1819.  By 1851 William had married Caroline Downes who was born in 1827 at Pebworth less than five miles from Admington.  The married of William and Caroline, which was registered at Evesham during the first quarter of 1848, very likely took place at nearby Pebworth.

#2

#3

#9

 

 

 

The 1851 Census confirmed that William, age 29, and Caroline, age 25, were living in the Evesham, Broadway and Weston Subedge registration district.  Shortly after the census day they settled in Admington where their ten children were born, although they were all baptised at the parish church of St Swithun’s in nearby Quinton.  In 1855 William was working as a groom, as stated at the baptism of his son Jabez.  Five years later the family at Admington comprised William 41, Caroline of Pebworth 35, and their first five children Alfred Collett who was eight, Louisa J Collett who was seven, Jabeth (Jabez) who was five, Hannah Collett who was three, and ‘Zilla’ Collett who was two years old.

#2

 

 

 

A further five children were born into the family over the following decade, although by 1871 the four oldest children had left the family home which, by then was living at Ilmington Road in Admington.  William Collett, age 50 from Admington, was an agricultural labourer William, his wife Caroline from Pebworth was 44, and with them were ‘Zilla’ Collett who was 12, Selina who was nine, Richard who was eight, John who was five, and Josiah who was three years old. 

#2

 

 

 

All of the children had been born at Admington, although no trace has so far been found of daughter Edwina who may have died while still a child.  Son Jabey (Jabez) Collett who was 15 and his sister Hannah Collett who was 13, were both living and working separately within the same registration district not far from their parents and the rest of their family.

#2

 

 

 

Just over seven years later William died at Admington on 18th December 1878.  So by the time of the 1881 Census, Caroline Collett, age 55, was listed as a widow and was head of the household.  Living with her at Lower Admington were her three youngest sons Richard Collett, who was 18 and an apprentice blacksmith following in the family tradition, and farm labourers John Collett who was 15, and Josiah Collett who was 13, all three boys having been born at Admington.  Also living with the family at that time was Caroline’s five years old granddaughter Lucy Hannah Collett (Ref. 11P77) who was also born at Admington and was the base-born daughter of Caroline’s eldest daughter Louisa Jane.

#3

 

#2

 

 

 

According to the next census in 1891, widow Caroline Collett, age 64 and from Pebworth, was living at Admington, where she was described as living on her own children.  Still living with her was her granddaughter Lucy Collett who was 15.  Living in the two adjacent properties were Daniel and Sarah Collett (Ref. 11O12), and his cousin George Collett (Ref. 11O6) and his wife Emma Collett nee Rogers.

#2

 

 

 

Ten years later in 1901 Caroline was 74 and still had her granddaughter Lucy living with her.  On that occasion they were no longer living at Admington, but had moved to nearby Ilmington.  Lucy H Collett of Admington was 25 and was working as a charwoman.  Also living with Caroline and Lucy were two children, Mabel Collett who was five and of Admington, and William Collett who was two years old and of Ilmington, who were the base-born offspring of unmarried Lucy H Collett.

#2

 

 

 

A few years later in 1904 Lucy was married and left her grandmother’s home.  Sadly within a year Caroline Collett nee Downes died at the age of 78 and was buried in the churchyard of St Mary the Virgin at Ilmington on 11th February 1905.

#3

 

 

 

11O35

Alfred Collett

Born in 1852 at Admington

#2

 

11O36

Louisa Jane Collett

Born in 1854 at Admington

#2

 

11O37

Jabez Collett

Born in 1855 at Admington

#2

 

11O38

Hannah Collett

Born in 1857 at Admington

#2

 

11O39

Zillah Collett

Born in 1859 at Admington

#2

 

11O40

Selena Collett

Born in 1861 at Admington

#2

 

11O41

Richard Collett

Born in 1863 at Admington

#2

 

11O42

Edwina Collett

Born in 1864 at Admington

#2

 

11O43

Christopher John Collett

Born in 1865 at Admington

#2

 

11O44

Josiah Collett

Born in 1867 at Admington

#1

 

 

 

 

11N13

Maria Collett was born at Admington but was baptised Quinton on 30th December 1821, the daughter of Robert Collett and Ann Hughes, although the IGI incorrectly gave her father’s name as Richard.  However, at the time of her marriage to John Such during the second quarter of 1843, she confirmed that her father was Robert Collett.  The marriage produced four children for Maria and John, and they were George Such, born 1843, Hannah Such, born 1845, Robert Such, born 1847, and Sarah Ann Such, born in the June quarter of 1850.

#2

#9

 

 

 

Maria died during the same quarter of 1850, and probably during the birth of her daughter.  It is interesting to note that after Maria's death, John Such married again, on that occasion to Lucy Hughes.  Lucy Hughes was the mother of Ann Hughes, Ann being her illegitimate daughter, who later married Josiah Collett (Ref. 11O24).  After Josiah died, Ann then married William Collett (Ref. 11O9), following the death of his first wife Rose Ann Hall.  Ann Collett nee Hughes is curiously named as Ann Such within an old family tree held by the family.

#9

 

 

 

 

11N14

Sarah Collett was born at Admington and may have been a twin sister to Elizabeth Collett, since both of them were baptised at Quinton one week apart.  Sarah was baptised first on 12th October 1823, while Elizabeth was baptised on 19th October 1823, both confirmed as the daughters of Robert Collett and Ann Hughes.

#2

 

 

 

Sarah gave birth to a base-born daughter in 1845, and when the child was baptised at Quinton parish church the following year, it was just the name of Sarah Collett that was entered in the parish records as being the child’s mother.  Sometime thereafter, and before the next census in 1851, Sarah Collett married William Mason who then appears to have adopted the child.

#2

 

 

 

The Admington census of 1851 confirmed that Sarah Mason was 26, as was her husband William, who was working as an agricultural labourer.  Living with the couple were two children, Ann Collett Mason, who was six years old, and Leah Mason, who was only three months old, perhaps suggesting that Sarah had only married William within the previous twelve months.  Also living at Admington, and just two dwellings away from the Mason family, was George Collett and his wife Emma Rogers.

#2

 

 

 

11O45

Ann Collett (later Ann Collett Mason)

Baptised on 14.06.1846 at Quinton

#2

 

 

 

 

11N17

Mary Collett was born at Welford-on-Avon around 1803 and it was there that she married William Gibbs on 24th January 1825.

#2

 

 

 

 

11O1

Robert Collett was born at Admington in 1819 and was baptised at Quinton on 2nd November 1819, the eldest child of Richard Collett and his wife Hannah Fletcher.  As an adult, his rounded age in the 1841 Census was stated as being 20, rather than 21, in which he was recorded as living with his family at Admington Farm Fields within the parish of Quinton.

#2

 

 

 

It is possible, although not proved, that this Robert Collett died in 1849, when his death was recorded at Shipston-on-Stour.  This would then account for his absence from the 1851 census and all later census returns.  His brother Richard (below) was living within the Shipston registration district in 1851.

#9

 

 

 

 

11O2

Martha Collett was born at Admington in 1820 and was baptised at Quinton on 29th October 1820, the eldest daughter of Richard and Hannah Collett.  Like her brother Robert (above), her rounded age in the census of 1841 was recorded as 20, and at that time she had already left the family home in Admington, but was living not that far away within the Quinton area.

#2

 

 

 

 

11O3

Richard Collett was born at Admington in 1821 and was baptised at Quinton on 20th January 1822, the son of farm worker Richard Collett and his wife Hannah Fletcher.  In 1841 he was living at the family home at Admington Farm Fields when his rounded age was stated as being 15, rather than his actual age of 19.

#2

 

 

 

By 1851, according to the census that year, Richard Collett was 28 and was still unmarried and was still living at the family home with his parents Richard and Hannah, his sister Ann and his brother William (both below).  It was later that same year that Richard emigrated to America, sailing out of Liverpool on board the ship ‘John & Lucy’ and arriving in New York on 17th November 1851.  He was a farm worker and work in England was becoming scarcer due to the gradual introduction of farm machinery.  So perhaps it was the opportunity to purchase his own land which attracted him to America, something he would not have been able to achieve had he stayed in England.

#9

 

 

 

From New York Richard very likely travelled up the Hudson River to Albany and from there via the Erie Canal, completed in 1825, to Macedon on the canal side only a few miles from Farmington.  On reaching Macedon he would have put up in a local inn or lodging house, after which he soon acquired some land at Farmington in Ontario County, New York State, which he had to clear himself and on which he built a log cabin.  Some years later he replaced the log cabin with a more grand residence, which was still there in 2012.

#9

 

 

 

It was during 1854, three years after arriving in America, that he married Sarah Randall who, at 18, was considerably younger than Richard who was 33, having been born at Great Wolford in Warwickshire, England in 1836, the daughter of Edward and Jane Randall.  Sarah Randall had also sailed to America with her family in a party of twenty-five in 1851 on board the ship ‘Gondar’ which sailed into New York on 29th October, three weeks before Richard.  Tragically her father died during the sea voyage.

#9

 

 

 

At the earlier time of the Great Britain census in 1851 Sarah Randall, age 14, was living with her family at Great. Wolford.  Her father Edward was 60, her mother Jane was 58, and her three siblings were William 23, and Ann who was 12.  Also living with the family was grandson George Randall who was four years old.  By that time Sarah’s three older brothers John, George and Thomas had already emigrated to America three years earlier and had settled in Farmington during 1848.

#9

#2

 

 

 

The US Census of 1870 simply placed the family in New York State under the name of Collet which, at that time comprised Richard Collet from England, who was 48, his wife Sarah, also from England, who was 34, and their four children, who were Alfred Collet, age 14, Mary J Collet, age 13, Hiram Collet, who was six, and Lettie Collet who was four.

#2

 

 

 

In a letter dated 4th February 1872 Richard informed his father that he had just purchased another 35 acres of land, adjoining his existing plot, making a total holding of 69 acres.  He added that his sister Eliza must be thinking he doesn’t mean to send her money (perhaps he had borrowed some from her) but he writes that he would have done, had he not bought the land, and that she should be sure to have it soon.  He then went on to say he had two horses, four cows, and a yearling, and that he uses the horses to plough and can plough two acres in a day.  He also said he has a mowing machine and can easily cut ten acres of grass in a day or wheat.  He also said that labour costs were very high, and that they have to pay twenty shillings a day in harvest time and a man can earn 40 pounds in English money in a year.

#9

 

 

 

A map dated 1874 shows the extent of the farm of Richard Collett at Farmington as Lot 52, alongside which runs Collett Road, which is still there to this day.  That same year Richard sent another letter to his father in England in which he said he had five cows, three horses, and twenty acres of wheat, but that they had had twelve inches of snow on 26th April.  By May the weather was good and he had put in five acres of barley, sixteen acres of oats, one acre of potatoes, and eleven acres of Indian corn. 

#9

 

 

 

During their life together, Sarah presented Richard with five children, as was validated by the Farmington census of 1875 when once again the family surname was recorded with a single t.  Richard Collet was 52, Sarah Collet was 39, Alfred Collet was 19, Hiram Collet was 11, Lettie Collet was nine, and the family’s latest addition was named as Sydnia L Collet who was not yet one year old.  Their daughter Mary had already left the family home by then, and was married later that same year.

#2

 

 

 

Five years later the family was living at Farmington in Ontario County, New York State, which lies south-east of Rochester on the southern shore of Lake Ontario, and 100km west of Syracuse.  According to the census return for 1880 Richard Collett was age 58 and a married man from England, whose occupation was that of a farmer.  Rather strangely his wife Sarah Collett, age 44 and also married and from England, not described as his wife, but was simply listed as ‘other’. 

#9

 

 

 

That was also the description given to the couple’s eldest child, Alfred Collett, who was 24 and a married farm labourer, although there was no reference to his wife.  The other members of the household were Hiram Collett, age 16 and a farm labourer, Lettie Collett who was 13, and Sidney Collett who was five years old, and all of the children were confirmed as born in New York State.

#9

 

 

 

Sadly during 1890 the Buffalo to Geneva Railroad cut through his land and around that time the railroad company paid a John Young of Farmington $1,000 to secure a right of way for the route, and in that way perhaps Richard received some compensation for the loss of his land.  This was relayed to his family back in England via a letter sent by Richard’s daughter Mary Jane, in which she also mentioned her younger brothers Hiram and Sidney as earning 5 dollars a day, which was apparently good pay.

#9

 

 

 

Unfortunately the census of 1890 has not survived, so the next record of the family at Farmington was in 1900 where they were listed as Richard, Sarah, Fred, Hiram, Lettie and Sidney, the missing child again being the couple’s married daughter Mary Jane.

#9

 

 

 

It was just three years after that when Richard Collett died and was buried at South Farmington Cemetery on Shortsville Road in 1903.  Seven years later he was reunited with his wife, when Sarah died in 1910 and was buried there with him.  A single headstone marks the combined grave of Richard and Sarah, which carries the following inscription “Richard Collett 1821 – 1903, Sarah Randall his wife 1837 – 1910”.

#9

 

 

 

In the same cemetery are the graves of Richard’s and Sarah’s son Hiram and his wife Cora, who were buried there in the 1920s.  Also a single commemorative stone for Lloyd L Collett junior and his wife Donna J Goff who are still alive in 2010.  The inscription on the stone indicates that the couple were married on 25th March 1955 and that they were born on 20th November 1936, and 5th March 1936 respectively.  Lloyd L Collett senior was the youngest son of Richard’s and Sarah’s son Sidney Collett and his wife Harriet, with the aforementioned Lloyd L Collett junior being their great grandson (Ref. 11R3). 

#2

 

 

 

11P1

Alfred Collett

Born in 1856 at Farmington

#9

 

11P2

Mary Jane Collett

Born in 1858 at Farmington

#9

 

11P3

Hiram K Collett

Born in 1863 at Farmington

#9

 

11P4

Lettie Collett

Born in 1866 at Farmington

#9

 

11P5

Sidney L Collett

Born in 1874 at Farmington

#9

 

 

 

 

11O4

John Collett was baptised at Quinton on 25th April 1824 but was not listed as living with his family at Admington Farm Fields in June 1841.  He would have been 16 years of age on that occasion, and since all of his three older siblings were still alive and recorded in the census, it may be safe to assume that John had died prior to 1841.

#2

 

 

 

 

11O5

Eliza Collett was born at Admington in 1826 and baptised at Quinton on 19th November 1826, the daughter of Richard Collett and Hannah Fletcher.  By the time of the census in 1841, when she was 14 years old, she had already left the family home at Admington Farm Fields, and had entered into the world of domestic service.  On that particular occasion she was a servant at the home of Robert Fletcher, a carpenter, his wife and their four children in Preston-on-Stour.  As Eliza’s mother’s maiden name was also Fletcher, coupled with the fact she was born at Preston, it is very likely that Robert Fletcher may well have been an uncle to Eliza to some other relative.

#2

 

 

 

#9

 

 

 

In 1851 Eliza Collett, age 26, was employed as the housekeeper for Thomas Slatter, age 30, and an unmarried solicitor living in the Old Stratford area of Stratford-on-Avon.  Also working at the same house was Eliza’s younger sister Elizabeth who was 17 and employed there as a housemaid.  A third servant at the house was a groom.  It was on 4th April in 1852 that Eliza married her employer Thomas Slatter, the marriage taking place at the parish church in the St Marylebone in London.

#9

 

 

#9

 

 

 

Eliza and Thomas were married after notice of banns, when the bride’s father was named as Richard Collett, whose occupation was that of a land bailiff.  The couple’s addresses were simply recorded as St Marylebone, while the witnesses were Thomas Snape and Mary Nelson.  With Thomas Slatter being a solicitor it seems highly likely that Thomas Snape was the attorney Thomas Snape from Warwickshire who was slightly older than Thomas Slatter.  Why the couple travelled to London to be married remains a mystery, but it may have been something to do with the stigma attached to a solicitor marrying his housekeeper.  However, after they were married the couple returned to Old Stratford where they continued to live for the next two decades.

#9

 

 

 

Over the remainder of the 1850s Eliza presented Thomas with three children, so by the time of the census in 1861 the family living at 7 Warwick Road in Old Stratford comprised Thomas Slatter 40, Eliza Slatter 34, John Slatter who was six, Katherine A Slatter who was five, and Florence S Slatter who was two years old.  Also living at the house as a domestic servant to the family, was Eliza’s unmarried sister Ann Collett (below) who was 27, and a male servant Thomas Burman who later married Ann Collett.

#9

 

 

 

#9

 

 

 

On the occasion of the next census in 1871 the Slatter family was still at the same address, but by that time no member of the Collett family was in service with them, although they still employed three servants in a cook, a housemaid, and a groom.  Sometime before 1881 the family left Old Stratford and by the time of the census that year they were living at Evesham Road in Salford Priors, midway between Stratford-on-Avon and Evesham.  However, still living in their house at 7 Warwick Road in Old Stratford was their son John with his wife Mary, and their young daughter Marianne Katherine Slatter.  John, age 26, was a solicitor employing a cook and a housemaid.  It was the same situation ten years later in 1891, and again in 1901, when John and Marianne were still living at 7 Warwick Road in Old Stratford with two servants.

#9

 

 

 

 

 

#9

 

 

 

While Eliza and Thomas were still living at 7 Warwick Road, Eliza received a letter from her brother Richard Collett at Farmington in America.  The letter dated 4th February 1872 referred to the loan of some money which had been used to purchase some land.  It may have been two years after that, when their son John was married, that the couple left Stratford and moved to Salford Priors.

#9

 

 

 

According to the census in 1881 Thomas Slatter, age 60, was a solicitor who had been born at Salford Priors.  His wife Eliza Slatter was 56 and from Admington, and their two unmarried daughters were Katherine Ann Slatter, age 25, and Florence Sarah Slatter who was 22, both of them born at Stratford-on-Avon.  The family was still supported by three servants, a cook, a housemaid, and a groom.

#2

 

 

 

It was just over three years later that Eliza Slatter nee Collett, age 57, died at Salford Priors during the June quarter of 1884, and was followed shortly after by her husband Thomas, who died there on 1st September 1884, at the age of 64.  According to his obituary he was very well thought of and was also generous with money, especially to the church.  He was obviously a very successful lawyer as his probate record shows that he left a sum of £20,002.16s.2d.

#9

 

 

#9

 

 

 

Thomas Slatter, who at the time of his passing was referred to as Thomas Slatter of Salford Priors, was born there on 1st July 1820.  He was very likely the son of farmer John Slatter and Elizabeth Brands who were married at Honington, near Shipston-on-Stour, on 3rd November 1814, where Elizabeth was born.  In 1851 widower John Slatter, age 61, was farming 200 acres of land at Salford Priors, midway between Alcester and Evesham, where he employed six men, two boys, and two labourers.  In addition to his son Thomas, John also had an older son, Henry Brands Slatter, who was born in 1816, whose daughter Mary Hannah Maria Slatter, born in 1848, married her cousin John Slatter, who was born in 1854, the aforementioned son of Thomas Slatter above.

#9

 

 

 

 

11O6

George Collett was born at Admington on 4th March 1829 and was baptised at Quinton on 19th April 1829, the son of Richard and Hannah Collett.  His age was recorded as 11 years at the time of the 1841 Census, when he was living with his family in Admington Farm Fields.  Nine years later George married Emma Rogers at Quinton parish church on 17th December 1850.  Emma was born at Admington in 1824, and was baptised at Quinton on 27th June 1824, the daughter of Richard and Martha Rogers.  The witnesses at their wedding were George’s sister Ann Collett (below) and Jacob Cox.

#2

 

 

 

Just over three months later, the census in 1851, recorded George, age 22, and his wife Emma, age 25, living at the Admington home of Emma’s widowed mother Martha Rogers.  George was working as a groom, while Emma was pregnant with the couple’s first child which was born later that same year.  All three occupants were noted as having been born at Admington.  Living next door to Martha Rogers was her son Richard Rogers 38, who was a game keeper, with his family, and next to him was the family of William Mason, age 26, and his wife Sarah, also 26 and from Admington.  Living with them was Sarah’s daughter Ann Collett Mason (Ref. 11O45) who was six years old and of Admington, and William’s and Sarah’s daughter Leah Mason who was three months old.  Sarah was very likely Sarah Collett (Ref. 11N14).  And living next door to them was the family of carpenter John Rogers, age 64, who was Martha Rogers’ brother-in-law.

#2

 

 

 

During the following two years Emma presented George with their second son who was born at Admington and baptised at Quinton.  However, it would appear that he did not survive, since no further record of him has been found to date.  According to the census in 1861, George Collett of Admington was described as being 32, while he was working away from home, and was recorded as a coachman, employed by Corbett Holland Corbett, County Magistrate at his home at Arlington House in the East Ward of Cheltenham St Mary. 

#2

 

 

 

Six years earlier, in 1855, Corbett Holland Corbett, of Admington Hall (described as near Stratford-on-Avon), held the office of High Sheriff of Gloucestershire, and was therefore the principal law enforcer in the county.  He was also listed in the Warwickshire Poll Book of 1865 as Corbett Holland Corbett of Ilmington and Compton Scorpion.

#2

 

 

 

At that same time in 1861 when George Collett was working in Cheltenham, his wife Emma Collett, age 35 and a dressmaker, was living at Admington was their son John Collett who was 10 years old.  Interestingly, a space had been provided on the census form above Emma’s name for her husband’s details, presumably because it was known that he was working away from the family home on that occasion.  By 1871 son John had left home and George and Emma were living in the village of Western Subedge in Gloucestershire, where George was still a coachman.  At that same time, John Collett, age 20, was living and working at Campden (Chipping Campden), and it was during the following years that he became a married man.  By 1881 he was living in Lancashire. 

#2

 

 

 

However, in census of 1881, George Collett of Admington was recorded as being age 57, a transcription error perhaps for 52, when his occupation was still that of a domestic coachman.  Living with him at Cross Cottage in Blaisdon, within the Westbury-on-Severn area on the edge of the Forest of Dean, was his wife Emma Collett of Admington who was 55.  By 1891 the couple were once again living at Admington where George was 62 and was still working as a domestic coachman, perhaps even for the Corbett family.  His wife Emma was 66, and living next door to the couple was George’s cousin Daniel Collett (below) with his wife, and in the next dwelling was the widow Caroline Collett (Ref. 11N12) and her granddaughter Lucy Collett. 

#2

 

 

 

It was almost exactly three years later that George Collett died at Willcote Grounds on 4th March 1894, his sixty-fifth birthday.  Willcote Grounds is likely to have been in Admington, since it was at Admington Grounds in the village that his parents were living in 1851.  Certainly it was at the parish church in Quinton that George was buried on 8th March 1894, and where a headstone marks his grave.  A memorial card found by Doreen North reads as follows:  “In Loving Memory of George Collett who died at Willcote Grounds March 4th 1894 on his birthday aged 65 years and was interred at Quinton Church March 8th – Thy Will Be Done”.  Following the death of her husband, his widow Emma left Admington and by March 1901 she was living at the Shipston-on-Stour Union Workhouse where she died during the following three months.  Sadly in the census of 1901 she was described as a pauper and a dressmaker from Admington, who was 75.

#9

 

 

 

11P6

John Collett

Born in 1851 at Farmington

#2

 

11P7

Richard Collett

Born in 1853 at Farmington

#2

 

 

 

 

11O7

Ann Collett was born at Admington in 1831 and was baptised at Quinton on 2nd October 1831, the daughter of Richard and Hannah Collett.  She was nine years old in June census of 1841, but on that occasion was not living with her family at Admington Farm Fields, but was staying at the Admington home of Ann Savage, age 70.  However, she was back with her family at Farm Fields in Admington in 1851, when she was 19, but with no stated occupation.  Just over three months prior to the census in 1851, Ann was one of the witnesses at the Quinton wedding of her brother George Collett (above) and Emma Rogers which took place in December 1850.

#2

 

 

 

Following the marriage of her older sister Eliza Collett (above) to Thomas Slatter in 1853, Ann was employed as a servant at their home at 7 Warwick Road in Old Stratford at the time of the census in 1861, when unmarried Ann Collett was stated as being 27, rather than 29.  Also working for Eliza and Thomas was bachelor Thomas Burman who was 24 and also a house servant like Ann.  Their close working relationship over the following six years lead to Ann Collett marrying Thomas Burman at Leamington Priors on 19th December 1867.  Thomas Henry Burman was born at Snitterfield, just north of Stratford-on-Avon, where he was baptised on 7th May 1836, the son of Sarah Burman.  However, in the census of 1851, Thomas Henry Burman, age 14 and from Snitterfield, was still living in that same village with Thomas, age 49, and Ann Burman who was 36, but at the home of his grandmother Mary Burman who was 70 years of age.

#9

 

 

 

 

 

 

#14

 

 

 

Once they were married Thomas was offered a better job, when he accepted the post of a gentleman’s servant and, by the time of the census in 1871, the childless couple was living at Wolverton, near Snitterfield, where Thomas was 35, and Ann was 38.  Over the years Thomas had other jobs, and by 1881 he and Ann were living at 48 St. George's Road in Leamington Priors, today known as Leamington Spa, where Thomas was 45 and employed as a coachman, while Ann was 48.

#9

 

 

 

Living with the couple at that time was unmarried Cecilia Mountford, who was 19 and a dressmaker from Harbury in Warwickshire.  Cecilia was the daughter of Ann’s sister Elizabeth Collett (below) and her first husband William Mountford.  By the time of the next census in 1891 they had moved on again.  On that occasion they were living at Garden Terrace, Wellesbourne to the east of Stratford on Avon, where Thomas was an agricultural labourer at 54.

#9

 

 

 

That was then the most stable period in their lives, since it was at Wellesbourne where they were still living in 1901, when Thomas was employed as a labourer on a farm.  It was almost exactly four years later that Ann Burman nee Collett died at Wellesbourne during March 1905, at the age of 73, her death being recorded at Stratford-on-Avon.  According to the following census in April 1911 Thomas Burman from Snitterfield was 74 when he was still living alone in Wellesbourne.  It was there also that he died three years later during 1914, aged 78.

#9

 

 

#2

 

#9

 

 

 

During their life together, their marriage produced at least two children, both of whom died in infancy.  Sarah Burman was born and died during the last quarter of 1868, while Thirza Caroline Burman was born during the last quarter of 1876 and died during the first three months of the following year.  It is therefore possible that they were other children born during the nine years between those two daughters.

#9

 

 

 

 

11O8

Elizabeth Collett was born at Admington in 1833 and was baptised at Quinton on 15th September 1833, the daughter of Richard and Hannah Collett.  She was seven years of age at the time of the census in 1841 when she was living with her family at Admington Farm Fields.  Ten years later, age the age of 17, she was employed as a kitchen maid by bachelor and solicitor Thomas Slatter at his home in Old Stratford, where her older sister Eliza (above) was the housekeeper, the household also being supported by a groom.

#2

#9

 

 

 

It has not been determined when exactly she left the employment of Thomas Slatter, but it may only have been just over two years after the census day in 1851, since it was during the second quarter of that year when her sister Eliza Collett married Thomas Slatter in London.  Three and a half years later, during the last quarter of 1856, Elizabeth Collett was living in the Warwick area when she gave birth to a base-born son Frank Collett. 

#2

 

#9

 

 

 

Curiously no record of Elizabeth Collett has been found in the next census of 1861 when she would have been 27.  Instead her son Frank Collett was four years old and described as a visitor at the Warwick home of elderly couple William Bromwich or Bromage, age 60, and his wife Elizabeth, age 70, and their son James Bromarch, age 32.

#2

 

 

 

It was during the third quarter of that same year, when Elizabeth Collett married William Mountford in Birmingham.  He was a widower with a son Thomas Mountford, following the 1857 death of his wife Mary Sheila Brown, whom he had married in 1846.  According to the census six months earlier William Mountford, age 37, was a widower and a carpenter, living at Mill Street in Harbury with his son Thomas who was 10.  Once they were married Elizabeth and William appear to have continued to live at Mill Street, since it was there that Elizabeth Mountford was still living in 1871, although by that time she was a widow.

#9

 

 

 

Sadly for Elizabeth, her husband had died around the time of their ninth wedding anniversary in December 1870, at the age of 48.  The census listed Elizabeth Mountford as a widow, age 32 and a milliner who had been born at Admington.  Living with her were her two children; her base-born son Frank Collett (recorded as Frank Mountford) who was 14, and her daughter Cecilia Mountford who was seven years old.  In addition to her own children, Elizabeth was also looking after a baby by the name of Edith Ann Gallaway.  Living very close to Elizabeth in 1871, was Henry Verney who, had been widowed himself, following the death of wife Elizabeth Verney during the previous year, just like Elizabeth with her very recent loss.  The census at that time listed Henry Verney, age 33, living at Farm Street in Harbury with his four children; Mary Verney who was 10, Caroline Verney who was eight, Jessie Verney who was seven, and Harry Verney who was five years old.

#9

 

 

 

It is interesting that ten years earlier, the census in 1861 listed the family of Henry Verney as living in the West Ham and Plaistow area of London.  Head of the household Henry Verney from Harbury was 23, his wife Elizabeth was 25, and their two children that day were Alice G Verney who was approaching two years of age and Mary Sophia Verney who was only six months old.  The information regarding the youngest of the two daughters will be more significant later on, at the time of the death of Henry Verney (see below).

#14

 

 

 

It was therefore possibly inevitable that Elizabeth Mountford, nee Collett, formed a relationship with Henry Verney later that same year, and during the following year the first of their two daughters was born.  No marriage record for the couple has been found to date, but by 1881 their combined families were living together at Mill Street in Harbury, where Henry Verney of Harbury was 43 and a machinist.  His ‘wife’ Elizabeth Verney from Admington was 45 (sic), and living with the couple was Henry’s son Harry Verney who was 15, and his and Elizabeth’s two daughters Amy Mountford Verney who was eight, and Lilley Verney, who was six, both of them having been born at Harbury.

#2

 

 

 

Also on the occasion of the census in 1881, Elizabeth’s eldest daughter Cecilia Mountford was living with Elizabeth’s married sister Ann Burman nee Collett (above) and her husband, coachman Thomas Burman, at 48 St Georges Road in Leamington Priors.  Cecilia was described as being 19 and a dressmaker from Harbury, who was a visitor at their home.  Seven years after that, Cecilia Mountford married Alfred Samuel Taylor at St Pancras in London during 1888.  He was a travelling sorter for the Post Office, so very likely worked on the mail trains.

#2

 

 

#9

 

 

 

No record of her son Frank has been located in 1881, although the next census in 1891 revealed that labourer Frank Collett, age 32 and an invalid, was living at Harbury with his mother.  He was described as the son-in-law of Henry Verney who was the owner of a threshing machine at the age of 53.  His wife Elizabeth Verney from Admington was 55, and the only other person living at the family home was Harry Verney who was curiously 23 and from Plaistow in Essex, rather than 25 and from Harbury. 

#2

 

 

 

By 1891 Elizabeth’s daughter, Amy Verney was one of three domestic servants working at the home of retired Colonel Henry Pratt and his wife, at 36 Clarence Square in Leamington.  The couple employed a cook and a parlour maid, while Amy was the housemaid.

#9

 

 

 

In March 1901 Henry Verney and his wife Elizabeth were living at 28 Mill Street in Harbury.  Henry, from Harbury, was 63, and was still described as the owner of a threshing machine, while his wife from Admington was 65.  Still living at Harbury with them was Henry’s son Harry Verney from Plaistow who was 35 and a ‘labourer working for his father’, and Elizabeth’s son Frank Collett who was 40 (sic) and described as Henry’s step-son, and as having fits since childhood. 

#2

 

 

 

#9

 

 

 

Elizabeth Verney nee Collett died at Harbury during 1909, age 74, so by the time of the Harbury census of 1911 widower Henry Verney, age 73, was still living there, with just his son Harry Ernest Verney, age 45, for company.  And by that time Amy Verney, age 28, was working at The Western Hospital in Fulham, London, where she was employed as a housemaid.  Also living nearby in Harbury was another of his sons, widower Albert Edwin Verney of Harbury who was 48, who had living with him his three children, Victor Albert 19, Beatrice Maud Mary 17, and Doris Verney who was 10 years old.  It was in 1922 that Henry Verney died at the age of 84.

#2

 

 

 

Other members of the Collett family were living in Harbury around that time, but they were members of an apparent unconnected branch of the family from Murcott in Oxfordshire, as detailed in Part 46 – The Charlton-on-Otmoor (Oxon) Area Line.  In addition to Elizabeth Mountford Verney Collett, the details of another Elizabeth Collett of Admington and Ilmington, whose origins have yet to be determined, can be found in the Appendix at the end of this file for completeness.

#2

 

 

 

The birth of the aforementioned Mary Sophia Verney of Plaistow, the second child of Henry and Elizabeth Verney was recorded at West Ham (Ref. 4a 21) during the last three month of 1860.  Tragically she was under ten years of age when her mother died and it was during 1891 that she married William Sumner at Chorley in Cheshire, when her father was confirmed as Henry Verney.  Upon the death of Henry Verney at Hatton, just north of Warwick, in 1922, administration of his estate of £670 17 Shillings 2d was granted to Mary Sophia Sumner.

#14

 

 

 

Jessie Elizabeth Verney, born around 1864 at Plaistow in East London and another daughter of Henry and Elizabeth Verney, was married in 1885 to (1) Alfred Whitlock, the grandfather of David Whitlock of Coventry.  Once married the couple lived in Radford Semele, where Jessie presented Alfred with six children.  Previously, at the age of 16, Jessie had worked as a servant with Maria Blakemore at 2 Euston Place in Leamington Spa, David’s home town.  Following the  death of Jessie Whitlock in 1921, her husband married (2) Jane Allibone, who was about thirty years his junior.

#15

 

 

 

11P8

Francis Collett

Born in 1856 Warwickshire

#2

 

 

 

 

11O9

William Collett, who was born at Admington in late 1835 and was baptised at St Swithun’s Church in Quinton on 7th February 1836, the youngest son of Richard Collett and Hannah Fletcher.  He was recorded as being five years old in the census of 1841 for the parish of Quinton, when he was living at Admington Farm Fields with his family.

#2

 

 

 

Ten years later he was one of only three children still living there with his parents at the age of 14.  It was just over eight years late that William, the son of Richard Collett, was working in Leamington where he married (1) Ann Hall at Leamington Prior (Leamington Spa) on 13th June 1859.  William was described as a labourer of Cross Street in Leamington, while his bride gave her address as Rosefield Street in the town.  The witnesses at the wedding ceremony were William Hall, Ann’s brother, and Sarah Hall, his wife, while both they, and the bride and groom, signed the register in their own hand. 

#2

 

 

 

#9

 

 

 

Ann Hall was born at Little Wolford in 1838 and was the daughter of the late Edward Hall and Ann Pargeter.  She was baptised at the church of St Mary the Virgin in Ilmington on 6th November 1836.  Following the death of her father, her brother William Hall had take over the family carpentry business at Campden Road in Ilmington.  It is therefore curious why Ann and William were not married at Ilmington.

#2

 

#9

 

 

 

Once they were married the couple initially settled in Admington where their first child was born just nine months after they were married.  So by the time of the census in 1861 the family living at Admington comprised agricultural labourer William, age 25, his wife Ann who was 24, and their son Francis who was just one year old, having been baptised at Quinton not long after he was born.

#2

 

 

 

 

Over the next ten years a further four children were added to the family, and the first of them was James who born after the family had moved to Atherstone midway between Tamworth and Nuneaton.  However, a few years later and before the end of the 1860s, the family moved to the village of Mickleton where all of the remaining children were born, and where they were living at the time of the census in 1871.

#9

 

 

 

Up until the move to Mickleton William’s occupation had been that of a carrier, transporting produce and passengers to Stratford-on-Avon and Evesham, but the move to Mickleton was the result of him appointed the landlord of The Milking Pail beer-house at 5 Sheep Street.  In 1871 he and his family were confirmed as living there when, rather curiously, he gave his age as 31, rather than 36.  Also rather curiously his wife was recorded in error as Rose A Collett of Ilmington said she was 30, and their three sons were Francis, who was 11, James who was seven, and baby Albert who was nine months old.  Also living with the family was William’s widowed father, 73-years old Richard Collett.

#9

 

#2

 

 

 

 

Two years later Ann presented William with their fourth child, their first daughter, and four years after that she discovered she was once again with-child, except she was expecting twins.  On that occasion she gave birth to a fourth son, Edward, and a second daughter Agnes, both of whom were born at Mickleton, although sadly neither of them survived the ordeal.

#9

 

 

 

According to the next census in 1881, William was still a publican and a carrier in Mickleton, where he was living with his wife Ann and their two youngest children.  The census confirmed that William was 42 and from Admington, Ann was 41 and from Ilmington, and their children were Albert who was 10, and Florence who was seven, both of them born at Mickleton, and both attending the school in Mickleton.  The household also included two visitors, Alfred W. Taplin, age 31 and a timber hawler (sic) from Campden, and his wife Ellen.

#2

 

 

 

Although not specifically mentioned by name, the establishment where William was the landlord was the beer-house known as The Milking Pail, in Sheep Street, which today is Lawson Square in Mickleton.  Within the family, the story is that William’s wife Ann insisted on serving each pint of beer with a piece of bread, which she thought would help to prevent the customers getting too drunk. 

 

Pictured here is the same

property in 1900 and 2000.

#9

 

 

 

The couple’s eldest son Francis had already left home by 1881 and was working as a footman in Devon, while son James was working as a groom in Worcestershire.  The family continued to live in Mickleton until around 1887, when they moved to Admington.  The move was confirmed by a school book belonging to daughter Florence, on the front of which was written “Florence Gertrude Ann Hall Collett, Admington Grounds, Quinton – 16th April 1887”.  However, just three years after that, tragedy struck the family when, on 1st February 1890, William’s wife Ann passed away, following which she was buried in the churchyard in Quinton, where a headstone marks her grave.  The cause of death was gout and influenza.

#2

 

 

#9

 

 

 

One year later William married (2) Ann Collett on 24th March 1891.  She was the widow of Josiah Collett (Ref. 11O24), William’s cousin, and was formerly Ann Hughes.  Ann was the illegitimate daughter of Lucy Hughes who married shoemaker John Such when Ann was around two years old, and from whence she was also known within the family, as Ann Such.

 

In the census that year, William was 54 years of age and was living at Admington with new wife Ann, who was 42, and his daughter Florence G A H Collett who was 17.  During the following year Ann presented William with their only child, son Thomas William Collett. 

 

This is a photograph of farmer William Collett around the end of the century, relaxing in a hammock on the farm, while smoking his pipe.

#9

 

 

 

The birth of their son was registered during the second quarter of 1891, indicating that Ann Collett was well advanced in her pregnancy on the day of the census in early April 1891.  Six years later in 1897 William Collett purchased four cottages in Admington, one being Cider Mill Cottage which was later bought by his son Fred in 1918.  By the time of the next census in March 1901 the family still living at Admington was made up of William who was 64, his wife Ann who was 52 and their son Thomas W Collett (sic) who was nine years old.  All three of them had been born at Admington and were residing in a property simply described as Farm House, from where William was a farmer with his own account.

#2

 

#12

 

 

 

It was the same situation at Admington ten years later in April 1911, when William Collett, a retired farmer, was 76, his wife Ann Collett was 64, and their son Thomas Collett was 19.  It was during the next year that William Collett died of heart failure on 10th April 1912, at the age of 77, when the ownership of the four cottages at Admington passed to his widow Ann.  The Will of William Collett was made ten years earlier during 1902 and was proved in Gloucester but not until 25th June 1918.  The Will confirmed that William was a farmer of Admington, and that his personal effects valued at £448 10 Shillings passed to his widow Ann.  The document also included the name of his youngest son Thomas (William Thomas).  It seems likely that Ann either died later that same year or sometime after 1918.  It is also of interest that William’s third son bought the aforementioned Cider Mill Cottage at auction in Stratford-on-Avon on 1st February 1918 for the sum of £430. 

#2

 

#9

 

 

#12

 

 

 

It is now known that the widow Ann Collett, the second wife of William Collett and the base-born daughter of Lucy Hughes, had a half-sister Jane Such who was born following the marriage of Lucy Hughes and John Such when Ann was two years old.  When Jane Such was married some years later, she had a daughter Gertrude, and it was Gertrude who later married Thomas Henry Cockbill who was a sewage worker in 1911.  So, when the death of widow Ann Collett was recorded at the Sewerage Works in Milcote, midway between Welford-on-Avon and Stratford-upon-Avon in Warwickshire, on 14th March 1935, she was living with her half-sister’s daughter Gertrude Cockbill and her husband Thomas Henry Cockbill.  That situation was confirmed at Gloucester when probate of the personal effects of Ann Collett, amounting to £377, was resolved on 27th March 1935 in favour of Gertrude Cockbill, the wife of Thomas Henry Cockbill.

#9

 

 

 

11P9

Francis Richard Edward Hall Collett

Born in 1860 at Admington

#2

 

11P10

James Collett

Born in 1864 at Atherstone

#2

 

11P11

Albert Frederick William Collett

Born in 1870 at Mickleton

#2

 

11P12

Florence Gertrude Ann Hall Collett

Born in 1873 at Mickleton

#2

 

11P13

Edward Shirley Collett              twin

Born in 1877 at Mickleton

#9

 

11P14

Agnes Beatrice Collett              twin

Born in 1877 at Mickleton

#9

 

The following is the only child of William Collett and his second wife Ann:

 

11P15

William Thomas Collett

Born in 1891 at Admington

#9

 

 

 

 

11O10

Jane Collett was born at Admington in 1838 and was baptised at Quinton on 30th December 1838, the youngest child of farm worker Richard Collett and his wife Hannah Fletcher.  On the occasion of the first national census on the sixth of June in 1841, Jane Collett was living with her family at Admington Farm Fields when she was listed as being two years old.  Sadly it was four years later that the death of Jane Collett was recorded during the last three months of 1845 when she was seven years of age.

#2

 

 

#9

 

 

 

 

11O11

Ann Collett was born at Welford-on-Avon and was baptised there on 15th January 1822, the only known child of Robert Collett and his first wife Mary.  Sometime after she was born her mother died, and when she was just ten years of age her father married Mary Hughes in 1832.  Ann’s rounded age in the 1841 Census was 20, when she was recorded as living in the Alcester & Stratford-on-Avon registration district. 

#2

 

 

 

 

11O12

Daniel Collett, who was born at Admington in late 1832 and was baptised at St Swithun’s Church in Quinton on 10th May 1833, the eldest children of agricultural labourer Robert Collett and his second wife Mary Hughes.  He was eight years old in the June census of Admington in 1841.  He was one of four children still living with his parents at Admington, in the parish of Quinton, at that time.  He was working as an agricultural labourer in 1851, when he was 17 and was still living at Admington with his family.  It may have been around ten years later that he married Sarah Ann Bayliss who was born in 1836 at Aston Magna, just north of Moreton-in-Marsh, the daughter of George Bayliss and Fanny Hulls.

#2

 

 

 

 

 

#14

 

 

 

By the time of the Admington census of 1871, the marriage had produced two children for Daniel and Sarah.  Daniel was 34, Sarah was 33 and their children were Jane Collett, who was five, and William Collett, who was two years old.  Both of the children were born at Admington, as was the couple’s third child, but all of them were baptised at St Swithun’s Church in Quinton.

#2

 

 

 

Ten years later in 1881, Daniel Collett, an agricultural labourer from Admington, and his wife Sarah from Aston Magna, were both listed as 48, when they were living at Lower Admington.  Living there with them were their sons William H Collett, who was 12 and who had already started work as an agricultural labourer with his father, and Dan Collett who was six years old, both boys confirmed as having been born at Admington.  By that time in her life, the couple’s only daughter Ellen Jane Collett was working away from home and was in domestic service at a house in nearby Stratford-on-Avon at the age of 15.

#2

 

 

 

In 1891 Daniel Collett, age 57, was an agricultural labourer still living at Admington with his wife Sarah A Collett who was 55 and from Aston Magna.  Living in the adjacent dwellings on either side of their property were other members of the Collett family.  On one side was Daniel’s older cousin George (Ref. 11O6) and his wife Emma Collett nee Rogers, while on the other side was Daniel’s aunt Caroline Collett (Ref. 11N12) and her granddaughter Lucy Collett.

#2

 

 

 

Sometime within the next ten years Daniel Collett died leaving his wife Sarah A Collett as a widow in the census of 1901.  By that time she was living with her eldest son William H Collett and his family at their home in Admington.  Curiously on that occasion Sarah was recorded as being 67 and from Admington, rather than 64 and from Aston Magna.  During the next decade her son William took his family from Admington to live in nearby Stratford-on-Avon, where Sarah also joined them.  According to the census in April 1911 Sarah Ann Collett, age 73 and from Aston Magna, was living there with her son William Henry Collett, his wife Ellen Collett, and their four children.

#2

 

 

 

11P16

Ella Jane Collett

Born in 1865 at Admington

#2

 

11P17

William Henry Collett

Born in 1868 at Admington

#2

 

11P18

Daniel Collett

Born in 1874 at Admington

#2

 

 

 

 

11O13

Rachel Collett was born at Admington in 1834 and was baptised at Quinton on 22nd March 1835.  She was six years of age in the 1841 census when she was living with her family, but by 1851, perhaps for reasons of overcrowding, Rachel at 16 was not living with them, but was living nearby in Admington.  Ten years later she was unmarried at the age of 25 and, by then, had returned to the family home in Admington.  It is assumed that she was married shortly thereafter since no further record of her as Rachel Collett has been found.

#2

 

 

 

 

11O14

Dinah Collett was born at Admington in 1836 and was baptised at Quinton on 22nd January 1837.  By June 1841 she was four years old and was living with her family in Admington, as she was ten years later when she was still attending the local school at the age of 13.  Six years later she married Thomas Tomlinson at Pebworth on 8th April 1857.  According to the census in 1871, Dinah was referred to as Diana Tomlinson, age 33, when she was living with her husband Thomas Tomlinson, age 34, at Pebworth with their four children, Joseph who was 11, William who was nine, Caleb who was six, and Jane who was four years old.

#2

 

 

 

Ten years later Dinah and Thomas were both 44 and were still living at Pebworth, where Thomas was born and was working as an agricultural labourer at that time.  Dinah was confirmed as having been born at Admington and all three of their children, Joseph 21, William 19 and Caleb 16, had been born at Pebworth and were also employed as agricultural labourers.  The family’s address was simply ‘cottage’ Pebworth.  With Dinah’s daughter Jane missing from the 1881 census records, when she would have been 14, it must be assumed that she had died during the previous ten years.

#2

 

 

 

 

11O15

Sarah Collett was born at Admington in 1838, and was baptised at Quinton on 10th February 1839, the daughter of Robert and Mary Collett.  Rather strangely there was no Sarah listed with her family in 1841 or at any later time, so it might be assumed that she died shortly after she was born, or that she was in fact Selena Collett (below).

#2

 

 

 

 

11O16

Selena Collett was born at Admington around 1839 and was listed using different variations of her name in the census records, although no baptism record has so far been found for her.  It would also appear that she never married and, in the Admington census in 1881, as Selina Collett age 40, she was living with her widowed mother Mary Collett and younger brother George Collett (below).

#2

 

 

 

During the earlier census records for Admington she was listed as Sierra (Siena) who was two years old in 1841, as Lena who was 11 in 1851, as Leanah, age 21, in 1861, and as Susannah who was 31 in 1871.  It is possible that Sierra may have been an interpretation of the name Sarah, which would perhaps indicate that Sarah (above) and Selena was the same person.  No record of any one with either name has been identified in 1891 or 1901, so there is a chance that she married late in life, or died between 1881 and 1891.

#2

 

 

 

 

11O17

John Collett was born at Admington in 1841, and was nine years old in the Admington census of 1851, when he was listed with his parents Robert and Mary Collett and other members of his family.  Whether because of a transcript error, he was recorded in some records as Jones Collett, where the original census form included him as Jn.  At that time in his life John’s father was an agricultural labourer, a profession that John followed when he left school.

#2

 

 

 

Nearly ten years later he married Harriet Cook Waters at the parish church in Shipston-on-Stour during the December quarter of 1860.  Harriet was born on 25th May 1840 in the hamlet of Honington just north of Shipston-on-Stour.

#2

 

 

 

Their first two children were born at Shipston-on-Stour before the couple moved to Admington, where they lived for the rest of their lives together.  And it was at Admington that a further eight children were born, although all of them were baptised in the parish church at Quinton.

#1

 

 

 

By the time of the census in 1871 the family had increased to five children.  John was 29 and was Harriet 30.  The children at that time were Mary who was 10, George who was eight, Emma who was five, Kate who was three, and William who was still under one year old.

#2

 

 

 

Ten years later, according to the census of 1881, John Collett, age 40 and born at Admington, was an agricultural labourer, as his father had been before him.  He was head of the house at Lower Admington where he was living with his wife Harriet, who was 41 and born at Ilmington, and eight of their nine children.

#2

 

 

 

It is possibly that John’s and Harriet’s eldest daughter Mary had already left the family home and may have even been married by then, as she would have been twenty years of age.  The fact that the census return indicated that Harriet was born at Ilmington may well have been a transcribing error.  That is, a misinterpretation of Honington, where she was actually born, and as indicated correctly in the later census of 1901.

#2

 

 

 

The eight children living with the couple at Lower Admington were, George Collett, age 18 and from Shipston-on-Stour, who was an agricultural labourer, Emma Collett 15, Kate Collett 13, Tom Collett 11, John Collett who was eight, Mark Collett who was five, Eliza Collett who was three, and Annie Collett who was seven months old.  With the exception of eldest son George, all the remaining children were described as having been born at Admington.

#2

 

 

 

Not long after the census day in 1881 Harriet became pregnant with the couple’s last child, who was born during the following year.  According to the next census in 1891, John was 49, while Harriet was also the same age.  Living with them at Admington on that occasion were their sons Thomas, age 21, John 18, Mark 15, and James who was eight years old, together with their daughters Eliza who was 13 and Annie who was 10.  By the time of the census in March 1901 John and Harriet were still living at Admington, where John of Admington was 58, and was employed as an agricultural labour, while his wife Harriet, from Honington was 59.

#2

 

 

 

Ten years later and John and Harriet were both listed in the 1911 Census as being 70 years of age.  Once again John’s place of birth was confirmed as Admington, while the couple were living in the Shipston-on-Stour registration district, but by that time all of their children were then living elsewhere.

#2

 

 

 

11P19

Mary Ann Collett

Born in 1861 at Shipston-on-Stour

#2

 

11P20

George Collett

Born in 1863 at Shipston-on-Stour

#2

 

11P21

Emma Collett

Born in 1866 at Admington

#2

 

11P22

Kate Collett

Born in 1867 at Admington

#2

 

11P23

William Thomas Collett

Born in 1870 at Admington

#2

 

11P24

John Collett

Born in 1873 at Admington

#2

 

11P25

Mark Collett

Born in 1875 at Admington

#2

 

11P26

Eliza Collett

Born in 1878 at Admington

#2

 

11P27

Annie Collett

Born in 1880 at Admington

#2

 

11P28

James Collett

Born in 1882 at Admington

#2

 

 

 

 

11O18

Mark Collett was born at Admington in 1844.  At the time of the 1861 Census he was 16 and ten years later in 1871 he was not married but was still living in Admington with his parents at the age of 26.  He later married Mary Mason who was born in 1850 at Long Marston just three miles to the north-west of Admington.  Sometime after they were married Mark and Mary moved to Hatton to the west of the town of Warwick where Mark took up employment as a cowman and where Mary was a dairy maid.

#2

 

 

 

According to the 1881 Census Mark was 37 and Mary was 31 and they were living at Georges Farm in Hatton not far from Leek Wootton where Mark’s brother Joseph was living at that time.  The marriage had not so far produced any children and the only person living with Mark and Mary was Mary’s younger brother Frederick Mason, age 14, who was working as a farm servant.  The 1901 Census placed Mark and Mary as living at Stretton-on-Fosse where Mark, age 56, was a farmer of Admington, and Mary was 51.  Ten years later in April 1911, Mark and Mary were still living at Stretton-on-Fosse where Mark of Admington was 67 and Mary was 61.

#2

 

 

 

It was ten years later that Mark Collett passed away at the age of 77, his death recorded at Shipston-on-Stour (Ref. 6d 708) during the third quarter of 1921.

#14

 

 

 

 

11O19

Ann Collett was born at Admington in 1846 and was five years of age at the time of the Admington census in 1851 when she was living there with her family.

#2

 

 

 

 

11O20

Joseph Collett was born at Admington in 1849.  Whilst he has not been located in the 1851 Census he was 12 years old and was living with his family in 1861.  Joseph later joined his brother Mark who had left the family home in Admington to travel north Warwick.  However, before leaving Admington Joseph entered into a relationship with Ann Neal, who was born at Quinton in 1848, and prior to the census of 1871 Ann presented Joseph with their first child.  According to the census in 1871 Joseph and Anne were recorded as being husband and wife when they were living with Joseph’s parents Robert and Mary Collett at Admington.  Joseph was 22 and Ann was 24 and with them was their first child, their daughter Mary J Collett, who died shortly after she was baptised in October 1871.

#2

 

 

#2

 

#2

 

 

 

It was a year later that Ann realised she was expecting their second child, following which the marriage of Joseph Collett and Ann Neal was recorded at Shipston-on-Stour (Ref. 6d 1103) during the final quarter of 1782.  Perhaps it was the death of the couple’s first child that prompted Joseph and Ann to move north to live at Barford between Stratford-on-Avon and Warwick, where the couple’s next two children were born.  By 1876 the family had moved again, on that occasion to Leamington, where their fourth child was born.

#14

 

#2

 

 

 

A couple of years later found the family living at Kenilworth where another child was born.  By early 1881, around the time of the birth of their sixth child, the family had settled at Leek Wootton where Joseph was the storekeeper and baker of the village Cooperative Stores.  Only the couple’s first born child was missing from the census record.  It is interesting to note that Leek Wootton is only a very short distance from Hatton where Joseph’s older brother Mark was living at the start of the 1880s.  The birth of the couple’s sixth child took place in the week just before the census date of 3rd April 1881 and on the day of the census no name was given to the child.  It was simply registered as ‘infant Collett unnamed’ although it is known that the child was later named Mary.

#2

 

 

 

During the next ten years a further three children were added to the family, so by 1891 the family was made up of Joseph 41, Anne 42, and seven of their children.  They were Ernest, age 17, George, age 14, Joseph, age 12, Mary, age 10, Helen, who was six, Albert, who was two, and Geoffrey who was under one year old.  The family was recorded as living at Charlton Entire near Evesham in Worcestershire.

#2

 

 

 

By 1901 Joseph, Anne and some of their children were still living at Charlton Entire.  Joseph was confirmed as being from Admington and was 51, while Anne was 52 and from Upper Quinton.  The children were daughter Mary, age 20, and their sons Joseph, age 21, Albert, age 12, and Geoffrey who was 10. 

#2

 

 

 

Curiously the occupation of Joseph Collett at that time in his life was that of a market gardener, and it may be of interest to note that another Collett family was also working in the same profession in 1901, although they were living at Badsey near Evesham.  They were William Collett of Willersey, and his wife Charlotte Collett of Badsey, the details for whom can be found in the appendix to Part 57 – The Bakers of Abbots Morton in Worcestershire Line.

#2

 

 

 

It would appear from the census of 1911 that Joseph Collett had died within the first ten years of the new century at which time the family’s market gardening business was taken over by his two youngest sons.  According to the census return that year Ann Collett of Upper Quinton was 62 and a widow living at Yessell Lane in Charlton near Evesham.  It also stated that she had given birth to nine children, eight of which were still alive in 1911.  Four of them were still living with Ann on that day and they were Ernest who was 37, Mary who was 30, Albert who was 22 and Geoffrey who was 20, it being Albert and Geoffrey who were described as market gardeners.

#2

 

 

 

11P29

Mary Jane Collett

Born in 1871 at Admington

#2

 

11P30

Ernest Collett

Born in 1873 at Barford

#2

 

11P31

Louisa J Collett

Born in 1874 at Barford

#2

 

11P32

George Robert Collett

Born in 1876 at Leamington

#2

 

11P33

Joseph Collett

Born in 1879 at Kenilworth

#2

 

11P34

Mary Collett

Born in 1881 at Leek Wootton

#2

 

11P35

Helen Collett

Born in 1884 at Leek Wootton

#2

 

11P36

Albert Collett

Born in 1888 at Charlton

#2

 

11P37

Geoffrey Collett

Born in 1890 at Charlton

#2

 

 

 

 

11O21

Jane Collett was born at Admington in either late 1850 or early 1851, since she was under one year old in the census of 1851 when she was living at Admington with her family.  She was still living in the same area when she was 21, but by the time of the census in 1881 Jane was living and working in London.  At that time she was employed as a domestic servant at the age of 31, at the home of draper’s assistant William S Rush at 34 Parkhurst Road in London.  Jane gave her place of birth as Chipping Campden, while also staying at the house were father and son Samuel and Gilbert Oberon who were also both listed as having been born at Chipping Campden.

#2

 

 

 

 

11O22

George Collett was born at Admington in 1853 and was eight years old in the census of 1861.  Ten years later George was still living with his parents in Admington and was listed as being 17 years old.  By the time of the census of 1881 he was a carrier at the age of 27, when he was still living at the family home in Lower Admington with his mother and older sister Selina Collett (above).

#2

 

 

 

Three years later in 1884 he married Agnes Skey at Quinton parish church.  The parish register confirmed that they were both 31 and that Agnes’ father was James Skey, while George’s father was Robert Collett.  The witness to the signing of the register was George’s oldest brother Daniel Collett (above).

#3

 

 

 

No further record of George and Agnes after that time has so far been found, although the widow Agnes was 58 and was living in the Toxteth district of Liverpool in April 1911.

#2

 

 

 

 

11O23

Ann Winifred Gilkes was born at Great Rollright in 1849.  She married Valentine Pinfold who was born at Enstone in 1846.  During his life Valentine was a shepherd and a farm labourer, but he was listed with his wife at the time of the 1881 Census.

#5

 

 

 

According to the census record, Ann who was 31 was a visitor at the Spelsbury home of shepherd William Leech and his family.  Accompanying Ann were two of her children, Joseph Pinfold, who was four years old, and Mary Elizabeth Pinfold who was just eleven months old, both children having been born at Chipping Norton.  Twenty years later Ann, age 51 and from Great Rollright, and Valentine, age 54 and from Enstone, were living at Chipping Norton with their children including 20 years old Mary E Pinfold who was working as a domestic cook.  Valentine Pinfold died during 1914.

#2

 

 

 

11P38

Mary Elizabeth Pinfold

Born in 1880 at Chipping Norton

#2

 

 

 

 

11O24

Josiah Collett was born at Admington in 1846, the only known child of blacksmith Thomas Collett and his wife Elizabeth.  With no church at Admington at that time, Josiah was baptised at St Swithun’s Church in Quinton on 21st February 1847, the parish record confirming that his parents were Thomas and Elizabeth Collett.  Like his father, and his grandfather before him, Josiah was also a blacksmith

#2

 

 

 

Josiah was four years old in the Admington census of 1851, when he was living there with his parents.  Over the following decades he was recorded as still living with his parents in Admington when, in 1861 he was 14, and was 24 in 1871.  Shortly after 1871 his father died, at which point Josiah continued with the family business alone, as a blacksmith.  He was still a bachelor at the time of the census in 1881, when he was 34 and was living at Upper Admington with his elderly widowed mother.

#2

 

 

 

Just a few months later the marriage of Josiah Collett and Ann Hughes was recorded at Birmingham (Ref. 6d 79) during the third quarter of 1881, when the witnesses were Edward John Powell and Lizzie Richmond Scampton.  Ann Hughes was the base-born daughter of Lucy Hughes who was born in 1848.  Sadly their marriage last just eight years when Josiah Collett died during 1889, following which his widow Ann Collett married William Collett (Ref. 11O9), who was Josiah’s cousin.  For the continuing story of the life of Ann Collett nee Hughes, go to Ref. 11O9.

#14

 

#2

 

 

 

 

11O25

John Collett was born at Admington in 1844 and was baptised at St Swithun’s parish church in Quinton on 5th May 1844, the first child born to George Collett and Maria Jennings.  Sometime after he was born his family left Admington when they moved to Chipping Campden, where they were living in 1851.  John was six years old at that time, when he and his family were living at Back Ends in Chipping Campden.

#1

#2

 

 

 

 

During the next ten years John’s family left Back Ends, when they moved to a new address in Chipping Campden at Cow Fair.  However, on leaving school he became a blacksmith and initially learned the trade with his father in the family business, before leaving Chipping Campden just prior to April 1861. 

#2

 

 

 

By the time of the census that month, John Collett, age 16, was no longer living at his parents’ home in Cow Fair; instead he was living and working in the Rugby area of Warwickshire.  It was after that when he moved northwards, again, and on that occasion the move took him into Staffordshire.  And it was there that he met his future wife Elizabeth, who is understood to have been Elizabeth Hammond.

#2

 

 

 

Elizabeth was born on 29th August 1833 and was therefore around ten years older than John, a fact that was somewhat confused in the next two census returns when both she and John gave conflicting ages and places of birth.  It was towards the end of the 1860s that they were married, following which they set up home at Ellenhall, where they appear to have lived for the rest of their lives, and where all of their children were born.

#2

 

 

 

At the time of the Ellenhall census in 1871, John Collett from ‘Gloucester Campden’ was 26 and was working as a blacksmith, employing two boys, one of which was his younger brother Mark Collett.  His wife Elizabeth was 30 and from Haughton, three miles south of Ellenhall.  By then they had already started a family, because with them was the first of their five known children, Annie M Collett who was one year old.  Elizabeth may have been with-child on the day of the census, since the couple’s second child was born during the following year.

#8

 

 

 

In addition to their daughter, John and Elizabeth had four other people living with them in 1871.  The first two of them were Fanny Hammond, who was 10 years old from Ellenhall, and Elizabeth Hammond also from Ellenhall who was eight years old.  The sisters were described as the nieces of John Collett, and were very likely the nieces of his wife.  The other two residents, were Mark Collett, age 16 from ‘Gloucester Campden’ and Edward Tomlinson, also 16 but from Little Haywood in Staffordshire.  Both boys were described as blacksmith’s apprentices.

#8

 

 

 

Living almost adjacent to the Collett household was possibly Elizabeth’s parents, William and Mary Ann Hammond.  William from Yarnfield in Staffordshire was 66 and an agricultural labourer, while his wife was 64 and from High Offley in Staffordshire, and they were more than likely the grandparents to the nieces Fanny and Elizabeth Hammond.

#8

 

 

 

Over the remainder of that decade a further four children were added to the Collett family.  So by 1881 the family comprised John Collett, age 40 (sic) and a blacksmith from Admington, Elizabeth Collett, age 48 (sic) of Ranton, which is midway between Haughton and Ellenhall, and their children Annie M Collett 11, Rosa G Collett who was eight, John A Collett who was seven, Francis E Collett who was five, and Fanny E Collett who was two years old.  Also living with the family was niece Elizabeth Hammond, age 18 of Ellenhall, and the aforementioned Edward Tomlinson, who was 25, and a servant and a blacksmith from Gayton in Staffordshire, who was continuing to work for John Collett.

#2

 

 

 

The Stafford registration district was still the family’s place of residence in 1891, when John was 49 (sic), Elizabeth was 57 (sic), and their children still at home with them, were their sons John who was 17, and Francis who was 15, and their daughter Fanny who was 10.

#2

 

 

 

Ten years later in March 1901, John who was then 59 (sic) was described as a farmer and blacksmith, but then on that occasion he once again gave his place of birth as Chipping Campden, rather than at Admington.  Similarly Elizabeth who was 67 (sic) stated she was born at Long Compton, which is just one mile south of Ranton and one mile north of Haughton.  Still living with them was their son Francis, age 25, who was a blacksmith like his father, and their unmarried daughter Elizabeth who was 23.  Their son John, who was 27 by then, had left the family home to be married and was working as a general farm labourer at Kings Norton to the south of Birmingham.

#2

 

 

 

Just less than five years later Elizabeth Collett nee Hammond passed away at Ellenhall on 30th January 1906, following which she was buried there where a memorial headstone marks her grave.  Subsequently in the next census of 1911 John Collett was 66 (his correct age at last) and a widower who was still living at Ellenhall with his daughter Elizabeth Collett who was acting as his housekeeper.  John survived his wife by eight years and was 75 when he died at Ellenhall on 10th March 1919.  His name also appears on the memorial stone with that of his wife.

#14

#2

 

 

#14

 

 

 

 

11P39

Annie M Collett

Born in 1869 at Ellenhall

#2

 

11P40

Rosa G Collett

Born in 1872 at Ellenhall

#2

 

11P41

John Harvey Collett

Born in 1873 at Ellenhall

#2

 

11P42

Francis Edwin Collett

Born in 1875 at Ellenhall

#2

 

11P43

Fanny Elizabeth Collett

Born in 1878 at Ellenhall

#2

 

 

 

 

11O26

Jane Collett was born at Admington and was baptised at St Swithun’s Church in Quinton on 5th November 1845, the second child, and eldest daughter of George Collett and Maria Jennings.  No further record of Jane living with her family has been found in any later census returns, so it may be correct to assume that she died prior to the census in 1851.

#1

 

 

 

 

11O27

Louisa Collett was born at Admington in 1846 and was later baptised at Quinton on 11th July 1847.  By the time of the census of 1851 Louisa and her family had moved to Chipping Campden and were living at Back Ends.

#2

#1

 

 

 

Ten years later in 1861 she was the oldest child at fourteen still living with her parents at Chipping Campden.  On that occasion the family was living at Cow Fair in the town.  Five and a half years later she and her family had moved to Mickleton where Louisa married George Unitt on 10th September 1866.

#1

 

 

 

George was a labourer born at Marston in 1840 and in 1881 he and Louisa and their five children were living at 24 North Street in Ruston, Birmingham.  The two oldest children, Annie L Unitt who was 11 and Lilly J Unitt who was 9, had been born at Northfield in Worcestershire midway between Bromsgrove and Birmingham, while the other three children had been born in Birmingham.  They were Fanny M Unitt who was seven, Ada Unitt who was five, and Clara R Unitt who was one year old.

#2

 

 

 

 

11O28

Robert Collett was born at Admington and was baptised at Quinton on 3rd June 1849.  Not long after he was born the family left Admington and moved south to Chipping Campden where in March 1851 they were living at Back Ends in the town.  By the time of the census in 1861 Robert had already left school and, at the age of 12, was an apprenticed shoemaker, while he was still living with his family in Chipping Campden, although at that time they were living at Cow Fair in the town.  During the next ten years Robert left the family home and in 1871, when he was 22, he was living in the Kings Norton & Edgbaston area of Birmingham.

#1

 

 

 

Five years after that Robert Collett married Agnes Catherine Connolly in Manchester (Ref. 8d 491) during the final three months of 1876 with witnesses Philip Coploa, John Kilroy and Angelina Brown.  Agnes had been born at Manchester in 1854.  According to the census in 1881 Robt Collett from Admington was 32 and a cordwainer, Agnes C Collett from Manchester was 26, and their first known child was Joseph who was five months old.  That day the family of three was living in a cottage adjacent to Gate House in the village of Ranton, to the west of Stafford, where young Joseph had been born.  That accommodation may have been a very temporary home for the family since, by the time of the birth of the couple’s next two children, the family was residing in Birmingham and not long after that the family returned to Manchester where seven more children were added to the family.

#14

 

 

#14

 

 

 

By 1891 the family was living at 63 Sanderson Street in Harpurhey, North Manchester, where Robert Collett from Admington was 40 and his occupation was that of a boot-maker.  His wife Agnes Catherine Collett was 36, and by that time she had presented her husband with six children.  George was eight years old, Frederick was five, Frank was four, and Leo was just nine months old.  Curiously the three missing children were all patients in the nearby hospital within the Prestwich & Newton Heath area of North Manchester.  The two youngest were Robert Henry Collett who was seven, and Agnes Collett who was two years old.  Both children survived whatever illness or ailment they had been admitted for, and were back with their family not long after.

#2

 

 

 

However, the third of the three children was the couple’s eldest son Joseph Collett who was ten years old and from Ranton in Staffordshire.  However, with no apparent record of the same Joseph Collett in 1901, it might appear that he did not survive whatever ordeal he was going through in hospital.

#14

 

 

 

The final three children of Robert and Agnes were added to the family during the first half of the next decade.  However, before the end of the century Agnes Catherine Collett became a widow, following the death of her husband Robert at the age of 47 during the second quarter of 1898, which was recorded at Prestwich in Lancashire (Ref. 8d 215).  So by the time of the census conducted in March 1901 the family living at 39 Lilley Street in Newton Heath, North Manchester, comprised Agnes Collett who was 46, Robert H Collett who was 17, Frederick 15, Frank 14, Agnes 12, Leo 10, Marie T Collett who was eight, Edmund who was six, and Wilfred who was five.  Sadly just over a year later Agnes suffered the death of her youngest daughter Marie Theresa Collett at the age of 10.

#2

 

 

 

 

 

 

#14

 

 

 

From the census return it was evident that it was just the three oldest sons who were in employment and therefore supporting their family financially.  Robert was a warehouse maker-up, Frederick was a dye works opener, while Frank was a commercial clerk.  No record of her eldest surviving son George has so far been found in the census of 1901 or 1911, when he would have been 18 and 28, and when he may have been in Ireland.

#2

 

 

 

By April 1911 the family’s home was at 21 Bradburn Street, Cheetham Hill in Manchester, but by then all four of Agnes’ older sons had left to make their own way in the world, although living nearby were her sons Robert Henry, who was 27 and married, and Frank who was 24 and unmarried.  The rest of the family was made up of Agnes 56, her daughter Agnes who was 22, Leo who was 20, Edmund who was 16, and Wilfred who was 15. 

#2

 

 

 

Twenty years after the census in 1911 the death of Agnes C Collett at the age of 76 was recorded at the Manchester North register office (Ref. 8d 843) during the first quarter of 1931.  Having already suffered the loss of first her husband and then her youngest daughter, Agnes also lost three of her seven sons during the First World War.  All of this being in addition to her first born son having not survived beyond infancy.

#14

 

 

 

11P44

Joseph Collett

Born in 1881 at Ranton, Staffs.

#14

 

11P45

George Collett

Born in 1882 at Birmingham

#2

 

11P46

Robert Henry Collett

Born in 1883 at Birmingham

#2

 

11P47

Frederick Collett

Born in 1885 at Manchester

#2

 

11P48

Frank Collett

Born in 1887 at Manchester

#2

 

11P49

Agnes Collett

Born in 1888 at Manchester

#2

 

11P50

Leo Collett

Born in 1890 at Manchester

#2

 

11P51

Marie Theresa Collett

Born in 1892 at Manchester

#2

 

11P52

Edmund Collett

Born in 1894 at Manchester

#2

 

11P53

Wilfred Collett

Born in 1895 at Manchester

#2

 

 

 

 

11O29

Walter Collett was born at Back Ends in Chipping Campden on 21st October 1851 shortly after his parents had moved there from Admington.  By 1861 he was nine years old and was living with his family at Cow Fair in Chipping Campden.  During the next decade Walter’s family left Chipping Campden and moved to The Butts in Mickleton where they were living in 1871, when unmarried Walter was recorded as being 19.

#1

 

#2

 

 

 

Later that same year Walter married Eliza Jane Green at Shipston-on-Stour on 19th November 1871.  Eliza, sometimes referred to as Elizabeth, was born at Benson near Wallingford in Oxfordshire in June 1850 and was the daughter of Edmund Green and Alice Cooke of Swyncombe, near Benson.  It may be interesting to note that the parents of Alice Cooke were John Cooke and Charlotte Kearsey, there being other connections between the Kearsey and Collett families.

#2

 

 

 

Shortly after they were married, Walter and Eliza moved to Stoke-on-Trent where their three surviving children were all born.  Sadly the couple’s first born child died while he was still an infant, and a further tragedy struck the family seven years later during the last quarter of 1879 when Eliza died during the birth of the couple’s fourth child.  That happened in the final quarter of that year and left Walter as a widower with three young children to look after, as well as needing to continue with his work as a blacksmith to support them.

#2

 

 

 

As a result of the situation, Walter moved the twelve miles south of Stoke-on-Trent, when he and his children went to live with his father George Collett at The Swan Inn in Eccleshall, where his father was the publican and also a blacksmith, like Walter.  That was confirmed by the 1881 Census in which blacksmith Walter was listed as living with at The Swan Inn on Small Lane with his daughters Alice who was eight and Gertrude who was two, and his son Walter who was six years old, all of them confirmed as having been born at Stoke-on-Trent. 

#2

 

 

 

Curiously Walter gave his place of birth as Admington rather than Chipping Campden, which may suggest that he was born right around the time his parents moved from Admington to Chipping Campden.  In addition to that, his age was recorded as 43 rather than 29, but that must surely have been an error in transcription.

#2

 

 

 

It seems likely that Walter’s time living with his father may have only been a temporary measure, since it was four years later that his daughter Gertrude died at Stoke-on-Trent in 1885 at the age of seven.  It was also at Stoke that Walter was living in 1890 when he passed away.  Walter’s only surviving daughter Alice and son Walter were the only members of his family that have so far been positively identified in the census of 1901.

#2

 

 

 

11P54

John E Collett

Born in 1872; died in 1872

#2

 

11P55

Alice Marie Collett

Born in 1873 at Stoke-on-Trent

#2

 

11P56

Walter Collett

Born in 1875 at Stoke-on-Trent

#2

 

11P57

Gertrude Collett

Born in 1879 at Stoke-on-Trent

#2

 

 

 

 

11O30

Mark Collett was born at Chipping Campden in 1854.  That may have taken place at either ‘Back Ends’ or ‘Cow Fair’ in the town, since it was at those two addresses that his parents were living in 1851 and 1861 respectively. 

 

In the 1861 Census for Chipping Campden, Mark was listed as being six years of age, but ten years later according to the 1871 Census, he had left Gloucestershire and was living in Staffordshire where he was listed as being sixteen years old and from Chipping Campden. 

Colletts mark harry nelly jane 2 crop mark

#1

 

 

 

 

 

#2

 

 

The photograph of Mark Collett was kindly provided by Paul Boreham of Arkell in Canada.

#8

 

 

 

It would therefore appear that, on leaving school and perhaps just prior to April 1871, Mark had moved to Ellenhall in Staffordshire to live with his eldest brother John Collett (above).  John was a blacksmith, and in the census of 1871 Mark Collett, age 16, was working with his brother as an apprentice blacksmith.  Working alongside him was Edward Tomlinson from Little Haywood, also 16, who was listed as a servant in the Collett household, although he too was working with the Collett brothers as an apprentice blacksmith.

#8

 

 

 

It was while Mark Collett was living and working in Staffordshire with his brother that he met, and later married Sarah Williams around 1874.  Sarah was born at Slindon, just north of Eccleshall in 1852, the daughter of Joseph and Sarah Williams of Eccleshall.  Having served his apprenticeship with his brother, Mark eventually became a fully fledged blacksmith, so following in the footsteps of his father George and his older brothers John and Walter, as confirmed by the census of 1881, when Mark and his two brothers were all living and plying their trade in Eccleshall.

#2

 

 

 

The census that year listed Mark Collett as 29 of Chipping Campden and a blacksmith, while Sarah his wife was also 29, their two daughters were Nelly age five and Ada who was two, and their son Thomas was three years old.  All three of the children had been born at Burslem, north of Stoke-on-Trent and, on that census day, Sarah was pregnant with the couple’s fourth child.  Living with the family was Sarah’s widowed mother Sarah Williams, age 56 a retired farmer, and her younger sister Jane Williams who was 17 and a dressmaker from Eccleshall who was listed as sister-in-law to head of the house Mark Collett.

#2

 

 

 

It was towards the end of June, later that same year, that Sarah presented Mark with a second son Albert.  However, there are conflicting views as to where he was born, bearing in mind the family had been living at Eccleshall less than two months earlier.  The census returns for 1891 and 1901 state that the birth had taken place back at Burslem, while death certificate for Albert Collett gave his place of birth as Slindon to the north of Eccleshall, where the couple’s next child was born.

#2

 

 

 

#8

 

 

 

The move to Slindon seems to have coincided with Mark ceasing to be a blacksmith, and becoming a farmer, and that may have been as a result of him taking over the farm previously run by his father-in-law Joseph Williams, following the death of his widow, Sarah Williams, in the mid-1880s.  And it was within the Slindon area that the family appear to have lived for many years thereafter.  The census in 1891 listed the family as Mark and Sarah Collett who were both 37, together with four of their five children.  Ellen, the absent oldest child, had already left the family home and was working as a domestic servant in the nearby village of Aspley.

#2

 

 

 

 

#8

 

 

 

The couple’s four other children were Thomas who was 13, Ada who was 12, Albert who was nine and Charles who was four years old. 

 

Not long after that it would appear that Mark took over Manor House Farm at Mill Meece, less than half a mile from Slindon, and it was there that the couple’s last child was born.  This photograph of Manor House Farm was taken in April 2015 when Mark’s great granddaughter Joan Fay Robertson (nee Collett) visited England from Canada.

#2

 

 

 

The 1901 census for Mill Meece listed Mark Collett of Chipping Norton as a farmer of 47, his wife Sarah from Slindon who was also 47, and their sons Thomas 23, Albert 19, and Charles 14 all of whom were described farmer’s sons, together with daughters Ada who was 22, and Annie who was six.  The census also confirmed that the couple’s three eldest surviving children were all born at Burslem, while Charles was born after the family had moved to Slindon, and Annie’s place of birth was given as Mill Meece.

#2

 

 

 

By April 1911 all of the children of Mark and Sarah had left the family home at Manor House Farm, when Mark and Sarah where both still living there at the age of fifty-seven.  Living nearby in the village of Slindon was their married son Thomas and his family, and separately living there, their daughter Annie Elizabeth Collett.  It is unclear from the census returns of 1911 as to what had happened to the three other children of Mark and Sarah, since no record has been found for Ada, Albert and Charles, nor is anything known about their lives after that time.

#2

 

 

 

Mark Collett died on 18th August 1916, when a funeral card used on that occasion referred to him as Mark Collett of Mill Meece.  He was 62 and was buried at Cotes Heath Church on 25th August 1916, where a headstone marks the grave.  Just over a year later his wife Sarah was a patient at Stafford County Mental Hospital when she died on 8th October 1917 at the age of 63.  The 1917 Will of widow Sarah Collett of Mill Meece near Eccleshall was proved in London on 8th December 1917 when her entire estate of £1,598 1Shilling 3d was left to her eldest son, who was described as Thomas Collett, farmer.

#8

 

 

#2

 

 

 

11P58

Ellen Collett

Born in 1875 at Burslem

#2

 

11P59

Thomas Collett

Born in 1877 at Burslem

#7

 

11P60

Ada Collett

Born in 1878 at Burslem

#2

 

11P61

Albert Collett

Born in 1881 at Burslem

#2

 

11P62

Charles Collett

Born in 1886 at Slindon

#2

 

11P63

Annie Elizabeth Collett

Born in 1894 at Mill Meece

#2

 

 

 

 

11O31

HENRY GEORGE COLLETT, who was referred to as George, was born at Chipping Campden in 1857 and he followed in the family tradition by being a blacksmith.  In April 1861 three years old George and his family were living at Cow Fair in Chipping Campden.

#1

 

 

 

It was during the following few years that George’s parents left Chipping Campden and moved a couple of miles to the north to settle in Mickleton.  And it was at The Butts in Mickleton that the family was living in 1871 when George was 13.  However, the family did not stay very long at Mickleton before eventually moving to Staffordshire where most of the family was living in 1881.

#2

#1

 

 

 

According to the Census of 1881 George was a servant and a blacksmith at 23 who had been born at ‘Camden’ in Gloucestershire, as in Chipping Campden.  At the time of the census he was single and was working for blacksmith Thomas Porter and was living at his home at Tittensor midway between Stone and Stoke-on-Trent.

#2

 

 

 

Three years later George married Alice Salt of Wolstanton on 13th June 1884 at St Peter’s Church in Stoke-on-Trent.  George’s older brother Walter Collett (above) was one of the witnesses at the wedding ceremony, and his signature also appears on the couple’s marriage certificate.  Three years earlier 24-years old Alice Salt was working as a servant and cook at Groundslow Farm in Stone.  The census record also revealed she had been born at Whitmore, south-west of Stoke-on-Trent.

#1

#2

 

 

 

The early years of their married life was spent living at 8 Cornwallis Street in Stoke-on-Trent where their first three children were born, and where Henry’s widowed father George Collett was living in 1891.  It was around two years earlier during 1889 that the family moved to Brook Street in Burslem.  The census of 1891 confirmed that the family was living at Brook Street in Burslem and comprised George, age 33, Alice, age 34, and their children, Henry who was six, Gertrude who was five, Alice who was two, and baby Ada who was not yet one year old.  Also living with the family at that time was George’s youngest brother Thomas (below) who was twenty-one. 

#1

 

 

#2

 

 

 

During the next ten years the family continued to live in Burslem, although their seventh and last child was born at Wolstanton.  However, in April 1901 the whole family, with the exception of eldest daughter Gertrude, was living at St Paul’s Street in Burslem.  In addition to the couple’s six children, the house also had a boarder in William H Miller, while Gertrude at that time was 15 living and working in nearby Tunstall where she was a domestic servant.

#1

 

#2

 

 

 

It was as Henry George Collett of Chipping Campden that he was recorded in the Burslem census of 1911.  At that time six of his seven children were still living with him and his wife in Burslem.  Only daughter Gertrude had left home and she was living and working in Wolstanton.  Henry George was 53, his wife Alice was 54, and their children were Henry George 27, Alice 22, Ada 20, Edgar Thomas 18, Cecil John 14, and Sydney Charles who was 12.

#2

 

 

 

Upon his retirement George was presented with a long service medal by the Stoke-on-Trent Gas Department for his thirty-nine years continuous employment with them as a blacksmith.  It is believed that George and Alice both died while they were still living at Burslem just north of Stoke-on-Trent, where they are also understood to have been buried.  Their address from 1912 may well have been 34 Ellgreave Street in Burslem.  That was the address given by their son Edgar when he joined the army, and was also the address to which their granddaughter Alice-Lyn Collett was sent to live following the breakdown of her mother when she received the sad news that her husband Henry George Collett, the couple’s eldest son, died near Poelcapelle in 1917.

#1

 

#2

 

 

 

11P64

HENRY GEORGE COLLETT

Born in 1884 at Stoke-on-Trent

#1

 

11P65

Gertrude Collett

Born in 1886 at Stoke-on-Trent

#1

 

11P66

Alice Collett

Born in 1888 at Stoke-on-Trent

#1

 

11P67

Ada Collett

Born in 1890 at Burslem

#1

 

11P68

Edgar Thomas Collett

Born in 1893 at Burslem

#1

 

11P69

Cecil John Collett

Born in 1896 at Burslem

#1

 

11P70

Sidney Charles Collett

Born in 1899 at Burslem

#1

 

 

 

 

11O32

Charles Collett was born at Chipping Campden in 1859 and most probably took place while his mother and father were living at Cow Fair in Chipping Campden where the family was recorded as living at the end of March in 1861 and where Charles was one year old.  Shortly after that his family left Chipping Campden and moved north to nearby Mickleton.  By 1871 part of his family was living at The Butts in Mickleton where Charles was confirmed as being eleven years old and born at Chipping Campden.

#2

#1

 

 

 

Unlike most of the other members of his family, Charles appears not to have moved to Staffordshire during the 1870s and in 1881 he was still living at Mickleton in Gloucestershire to where his family had moved when they left Chipping Campden when he was still an infant.  According to that year’s census for Mickleton, Charles, age 22 and of Campden, was a shoe maker and a lodger at the home of retired boot maker and local preacher Thomas Smith, age 83 and of Mickleton, and his wife Hannah 71 of Pilerton Priors in Warwickshire.  So it perhaps can be assumed that the older man was teaching Charles the ‘tricks of the trade’.

#2

 

 

 

During the following year it would appear that Charles married Jane Manners.  She was born at Morpeth in Northumberland and after they were married they settled at Mickleton where their sons were born and where Charles continued to work as a boot and shoe maker.  However, by 1891 Charles and Jane were living at Blockley with their two sons.  The census details confirmed that Charles Collett was 33, that Jane Collett was 30, and that their sons were John M Collett, who was seven, and Arthur Collett, who was four years old, although ten years later the family was again living back at Mickleton.

#2

 

 

 

According to the 1901 Census for Mickleton, Charles was 42 of Campden a boots and shoe maker, Jane was 41 and their sons were 17 and 14 respectively and both working as market gardeners.  Ten years later the census conducted in April 1911 revealed that Jane Collett was a widow at 61 when she was still living in Mickleton with her unmarried sons John M Collett who was 27 and Arthur Collett who was 26, both confirmed as having been born at Mickleton.  It was during the third quarter of 1907 that Charles Collett had died at the age of 49, his death being recorded at Shipston-on-Stour (Ref.6d 329).

#2

 

 

 

 

#14

 

 

 

11P71

John Manners Collett

Born in 1883 at Mickleton

#2

 

11P72

Arthur Collett

Born in 1886 at Mickleton

#2

 

 

 

 

11O33

Sarah Ann Collett was baptised on 3rd July 1863 at St Lawrence’s Church in Mickleton where her family was living in April 1871 and where she was recorded as being aged seven years.  On that occasion Sarah and her family were living at The Butts in Mickleton but around 1880 virtually the whole family moved to Staffordshire.

#2

#1

 

 

 

By 1881 Sarah was 17 and was living with her family at The Swan Inn on Small Street in Eccleshall where her father was the publican and local blacksmith.  However, Sarah’s place of birth, like that of her younger brother Thomas (below) was stated as being Admington rather than Mickleton.

#2

 

 

 

Less than eighteen months later Sarah Ann Collett married Alfred Beech in front of witnesses Edward Currie and Martha Jane Worthington, the event recorded at Stoke-on-Trent (Ref. 6b 339) during the third quarter of 1882.  The marriage produced six children before the end of the century, although only four survived, by which time the family was residing in Moor Street in Worcester.  Alfred Beech was 38 and a blacksmith from Newcastle-under-Lyme, Sarah Ann Beech was 37 and from Mickleton and their four children were Alfred Beech who was 16 and working with his father as a blacksmith, Francis Beech who was 14 and an errand boy, Mable Beech who was 12 – all born at Stoke, and Ethel Beech who was nine years old and born in Worcester.  After a further decade just four members of the family were recorded living at 99 St George’s Lane North in Worcester and they were shoeing smith Alfred age 48, Sarah Ann who was 47, Mabel who was 22 and Ethel who was 19.  One of the two children who had died was the eldest, Sarah Ann Beech, who was eight years old in 1891 who died in Worcester.

#14

 

 

 

Alfred and Sarah continued to live in Worcester for the rest of their lives.  The death of Sarah A Beech was recorded at the register office there (Ref. 6a 190) during the first quarter of 1931 when she was 67.  It was one year later that her husband Alfred Beech died at the age of 69 when his death was recorded at Worcester register office (Ref. 6c 179) during the first three months of 1932.

#14

 

 

 

 

11O34

Thomas Collett was baptised on 5th September 1869 at Mickleton, the son of George Collett and Maria Jennings.  He and his family were living at The Butts in Mickleton in April 1871 when he was seven months old.  By the time of the census of 1881 the family had left Gloucestershire and was living at The Swan Inn on Small Street in Eccleshall where Thomas was 11.  Like his sister Sarah (above) his place of birth was recorded as having been Admington.  It seems very likely that over the next ten years Thomas moved in with his older married brother George (above) since, in the 1891 Census, he was 21 and was staying with the family at their home in the Burslem & Wolstanton registration district of Staffordshire. 

#2

#1

#2

 

 

 

 

11O35

Alfred Collett was born at Admington in 1852 and was baptised at Quinton on 20th June 1852.  In the Admington census of 1861, Alfred was eight years old, and was living there with his family.  At some time in his life he moved from Gloucestershire to live in Birmingham, most likely for work reasons.  It was while there that he met and married Caroline Gray who was born at Harborne just to the south of Birmingham in 1856.  Details of their wedding were recorded at Birmingham (Ref. 6d 92) during the second quarter of 1878 when the witnesses were Edward Chamberlain and Emma Smith.  According to the census in 1881 Alfred, age 28, was an F L packer, and he and his wife Caroline, age 24, were living at Ada Terrace in Osler Street in Birmingham, the property described as ‘house 1’ in Ada Terrace.  With them was their son Arthur who had been born at Edgbaston, who was two years old.

#2

 

 

 

#14

 

#2

 

 

 

On the day of the census in 1881 Caroline may well have been pregnant with Alfred’s second child, since their daughter was born later that same year or early in the following year.  The new arrival was confirmed in the next census in 1891 when the family of four was still living within the Kings Norton & Edgbaston registration district.  Alfred Collett was 38, Caroline was 33, Arthur Collett was 12, and Ada M Collett was nine years of age.

#2

 

 

 

The 1901 Census for Birmingham recorded the family residing at 53 Hyde Road in the Parish of St John where Alf Collett was 48 and a general packer who had been born at Admington.  Living there with him was his wife Caroline Collett who was 45 and from Bricklane in Worcestershire, their son Arthur Collett who was 21 and a domestic groom who had been born in Birmingham, and their daughter Ada M Collett who was 18 and a warehouse girl also born in Birmingham.   According to the next census in 1911 Alfred and Caroline were living with their married daughter at 222 Park Road in Warley within the Bearwood district of Birmingham, while by then their son Arthur was serving with the military and was based in Kent.  Alfred was 58 and Caroline was 54.

#2

 

 

 

 

#14

 

#2

 

 

 

11P73

Arthur Collett

Born in 1878 at Edgbaston

#2

 

11P74

Ada May Collett

Born in 1882 at Edgbaston

#2

 

 

 

 

11O36

Louisa Jane Collett was born at Admington in 1854, was baptised at Quinton on 19th March 1854, and was seven years old in the Admington census of 1861.  When she was only twenty-one years old she produced a baby daughter even though she was still unmarried.

#2

 

#3

 

 

 

Her base-born daughter Lucy was placed in the care of Louisa’s mother Caroline Collett where she lived until she eventually married in 1904, but not before having two base-born children of her own.  Almost two years to the day after the birth of her illegitimate daughter, Louisa married agricultural carter Samuel Keeley at St Swithun’s Church in Quinton on 17th November 1877.  Samuel was born at nearby Ilmington in 1851. 

#2

 

 

#3

 

 

 

According to the 1881 Census, Louisa, at the age of 27 had produced three children for Samuel, they being Elizabeth Ruth Keeley who was five, and William Keeley who was two, both born at Ilmington, and ten months old Sarah Jane Keeley born at Admington.  At that time the family was living at Lower Farm Cottage in Quinton.  Her daughter Elizabeth Ruth later married Samuel Wells when the witnesses at the wedding ceremony were her sister Sarah Jane and her father Samuel.

#2

 

 

#3

 

 

 

Louisa Jane Keeley nee Collett died when she was residing in the Stratford-upon-Avon area, her death recorded at Stratford register office (Ref. 6d 373) during the last three months of 1905 when she was 53.

#14

 

 

 

11P75

Lucy Hannah Collett

Born in 1875 at Admington

#2

 

 

 

 

11O37

Jabez Collett was born at Admington and baptised at Quinton on 23rd December 1855 when his parents were named as William Collett, a groom, and his wife Caroline.  He was five years old at the time of the Admington census of 1861, but was incorrectly recorded as Jabeth Collett, and was named as Jabey Collett who was 15 in 1871.  It is understood that he later married Jane at Quinton although rather strangely neither Jabez nor Jane has been located in the census of 1881 or any census record after that time.

#2

 

 

 

 

11O38

Hannah Collett was born at Admington in 1857 and baptised at Quinton on 30th August 1857.  In the next two national censuses for Admington she was aged three years and 13 years.  For the first of these she was living with her family, while for the second she had left school and was working as a servant at the home of William Harwood and his family.

#2

 

 

 

During the following decade Hannah left Warwickshire and headed for London where she may have been paid a little more.  According to the next census in 1881 Hannah Collett from Adminton (sic) was 22 when she was a housemaid at the girls school of professor of singing Mary Eliza Probart at 1 Grosvenor Villa in Brixton Rise within the London Borough of Lambeth.

#14

 

 

 

 

11O39

Zillah Collett was born at Admington in 1859 and was baptised at Quinton on 19th June 1859.  In the census of 1861 she was recorded as Zilla Collett aged two years, and was 12 years old in 1871.  It was in 1880 at Quinton parish church, That Zillah Collett, age 21, married (1) farm labourer Joseph Aston.  Joseph was the son of Richard Aston and was born at nearby Ilmington in 1857.  In the national census the following year the couple was listed as living at Campden Street in Ilmington, Zillah was 22 and Joseph was 23.  There were no children born to the couple at that time.

#2

#3

 

 

#2

 

 

 

Tragically Joseph died in 1892 and six years later his widow Zillah married (2) John Alcock at the Ilmington parish church of St Mary the Virgin. 

 

John (pictured right) was a carter born in 1860 and was the son of pearl button cutter Joseph Alcock of Birmingham.  The witnesses at the wedding were Richard Aston (Zillah’s previous father-in-law) and William Collett. 

 

That William Collett may have been Zillah’s cousin William Henry Collett, since her father William Collett had died in 1878.

#3

 

 

 

Zillah’s first marriage produced two daughters, Zillah Aston born in 1888 and Selina Aston born in 1890, both girls having been born at Ilmington.

 

In the 1901 Census Zillah and John were listed as living at Ilmington with stepdaughters Zillah and Selina and John’s grandson Harry Alcock (pictured right) who was born in 1897.

 

Harry was the base-born son of John Alcock junior and Emma Cockbill.

#3

 

 

 

By April 1911, the family was still living in Ilmington where John Alcock was 62, his wife Zillah Alcock was 52, and Zillah’s two daughters were listed as Zillah Aston 23 and Selina Aston 21.  Selina Aston went on to marry John Hawtin at Ilmington on 22nd August 1912.  John was the son of William and Sarah Hawtin who was born at Whichford in Warwickshire. 

#2

 

 

 

John Hawtin was a farrier and Corporal TS/6013 with the Eighth Horsed Transport Unit of the Army Service Corp.  Tragically he died during the Great War when he was 33 and was buried at the Cairo War Memorial Cemetery grave reference D.230.  His death, recorded on 23rd December 1915, probably happened during the failed attempt by the ASC to seize control of Constantinople/Istanbul from the combined German and Turkish forces.

#2

 

 

 

 

11O40

Selena Collett was born at Admington in 1861 but after 7th April.  Ten years later in 1871 she was nine years old.  By the time Selena had reached twenty years of age she had left the family home in Admington and had moved to Birmingham where her brother Alfred was living. 

#2

 

 

 

The 1881 Census confirmed she was 21 and had been born at Admington and that she was working as a general servant at the home of silversmith Charles Marcus of Dublin and his wife Rose from Bristol.  The household at 20 York Road in Edgbaston comprised Charles and Rose and their three sons, and Rose’s brother Fred Blankensis who was also a silversmith.  They were supported by three general servants of whom Selena was the youngest.

#2

 

 

 

It would appear that Selena never married and in 1901 she was still living in Birmingham.  No record of Selena has so far been found in the census of 1911 although it is known that she died in 1947.

#3

 

 

 

 

11O41

Richard Collett was born at Admington in 1863 and was baptised at Quinton on 1st May 1864 in a joint ceremony with his sister Edwina.  He was confirmed as being eight years old in the census of 1871.  By 1881 he was an apprenticed blacksmith, age 18, when he was living at the Lower Admington home of his mother, the widow Caroline Collett.  Curiously no record of Richard has so far been found in the next three census returns in 1891, 1901 and 1911.

#2

 

 

 

 

11O42

Edwina Collett was born at Admington in 1864 and baptised at Quinton on 1st May 1864 in a joint ceremony with her brother Richard.  However, no trace of her has been found in any subsequent census record so it might be assumed that she had suffered an infant death.

#2

 

 

 

 

11O43

Christopher John Collett was born at Admington in 1865, but was baptised as John Collett in a joint ceremony with his younger brother Josiah (below) on 5th June 1870 at Quinton.  However, it was as Christopher Collett that the birth was also registered with Shipston-on-Stour registrar during the second quarter of 1865, between 1st April and 30th June.  John was only five years old in 1871, but ten years later, age the age of 15, he had already left school and was employed as a farm labourer, while still living with his widowed mother at her home in Lower Admington.

#2

 

 

 

During the past years of family history research, this particular member of William’s and Caroline’s family was only known as John Collett, and it is this that has made it impossible to identify him in the later census records.  However, it is now known, that once he was married he reverted to using his registered name of Christopher, which has only been recently discovered, thanks to Doreen North of Bushy Heath.  It was therefore as Christopher that he was listed in census of 1891, as Christopher John Collett of Admington in 1901, and as Christopher J Collett of Shipston-on-Stour in 1911.

#2

 

 

 

After 1881 John Collett left Admington, when he made the move south to London.  It was there, around ten years later, during the first quarter of 1891, that he married Ada Stone using the name Christopher Collett.  Ada was the eldest child of master boot-maker George Stone, who was born at Edgware in Middlesex on 6th October 1843, and his wife Sarah Johnson, from Elstree, who were married at Hendon during the first three months of 1867.  It was also at Edgware that their daughter Ada was born, together with her seven younger siblings.

#2

 

 

 

By the time of the census on fifth of April in 1891 Christopher Collett and his wife Ada were living at 4 Star Cottage in Hendon.  Ada was 21 and from Edgware, while her husband’s place of birth was recorded as Over Maston, which may have been a misinterpretation of Lower Admington.  At that time in his life Christopher Collett was 25, and was described as a groom, and ‘whip to hounds’, which would have been a continuation of his earlier work as a farm labourer.

#2

 

 

 

During the next ten years Ada’s father died, and it may have been that sad event, which resulted in Christopher and Ada taking in her widowed mother and younger siblings.  Certainly by the time of the census in 1901 the farm at which the Colletts were living, was also home to three member of Ada’s Stone family.  According to the census return, the five of them were residing in the Neasden-cum-Kingsbury area of Kingsbury & Hendon registration district of Middlesex.  The name of their place of residence is almost unreadable, but it is believed to be Fryent Farm, particularly since there is a Fryent Country Park in Kingsbury today.

#2

 

 

 

On that occasion Christopher John Collett, age 35 and from Admington, was a huntsman and groom, who was also an employer, rather than an employee.  Living with him was his wife Ada Collett, age 31 and from Edgware, the widow Sarah Stone, age 54 from Elstree, and her two youngest children, Cecily Stone, who was 20 and working as a book-keeper, and James Henry Stone, who was 18 and working as a clerk.  Both of the Stone children were confirmed as also being born at Edgware.

#2

 

 

 

It was a similar situation ten years later in April 1911, except that by then Christopher had given up farming and was a licenced victualler managing The Wellington Inn on the Hatton Road in Bedfont, Middlesex.  On that occasion he was listed as Christopher J Collett, age 45, who was born at ‘Shipston-on-Stone’, an interesting error in translation for Shipston-on-Stour, but it is this that more or less confirms him as John Collett of Admington.  Still living with him, and helping him operate the inn, was his wife of twenty-one years, Ada Collett age 41 of Edgware, who was described as ‘assisting with the business’.  Also still living with the couple was Ada’s mother Sarah Stone who was 64.  By then Ada’s two youngest siblings had been replaced by another of her unmarried sisters, that being Mabel Louise Stone, age 24 from Edgware, who had no stated occupation.

#2

 

 

 

 

11O44

Josiah Collett was born at Admington in 1867 and was the youngest child of William and Caroline Collett.  He was later baptised at Quinton on 5th June 1870 in a joint ceremony with his older brother John (above).  The census in 1871 listed Josiah Collett as being three years old, when he was living with his family at Ilmington Road in Admington. 

#1

#2

 

 

 

By 1881 he was 13 and had joined his brother John as a farm labourer, while living at the Lower Admington home of his widowed mother.  Ten years later and Josiah had left Admington and had made his way to Birmingham where, in 1891 he was 23 and was living in the Lady Wood district of the city.  During the third quarter of 1894 Josiah Collett married Sarah Hooper who was born at Dudley Port in 1858.  The marriage was recorded at Birmingham (Ref. 6d 131) when the witnesses were Arthur Houghton and Ada Elizabeth Gardner.  It was during the following year that Sarah gave birth to the couple’s only known child, their daughter Daisy, who was born while the couple was living in Birmingham.

#2

 

 

#14

 

#2

 

 

 

It was also in Birmingham that Josiah and Sarah were living in March 1901, with their daughter.  Josiah Collett, age 34 and of Admington, was working as an iron casement maker, while his wife was 42 and Daisy was five years old.  Their address at that time was 5 Khartoum Place in the Rotton Park district of the city.  According to the later census of 1911, Josiah from Admington was 43, his wife Sarah was 52, and daughter Daisy was 15.  By that time the family was living in the West Bromwich area of the Midlands.

#2

 

 

 

11P76

Daisy Collett

Born in 1895 at Birmingham

#2

 

 

 

 

11P1

Alfred Collett, who was known as Fred, was born at Farmington in New York State on 29th March 1856.  He was the eldest child of Richard Collett and Sarah Randall.  In both the census returns for 1870 and 1875 he was listed with his family as Alfred Collet, aged 14 and 19 respectively, and for the second of them the family was confirmed as living at Farmington, compared to simply New York State in the first.  By the time of the US Census on 1st June 1880, Alfred Collett from New York was 24 and a married man, when he was working with his father and younger brother Hiram on the family’s farm at Farmington in Ontario County.

#9

 

#2

 

 

 

It is established that he had married Jennie Pratt on 24th September 1879, while the census return in 1880, which did acknowledge that he was married, simply recorded him as ‘other’ rather than ‘son’.  Where his wife might have been on that occasion has not been discovered, but she was presumably with their daughter Theda Collett who would have been only a few days old.  It is also possible that her absence from the census may have been due to her actually giving birth to her daughter around that time, which was close to nine months after she had married Alfred.

#9

 

 

#2

 

 

 

Unfortunately the census of 1890 did not survive, but in 1892 under the name of Collet, like it had been in 1870 and 1875, the four members of the family were recorded at Farmington.  They were Fred Collet, who was 35, Jennie F Collet, who was 36, Theda M Collet, who was 12, and Clara J Collet who was two years old.  It was two years later that Jennie presented Alfred with their third daughter, who sadly died when she was two years old.  There is also the possibility that other children were born into the family considering the number of years between each of the births of their three known daughters.

#2

 

 

 

By 1900 only the younger of their two surviving daughters was living at Farmington with Alfred and Jennie, following the very recent marriage of the couple’s eldest daughter.  According to the census that year Alfred Collett, age 44 and from New York, was a farmer at Farmington, his wife Jennie F Collett also from New York was 46, and their daughter Clara J Collett was 11.  Supporting the family was widower and servant Charles Bumpus, who was 46 and a farm labourer from Massachusetts, while also recorded with them as a boarder was Nathan Redfield from New York, who was 65 and a farmer.  It may be of interest that Clara P Bumpus, age 55, was living with Clara Jeffrey Allyn nee Collett at Macedon in Wayne County during 1930.

#9

 

 

#2

 

 

 

It was a similar situation ten years later in 1910.  The family was still residing in Farmington, when Fred Collett was 54, Jennie F Collett was 55, and Clara J Collett was 20.  Curiously the previously named boarder Nathan Redfield was then described as Nathan Collett, a widower of 75, who was still living with the Collett family, but there is a possibility that his surname was recorded in error.  Whoever Nathan was, he certainly made an impact on the Collett family, because Alfred’s daughter Theda named her first child Nathan Redfield Walker in 1902.

#9

 

 

 

#2

 

 

 

The only person living with Alfred and Jennie in 1920 was Jennie’s brother Albert A Pratt who was 61, when Alfred was 63 and Jennie was 65.  It was later that same year that Jennie Collett nee Pratt died at Farmington and was buried at South Farmington Cemetery, while he husband survived her by eight years, when Alfred Collett passed away during 1928, following which he was buried with his wife at South Farmington Cemetery.

#9

 

 

 

11Q1

Theda M Collett

Born in 1880 at Farmington

#9

 

11Q2

Clara Jeffrey Collett

Born in 1889 at Farmington

#9

 

11Q3

Sarah Collett

Born in 1894; died in 1896

#9

 

 

 

 

11P2

Mary Jane Collett was born at Farmington in Ontario County on 20th February 1858, the eldest daughter of Richard and Sarah Collett.  In 1871 she was recorded in the census that year as Mary J Collet (sic) age 13, when she was living in New York States with her family.  By the time of the census in 1875, when her family was recorded as living at Farmington, Mary had already left home to become a married lady when she was still in her teenage years.

#9

 

 

 

In was during September 1875 Mary had married William M Wells, the son of Joseph Wells, farmer and owner of a grist-mill, a saw-mill, and a barrel making factory at Lot 44 in Farmington.  Over the first seven years of their marriage, up to 1882, the couple had four children, and they were Ida May Wells, who was born on 7th June 1876, Benjamin Wells born in 1878, daughter Jessie Wells born in 1880, and Frank Wells who was born in 1882.

#9

 

 

 

Ten years after they were married Mary Jane wrote a letter on 5th March 1885 to her Aunt Ann in Admington, who was Ann Collett nee Hall, the wife of Mary Jane’s uncle William Collett (Ref. 11O9), her father’s younger brother.  In that letter she wrote that their farm comprised a holding of 120 acres, which included a saw-mill and a grist-mill, possibly taken over from William’s father.  She went on to say that they made 25,000 flour barrels and 7,000 apple barrels, and employed nine men in the cooper shop, but sometimes up to fifteen.  She continued to say that her husband cuts the staves and the headings for the barrels and that he was more interested in working with machinery than farming, as a result of which it her father, Richard Collett, who undertook most of the work on their farm.

#9

 

 

 

It was during January 1888 that William Wells died as the result of a tragic accident at work.  At the time of his death it was reported that he was a well-known barrel maker in the town of Manchester, to the east of Farmington.  It appears from his obituary, that he was using a buzz-saw when the ladder on which he was standing became dislodged and he fell against the saw, which was instantly thrown against his head inflicting severe wounds.  He died four days later.  He was a highly respected member of the community, and left a wife, four children, three sisters and an aging father.  After the tragic accident William’s father Joseph Wells sold off the saw-mill and cooperage.

#9

 

 

 

Following the death of her husband Mary Jane and her children were still living in Manchester at the time of the census in 1890.  In another letter written at the start of that year to her Aunt Ann Collett in England, Mary Jane hinted that she was thinking of getting married again during the autumn of 1890 to a gentleman who lives in the next state to the west.  She added that her folks cannot bear to have her move away and that it may not happen anyway.  Whether her aunt ever read the letter is not known, but sadly in February 1890 Ann Collett nee Hall passed away.  In any event it was later that same year at Farmington that Mary Jane Well was married to Louis (Lewis) Leix on 16th October 1890 by the Presbyterian minister, the Reverend J C Lenhard of Shortsville.  Lewis was the son of German-born Ludwig Leix and Katherine Khunley and was a farmer at Mayville in Michigan, to where Mary Jane and her Wells family moved after the wedding.  The Leix family was well known in Mayville and there is now a road named after them.

#9

 

 

 

 

 

#9

 

 

 

That second marriage for Mary Jane lasted only seven years, when Mary Jane Leix, aged just 40 years, the daughter of Richard Collett, died during 1897, the cause of death being a burst blood vessel.  However, nothing more is known about the last few years in the life of Mary Jane Leix nee Collett, except that her mother Sarah Collett stated in the census of 1900 that she had given birth to five children, of which only four were still alive.  As those four can be positively identified, the missing child was therefore confirmed her daughter Mary Jane.

#9

 

 

 

Lewis Leix was born in 1854 and it was on 16th October 1879 at Fremont, Tuscola County, that he first married May Wilcox, as confirmed in the Fremont census in 1880.  Lewis Leix was a farmer of 26, and his wife May was 24.  Tragically it was shortly after that when May Leix died.  Three years after the death of his second wife Lewis was recorded in the census of 1900, while five years after that, at the age of 50 and on 3rd May 1905, he was married for a third time, to spinster Lizzie Eichemeyr who wase 42.  That wedding took place at Bay City in Michigan when he confirmed that he had been twice married before, and that he was the son of Ludwig Leix and Catherine Kunely.  Lizzie’s parents were confirmed as Edward Eichemeyr and Sabina Deneke.  It was as Lewis and Eichmur Leix that they were curiously recorded in the Fremont census of 1910, and they were still there in 1920, when even more curiously they were listed in that year’s census as Lewis and Louis Leix when they were 65 and 56.  It was just four years later that Lewis Leix died at Fremont during 1924, where he was buried.

#9

 

 

 

 

#2

 

 

 

What is of particular interest is that it was less than three years after Mary Jane Wells married Lewis Leix, that her eldest daughter Ida May Wells became with-child and was quickly married to Adolph Leix on 14th August 1893 in Fremont, Tuscola County in Michigan.  Just one month later their son Theodore Leix was born on 19th September 1893 when Adolph was 21 and Ida was only 17.  Adolph was the son of Ludwig and Katherine Leix and the younger brother of Lewis Leix.  On the day of their wedding Adolph was recorded as a farmer, while Ida was described as a dressmaker.

#9

 

 

 

Mary Jane’s second child, Benjamin Wells was born on 28th December 1877 and, according to the census in 1900, he was living with William Petty and his family.  William’s wife Mary was Benjamin’s aunt.  Benjamin was described as a servant and a farm labourer, and also living there was his grandfather Joseph Wells whose farm and sawmills at Farmington were recorded as Lot 44.  His whereabouts during the next twenty years is not known, but by the time of the census in 1920 Benjamin Wells, age 42 and with no occupation was living with his sister Ida May Leix in Bay City, Michigan.  It was shortly after that when he died on 6th March 1920 and was buried two days later at the Shortsville & Manchester Cemetery.  The cause of death was stated on his death certificate as ‘insanity, becoming more imbecile in the last three months of his life’.

#9

 

 

 

Mary Jane’s third child, Jessie Wells was born in 1880 and following the death of her father in the mid-1880s, she appears not to have gone with her mother to Michigan when she would have been around eleven years old.  Instead, at the age of 12, she was living at Farmington with her grandparents Richard and Sarah Collett and their unmarried son Hiram Collett at the time of the New York State census of 1892.  Jessie later married Charles P Loomis during 1900 and at the time of the census that year the pair of them were living in Farmington with Charles’ parents.  Charles’ occupation was that of a farm labourer, very likely working on his father’s farm.

#9

 

 

 

By 1920 the family had moved to Schenectady City in New York State where Charles was a machinist for General Electric.  Their sole surviving daughter Marion Loomis, age 17, was still living with them.  Furthermore Jessie and Charles were still living in Schenectady in 1930, but later returned to Farmington, where Jessie died on 8th February 1960 and Charles died 11th May 1968.  They were both buried in South Farmington Cemetery.  Marion Loomis married Edwin L Clark and in 1930 they were living at Haddonfield, Camden in New Jersey, whereas her deceased sister Doris Loomis, who had been born during August 1903, was only five months old when she died on 15th January 1904.

#9

 

 

 

The last child of Mary Jane Wells was Frank Wells and he was born in 1882.  After the death of his father just a few years later, Frank very likely travelled with his mother and sister to Michigan around 1890/91.  Certainly he was in Michigan ten years later when he was living with his married sister Ida May Leix and her husband Adolph Leix at Sherman Street in Bay City, East Side, at the time of the 1900 census.  By that time in his life Frank Wells was 18, but had no stated occupation.  Adolph Leix was teamster (a truck driver) and with him and his wife Ida May were their two sons Theodore Leix, who was six, and William Leix who was just two months old.  It was eleven years later that Adolph Leix died of an appendicitis on 14th July 1911 and was buried at Elm Lawn Cemetery in Bay City.

#9

 

 

 

No record of the family has been found in 1910 but by 1920 Ida May was still living in Bay City, then aged 44 and widowed.  Her occupation was given as ‘milk station’.  Her two sons, Theodore Leix, age 24, and William Leix, age 17, were both described as milk bottlers.  Her daughter Ruth Leix was 15 and a bookkeeper in a clothes store.  Also living with them was Ida May’s aunt Rhoby Wells, her father’s sister, who was 65, together with Ida May’s unmarried brother Benjamin Wells (above).

#9

 

 

 

Later that year, on 22nd December 1920, Ida May Leix married Andrew J Rumph at Hampton Township in Bay City.  Andrew was 51 and a farmer who had been born in Canada who had emigrated to America in 1878.  His father was from England and his mother from Canada.  By 1930 Ida M Rumph was still a resident of Bay City, where she was recorded as being married and head of the household at the age of 54.  The only people living there with her were her daughter Ruth and a boarder John Auch who was a labourer in the dairy.  Living in the adjacent dwelling was Ida May’s son William Leix, the owner of a dairy, with his wife Esther and their two sons Robert N Leix, who was five, and Theodore Leix who was four.  Also living next door to Ida May, but on the other side, was her other son Theodore Leix, age 27, the owner of a gas station, with his wife Gertrude.

#9

 

 

 

At that same time in 1930 the husband of Ida May Rumph was living in Watertown, a suburb of Bay City.  Andrew Rumph stated that he was married and was head of the household.   Living with him was his sister Mary J Freeland and her husband Albert, along with Andrew’s aunt Mary J Mallion who was 88.  So it seems likely that the marriage of Ida May and Andrew had not last many years before they decided to live apart from each other.  It was less than six years later that Andrew Rumph died at Watertown 1st February 1936.

#9

 

 

 

Following the death of her estranged husband, Ida May had reverted to her previous married name by the time of the census in 1940 when, as Ida Leix, she was living at Block 44, Tuscola Road in Bay City.  Also by that time the boarder at her home in 1930, John Auch, was then her son-in-law married to her daughter Ruth, both of whom were employed in the dairy.  On Thursday 4th March 1965 Ida May Leix fell and broke hip and shoulder and was admitted into the Bay City General Hospital where she died, then buried at Elm Lawn Cemetery in Bay City on 6th March 1965.

#9

 

 

 

 

11P3

Hiram K Collett was born at Farmington in Ontario County on 26th September 1863.  He was the second known son of farmer Richard Collett from Admington in England and his English born wife Sarah Randall.  Hiram Collet (sic) was six years of age in 1870 and was 11 in the Farmington census of 1875.  He was 16 years old in the US Census of 1880 when he was a farm labourer living with his family at Farmington, south-east of the town of Rochester.  Like his father Richard and his older brother Alfred, Hiram was also a farmer and was later recorded as having the farm holding referred to as Lot 70, not far from his father whose land at Farmington was Lot 52.  As Hiram Collett he was 19 in 1892.

#9

 

#2

 

 

 

#2

 

 

 

Hiram helped his parents run their farm right up until he married the widow Cora B de Rieu (nee Brulee) in 1899, when he was 33.  Cora was born in Holland in 1868, and she brought with into the marriage the two children from her previous marriage to the late John de Rieu.  They were Myrtle de Rieu, who was born in 1887, and Lena de Rieu, who was born in 1889.  At the time of the census in 1900 farmer Hiram Collett, age 37, and his wife Cora, age 32, were recorded as having been married for one year, when they had Leona (Lena N D Rew), age 11, living with them at Farmington.  Two doors away Cora’s daughter Myrtle was living with her maternal grandparents Isaac and Magdelena Brulee.  Ten years later, and following the death of her grandparents, Myrtle and her sister Lena were both living with Hiram and Cora, when they were both recorded with the Collett surname.

#9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

#2

 

 

 

On that occasion in 1910 Hiram Collett was 47, Cora Collett was 43, Myrtle S Collett was 22, and Leona N Collett was also 22.  Five years later the Farmington census in 1915 stated that Hiram Collett was 51, and after a further five years it was just Hiram, age 56, and Cora, age 51, who were living at Farmington in 1920.  Despite Cora being a few years younger than Hiram, they never had any children of their own, while they lived out their lives together at Farmington.  And it was there three years later that Hiram K Collett died and was buried at South Farmington Cemetery in 1923, where a gravestone marks the plot with the simple inscription “Hiram K Collett 1863 – 1923”.  His wife Cora died five years later and was also buried at South Farmington Cemetery, where a separate gravestone simply reads “Cora B Collett 1868 – 1928”.

#2

 

 

#9

 

 

 

 

11P4

Lettie Collett was born at Farmington in Ontario County on 19th June 1866, the second daughter and fourth known child of Richard and Sarah Collett.  Lettie Collet (sic) was four years old in 1870 and was nine in 1875.  By the time of the next census in 1880 she was 13 when she and her family were still residing in Farmington.  Seven years later Lettie married John Whittaker in 1887 when she was just 21 years old.  John was born in England and had emigrated to America in 1874, while his marriage to Lettie produced just one child, Edna Whittaker, who was born during November 1892.

#9

#2

 

 

 

By the time of the census in 1900, the family of three was still living in Farmington, where John Whittaker was 44 and his wife Lettie was 33.  The census that year also confirmed that they had been married for thirteen years and that John was a farmer.  It was eleven years after that when Lettie Whittaker nee Collett died at Farmington during 1911, following which she was buried at South Farmington Cemetery.  In 1920 her widowed husband John was living with his daughter Edna Whittaker at the home of De Witt van Noy, her future husband.

#9

 

 

 

Edna Whittaker later married De Witt van Noy and by 1930 they were living in Canandaigua, the nearest large town to Farmington.  De Witt was a dairy farmer in partnership with his father-in-law John Whittaker who was still living with them, and who died in 1936 when he was reunited with his wife.  The marriage provided the couple with just one son, De Witt Edwin van Noy, who was born on 4th March 1935.  De Witt van Noy died in 1948 and was followed by Edna who passed away during 1952, following which they were both buried in South Farmington Cemetery.  Their son De Witt Edwin van Noy married Sarah Randall and they have two daughters, Judy Ann van Noy (born in 1961 who married John Wint), and Kay Lorie van Noy (born in 1967).

#9

 

 

 

Lettie Whittaker nee Collett was a great letter writer, and copies of three letters that she sent to family back in England are still held by the family.  In the first, dated 15th March 1881, Lettie wrote to ‘dear Aunt and Uncle’ to say she will be 15 in June.  School is now out but will begin again in May.  She explained that there are two terms in each school year, each of sixteen weeks.  She continued to tell them about the price they were getting for wheat and eggs, and that they were making maple syrup.

#9

 

 

 

In a later letter sent from Manchester, near Farmington, in 1885 to her ‘dear Aunt’ she reported that father was sorry to hear of the death of his sister.  That was most probably Eliza Slatter nee Collett (Ref. 11O5) who died in 1884.  Lettie added that she will be going home that same afternoon, which perhaps indicated that she was living away from home at that time and was possibly working as a domestic servant elsewhere.

#9

 

 

 

The last of the three letters was dated 7th January 1886 and was again sent to her Aunt and Uncle from Manchester in which she said she was living with a Quaker woman of 80, for whom she may have been a housemaid.  She wrote in the letter that she wanted to go home for the winter, but that the woman wanted her to stay with her as she was ‘pretty weak and bent’.  However, she added that she does manage to go home every Sunday.

#9

 

 

 

 

11P5

Sidney Collett was born at Farmington in Ontario County on 8th July 1874, and it was there that he was living with his family in 1875 when he was recorded as Sydnia L Collett who was still under one year old.  He was the youngest child of Richard Collett and Sarah Randall from England, and was five years old in the Farmington census of 1880, and was 18 in 1892.  For the first twenty-five years of his life his continued to life and work at the family’s farm, up until he became a married man.  It was on 14th March 1900 that he married Harriet Chilson, who was known as Hattie, and who came from the Pumpkin Hook area of Farmington.  At the time of the Farmington census in 1900 Sidney Collet (sic), age 26, and his wife Harriet G Collet, age 22, were living with his parents, and it was three years later that Sidney’s father died, and two years after that the first of the couple’s children was born, who was named after his grandfather.

#9

#2

 

 

 

Following the death of his father, Sidney and Hattie continued to live with Sidney’s mother and to manage the farm for her.  That they did for the next seven years and, upon the death of his mother in 1910, Sidney inherited the farm where he and his family lived until his own death thirty-seven years later.  According to the Farmington census of 1910 it was just Sidney Collett, who was 35, and Harriet G Collett, who was 32, living on the farm with their two children.  Richard S Collett was five, and Helen E Collett was three years of age.  The couple’s last child was added to the family within the next twelve months, and in 1915 Sidney Collett was 40 when his three children were aged eleven, eight, and four years respectively.

#9

 

 

 

 

#2

 

 

 

Five years later, according to the Farmington census of 1920 the family comprised farmer Sidney Collett, who was 45, Harriet G Collett, who was 41, their son Richard S Collett, age 16, who was employed on a work-train for the steam railroad, Helen E Collett, who was 12, and Lloyd L Collett who was eight years old and listed as Loyde L Collett.  In 1925 Sidney Collett of Farmington was 50, while his sons Richard and Loyde were 21 and 16, and his absent daughter Helen was married by then.  With the passing of a further five years it was only Lloyd who was still living at the family home with his parents, his older brother Richard being married by then.

#9

 

 

#2

 

 

 

Having been Sidney L Collett in the census of 1875, and with no middle initial at any other time, in the Farmington census of 1930 he was named as Sidney J Collett when he was 55.  The census enumerator also noted his wife’s name as Harriet J Collett, who was 51, while their son was named as Loyde L Collett who was 19.  The next census in 1940 recorded that the couple were still living in the same house where they had been residing in 1935.  Sidney Collett was 65 and Harriet was 61. Living with them at that time were their three grandchildren, Jeanette Kipp, who was 13, Alton Kipp, who was 11 and actually William Alton Kipp, and Francis Kipp who was nine years old, the children of their daughter Helen.

#2

 

 

 

It was seven years later that Sidney Collett died at Farmington on 15th March 1947 at the age of 72, and for a few years his widow Hattie continued to live there.  Keeping her company was her married daughter Helen with her children, and that arrangement continued until around 1955 when the farm was sold out of the Collett family.  After the farm was sold Hattie took up employment as live-in carer for sick people, which she did until the 1970s.  She lived for the last few years of her life with her grandson William Alton Kipp – who was known as Bill, prior to her death on 10th December 1979, aged 101.  Following her passing she was buried at South Farmington Cemetery, where she was laid to rest with her husband.

#9

 

 

 

11Q4

Richard S Collett

Born in 1903 at Farmington

#9

 

11Q5

Helen Emogene Collett

Born in 1907 at Farmington

#9

 

11Q6

Lloyd Lester Collett

Born in 1911 at Farmington

#9

 

 

 

 

11P6

John Collett was born at Admington after thirtieth of March in 1851 and was baptised at Quinton shortly after on 1st June 1851.  He was the eldest child of George Collett and Emma Rogers.  He later married Maria who was born at Southam near Cheltenham in 1848.  By the time John was ten years old, the census of 1861 placed him living with his mother Emma at Admington.  At that time his father was working away from home in Cheltenham, where he was a coachman for the County Magistrate of Gloucestershire. 

#2

 

 

 

Ten years later in 1871 John Collett of Admington was a footman in the household of the Vicar of Campden, the Reverend Charles E Kennaway.  He was 20 years old, unmarried, and was one of six servants living at the Vicarage House in Campden. 

#2

 

 

 

It was during 1879 that John married Maria Pullam, who was born at Southam near Cheltenham in 1848.  Following their marriage at Cheltenham, the couple moved north to Lancashire where John started a new job on the railway.  According to the census in 1881, the childless couple were living at 141 Morton Street in Gorton, to the east Manchester, where John Collett, age 29, was a railway guard, and his wife Maria was 32.

#2

 

 

 

During the follow two years John suffered with a terrible illness, as a result of which the couple returned to live in Cheltenham, and it was there that he died on 7th November 1883.  The memorial card produced by his wife read as follows:  ‘In Loving Remembrance of John the dearly beloved husband of Maria Collett who, after patiently enduring a long and painful illness, peacefully entered into rest of Nov. 7th 1883, age 32’.  The card also carried the following: ‘Who fell asleep in Jesus, rejoicing in the realisation of his Saviour’s redeeming grace, whose rod and staff were his great comfort in passing through the valley of the shadow of death’.

#9

 

 

 

In order to survive and make ends meet, his widow Maria took up the post of parlour maid at Hayes Lodge, Sydenham Road in Cheltenham, where she was working at the time of the 1891 and 1901 censuses.  She died at Cheltenham during the third quarter of 1905, aged 57.

#9

 

 

 

 

11P7

Richard Collett was born at Admington in 1852 and was baptised at Quinton 29th August 1852, the second son of George Collett and Emma Rogers.  However, his absence from the family in the census of 1861, and his non-appearance in all later census returns, very likely indicates that he suffered an infant or childhood death.

#2

 

 

 

 

11P8

Francis Collett, who was known as Frank, was born in Warwick during the last quarter of 1856, the base-born son of Elizabeth Collett of Admington.  At the time of the census in 1861 ‘Frank Collit’ was four years old and was described as a visitor at the Warwick home of William Bromage in Northouse Street.  Following the marriage of his mother to William Mountford later that year it would appear that Frank returned to live with his mother and her husband at Harbury.

#9

 

 

 

It was at Harbury that he was living with his mother in 1871, but by which time William Mountford had been dead for just three months.  So the census return that year recorded him as the son of Elizabeth Mountford, head of the household, with ditto marks under her surname alongside that of Frank’s name, which may have been an enumerator’s error.  On that occasion as Frank Mountford, age 14, he was simply described as an invalid.

#9

 

 

 

No record of him has been found in 1881, but ten years later in the Harbury census of 1891 he was listed as Frank Collett, age 32 and a labourer.  He was also recorded as an invalid and described as the son-in-law of Henry Verney, age 53, his wife being Elizabeth Verney from Admington who was 55 and Frank’s mother.

#2

 

 

 

After a further ten years the March census of 1901 included Frank Collett, age 40 (sic), as the step-son of Henry Verney, having ‘fits since childhood’ while he was still living at Harbury with his mother Elizabeth Verney and his stepfather.  Apart from those four census records, no other details are known regarding the life of Frank Collett, except that he died at Warwick during the first quarter of 1912.

#9

 

 

 

 

11P9

Francis Richard Edward Hall Collett, who was known as Frank, was the eldest child of William Collett and Ann Hall.  He was born at Admington and was baptised at St Within’s Church in Quinton on 5th March 1860.  He was one year old in the Admington census the following year.  In 1871, at the age of 11, he was living with his family at The Milking Pail beer-house on Sheep Street in Mickleton, where his father was the inn keeper.  By the time of the next census in 1881 Frank had left the family home at The Milking Pail and was working as a footman at the home of ‘M D’ James A Huxley at 9 Higher Terrace in Tor-Moham in Devon, which is a parish of Torquay.

#2

 

 

 

Widower James Huxley was aged 46 and was of Newport in Shropshire.  He must have been a wealth man owning his own horse-drawn carriage since, in addition to footman Francis Collett, the other occupants of the house were: coachman George Stoneman and his wife and son, and servant girl and housemaid Mary Northey.  It was two years later that Francis married Jane Treeby Paige at Newton Abbot in 1883.  Jane was born at Modbury in Devon, and after two years she presented Frank with a son Francis James P Collett while they were living in Torquay.  To avoid any confusion with his father, he was known as Frankie.

#2

 

 

 

#9

 

 

 

Ten years later, the census of 1891 placed Francis, recorded as Frank Collett from Admington, as living in the Wandsworth & Streatham area of London, when he was 31.  At that time in his life he was a servant at the home of Edmund Colthorpe at Streatham Lodge, while Frank’s wife Jane, age 33, and their five years old son were living nearby at 58 Colmer Road in Streatham.

#2

 

#9

 

 

 

After a further ten years Frank Collett, age 41 from Admington, was living at 21 Beale Street in West Ham with his wife Jane Collett, age 42 and from Modbury, although by that time their son Frank was not living with them.  He would have been 15, so his absence from any census record in 1901 may indicate that he had already joined the army and was serving abroad.  On that occasion Frank Collett was the manager of an off licence, having his own account.

#2

 

 

 

Over the following years the couple made the short move to Plaistow, where they were living within the West Ham registration district when the next census was conducted in April 1911.  Frank Collett from Admington was then 51, while his wife Jane Collett from Modbury was 53.  Also living nearby within the same area of Plaistow was their son Frank, who was married by then, with a child of his own.

#2

 

 

 

Francis Richard Edward Hall Collett, aka Frank Collett, died while he was still living in West Ham, where his death was registered during the first quarter of 1914.  He was 53, and his wife Jane survived him by a further fourteen years when she died in 1928 at the age of 70.

#9

 

 

 

11Q7

Francis James P Collett

Born in 1885 at Torquay

#2

 

 

 

 

11P10

James Collett was born at Atherstone in 1864, where he was baptised on 24th July 1864, the son of William and Ann Collett.  He was seven years old at the time of the census in 1871, when he was living with his family at Mickleton.  Upon leaving school, James secured work as a domestic groom with the Middlemore family of Birmingham, at their home in Bristol Road, Northfield near Kings Norton in Selly Oak.  That was confirmed by the census in 1881, which described James Collett as a servant and domestic groom, age 16 and from Atherstone-on-Stour.

#2

 

 

 

Also working for the Middlemore family as a domestic housemaid at that time was Sarah Evans, age 26, from Chirbury near Montgomery in Wales.  Although she was ten years older than James, it was Sarah Evans that he married some years later, although no record of the marriage has been found to date.  Once they were married the couple made their initial home in Quinton.

#9

 

 

 

The Quinton census in 1891 recorded James Collett as a farmer employing one farm servant, living there with his wife Sarah.  They did not stay in Quinton very long, and that may have resulted from a farming disaster, since by 1897 when their son was born, the couple was living at Woodford, near Thrapston in Northamptonshire.  However, they were not there very long, because by March 1901 the family was living at Hitcham in Buckinghamshire.

#9

 

 

 

According to the census in 1901, James Collett, age 36 and of Atherstone-on-Stour, and his wife Sarah Collett, age 40 and from Chirbury in Shropshire, which is just across the boundary into England from Montgomery in Wales, were living at Hitcham in Buckinghamshire, which is Hitcham St Mary in Burnham near Slough.  James’ occupation was stated as being that of a night watchman, a major change from the farmer he was only ten years earlier.  Living with the couple was their son Shirley Collett who was four years old, whose place of birth was confirmed as Woodford.

#2

 

 

 

During the next few years the family of three moved the short distance from Hitcham St Mary to Cedar Lodge in the Dropmore area of Burnham near Slough, where they were living in April 1911.  James Collett of Atherstone, age 46, was still employed as a night watchman, his wife Sarah Collett was 48, and their son Shirley Collett was 14.

#2

#9

 

 

 

And it was at Cedar Lodge that James and Sarah remained for the rest of their life.  However, the couple may have been visiting relatives in Gloucestershire or Warwickshire twenty-one years later, since the death of James Collett of The Cedars in Dropmore, Burnham was recorded at Stow-on-the-Wold register office (Ref. 6a 387) on 28th July 1932.  Probate of his personal effects valued at £139 6 Shillings 9d was granted to Shirley Evans Collett, a railway employee, when the place of his passing was named as 20 Admington, Shipston-on-Stour.  It is therefore possible that James was visiting his stepmother Ann Collett who died in 1935 at Milcote in Warwickshire, midway between Welford-on-Avon and Stratford-upon-Avon.

#14

 

 

 

 

#9

 

 

 

11Q8

Shirley Evans Collett

Born in 1896 at Woodford

#2

 

 

 

 

11P11

Albert Frederick William Collett, who was more usually known as Fred or Frederick, was born at Mickleton on 7th June 1870, the birth being registered by his mother on 28th June.  He was three months old when he was baptised at the Church of St Lawrence in Mickleton on 4th September 1870, the third child of William Collett by his first wife Ann Hall.  It was as Albert Collett that he was nine months old in the Mickleton census of 1871, and was 10 years old and was still living in Mickleton with his family in 1881.  On both occasions the family was living at The Milking Pail on Sheep Street which was specifically named as 5 Sheep Street in 1871.

#2

#12

 

#9

 

 

 

However, like many members of this family line, Albert later sought work in Staffordshire and was living in Walsall at the time of the census in 1891, by which time he was recorded as Frederick Collett from Mickleton.  He was 21 and a railway labourer who was a lodger at the home of 25-years old Walter Lloyd and his wife Elizabeth at 64 Oxford Street in Walsall.  It may have been while he was in the Walsall area that he met his future wife Eliza Atkins.

#9

 

 

 

 

It was over three years later that Fred married Eliza by banns at the Church of St. Michael in Rushall on 25th December 1894.  By that time Fred’s occupation had changed to that of a gas stoker, while his father’s occupation was recorded as a farmer.  His address on that occasion was Ryecroft in Rushall, north-east of Walsall.  Eliza’s father was described as a contractor and the witnesses were John Hewitt, the husband of Eliza’s sister Mary Ann, and Ida Mason.

#12

 

 

 

Eliza was born at James Street in Rushall on 4th May 1874, the fourth child of James Atkins and his wife Sarah Beetlestone.  However, in 1881 and 1891 the Atkins family was living at 5 Brewer’s Cottages in Rushall from where Eliza, at the age of 17, was the employed as a brace-maker, most probably making leather braces with her sister Mary Ann who was a harness stitcher.

#12

 

 

 

Once they were married Fred and Eliza settled in Walsall where their first two children were born.  Shortly after the birth of the second child the family moved to Admington Farm Fields, which was where they were living in March 1901.  The census that month confirmed that Fred was a farmer, perhaps even taking over from his brother James (above).  Once again he referred to himself as Frederick Collett, as he had ten years earlier.  At that time he was 29 years of age and his place of birth was confirmed as Mickleton.

#2

 

 

 

His wife Eliza Collett was 27 and their two children at that time were five years old Frederick and two years old Florence, both confirmed as having been born at Walsall.  Also living and working with the family was a lad named Frank Taplin who was 16 and a servant and a cowman from nearby Newbold.  It may be significant that twenty years earlier Alfred and Ellen Taplin had been living with Fred’s parents at The Milking Pail in Mickleton, so Frank could have been their son.

#2

 

 

 

During the following year Eliza gave birth to the couple’s second daughter while they were still living at Admington.  Over the next five years a further two more children were added to the family after they had settled in Mickleton, where the family was residing in April 1911.  At the time of the birth of his daughter Annie in 1904, Fred Collett’s occupation was that of a labourer, although three years later his occupation was recorded at the birth of his son Henry as being that of a haulier.

#2

 

 

#9

 

 

 

In the census of 1911 Albert once again referred to himself as Frederick Collett of Mickleton, when he was 40 and a self-employed haulier living with his family at a ‘private house’ in Mickleton, which may have been Hidcote Cottage in Sheep Street.  Eliza Collett from Walsall was 36, and their children by then were Frederick Collett, age 15, who was a gardener working in a private garden, Florence Collett, age 11, Ethel Collett, who was eight, Annie Collett, who was six, and Henry Collett who was three years old and the only one not attending school.  Whilst she was very likely baptised as Sarah Ann, it would appear that she never used her first name, and was known as Annie or Nan.

#2

 

 

 

One more child was born into the family after 1911, and that was another son, Arthur George Collett who was also born while the family was still living in Mickleton.  When the child’s birth was registered during 1916 Fred’s occupation was stated as being that of a gardener.  It was also in 1916 that Eliza’ father died on March 13th when he left an estate valued at £8,609 4 Shilling and 7 Pence which would equate to around £450,000 in 2012 using the Retail Price Index, or a massive £2.4 Million using the Average Earnings Index.

#9

 

 

#12

 

 

 

An account dated 29th June 1916 included an advance of £200 paid from the estate to Eliza Collett for the purchase of a house at Mickleton where the family lived until Eliza’s premature death.  Her father’s Will was proved on 19th May 1917, and in 1918 Frederick Collett bought Cider Mill Cottage in Admington for £430 at auction held in Stratford-on-Avon on 1st February 1918.  That dwelling, together with three other cottages, had been purchased by Fred’s father in 1897 and upon his death they had been passed onto his second wife Ann.

#12

 

 

 

Just three years after the birth of her last child Eliza Collett nee Atkins died on 16th March 1919 at the age of 44.  Her granddaughter Dorothy said that she had died of influenza during the massive world-wide epidemic of 1919, but her death certificate gave the cause of death as a cerebral haemorrhage.  Her eldest daughter Florence who, along with her sister Ethel was in domestic service, was called home to take charge of the household and, in particular, to care for her brother Arthur who was only three years old.

#12

 

 

 

 

Eliza died without making a Will, so administration of her estate was granted to Frederick under a bond jointly with Francis James Paige Collett (his nephew) of Stratford-on-Avon, a poultry dealer, on 18th January 1922.  The estate was valued at £338 7 Shillings and 8 Pence, made up of a freehold messuage and premises situate at Mickleton in the County of Gloucester in the occupation of the deceased at the time of her death, worth £200 or £9 per annum if rented, plus £52 12 Shillings and 9 Pence in the Stratford-on-Avon branch of Lloyds Bank, plus the balance due as one of the children of James Atkins at £85 14 Shillings and 11 Pence.  Shortly after he death the family moved into Cider Mill Cottage in Admington.

#12

 

 

 

 

It was nineteen years later that Albert Frederick William Collett died on 6th February 1938, his death being registered at the North Cotswold district registrar’s office on the following day by his son A G Collett of Ilmington, who had been present at the death.  However, by that time in his life he was staying at the home of his married daughter Florence Bennett at Hidcote Boyce in Gloucestershire.  He was 67 years old and had been working as a roadman, and the cause of death was: Syncope (loss of consciousness), Heart failure, and. Chronic nephriris and dropsy. Following his death Albert Frederick William Collett was buried in the parish churchyard at Quinton.  Attending the funeral were Bob and Lorna North (Mr & Mrs R North – see Obituary below), Lorna Collett North nee Craven being the eldest daughter of Albert’s sister Florence Gertrude Ann Hall Craven nee Collett.

#12

 

 

 

The following obituary was published in the local newspaper that same month:  ”Mr A .F Collett in his 67th year after failing health for over 12 months.  Native of Mickleton and at one time farmed at Admington Grounds.  Afterwards employed by Warwickshire and Gloucestershire County Councils and had lived in Admington for over 30 years.  Survived by 3 sons and 3 daughters.  Wife died 1919.  Funeral at Quinton on Wednesday.  Mourners Mr & Mrs Fred Collett - son and daughter-in-law, Mr & Mrs Henry Collett - son and daughter-in-law, Mr Arthur Collett – son, Mr & Mrs J Bennett - daughter [Florence] and son-in-law, Mrs W Bailey – daughter [Ethel], Mr & Mrs Charles Clifford - daughter [Sarah Ann] and son-in-law, Mr F Collett – nephew  [Francis James Paige Collett, the son of his brother Francis], Mr & Mrs R. North - nephew and niece [Lorna Collett Craven, the daughter of his sister Florence].  Frederick’s estate was administered by Slatter, Son & Slatter of Stratford-upon-Avon [Frederick & John Slatter Jnr were cousins].  Frederick William Collett & Francis James Paige Collett were executors.”

#12

 

 

 

11Q9

Frederick William Collett

Born in 1895 at Walsall

#9

 

11Q10

Florence Gertrude Collett

Born in 1899 at Walsall

#9

 

11Q11

Ethel May Collett

Born in 1902 at Admington

#9

 

11Q12

Sarah Ann Collett

Born in 1904 at Mickleton

#9

 

11Q13

Henry James Collett

Born in 1907 at Mickleton

#9

 

11Q14

Arthur George Collett

Born in 1916 at Mickleton

#9