PART EIGHTEEN

 

The Main Suffolk Line - 1360 to 1745

 

This is the first of five sections of Part 18 of the Collett family

 

Updated December 2015

 

 

In November 2012 a new Collett family line was produced, Part 63.

That focuses on the Collett-Stratfold-Collet Family of Buckinghamshire

which also contains references to The Hale in Wendover, as does Part 18.

The place of origin of that Collett family is Ivinghoe in Buckinghamshire.

 

As a result of the February 2014 update, the link between Parts 18 and 63 has been proved,

thanks to the extensive and detailed information received from Peter Proctor in Australia.

We now know that the original Colet family in Part 18 divided into two distinct branches;

one remaining in Wendover as Collet, the other settling in Suffolk as Collett.

 

Tragically the Wendover Collet family eventually ran out of male heirs, resulting in the last Collet at The Hale,

Robert Collet (Ref. 18L5), handing the estate to his cousin Robert Stratfold (Ref. 63L2),

but on the condition that he change his name to Collet, which he did

 

~ ~ ~

 

This is the family line of Michael John Collett (Ref. 18R73) of France,

which is depicted by the names in capital letters, and Liz Whittaker (Ref. 18R14),

whose family line is depicted by the names underlined

 

It is also the line of Avryll Sixtus (see Ref. 18Q13) of New Zealand,

Rachael Ann Collett (Ref. 18S31) of New Zealand (depicted in italic script),

Candace Austin nee Collett (Ref. 18Q18) of Southwold in Suffolk,

Mary-Ann Dunn nee Collett (Ref. 18S22) of Felsted in Essex,

Jane Clements (see Ref. 18Q122), and Gordon Alan Collett (Ref. 18S37),

all of whom have kindly provided some family details over the past few years.

 

My thanks also go to the aforementioned Michael Collett and Liz Whittaker

for providing copies of some of the early Colet, Collett and Dameron Wills

 

 

It should be noted that the relationship of the opening generation is not proved

 

 

There are anomalies with a couple of the early generations in this line for which an explanation may be useful.  If Robert Colet (Ref. 18B1) was born in 1427 as detailed in a Collett genealogy at the British Library in London, his fifth son Henry Colet could not have been born around 1435.  It is therefore possible that Robert, who is positively confirmed as the father of Sir Henry Colet (Ref. 18C5), was actually the son of Richard Colet (Ref. 18A1) who was born around 1380.  This would also align more sensibly with Robert’s eldest son John Colet (Ref. 18C1), who is known to have served an apprenticeship in 1435 and 1436, placing his date of birth around 1420.  However, in the absence of any confirmed details, the original details have been retained here, but require further research to produce a more accurate account.

 

 

 

18Y1

Unknown Colet parents

 

 

 

18Z1

HENRY COLET

Born circa 1360

 

18Z2

Thomas Colet

Date of birth unknown

 

 

 

 

18Z1

HENRY COLET was born around 1360, and was the brother of Thomas Colet the Rector of Little Kimble.  He was mentioned in various Wills during the period 1418 to 1439, and was almost certainly the father of Richard Colet of Wendover and Matthew Colet of Kimble.  It was around 1439, the seventh year of the reign of King Henry VI, that he died.

 

 

 

18A1

RICHARD COLET

Born circa 1380

 

18A2

Matthew Colet

Date of birth unknown

 

 

 

 

18Z2

Thomas Colet was the Rector of Little Kimble in Buckinghamshire in 1408 and he may have exchanged that for Barnsley in Gloucestershire.  If so, he may well be the grandfather or great-grandfather of Thomas Collett of Upper Slaughter - see Part One – The Main Line starting with Ref. 1D1.

 

 

 

 

18A1

RICHARD COLET was born around 1380 and was referred to as ‘Richard of The Hale’ at Wendover in Buckinghamshire.  He was a tenant sheep farmer and wool trade and he died in 1461, leaving an only son.

 

 

 

18B1

ROBERT COLET

Born circa 1400

 

 

 

 

18A2

Matthew Colet of Kymbell (Kimble), whose date of birth is not known, married Margaret of Kimble with whom he had several children before he died, which was just prior to 1451 the twenty-ninth year of the reign of King Henry VI.  It is established that his children remained living within the Great Kimble and Great Hampden areas for several generations.

 

 

 

18B2

John Colet

Date of birth unknown

 

18B3

William Colet

Date of birth unknown

 

 

 

 

18B1

ROBERT COLET of Wendover in Buckinghamshire was originally thought to have been born around 1427, according to the British Library.  That date also corresponds with the family record which states he was born in the fifth year of the reign of King Henry VI.  However, it is more likely that he was born some years earlier based on the fact his eldest son John Colet served an apprenticeship in 1435/36 and therefore could have been born around 1420.  He was essentially a Londoner and a freeholder and a yeoman who had trading links with other members of the Colet, Coly and Collett family.  It is known that he had cousins in Gloucestershire, Somerset, Oxfordshire and Berkshire.  There was also a further Collett family in Kent that claimed to have links with ‘Robert of Wendover’.

 

 

 

With the dissolution of the monasteries several members of the Colet family purchased abbey land for raising sheep to supply the wool markets.  Robert Colet married Margaret in the reign of King Edward IV, and he died at Wendover in 1470 just before the eleventh year of the reign of King Edward IV.  Margaret’s date of birth, like that of her husband, was given as 1427, but again that must be an error. 

 

 

 

The British Library has a manuscript book entitled 'Pedigrees of English Families’ dated by the BL to around 1630, which was written by Sir Henry St George, a Garter King of Arms in 1644.  This contains a number of short pedigrees of minor branches of various families, one of which focuses on William (Willyam) Collett, the son of Robert Collett, esquire of Wendover.  By the time it was written the surname was fully accepted in the more recent spelling, with two Ls and two Ts.  The lineage also lists the sons of Robert Collett in order as Thomas, William, James and Henry, and is followed by a note that it was proved by the oaths of various persons in the Guild Hall, London.

 

 

 

18C1

John Colet

Date of birth unknown (possibly 1420)

 

18C2

THOMAS COLET

Date of birth unknown (possibly 1424)

 

18C3

William Colet

Date of birth unknown (possibly 1428)

 

18C4

James Colet

Date of birth unknown (possibly 1432)

 

18C5

Henry Colet

Born circa 1435

 

 

 

 

18B2

John Colet, whose date of birth is not known, is known to have had a son named Thomas Colet.

 

 

 

18C6

Thomas Colet

Date of birth unknown

 

 

 

 

18B3

William Colet was the Rector of Great Hampden in Buckinghamshire in 1486.

 

 

 

 

18C1

John Colet was a citizen and merchant of London, and mercer and dealer in fabrics and fine cloth.  In 1435 and 1436 he was apprenticed to William Kirton, which may place his date of birth around 1420.  He was later admitted into the Freedom of the Mercers’ Company of London in 1442 and was re-admitted again in 1450.  He was married to Alice, whilst it is curious he was not listed as a son of Robert Collett by Sir Henry St George in his 1630 book 'Pedigrees of English Families’.  John Colet died in 1461 and was buried at St Alban’s Church in Wood Street, London.  His Will made on 5th May 1461 was proved on 27th October 1461. (see Will in Legal Documents)

 

 

 

In the Will, John bequeathed £100 to each of his children, with the total amount of £600 being placed in the care of the Chapel of the Guildhall until such time as it was needed to be used by them.  The Will also confirmed that all of John’s land at Southwark was to pass to his eldest son Robert, but in default to each of his other children in order of their age.  To his wife Alice, he bequeathed that she receive a dower (dowry) of £200 and goods comprising all wearing clothes, rings, etc.  The total sum paid out under the Will amounted to £1,032 13 Shillings 4d, an immense sum of money at that time.

 

 

 

18D1

Robert Colet

Date of birth unknown (possibly 1450)

 

18D2

John Colet

Date of birth unknown (possibly 1452)

 

18D3

Jeffrey Colet

Born circa 1454

 

18D4

Alice Colet

Born before 1461

 

18D5

Agnes Colet

Born before 1461

 

18D6

Johanna Colet

Born before 1461

 

 

 

 

18C2

THOMAS COLET was possibly born at Wendover around 1424, a son of Robert Colet, esquire of Wendover.  Thomas was a sheep farmer and was married to Joan and it is well documented that he spent all his life in rural Buckinghamshire, most likely at Wendover, where all of his children were born.  He was a legatee in the 1461 Will of his brother John (above) and was named in the 1492 Will of his eldest surviving son John.  It was therefore after 1492 that Thomas Colet died, with one source indicating that he passed away later that same year.

 

 

 

18D7

John Colet

Born circa 1458 at Wendover; infant death

 

18D8

John Colet

Born circa 1460 at Wendover

 

18D9

WILLIAM COLET

Born circa 1465 at Wendover

 

18D10

Alice Colet

Born circa 1470 at Wendover

 

18D11

Margaret Colet

Born circa 1472 at Wendover

 

 

 

 

18C3

William Colet was possibly born at Wendover around 1428, another son of Robert Colet, esquire of Wendover.  His family line, proved by oaths at the Guild Hall in London, was documented by Sir Henry St George in 1630, a manuscript book of which is held at the British Library.  That names just two children of Willyam Collett, where were John Collett and Nycholas Collett ‘who dyed young’.

 

 

 

18D12

John Colet

Born circa 1455 in London

 

18D13

Nicholas Colet

Born circa 1460 in London; infant death

 

 

 

 

18C5

Henry Colet was born at Wendover around 1435 and in some later records was referred to as Harry Colet, the youngest son of Robert Colet.  Unlike his older brother Thomas Colet (above), Henry gave up life in rural Buckinghamshire when he set out for London.  In 1457 he was admitted into the Freedom of the Mercers’ Company of London, following an apprenticeship with his older brother John Colet (above).  In 1476 he became an alderman in the City of London, and a sheriff during the following year.  He was knighted by King Henry the Seventh in 1487, following his involvement in the Battle of Bosworth Field on 22nd August 1485.  He became Lord Mayor of London on two occasions, the first time in 1486, and then again in 1495.  He was also a merchant and sometime mayor of the Staple of Calais and of Westminster.

 

 

 

Around 1466 he married Christian Knyvet the daughter of Sir John Knyvet and Alice Lynne of Ashwellthorpe, which is just south of Norwich.  Twelve later Sir William Knyvet, who mortgaged and sold various estates, passed his lands at Thurning, on the boundary between Northamptonshire and Huntingdonshire,  to Sir Henry Colet of London, the sale confirmed by fine in 1478, the estate being described as the Manor of Thurning.  Following that acquisition Sir Henry purchased other estates in Thurning.  Upon his death in 1505, the manors and estates descended to his son and heir Dean Colet, who died in 1519, and by his Will left his estate to his mother for her life, for division after her death.  The Manor of Thurning, with other manors and lands purchased from Sir William Knyvet, was to pass to his mother's kinsman Edmund Knyvet, of Ashwellthorpe in Norfolk, a sergeant porter to Henry VIII.  The Manor at Molesworth together with the Church at Thurning, purchased from Thomas Molesworth, and two messuages in Thurning, purchased from Thomas Henson, and another messuage purchased from Thomas Newman, were to go to Christopher Knyvet, the brother of Edmund Knyvet, with another brother, Anthony Knyvet, having the remainder of the estate.

 

 

 

In addition to all of this Sir Henry acquired the Manor of The Hale in Wendover in 1503 upon the death of Sir John Verney, when it was identified as part of the honour of Barcamstede [Berkhamsted] in Buckinghamshire even though the Manor itself was in Wendover Forens.  He then gave the property to the children of Thomas Colet (above), his late brother.  He also built and lived in a house known as The Great Place, the grounds of which adjoined the churchyard in what is known today as Spring Garden Place, the actual site now being occupied by The Green Dragon Inn.  Henry acquired an extensive estate in Stepney, where he was also the Lord of the Manor.  From 1869 up to closure in 2003, Sir Henry was commemorated in Stepney by the naming of the public house ‘Colet Arms’ which stood on the corner of White Horse Road, and which today is a residential property.  Henry’s vast estate was eventually passed to his eldest son John Colet upon his death, and was bequeathed by him in trust to the Mercers’ Company of London for the foundation of St Paul’s School.  The school has now been rebuilt and is in Hammersmith.

 

 

 

Henry’s wife Christian died in 1523, while Henry died in 1505, and both were buried at St Dunstan’s Church in Stepney.  Today, on the north side of the chancel is a large canopied tomb with the inscription “Here lyeth Sir Henry Collet Knight, twice Mayor of London, who died in the year of our Redemption 1510”.  The year 1510 may be an error made at the time the tomb was created, since Henry’s Will was made on 27th September 1505 and, following his death, was proved on 20th October 1505. (see Will in Legal Documents).  Also noticeable in the inscription is the fact that it has the sixteenth century Anglicised spelling of the surname, rather than the latinised spelling of Colet, as in Sir Henry’s motto colet dieum, "to look after and worship".

 

 

 

What is of particular interest is the Will of his wife, Dame Christian Colet, which was made in 1522 and proved in 1523.  In the document her surname was written with the ‘modern’ spelling using double ll and double tt, as are the references to her husband and his kinsman John Colet.  (see Will in Legal Documents).  Henry and Christian had twenty-two children, but only the four listed below survived for any length of time.

 

 

 

18D14

John Colet

Born in 1467

 

18D15

William Colet

Born in 1468

 

18D16

Thomas Colet

Born circa 1470

 

18D17

Richard Colet

Born in 1479

 

 

 

 

18C6

Thomas Colet, whose date of birth is not known, married Joan of Great Kimble in Buckinghamshire.  It looks very much as though Joan may have suffered with the same ailment or illness that, in 1520, also took the lives of her son William Colet and her daughter Agnes Colet.

 

 

 

18D18

Thomas Colet

Date of birth unknown

 

18D19

William Colet

Died in 1520

 

18D20

Agnes Colet

Died in 1520

 

18D21

Elizabeth Colet

Died in 1525

 

 

 

 

18D1

Robert Colet, whose date of birth is not known (but who was possibly born around 1440), was a citizen and mercer of London and inherited property in Southwark from his father in 1461.  He was admitted into the Freedom of the Mercers’ Company of London in 1473 and died sometime between then and 1505.

 

 

 

 

18D2

John Colet, whose date of birth is not known (but who was possibly born around 1444), was apprenticed to William Scowre in 1462 and 1463, and was admitted into the Freedom of the Mercers’ Company of London in 1476.

 

 

 

 

18D3

Jeffrey Colet was born in London around 1454 and was admitted into the Freedom of the Mercers’ Company of London in 1491.  In some records his named was recorded as Geoffrey.

 

 

 

 

18D4

Alice Colet was born in London and before the death of her father in whose Will dated 1461 she was named.  She later married William White who was a mercer of London.

 

 

 

 

18D5

Agnes Colet was born in London and before the death of her father in whose Will dated 1461 she was named.  She later married gentleman Richard Bissett.

 

 

 

 

18D8

John Colet was born at The Hale in Wendover, one of the sons of Thomas and Joan Colet.  Although his actual date of birth is not known, it is possible that he was born around 1460.  What is known is that he was married to Katherine the daughter of Agnes, with whom he had a son, and died in 1492, following which he was buried at St Lawrence Church in Wendover.  It is also established that during his short life he was known as a citizen and a mercer of London and Wendover.  His father was mentioned in the 1492 Will of John Colet, confirming that Thomas Colet was still alive at that time, although it was shortly after that when he too died.  The same Will also bequeathed The Hale Estate of John Colet to his father Thomas which suggests that John inherited The Hale from his mother and that it later belonged to his father only by the courtesy of Court.

 

 

 

18E1

Robert Colet

Born circa 1485 at Wendover

 

 

 

 

18D9

WILLIAM COLET was born at The Hale in Wendover around 1465 and he married Katherine who died around 1543 and was buried that year at Wendover.  William also died that same year and was buried with Katherine at Wendover.  It was also at Wendover that all of their children were born.  William was the only relative of his uncle Sir Henry Collett (Ref. 18C5) to be specifically mentioned in his Will of 1505.  In the document William and ‘other of my kin numbering ten’, were bequeathed £100 each to be paid at four pence per week.  The names of William and his wife Katherine (deceased), together with their sons John and William, and all of John’s children, were listed in the Visitation of Suffolk in 1561.  The first part, relating to William Collett the elder, read as follows:

 

 

 

Collett of Grundisburgh

 

[One shield] [Tricked] Sable on a chevron between three hinds statant Argent three annulets Sable in chief a crescent Or

William Collett of Wendover in the County of Buckinghamshire married Katherine and by her had issue John Collett, son and heir, and William Collett, his second son.

 

 

 

18E2

JOHN COLLETT

Born circa 1495 at Wendover

 

18E3

William Collett

Born circa 1500 at Wendover

 

18E4

Alice Collett

Date of birth unknown at Wendover

 

18E5

Nicholas Collett

Date of birth unknown at Wendover

 

 

 

 

18D10

Alice Colet was born at The Hale in Wendover during 1470 and was baptised in Wendover that same year, the daughter of Thomas and Joan Collett.  She was still alive when her father died in 1492.

 

 

 

 

18D11

Margaret Colet was born at The Hale in Wendover during 1472 and was still alive when her father died in 1492.

 

 

 

 

18D12

John Colet was born in London around 1460, the surviving son of William Colet.  According to the 'Pedigrees of English Families by Sir Henry St George at the British Library, John was a citizen and a mercer of London who had eight children; Thomas, Willyam, Arthur, Mychael, Katherine, Margaret, Elizabeth and Anne.

 

 

 

18E6

Thomas Collett

Date of birth unknown

 

18E7

William Collett

Born circa 1490 in London

 

18E8

Arthur Collett

Date of birth unknown

 

18E9

Michael Collett

Date of birth unknown

 

18E10

Katherine Collett

Date of birth unknown

 

18E11

Margaret Collett

Date of birth unknown

 

18E12

Elizabeth Collett

Date of birth unknown

 

18E14

Anne Collett

Date of birth unknown

 

 

 

 

18D14

John Colet was born in London, possibly at the family home in Watling Street within the parish of St Antholin, during January 1467 after his father had left Wendover where he was born.  John was one of only two children of Sir Henry Colet and Lady Christian Colet, out of a total of twenty-two, that survived beyond childhood.  Having completed his early education in London, possibly at St Anthony’s, he graduated with a Master of Arts degree from Magdalen College in Oxford, where he read mathematics, and platonic and neo-platonic philosophy.  He was appointed Dean Rector of Dennington in Suffolk in 1485 – insert below, and was also the Vicar of St Dunstan’s Church in Stepney.  He travelled to Italy, returning in 1489 to be ordained as a priest and to become the first Greek teacher at Cambridge in 1490.  Also in that year, on 2nd October, he was appointed the Rector of Thurning in Huntingdonshire (near Little Gidding), a post he held until February 1494.  Further trips to Italy and Paris were also undertaken in 1493.

 

 

 

Despite his extensive excursions in Europe John always returning to Cambridge to teach others of what he had learned.  In 1494 he was made Prebendary of York and St. Martin-le-Grand, and later the Chaplain of Hilberworth in Norfolk.  While in Italy he studied the fathers, canon, and civil law, and the rudiments of Greek.  During 1495 and 1496 he resided in Oxford, where he lectured on the New Testament.  While he was in Italy he became acquainted with the Dominican priest and leader of Florence, Girolamo Savonarola, who was known for his book-burning, the destruction of what he considered immoral art.  For his views, Savonarola was executed in 1498, two years after John Colet had returned to England.  Following his return he was ordained a priest and became a lecturer at Oxford on the Epistle of St Paul in which he opposed the interpretations of the scholastic theologians.  While at Oxford he was a colleague of both Sir Thomas More and Erasmus.

 

 

 

In 1502 he was appointed Prebendary of Salisbury and then in 1505, he was made Dean of St Paul’s Cathedral and continued to deliver controversial lectures on the interpretations of scriptures, and to preach against ecclesiastical abuses.

 

Charges of heresy were brought against John Colet, but Archbishop William Warham refused to support them, and as a result he survived the accusation.

 

 

This drawing of John Colet, Dean of St Pauls, by the artist Hans Holbein is believed to have been commissioned by Sir Thomas More in 1532.

 

Today the drawing is part of the Royal Collection at Windsor.

 

 

 

John inherited his father’s wealth in 1508, following Sir Henry Colet’s death in 1505.  In his father’s Will, John was referred to as ‘Mr John Colet, Doctor of Holy Divinity’.  He was also the executor for the Will.  Inheriting his father’s estate coincided with John being admitted into the Freedom of the Mercers’ Company of London in 1508, where his father’s money was placed in trust in order to protect it from being taken by King Henry VIII.  From 1509 to 1512, using the fortune he had inherited from his father, he developed the St Paul’s School for Boys at the cathedral which had been established many years earlier and which still exists today.

 

 

 

In 1512 he preached against the war with France and was accused of heresy by Richard Fitzjames, the Bishop of London.  Two years later he made the pilgrimage to Canterbury and in 1515 he preached at the installation of Cardinal Wolsey.  Together with Desederius Erasmus and Sir Thomas Moore, Dean John Colet was instrumental in bring about The Reformation in England, during the reign of King Henry VIII.  He owned property in Buckinghamshire, Northamptonshire, Norfolk and Huntingdon and died on 16th September 1519 at Richmond, formerly Sheen in Surrey.  He was buried on the south side of St Paul’s Cathedral, where a stone still bears his name.

 

 

 

Nearly twenty years after he had passed away the name of Dean John Colet appeared in the Chancery Proceedings 1533-1538 (ref. C 1/848/28).  The wardens and commonalty of the Mercery of London v Ralph Kyngston, gentleman, and John Nasshe.  Detention of deeds relating to land in Wendover acquired by Dean Colet for St. Paul's School.  Buckingham”.

 

 

 

 

Today in the church at Dennington in Suffolk, John’s name is included in a list of past clergymen from 1324 to 1966.  His entry reads – 1485 John Collett D.D. (Dean of St Paul’s Cathedral: Founder of St Paul’s School) and, judging by the next entry on the list, it was a position that he held up until 1519.

 

 

 

At the time of his death he entrusted the Mercers’ Company to administer and fund St Paul’s School from an endowment of property, and the Company of Mercers has continued to discharge this duty to this day.  His great friend Desederius Erasmus explained “And when Colet was asked the reason for so committing this trust to the Mercers’ Company he answered to this effect; that there was no absolute certainty in human affairs, but for his part he found less corruption in such a body of citizens than in any order or degree of mankind”.

 

 

 

John Colet spent his entire personal fortune on establishing his school, and the foundation property originally included large areas of Stepney and Buckinghamshire, along with land in the City of London.  The foundation he set up all those years ago, also established St Paul’s Girls’ School in 1904.  In 1823 Samuel Knight, the Prebendary of Ely, was the author of “The Life of Dr John Colet Dean of St Paul’s in the reigns of King Henry VII and King Henry VIII and Founder of St Paul’s School”.  One of the pages in the book sets out the family tree under the heading of The Pedigree of the Colets, as far as can be discovered by the deeds in the old family book.

 

 

 

At the head of the family tree is Richard Colet, followed by his son Robert Colet and his wife Margaret, Robert being described as “of Wendover – Burrow (borough), from 5 to 24 Hen. VI, dead before 11 Ed. IV” Robert and Margaret are depicted as having three sons Thomas, John, and Henry, and these were listed as follows: “Thomas Colet of Wendover 9 to 12 Ed. IV”; “John Colet citizen and mercer of London, died before 11 Ed. IV”; and “Sir Henry Colet, knight, citizen, mercer, alderman, sheriff and Mayor of London, occurs from 12 Ed. IV to 18 Hen. VII”

 

 

 

Thomas Colet is shown as having a son William, while John Colet had five children, and Henry Colet was shown with two, John and Richard, plus others unnamed.  William Colet, the son of Thomas, of Wendover 20 Hen. VIII was married to Kateryne, and their son, John Colet, citizen and mercer of London 17 to 24 Hen. VIII, was married to Katherine the daughter of Thomas Whall of London, salter.  The five children of John Colet were Robert Colet of London 14 Ed. IV, John, Jeffrey, Alice, and Ann.  Of the two sons of Sir Henry Colet, only the first included any detail, and he was described as John Colet, Dean of St Paul’s.

 

 

 

A footnote on the same page listed the following: Henry Colet, 5 Hen. V to 17 Hen. VI; Matthew Colet of Kymble, 24 Hen. VI who died before 29 Hen. VI, and left a widow Margaret; and John Colet of The Hale in Wendover, the son of Robert Colet of The Hale aforesaid, husbandman, deceased 32 Hen. VIII.

 

 

 

The first page relating the life of Dean John Colet commenced as follows:  “This excellent person was son and heir to Sir Henry Colet, Knight, the younger son of Robert Colet of Wendover near Aylesbury in the County of Buckinghamshire, Esquire, who was born in the county at the Manor of The Hale, near which place some of his name still continue.” (that was in 1823)

 

 

 

“His father being bred a mercer at London, did by God’s blessing upon his industry arrive at great wealth and honour; retaining always the more eminent character of a wise and honest man; and his good qualities made him soon taken notice of, and judged very fit for one of the chief offices in the city, in a time of trouble and confusion.”

 

 

 

Within the Dictionary of National Biography is the following information written about Dean John Colet:  Colet’s last Will and Testament was written on 22nd August 1518 in which there was no reference made to the Virgin Mary or to the saints, and no money was appointed for the masses for his soul.  Most of his realty (property/estate) he had previously alienated within documents dated 8th July 1511 and 10th June 1514, which had been passed to the Mercers’ Company for the endowment of St Paul’s School

 

 

 

That part of his realty that he retained, he bequeathed to his mother’s relative, Edmund Knevet, sergeant-porter to Henry VIII, and to John Colet, son of his uncle William, and small money legacies and books were assigned to his friends, Doctor Aleyn, Doctor Morgan, Thomas Lupset his amanuensis (in his employ to take dictation and copy manuscripts) and William Garrard who, with his mother and Nicholas Curleus, was an executor. 

 

 

 

His great friend and colleague Desederius Erasmus was not mentioned, but during the years prior to his death Dean John Colet had paid him a pension.  And it was Erasmus who described him as being “tall and comely”.  Another separate paragraph within the Dictionary states that Colet’s numerous manuscript treatises were left by his will at the disposition of his executors.  After many wanderings, some of these documents are now in St Paul’s School Library, while others are held at Cambridge. 

 

‘The Life of Dr John Colet Dean of St Paul’s’ by Samuel Knight of Ely (on the right) was published in London during 1724.

 

 

 

Footnote:  During the 1950s a new school was established at Wendover and given the name John Colet School.

 

 

 

 

18D16

Thomas Colet was born around 1470 and he died in 1479, following which he was buried at New Buckenham Church near Attleborough in Norfolk.

 

 

 

 

18D17

Richard Colet was born in 1479 and, with his brother Dean John Colet (above), was one of only two children of Henry and Christian to survive beyond childhood from a total family of 22 children.  In 1493 he was admitted to Lincoln’s Inn in London, and he died ten years later in 1503 at the age of 24.  He was mentioned in several documents just prior to his death which reflect his importance in the affairs of the day.  In 1500 Richard Colet was a gentleman usher supporting King Henry VII at his meeting with Archduke Philip of Austria.  That same year, on 1st May, a licence draw issued to alienate land at Little Missenden in Buckinghamshire to his father Henry Colet, knight, and Richard Colet, their heirs and assigns. 

 

 

 

Two years later he and his father were again named in a legal document dated 1st March 1502.  This stated “Pardon for £20, paid in the hanaper to Henry Colet, knight, and Richard Colet, gentleman, for acquiring Thomas Fenys, knight, Lord of Acre, the manor of Codeham in the County of Kent, without licence.”  Hanaper is a reference to the Royal Treasury into which the clerk of the Hanaper received all monies due to the Crown for sealing charters, patents, writs etc.

 

 

 

 

18E1

Robert Colet of The Hale in Wendover was most likely born there around 1485.  He died in 1541 and is known to have been married and had a son John Colet.  Like his father John Colet, Robert was also known as a citizen and mercer of Wendover.

 

 

 

18F1

John Colet

Possibly born circa 1510

 

 

 

 

18E2

JOHN COLLETT was born in Wendover around 1495 the eldest child of William and Katherine Colet.  He married (1) Katherine Wall, the daughter of Sir Thomas Wall and Alice Langston. 

 

Sir Thomas Wall (Whall) was Salter of St Botolph’s in Bishopsgate in London and of Grundisburgh, and he left a house called Bastes at Grundisburgh to Katherine his eldest daughter.  Through her marriage to John Collett, the house later passed to their eldest son Thomas Collett.

 

This picture of the 16th Century property was taken around the turn of the 21st Century.

 

 

 

On 17th August 1531 Thomas Wall made his Will (eight years before his death) which read as follows:  To my wife Alice the manors and lands in Suffolk, Essex, Kent & London.  If she yearly during her life at her costs and charges do find an honest secular priest to sing and say divine service within the church of Grundisburgh for my soul, my father's, and mother's souls at yearly stipend of £6 paid quarterly.  The remainder to John and Katherine Collett manors in Grundisburgh, Hasketon, Great Bealings, Culpho, Tuddenham and Playford.  All of these are in Suffolk, in addition to which there was reference to The Sun (an inn perhaps) and shops at St Botolph in London, given for life.

 

 

 

Upon his death in 1539 the following was stipulated:  Thomas Wall, senior citizen and salter of London, 3rd March 1539, buried in St. Botolph's, Billingsgate; to be conveyed to burial with 12 torches and 4 tapers borne by 16 poor men in their hands, the dirge to be sung by note and next day a solemn requiem to the fellowship of the salters to drink overnight and for their recreation next day if they come to mass and dirge three pounds.

 

 

 

It is possible that Alice, the wife of Thomas Wall, died within the next five years, since in 1546 the following Chantry Certificate was lodged in London.  Mr Thomas Wall gave unto John Collett and Katherine his wife, one tenement in Thames Street, called The Sonne and to William Saunderson and Jane his wife and to the longer liver of them and to their heirs and the longest liver of them upon condition that they of the profits of the same should pay yearly unto a priest six pounds to sing forever in the parish Church of Grundisburgh in the County of Suffolk and in default of keeping certain covenants the same priest to be found in the parish church of St Botolph nigh Billingsgate which priest hath not been found by the space of these two years and one quarter past.

 

 

 

John Collett, a citizen and mercer of London, who died before 1555, was posthumously Granted Arms in 1561 – see below.  Following his death Katherine married William More of Sherfield on Loddon near Basingstoke in Hampshire.  He was a relative of Sir Thomas More, and once married Katherine moved to live with him in Hampshire, where she died after 1558.  The second part of the Visitation of Suffolk in 1561 relating to John Collett is of great significance as it confirmed the names of John’s children and the married names of his daughters.  Missing from the list was his son Arthur Collett who had died in 1553.  It read as follows:

 

 

 

Collett of Grundisburgh

 

[One shield] [Tricked] Sable on a chevron between three hinds statant Argent three annulets Sable in chief a crescent Or

John Collett of London Mercer son and heir to William Collett married Katherine daughter and heir to Thomas Wall of London Salter and by her had issue Thomas Collett son and heir, William Collett second son, Michael Collett third son, Alice married to Thomas Johnson of London, Katherine married to John Gambull, Elizabeth married to Hugh Throgmerton of Warwickshire.

 

 

 

Prior to the death of Katherine More, formerly Collett, she was mentioned on two occasions in the records of the Chancery Proceedings for the period 1544 to 1551.  The first of them (ref. C 1/1144/25-27) stated:  William MORE and Katherine his wife, late the wife of John Collett, citizen and mercer of London v William COLLETT, brother of the said John.  Messuage and land in the borough, town and fields of Wendover, Buckingham.  The second (ref. C 1/1245/78-80) read as follows:  “William MORE and Katherine his wife, late the wife of John Collett, citizen and mercer of London v Thomas ALLEN, clerk, and Anne ALLEN, executors of Ralph Allen, knight, alderman of London.  Messuage and land held of the King's Manor of Wendover, and dower in lands in the borough, ‘Forens’, and parish of Wendover bequeathed by the said Collett to his younger sons.

 

 

 

18F2

THOMAS COLLETT

Born circa 1523 at Grundisburgh

 

18F3

William Collett

Born circa 1525 at Grundisburgh

 

18F4

Arthur Collett

Born circa 1526 at Grundisburgh

 

18F5

Michael Collett

Born circa 1527 at Grundisburgh

 

18F6

Alice Collett

Born circa 1529 at Grundisburgh

 

18F7

Katherine Collett

Born circa 1531 at Grundisburgh

 

18F8

Elizabeth Collett

Born circa 1533 at Grundisburgh

 

 

 

 

18E3

William Collett was born in Wendover around 1500 and he married Joan Beere, the daughter of William Beere and Elizabeth Felton.  William was alive in 1543, as he was named as the sole executor in his mother’s Will which was proved at the Archdeaconry Court of Buckinghamshire.  Also between 1538 and 1544 the name of William Collett was mentioned in Chancery Proceedings (ref. C 1/1019/43) whenNicholas KYPPYNG v William COLLET of Wendover, butcher, Debt for sheep, the officers of the liberty of Wendover being in alliance with the defendant, Buckingham”.

 

 

 

He was also mentioned on two occasions in further Chancery Proceedings 1544-1561.  It was during the period “22 April 1544 – 15 Feb 1547 (ref. C 1/1113/34-36) that William COLLETT, apprentice of London, son of John Collett of London, mercer v William COLLETT of Wendover, his uncle.  Lands in the `Forens of Wendover’, Buckingham”.  The second case was between his former sister-in-law and her husband (ref. C 1/1144/25-27) which stated:  William MORE and Katherine his wife, late the wife of John Collett, citizen and mercer of London v William COLLETT, brother of the said John.  Messuage and land in the borough, town and fields of Wendover, Buckingham. 

 

 

 

William may also have been alive in 1561, three years after his former sister-in-law Katherine (above) had passed away, since he was listed in the Visitation of Suffolk that year, in which he was described as the second son of William Collett of Wendover.  Other connections with the Felton family can be found at References 18F3 and 18G5.

 

 

 

 

18E4

Alice Collett was the daughter of William and Katherine Colet, was born in Wendover, and was still alive in 1543 when her mother died and left a Will in which she was mentioned.

 

 

 

 

18E5

Nicholas Collett was the third son of William and Katherine Colet who may have suffered a premature death.  He was born at Wendover after 1500 but was not mentioned in his mother’s Will of 1543, perhaps an indication that he had died by then.

 

 

 

 

18E7

William Collett was born in London around 1490 and was one of the eight children of John Collett, a citizen of London.  William also became a citizen of London, where he was a linen draper.  His marriage produced two sons who were both named William, the first of them, William the elder, produced no issue.

 

 

 

18F9

William Collett

Date of birth unknown in London

 

18F10

William Collett

Date of birth unknown in London

 

 

 

 

18F1

John Colet was born at The Hale in Wendover, the only known child of Robert Colet.  He was possibly born around 1510 and he was later married to Joan.  The couple took over residency of The manor of The Hale in Wendover following the death of his father in 1541.  It was therefore at Wendover that all of his children were born.  His Will was proved at the Archdeaconry Court of Buckinghamshire, a copy of which was placed in the manor chest.  At the time of his death his wife Joan was still alive, as were all four of their children.  It was John who changed the surname from Colet to Collet while, at an earlier time, the Grundisburgh branch of the family adopted the Collett spelling of the name.

 

 

 

18G1

Henry Collet

Born circa 1532 at Wendover

 

18G2

William Collet

Born circa 1534 at Wendover

 

18G3

Elizabeth Collet

Born circa 1536 at Wendover

 

18G4

Nicholas Collet

Born circa 1538 at Wendover

 

 

 

 

18F2

THOMAS COLLETT was born around 1523 and was named as the son and heir of John Collett of Grundisburgh in the second part of the Visitation of Suffolk in 1561.  Some years for that he is understood to have married Joan, that event taking place between 1550 and 1555.  He was referred to as Thomas of Grundisburgh, so it seems very likely that all of his children were born there, although there is a chance that Thomas’ first son may have been base-born and not the child of his wife Joan (see below).  The short marriage produced three certain children for the couple, before Thomas Collett died in 1558.  His Will was proved on 31st October 1558.

 

 

 

Within a year of the death of her husband Joan also died, and that happened during the first week of June 1559.  Her Will made just prior to her death on 31st May 1559 was proved on 12th June, shortly after she was buried.  The Will referred to son William and her daughters Katherine and Thomasin, who were named among the beneficiaries. 

 

 

 

Curiously in Joan’s Will, no reference was made to her husband’s eldest son John, even though he was the main beneficiary under the terms of his father’s Will in the previous year.  It is also well established that he was still alive at that time, since he died at Westerfield forty years later in 1599.  His absence from Joan’s Will may therefore indicate that John was not one of her children.  However, it has been pointed out that a widow would often not provide for one of her children in her Will, if that child had already been adequately provided for under the terms of the Will of her late husband.

 

 

 

Due to the early deaths of both parents, which happened while the children were still infants, Joan’s Will stipulated that her brother-in-law, William Collett (below), would be responsible for looking after her children.  The Will also referred to the two daughters of the said William who, it was stated, would inherit the items bequeathed to Joan’s own two daughters in the event of their death prior to reaching the age of maturity- see Will in Legal Documents.

 

 

 

It was originally believed that Thomas (of Grundisburgh) received a Grant of Arms prior to his death but this has not been verified and may be incorrect, since his brother William was granted arms in 1561.  It therefore seems highly unlikely that the Heralds would have made two visits to Grundisburgh in such a short space of time.

 

 

 

18G5

JOHN COLLETT

Born circa 1554 at Grundisburgh

 

18G6

William Collett

Born circa 1555 at Grundisburgh

 

18G7

Katherine Collett

Born circa 1556 at Grundisburgh

 

18G8

Thomasin Collett

Born circa 1557 at Grundisburgh

 

 

 

 

18F3

William Collett was born around 1525 and was named as the second son of John Collett of Grundisburgh in the second part of the Visitation of Suffolk in 1561.  He married Anne Symple on 4th October 1550 at Grundisburgh in Suffolk, which is just north of Ipswich and west of Woodbridge.  Anne was born at Hackney around 1530.  A few years earlier the unmarried William was also mentioned in the Chancery Proceedings 1544-1561.  It was during the period “22 April 1544 – 15 Feb 1547 (ref. C 1/1113/34-36) that William COLLETT, apprentice of London, son of John Collett of London, mercer v William COLLETT of Wendover, his uncle.  As William Collett of Grundisburgh he received a Grant of Arms in 1561 – see below.  The third part of the Visitation of Suffolk in 1561 related to William Collett and read as follows:

 

 

 

Collett of Grundisburgh

 

[One shield] [Tricked] Sable on a chevron between three hinds statant Argent three annulets Sable in chief a crescent Or

William Collett of Gromesborough in the County of Suffolk gentleman married Anne Symple daughter to Symple of Hackney and by her hath issue William son and heir, and William second son, Dorothy, and Alice.  The herald’s visitation made no mention of the fact that William also had responsibility for the four children of his brother Thomas (above), into whose care they were given when they were orphaned in 1559.

 

 

 

What is of interest here is that the later Grant of Arms to Anthony Collett (Ref. 18H8) and Samuel Collett (Ref. 18I9) in 1664 were almost identical to that of William.  In the past there has been an assumption that John Collett (Ref. 18G5), Anthony’s father, may have been the base-born son of William, rather than of Thomas (above).  However, that theory seems to be disproved by Thomas’ Will of 1558, in which he named his eldest son as John, the main beneficiary to his estate.

 

 

 

In an earlier version of this family line there was also an assumption that the first born son of William and Anne Symple must have died as an infant, in order for the second born son to be given the same name.  The Visitation of Suffolk in 1561 (above) clearly proved that not to be the case, as evidenced that William and Anne gave the name William to their first two sons, and both of them survived beyond their childhood.

 

 

 

William Collett was a linen draper and a gentleman of Grundisburgh, where he died in 1569.  Ten years prior to his death he was charged with bringing up his brother’s children under the terms of the Will of his sister-in-law Joan Collett (above) for which he received all the profits, commodities and revenues of her estate at Burgh and Hasketon – see Will in Legal Documents.  Hasketon and Burgh (referred to as Burgh Cronisburgh) lie close to Grundisburgh.

 

 

 

This presumably meant that William’s wife Anne was left with the responsible for the children until they reached the age of maturity.  It is interesting to note that the age of the orphaned children of Thomas and Joan Collett was virtually the same as the age of her own children in each case.  However, it is known that the widow Anne Collett was eventually married, for a second time, to Mr R Felton.  He was very likely a relative of Elizabeth Felton whose daughter Joan Beere married William Collett the brother of her father-in-law.  Other connections with the Felton family can be found at references 18E3 and 18G5. 

 

 

 

William was referred to as “friend William Collett of Wetheringsett” in the Will of John Dameron the father-in-law of William’s nephew John Collett (Ref. 18G5), who married John Dameron’s daughter Joan.  It is also believed that William, on taking over the care of the four orphaned children of his brother Thomas Collett (above) in the latter part of 1559, may have appropriated the inheritance of the eldest son John.  That belief may be borne out by the fact that John Collett was penniless when he married Joan Dameron.

 

 

 

18G9

William Collett

Born circa 1552 at Grundisburgh

 

18G10

William Collett

Born circa 1553 at Grundisburgh

 

18G11

Dorothy Collett

Born circa 1555 at Grundisburgh

 

18G12

Alice Collett

Born on 17.11.1556 at Grundisburgh

 

 

 

 

18F4

Arthur Collett was born around 1526, but only survived for 27 years, when he died in 1553.  His brother Michael Collett (below) was a witness at the signing of Arthur’s Will.

 

 

 

 

18F5

Michael Collett was born around 1527 and he died after the Visitation of Suffolk in 1561, in which he was named as a son of John Collett of Grundisburgh.  Michael was also a witness to the making of the Will of his brother Arthur Collett (above) just prior to his death in 1553.

 

 

 

 

18F6

Alice Collett was born around 1529 and she married later Thomas Johnson of London.  Alice died sometime after 1561, since she was listed under her married name, as the daughter of John Collett of Grundisburgh, in the Visitation of Suffolk in 1561.

 

 

 

 

18F7

Katherine Collett was born around 1531 and she later married John Gambull.  Katherine died sometime after 1561, since she too was listed under her married name, in the Visitation of Suffolk in 1561.

 

 

 

 

18F8

Elizabeth Collett was born around 1533 and she married Hugh Throgmorton of Warwickshire.  As with her two sisters (above), Elizabeth also died after 1561, since she was also listed in the Visitation of Suffolk in 1561 under her married name.

 

 

 

 

18F10

William Collett, the younger, whose date of birth is not known, was born in London, the second son of that name of William Collett, a citizen of London and a linen draper.  William had eight children according to 'Pedigrees of English Families’ by Sir Henry St George, with the first three, all named William, not surviving to adulthood.

 

 

 

18G13

William Collett

Infant death possibly in London

 

18G14

William Collett

Infant death possibly in London

 

18G15

William Collett

Possibly born in London

 

18G16

Nathaniel Collett

Possibly born in London

 

18G17

John Collett

Possibly born in London

 

18G18

Henry Collett

Possibly born in London

 

18G19

Lastly Collett

Possibly born in London

 

18G20

Joan Collett

Possibly bapt 25.12.1551 at St Michael Cornhill

 

 

 

 

18G1

Henry Collet was the eldest child of John and Joan Collet who was born at The Hale in Wendover, possibly around 1532.  He was certainly alive in 1541 when his father died, as he and his three siblings (below) and their mother were named in his Will.  Henry later married Agnes of Welford in Northamptonshire and they had seven children at The Hale whose years of birth below are only estimates.  He was a Yeoman of The Hale in Wendover which, as the eldest son, he took over from his father upon his death, and it was there that he lived until he died in 1589.  His Will was proved at Canterbury on 9th June 1589.  His wife survived him by almost twenty-seven years when the Will of widow Agnes Collet of The Haile (sic) was proved at the Archdeaconry Court in Buckinghamshire during 1616.  That document referred to her son John and the children of three of her four daughters.

 

 

 

18H1

John Collet

Born circa 1566 at Wendover

 

18H2

Henry Collet

Born circa 1568 at Wendover

 

18H3

Michael Collet

Born circa 1570 at Wendover

 

18H4

Isobel Collet

Born circa 1572 at Wendover

 

18H5

Mary Collet

Born circa 1574 at Wendover

 

18H6

a daughter Collet

Born circa 1576 at Wendover

 

18H7

a daughter Collet

Born circa 1578 at Wendover

 

 

 

 

18G2

William Collet was born at The Hale in Wendover around 1534 and was alive in 1541 when his father John Collet died that year.

 

 

 

 

18G3

Elizabeth Collet was born at The Hale in Wendover around 1536 and was alive in 1541 when her father John Collet died that year.  It is also established that she was later married to become Elizabeth Playter.

 

 

 

 

18G4

Nicholas Collet was born at The Hale in Wendover around 1538 and was alive in 1541 when his father John Collet died that year. 

 

 

 

 

18G5

JOHN COLLETT was born at Grundisburgh around 1554 and may have been the base-born so of Thomas Collett.  Upon the death of his father in 1558, John received an inheritance through the Will.  However, it is believed that when, upon the death of his mother in 1559, John was taken into the family of his uncle William Collett (Ref. 18F3), that the young John had his inheritance taken from him by his ‘wicked uncle’.  As a result, John Collett was penniless when he married Joan Dameron in November 1577 at Westerfield near Ipswich.  It is a known fact that Joan did marry a John Collett, but it has yet to be proved that the John in question was this particular one.  The Will of John Dameron (see below) is perhaps an indication that it could be.

 

 

 

Joan was baptised at Westerfield on 25th April 1557 and was the daughter of Lord of the Manor of Westerfield, John Dameron and his wife Margaret Felton.  John Dameron died on 1st March 1597 and his sole heir was his daughter Joan, who was referred to as Johanna.  However, through her father’s Will, Joan’s mother Margaret inherited the Manor House at Westerfield under the terms of the 1596 Will of her husband John Dameron to whom it had been previously bequeathed by her husband’s father William Dameron, who had purchased it from Anthony Bedingfield in 1552.  The said John Dameron and his brother George Dameron were the named executors of their father’s Will which was made in 1558.  see Will in Legal Documents

 

 

 

John Dameron’s Will of 1st February 1596 also made his wife Margaret responsible for bringing up the children of his daughter Joan and her husband John Collett.  Their children named in the Will were Anthony Collett, John, Dameron Collett, Martha Collett, Abigail Collett, Philologus Collett and Edith (Edny) Collett.  Margaret Dameron was also charged with ensuring that they, and their mother Joan Collett nee Dameron the testator’s daughter, had sufficient meat, drink, clothes and lodgings.

 

 

 

Sadly Joan Dameron was mentally defective from birth and her father, having no sons of his own, wanted her to be married so that her children could inherit the Dameron estate.  In his Will, John Dameron made reference to his friend William Collett of Wetheringsett, the foster-father of his future son-in-law John Collett.

 

 

 

John Dameron’s Will also made allowance that, upon the death of his wife, the Manor House of Westerfield should pass to his daughter’s eldest son Anthony Collett upon reaching the age of twenty-one, and to the heirs of his body.  Failing these, the remainder to go to Philologus Collett, his brother, Dameron Collett, and Martha Collett, sister of the said Anthony.

 

 

 

The mental state of Joan, and her competency to manage her father’s estate, was raised by Chancery in court on 5th March 1601 in the reign of Queen Elizabeth.  A brief summary of the court proceedings, together with the Return of the Inquest at Ipswich on 10th June that year, can be found under ‘1601 Chancery File for Joan Dameron’ in Legal Documents.  What was interesting in that document was the reference to the cottage and lands at Westerfield called Keelings.  In later generations of this family, Keeling was used as a Christian name on two occasions.

 

 

 

An earlier version of this family line gave the name of John Dameron’s wife as Margaret Phesse.  However, it now seems very likely that his wife was in fact Margaret Felton, as indicated by the Feltham family history records in which all of the children of John and Margaret are listed.

 

 

 

There is also the possibility that John first married Margaret Phesse who died shortly after, allowing John to then marry Margaret Felton.  Other connections with the Felton family can be found at references 18E3 and 18F3.

 

 

 

John Collett died at Westerfield on 24th March 1600, where he was buried that same day.  His Will made on 4th March 1599 was proved on 5th June 1600.  Only three of John’s eight children were beneficiaries under the terms of his Will, along with his wife, and they were his daughters Dameron and Edith, and son John - see Will in Legal Documents.  John’s wife Joan Collett nee Dameron died in 1613 and was buried on 13th February 1613.  Both John and Joan were buried at Westerfield, where all of their children were also born and baptised.

 

 

 

18H8

Anthony Collett

Born in 1578 at Westerfield

 

18H9

John Dameron Collett

Born on 22.10.1579 at Westerfield

 

18H10

Dameron Collett

Born circa 1581 at Westerfield

 

18H11

Martha Collett

Baptised on 10.11.1582 at Westerfield

 

18H12

Abigail Collett

Baptised on 01.12.1584 at Westerfield

 

18H13

PHILOLOGUS COLLETT

Baptised on 30.10.1586 at Westerfield

 

18H14

John Collett

Baptised on 23.04.1588 at Westerfield

 

18H15

Edith Collett

Baptised on 02.03.1589 at Westerfield

 

 

 

 

18G6

William Collett was born at Grundisburgh around 1555.  By the middle of 1559 he was an orphan and the 1559 Will of his mother Joan Collett stated that he and his two named sisters (below) should be brought up by their uncle William Collett (Ref. 18F3).  The Will also made provision for him to inherit four houses on reaching the age of twenty-one, together with two bedsteads and two great chests from the chapel chamber - see Will in Legal Documents.  Whilst it is established that his older brother John Collett (above) was alive up until 1599, no such records exist for William, or his sisters Katherine Collett and Thomasin Collett (below). 

 

 

 

With no burial records having been found for any of the three siblings, it may be worth noting that in the period up to 1566 sweating sickness was rife and, as a result, the population of the country fell by six percent.  In addition to that, there was a flu epidemic around that time which killed more than one in twenty of the population.  Furthermore, in some towns, for example at Loughborough in Leicestershire, there was a reluctance to bury plague victims in the churchyard, and because of that many burials were unregistered.

 

 

 

 

18G7

Katherine Collett was born at Grundisburgh around 1556.  As with her brother William (above) and sister Thomasin (below), Katherine was made an orphan in June 1559, when she was placed in the care of her uncle William Collett.  Under the terms of the Will of her mother, Katherine inherited one cow, a set of three plates, dishes, cups, saucers and a charger, the best bed and covers, the greatest chest, and some jewellery - see Will in Legal Documents.

 

 

 

 

18G8

Thomasin Collett was born at Grundisburgh around 1557, but was an orphan by the time she was two years old.  Following the death of her mother in June 1559, she and her brother William and her sister Katherine (above) were placed in the care of their uncle William Collett.  Under the terms of the Will of her mother, Thomasin inherited one cow, a set of three plates, dishes, cups, saucers and a charger, the next best bed and covers, and a gold and ruby ring - see Will in Legal Documents.

 

 

 

 

18G9

William Collett, who may have been Matthew William Collett, was born around 1552 and was the eldest son of William Collett of Grundisburgh and his wife Anne Symple.  He was later married to Anne with whom he was known to have had four daughters and a son, and all of them were born at Grundisburgh.  It seems rather strange that, while his two sisters were beneficiaries in the Will of his aunt Joan Collett (Ref. 18F2), William was not.  His exclusion from the Will as the eldest son may be for the same reason that her own first born son was also excluded from her Will.

 

 

 

18H16

John Collett

Born circa 1573 at Grundisburgh

 

18H17

Alice Collett

Born on 20.11.1574 at Grundisburgh

 

18H18

Marie Collett

Baptised on 16.02.1576 at Grundisburgh

 

18H19

Cecily Collett

Baptised on 28.08.1579 at Grundisburgh

 

18H20

Elizabeth Collett

Baptised on 07.09.1583 at Grundisburgh

 

 

 

 

18G10

William Collett was born around 1553 and was the second son of William Collett and Anne Symple to be named William.  It is known that he was married, and that the marriage produced issue.

 

 

 

18H21

William Collett

Date of birth unknown; infant death

 

18H22

William Collett

Date of birth unknown; infant death

 

18H23

William Collett

Date of birth unknown; infant death

 

18H24

Nathaniel Collett

Date of birth unknown

 

18H25

John Collett

Date of birth unknown

 

18H26

Henry Collett

Date of birth unknown

 

18H27

Joan Collett

Date of birth unknown

 

 

 

 

18G11

Dorothy Collett was born at Grundisburgh around 1555 and was mentioned in the Will of her aunt Joan Collett (Ref. 18F2) who died in June 1559.  Just as it did for her younger sister Alice (below), the Will made provision for Dorothy to inherit the items originally left to Joan’s youngest daughter in the event of her not surviving beyond childhood.  In addition to that, Dorothy was bequeathed one weaning calf (see Will in Legal Documents).  It is understood that Dorothy was married in 1575.

 

 

 

 

18G12

Alice Collett was born at Grundisburgh on 17th November 1556, where she was baptised on 30th November 1556 the daughter of William and Anne Collett.  Alice and her older sister Dorothy (above) were named in the 1559 Will of their aunt Joan Collett (Ref. 18F2).  The Will made provision for Alice to inherit the items originally left to Joan’s oldest daughter in the event of her not surviving beyond childhood.  In addition, Alice was bequeathed one weaning calf (see Will in Legal Documents).  Sometime after 1576 Alice married George Payne of Rushmere St Andrew near Ipswich.  Shortly after they were married Alice gave birth to a son Nicholas Payne who later married Cecily Collett (Ref. 18H19) the daughter of Alice’s brother William (above).

 

 

 

 

18H1

John Collet was born at The Hale in Wendover around 1566, the eldest child of Henry and Agnes Collet.  He attained full age in 1587 when he was mentioned in the Manorial Court of the Manor of The Hale on 27th April 1587.  He was also listed in his father’s Will of 1589.  John was sworn of the homage of the Manor of The Hale in 1593, 1601 and again in 1620.  On 4th April 1615 an indenture was made between Henry Baldwin and John Collet a yeoman of the hamlet of Hale in the village of Wendover with regard to land at Halton near Wendover.  Although no record of his marriage, his death, or the baptism of his children has been found, it is established from the 1616 Will of his mother Agnes that his marriage produced six children as all of them and John Collet were mentioned therein.  It is also known that John was still alive in 1620, as confirmed above.

 

 

 

18I1

John Collet

Born circa 1599 at Wendover

 

18I2

Joseph Collet

Born circa 1601 at Wendover

 

18I3

Joan Collet

Born circa 1603 at Wendover

 

18I4

Martha Collet

Born circa 1605 at Wendover

 

18I5

Elizabeth Collet

Born circa 1607 at Wendover

 

18I6

Rebecca Collet

Born circa 1609 at Wendover

 

 

 

 

18H2

Henry Collet was born at The Hale in Wendover around 1568, the son of Henry and Agnes Collet.  All that is currently known about him is that he was still alive when his father died in 1589.

 

 

 

 

18H3

Michael Collet was born at The Hale in Wendover around 1570, the third son of Henry and Agnes Collet.  He had not reached his twenty-first birthday when he was named in his father’s Will of 1589.

 

 

 

 

18H4

Isobel Collet was born at The Hale in Wendover around 1572, one of the four daughters of Henry and Agnes Collet.  She was later married when she became Isobel Randall and had two children John Randall and Ellen Randall who were named in the 1616 Will of Isobel’s mother Agnes Collet.

 

 

 

 

18H5

A Collet daughter was born at The Hale in Wendover around 1574, one of the four daughters of Henry and Agnes Collet.  She was later married to William Arnott and was named in the 1616 Will of Mary’s mother Agnes Collet.

 

 

 

 

18H6

A Collet daughter, whose date of birth may have been around 1576, was another daughter of Henry and Agnes Collet.  It is understood that she later married and, as Mrs Duncombe, she had a daughter Agnes Duncombe who was named after her grandmother in whose Will of 1616 she was listed.

 

 

 

 

18H7

Mary Collet, whose date of birth again is not known but may have been born around 1578, was yet another unnamed daughter of Henry and Agnes Collett.  She later married Richard White on 22nd June 1612 at St Mary’s in Wendover with whom she had a daughter Mary White who was born prior to the death of her grandmother, as she was named in the 1616 Will of Agnes Collet.

 

 

 

 

18H8

Anthony Collett was born at Westerfield in 1578, the eldest child of John Collett and Joan Dameron.  His father died in March 1600, but Anthony was not even mentioned in the Will, nor was he instructed as the executor, a duty that was given to his sister Dameron Collett (below).  The reason for that might have something to do with his inheritance from his grandfather, described below.  Shortly after reaching his twenty-first birthday, and probably following the death of his father in 1600, Anthony inherited the Manor House at Westerfield from his grandfather John Dameron which had been left in trust with his grandmother.

 

 

 

He married Elizabeth Jesmond on 10th November 1601 at St Peter Mancroft in Norwich, where the couple’s first two sons were baptised.  Elizabeth was born around 1570 and was the daughter of John Jesmond of Norwich.  It is under understood that the couple also had a daughter, but no details are available at this time.

 

 

 

Anthony was the first Collett to become Lord of the Manor at Westerfield when he inherited the Manor House, pictured here in more recent times.

 

He died on 11th August 1640 and was buried at Westerfield on 14th August 1640, at which time the Manor House passed to his only surviving son Anthony.

 

As Anthony Collett of Westerfield, he was given Grant of Arms by the College of Arms in London, which was also given in 1664 to Anthony’s surviving son and his nephew Samuel Collett (Ref. 18I9), the son of his brother Philologus Collett.

 

 

 

The Harleian Society’s published details of the Arms read as follows:  “COLLETT, Anthony, of Westerfield, Suffolk, and to Samuel son of Philologus, second brother of Anthony and deceased 14 Aug 1644.  Harl. MS. 1105, fo.38 and 39b; Crispe’s Frag. Gen., i., 57; Bysshe’s Grants, 32, by Bysshe, clar. (as Collett).”

 

 

 

The Arms was also documented within Burke’s General Armoury as follows:

“Collett (Westerfield, county of Suffolk, granted).  Sable on a chevron engrailed between three hinds trippant Argent as many annulets of the first.  Crest; A hind’s head couped Argent gorged with a collar engrailed Sable (another) a hind statant Argent”

 

 

 

18I7

John Collett

Baptised on 26.04.1603 at Norwich

 

18I8

Peter Collett

Baptised on 06.01.1604 at Norwich

 

18I9

Anthony Collett

Baptised on 04.12.1614 at Westerfield

 

 

 

 

18H9

John Dameron Collett was born at Westerfield on 22nd October 1579, and it was there also that he was baptised on 2nd November 1579, the second child of John Collett and Joan Dameron.  He died at Ipswich on 27th October 1582 at the age of three, and was buried the same day at Westerfield.

 

 

 

 

18H10

Dameron Collett was born circa 1581 at Westerfield where she married Edward Mann on 25th April 1600 (or 1609).  Edward was the son of Robert and Mary Mann and was baptised at Westerfield on 15th June 1572.  Dameron Mann died in 1627 and was buried on 15th June 1627, while Edward died in 1635 and was buried on 27th March 1635.  Both were buried at Westerfield, where all of their nine children were born and baptised.  Just a month before she was married her father died, and when his Will was proved in June 1600, Dameron Collett was one of only three of her father’s eight children to benefit from his estate.  Even at the tender age of just less than twenty years, and despite having one older brother, Anthony, alive at that time, it was Dameron who was made the executor of her father’s Will.  See Will in Legal Documents

 

 

 

 

18H11

Martha Collett was born at Westerfield and baptised there on 10th November 1582.  She was 17 years old when her father died, but was not mentioned in his Will.  She later married Samuel Jellow of Bury St Edmunds at Westerfield on 7th May 1612.

 

 

 

 

18H12

Abigail Collett was born at Westerfield where she was baptised on 1st December 1584, the daughter of John Collett and Joan Dameron, although another source says the month was November.  It is also known that she later married Miles Edgar at Westerfield during 1605 and, perhaps it was through that association that, twelve years later, Abigail’s brother Philologus Collett (below) married Dorcas Edgar, the sister of Miles Edgar.  It would appear from the records that Abigail was not married to Miles for very long, since he later married Dorothy Richmond, who was the daughter of Robert Richmond, of Hedenhall Hall in Norfolk, and his wife Katherine Prettyman.  At some time in his life Miles Edgar of Cranley Hall in Eye was the Principal Burgess of Eye.

 

 

 

 

18H13

PHILOLOGUS COLLETT was baptised at Westerfield on 30th October 1586, the son of John and Joan Collett.  The name Philologus means ‘lover of words’.  He was 13 years old when his father died but, strangely, Philologus was not mentioned in his Will.  He married his much younger sister-in-law Dorcas Edgar on 6th August 1617 at Dennington, near Framlingham in Suffolk.  Dorcas was the daughter of Henry Edgar, the Churchwarden of Dennington, and his wife Bridget Docker.  Dorcas was baptised at Uggeshall on 27th February 1598, and her older brother Miles Edgar married Philologus’ sister Abigail (above) when she was only seven years old.  All of the children of Philologus and Dorcas were born and baptised at Westerfield.

 

 

 

Philologus Collett was named in the Chancery court proceedings of 10th June 1601 relating to the mental state of his mother Joan Collett nee Dameron and her competency to manage the estate inherited from her father (see Legal Documents).  Dorcas Collett nee Edgar died in 1641 and was buried at Westerfield on 25th September 1641, the burial record confirming that she was the wife of Philologus Collet (sic).  It was also there that Philologus Collett was buried five and a half years later on 7th March 1647, which was curiously the same date that his Will was also proved, the Will having been made on 7th November 1646.  Fifteen years after his death, at the time of the death of his eldest daughter Bridget Collett in 1662, she was described as the daughter of Philologus Collett, a woollen draper.

 

 

 

18I10

Bridget Collett

Born in 1618 at Westerfield

 

18I11

Dorcas Collett

Born in 1622 at Westerfield

 

18I12

Philologus Collett

Born in 1625 at Westerfield

 

18I13

John Collett

Born in 1627 at Westerfield

 

18I14

Benjamin Collett

Born in 1629 at Westerfield

 

18I15

Samuel Collett

Born in 1631 at Westerfield

 

18I16

Mary Collett

Born in 1633 at Westerfield

 

18I17

John Collett

Born in 1634 at Westerfield

 

18I18

Philologus Collett

Born in 1636 at Westerfield

 

18I19

HENRY COLLETT

Born in 1638 at Westerfield

 

18I20

Martha Collett

Born in 1641 at Westerfield

 

 

 

 

18H14

John Collett was born at Westerfield on 23rd April 1588 and was baptised there on 25th April 1588, the youngest son of John Collett and Joan Dameron.  He was only twelve years old when his father died in March 1600, and he was only one of three of the eight children to be mentioned in the Will.  see Will in Legal Document

 

 

 

For the continuation of this family line see Part 19 – The Oxfordshire International Line.

 

 

 

 

18H15

Edith Collett was born Westerfield where she was baptised on 2nd March 1589, the youngest of the eight known children of John Collett and Joan Dameron.  Edith, together with her mother, sister Dameron Collett, and brother John Collett (both above), were the only members of the family named in the Will of John Collett who died in March 1600.

 

 

 

 

18H16

John Collett was born at Grundisburgh around 1573, the son of William Collett.  He later married Joan at nearby Westerfield. 

 

 

 

 

18H18

Marie Collett was baptised on 16th February 1576 at Grundisburgh, the daughter of William Collett.  She married George Gurney on 15th January 1601 at Wetheringsett near Mendlesham.

 

 

 

 

18H19

Cecily Collett was baptised at Grundisburgh on 28th August 1579, the daughter of William Collett.  She later married her cousin Nicholas Payne of Rushmere St Andrew.  Nicholas was the son of George Payne and Alice Collett (Ref. 18G12).

 

 

 

 

18I1

John Collet was born at The Hale in Wendover, possibly around 1599 and it is known he was certainly alive in 1616 as he was named in his grandmother’s Will that year.  He was very likely the eldest of the six children of John Collet and his unnamed wife.  John Collet of The Hale married Mary Pedder at St Mary’s Church in Wendover on 31st May 1627, their marriage producing seven known children.  John Collet was sworn of the homage of the Manor of The Hale in 1649 and again in 1651, and received mercers’ grants in 1655 but died within the next seven years.  Like her husband, Mary Collet nee Pedder also died sometime prior to 1662.

 

 

 

18J1

John Collet

Born in 1628 at Wendover

 

18J2

Mary Collet

Born in 1629 at Wendover

 

18J3

Anne Collet

Born in 1631 at Wendover

 

18J4

Hester Collet

Born in 1634 at Wendover

 

18J5

Rebecca Collet

Born in 1636 at Wendover

 

18J6

Joseph Collet

Born circa 1638 at Wendover

 

18J7

Edmund Collet

Born circa 1640 at Wendover

 

 

 

 

18I2

Joseph Collet was born at The Hale in Wendover around 1601, another son of John Collet who was mentioned in the 1616 Will of his grandmother Agnes Collet.  He was later a yeoman of Whitchurch, near Aylesbury, and he married Amy Wills at Aston Clinton on 1st February 1625 with whom he had five daughters.  Joseph Collet died in 1679 and his Will was proved on 21st February that year at the Archdeaconry Court in Buckinghamshire.  His wife Amy Collet nee Willis died shortly after and her Will was also proved there on 17th May 1680.  Joseph’s Will was made in 1678 and named his wife Amy and his son-in-law Edward Hall, who were also appointed as the joint executors, while his own children were not named.  In addition to a stone slab in the floor of the south aisle in the church at Whitchurch which bears the name of Joseph Collet, his name is also inscribed around the base of the font as the Churchwarden in 1661.

 

 

 

It was the Will of Amy Collet nee Wills her grandsons were named as Thomas Piddington, John and Joseph and Thomas Simon, while her granddaughters were Elizabeth Simon, Rebecca Hall and Martha Harding.  The Will also confirmed that her daughter Martha (Collet) was the wife of Daniel Harding, and that Edward Hall and John Simon, the appointed executors, were the husbands of two other daughters.  With no mention of a fifth son-in-law it is possible one of her daughter did not reach full age.  The order of the five children listed below is based on the order in which they were married, their year of birth being an estimated date.

 

 

 

Following his death Joseph Collett was buried at Whitchurch on 9th February 1679, while his daughter Mary Collet was buried there on 27th March 1680 and less than one month later his wife Amy was buried there on 22nd April 1680 perhaps the pair of them suffering from the same illness.

 

 

 

18J8

a Collet daughter married Edward Hall

Born circa 1627 at Whitchurch

 

18J9

Elizabeth Collet

Born circa 1630 at Whitchurch

 

18J10

Rebecca Collet

Born circa 1634 at Whitchurch

 

18J11

Mary Collet

Died in March 1680 at Whitchurch

 

18J12

Martha Collet

Born circa 1645 at Whitchurch

 

 

 

 

18I3

Joan Collet was born at The Hale in Wendover around 1603 the eldest daughter of John Collet who was mentioned in the 1616 Will of her grandmother Agnes Collet.  It was eight years later that she married John Dudley at St Mary’s Church in Wendover on 20th April 1624.

 

 

 

 

18I4

Martha Collet was born at The Hale in Wendover around 1605 another daughter of John Collet and his unnamed wife.  Like her three sisters below Martha was also one of the many grandchildren referred to the 1616 Will of Agnes Collet.

 

 

 

 

18I5

Elizabeth Collet was born at The Hale in Wendover around 1607 and was mentioned in the 1616 Will of Agnes Collet, her grandmother.

 

 

 

 

18I6

Rebecca Collet was born at The Hale in Wendover around 1609, one of the six children of John Collet.  All that is currently known about Rebecca is that she was alive in 1616 as her named was included in her grandmother’s Will that year.

 

 

 

 

18I7

John Collett was baptised at St Peter Mancroft in Norwich on 26th April 1603, the son of Anthony Collett and Elizabeth Jesmond.  All that is known about John is that he died while in Ireland, and that his passing happened prior to the death of his father in August 1640; also that he had no issue.

 

 

 

 

18I9

Anthony Collett was baptised at Westerfield on 4th December 1614.  Following the death of his father Anthony Collett on 11th August 1640, Anthony inherited Westerfield Manor.  That would have been around the time he married Elizabeth Manning, the daughter of William Manning of Knodishall.  There was apparently a dispute concerning the estate left by Anthony’s father.  Amongst the Exchequer Depositions of 1641 there are particulars of “an action taken by Lionel Cooke against the bailiffs of Ipswich, as to whether the capital messuage in Westerfield, lately belonging to Anthony Collett deceased, was within the liberty of Ipswich or not”.

 

 

 

Four years after his father’s death Anthony received a Grant of Arms during the Suffolk Visitation of 1664.  Anthony Collett died in 1677 and was buried at Westerfield on 14th February 1677.  His Will of 11th February 1677 was proved on 7th May 1678, at which time Westerfield Manor was then passed onto his only son Cornelius.  Following the death of her husband, Anthony’s widow Elizabeth Collett married Bence Dowsing, gent of Alderton.  However, that marriage only lasted for a short while, when she died during 1681.  It is of interest that in the July of the previous year Elizabeth’s son Cornelius married Elizabeth Dowsing, the daughter of Bence Dowsing and his second wife.

 

 

 

The Will of Elizabeth Collett was written on 7th February 1681, and was proved at Ipswich on 21st October 1682, in which she was described as ‘the daughter of William Manning of Knodishall’.  Anthony and Elizabeth are believed to have had a seventh child and sixth daughter, Keturah Collett, about whom nothing is known at this time.

 

 

 

18J13

Elizabeth Collett

Born circa 1640 at Westerfield

 

18J14

Cornelius Collett

Born circa 1642 at Westerfield

 

18J15

Anne Collett

Born circa 1644 at Westerfield

 

18J16

Mary Collett

Born circa 1646 at Westerfield

 

18J17

Rebecca Collett

Born circa 1649 at Westerfield

 

18J18

Candace Collett

Born circa 1652 at Westerfield

 

 

 

 

18I10

Bridget Collett was born at Westerfield in 1618, but was baptised at Dennington on 8th December 1619, the eldest child of Philologus Collett and Dorcas Edgar.  She never married and was buried at St Saviour’s Church in Southwark in London, following her death on 23rd September 1662, when she was described as the daughter of Philologus Collett a woollen draper.  She was credited with establishing a school at Westerfield.  The Will of Bridget Collett, made on the day she died, is available to view, but is very difficult to read.  The Will was proved on 9th July 1663, in which the main subject matter is that the bulk of her estate, including the rents from various cottages in Suffolk, be used to establish the first school at Westerfield for the poor children of the village.

 

 

 

Bridget’s estate must have been considerable, and wisely invested over three centuries, since it was still benefiting the local community in Westerfield towards the end of the twentieth century.  The son of the vicar received £300 from the fund towards the cost of the books for his course of studies.

 

 

 

 

18I11

Dorcas Collett was born at Westerfield on 5th November 1622, the daughter of Philologus and Dorcas Collett.  She later married Henry Spenny in 1662 and died sometime thereafter.

 

 

 

 

18I12

Philologus Collett was born at Westerfield on 2nd March 1625 where he was baptised on 2nd November 1625, the eldest son of Philologus and Dorcas Collett.  And it was also at Westerfield where he died and where he was buried at the age of nine years on 5th August 1634, when he was described as the son of Philologus Collet (sic).

 

 

 

 

18I13

John Collett was born at Westerfield on 10th December 1627, but tragically died that same day and was buried there, when he was recorded as John the son of Philologus Collet (sic).

 

 

 

 

18I14

Benjamin Collett was born at Westerfield around 1629 and was named in the Will of his father Philologus Collett who died in 1647.  So from that document we know that Benjamin Collett was still alive at nearly twenty years of age.

 

 

 

 

18I15

Samuel Collett was born at Westerfield on 12th April 1631, the son of Philologus Collett and Dorcas Edgar.  He married Elizabeth Fox on 3nd June 1669 at Dallinghoo just north of Woodbridge in Suffolk.  Elizabeth was born at Dallinghoo around 1647.  She was the daughter of William and Catherine Fox of Hollesley, and the sister of Martha Fox who married Cornelius Collett (Ref. 18J14).  All of their children listed below were born at Westerfield, but it seems there were many more who did not survive.

 

 

 

At some time during his life, Samuel was responsible for the building of Westerfield Hall, pictured here.

 

He received a Grant of Arms during the Suffolk Visitation in 1664, all as described under his uncle’s name Anthony Collett (Ref. 18H8).

 

Samuel Collett died on 24th April 1681 and was buried at Westerfield on 8th May 1681. 

 

 

 

His Will of 21st April 1681 was proved on 21st November 1681 in which there was a reference to ‘the eldest son of brother Henry Collett’ – that possibly being Henry Collett (Ref. 18J22), if he was alive in 1681, or if not it may have been a reference to his younger brother John Collett (Ref. 18J24).  The reference above, to there being more than the three children listed below, results from the memorial stone in Westerfield Church for their son Samuel who died in 1710, the inscription on which includes a statement concerning the prior passing of his four brothers and four sisters, but without any names.

 

 

 

18J19

Samuel Collett

Born in 1671 at Westerfield

 

18J20

Elizabeth Collett

Born circa 1675 at Westerfield

 

18J21

Mary Collett

Baptised on 10.04.1681 at Westerfield

 

 

 

 

18I16

Mary Collett was born at Westerfield around 1633, and was the daughter of Philologus and Dorcas Collett.  Her omission from her father’s Will of 1647 suggests that she had died sometime during the intervening years.

 

 

 

 

18I17

John Collett was born at Westerfield on 25th November 1634, the son of Philologus and Dorcas Collett.  It is established that he was married to Elizabeth Baldock at St Marys Church in Tubbenham, near Mildenhall in Suffolk, and that the marriage took place during September 1666.  It is also known that he was alive at the time his older brother Samuel made his Will in 1681, since John was mentioned therein.  It was in fact two years later, that John Collett, the son of Philologus, died on 3rd August 1683.  It is understood the marriage of John and Elizabeth did produce a number of children for the couple but, to date, no details are known.

 

 

 

 

18I18

Philologus Collett was born at Westerfield on 19th May 1636, the son of Philologus and Dorcas Collett.  He was their second child to be given his father’s name, following the death of his older brother, of the same name, who died at Westerfield in 1634.

 

 

 

 

18I19

HENRY COLLETT was born at Westerfield on 22nd April 1638, the son of Philologus and Dorcas Collett.  He married Ann Bishop on 24th October 1667 at Rishangles south of Eye in Suffolk.  Ann was baptised on 29th July 1628 at Thorndon, the next village to Rishangles, and was the daughter of John and Anna Bishop (Byshope). 

 

 

 

Henry and Ann are known to have had children, and in particular an older son, since the Will of Henry’s brother Samuel Collett (above) makes reference to the eldest son of Henry.  In searching for him, one unconfirmed source declares that Henry Collett was born at Eye, where he was baptised on the same date as his sister Katherine, and that he was the son of Henry Collett of Westerfield.  Henry Collett died around 1679 at Eye near Diss in Norfolk, where his daughter Katherine and son John are certainly known to have been born.

 

 

 

18J22

Henry Collett

Baptised on 25.09.1668 at Eye

 

18J23

Katherine Collett

Baptised on 25.09.1668 at Eye

 

18J24

JOHN COLLETT

Baptised on 20.09.1670 at Eye

 

 

 

 

18I20

Martha Collett was born at Westerfield around 1641, where she was baptised in 1644, although no record of the event has been found to confirm the event.  She was the daughter of Philologus Collett and Dorcas Edgar, and what is known for sure is that Martha was a named daughter in her father’s Will of 1647.

 

 

 

 

18J1

John Collet was born at The Hale in Wendover around 1628 and was baptised at Wendover on 8th June 1628 when his father was named as John Collet.  He was the eldest of the six children of John Collet and Mary Pedder.  It was at St Mary’s Church in Hemel Hempstead that he married Ellen Halsey of Great Gaddesden on 4th April 1654, their marriage providing them with six children.  Four years later he was sworn of the homage of the Manor of The Hale in 1658 and again ten years later in 1668.  John Collett, a yeoman of The Hale, died during 1679 and was buried at St Mary’s Church in Wendover on 10th June 1679.

 

 

 

Apart from his wife Ellen, the other members of his family named in the Will of John Collet of Wendover were his second son Thomas (the first child of that name having suffered an infant death), his third son William, Mary his eldest daughter, Elizabeth his youngest daughter and his eldest son John.  The Will was made on 10th May 1679 and was witnessed by his sister Rebecca (below), in which his wife Ellen and his son John were appointed as joint executors of his estate.  It was four months later that the Will of John Collet of Wendover was proved at Canterbury on 10th September 1679, while his widow Ellen Collet nee Halsey was still alive in 1715 when her aforementioned daughter Rebecca Collet passed away.

 

 

 

18K1

Thomas Collet

Born in 1657 at Wendover

 

18K2

Mary Collet

Born in 1658 at Wendover

 

18K3

Elizabeth Collet

Born in 1660 at Wendover

 

18K4

John Collet

Born in 1662 at Wendover

 

18K5

Thomas Collet

Born in 1665 at Wendover

 

18K6

William Collet

Born in 1670 at Wendover

 

 

 

 

18J2

Mary Collet was born at The Hale in Wendover around 1629 and was baptised at St Mary’s Church on 4th February 1629, the daughter of John and Mary Collet.  She married Richard Kent at St Mary Magdalen Church on Old Fish Street in London on 25th March 1662.  By that time Mary Collet of St Margaret’s Westminster was a spinster of 34 whose parents were not alive, while Richard Kent of St Martin’s-in-the-Field was a gentleman and a bachelor of 30.  Their marriage produced just one known child, their daughter Sarah Kent who was a beneficiary under the terms of the 1715 Will of her aunt Rebecca Collet (below).

 

 

 

 

18J3

Anne Collet was born at The Hale in Wendover around 1631 and was baptised at St Mary’s Church on 11th March 1631, another daughter of John and Mary Collet.

 

 

 

 

18J4

Hester Collet was born at The Hale in Wendover around 1634 and was baptised at St Mary’s Church on 30th July 1634, the daughter of John Collet.  During her life she married to become Hester Goddard who was still alive in 1715 when he sister Rebecca passed away, as she was named as Esther Goddard, sister.

 

 

 

 

18J5

Rebecca Collet was born at The Hale in Wendover around 1636 and was baptised at St Mary’s Church on 11th September 1636, the daughter of John and Mary Collet.  She never married and died during 1715, her Will being proved that year at the Archdeaconry Court of Buckinghamshire when she was described as Rebecca Collet spinster of The Hale.  She was buried at St Mary’s Church on 12th December 1715.

 

 

 

 

18J6

Joseph Collet was born at The Hale in Wendover around 1638, the son of John and Mary Collet.  He was later known as Joseph Collet of Berkhamsted St Peter in Hertfordshire and was alive in 1715 when his sister Rebecca (above) died, as both Joseph and his son William were named in her Will.  He appears to have married later in his life when he wed (1) Mary who gave him a son William in 1694, just prior to her death on 12th October 1695 at Berkhamsted.  Administration of her estate was granted to Joseph Collet her husband on 27th January 1696.  Seven years later Joseph married (2) Sarah Goslin at St Dunstan’s in Stepney, London, on 28th April 1703 who presented him with three further children before she died in 1714 following which she was buried at St Peter’s Church on 21st October 1714, where the baptism of her three children also took place.

 

 

 

18K7

William Collet

Born in 1694 at Berkhamsted

 

The following are the children from Joseph’s second marriage to Sarah Goslin:

 

18K8

Joseph Collet

Born in 1703 at Berkhamsted

 

18K9

John Collet

Born in 1705 at Berkhamsted

 

18K10

James Collet

Born in 1709 at Berkhamsted

 

 

 

 

18J7

Edmund Collet was born at The Hale in Wendover around 1640, possibly the youngest child of John Collet and Mary Pedder.  From 1648 to 1655 the Court of the Mercer’s Company paid £10 annually to his father John Collet of The Hale for his schooling.  He attended Christ Church College in Oxford from 1656 to 1660 where he obtained as Bachelor of Arts Degree on 28th February 1660.  He married Mary, the name given to their only known child.  Edmund Collet died during 1726, the same year his Will was proved at Canterbury.  Administration of his estate was granted to Mary Wordsworth, the wife of Charles Wordsworth and the daughter of Edmund Collet late of St Botolph’s Aldergate in London.

 

 

 

18K11

Mary Collet

Born in 1694 at Berkhamsted

 

 

 

 

18J9

Elizabeth Collet was born at Whitchurch around 1630, the daughter of Joseph Collet and Amy Wills.  It was also at Whitchurch on 7th December 1655 that she married John Simon of Northmarston when her father Joseph was a witness.  Their marriage produced four children who were all named in her mother’s Will of 1680.  They were John Simon, Joseph Simon, Thomas Simon and Elizabeth Simon.  No mention of their mother was made in the Will, although her husband John Simon was named as son-in-law and was one of the two appointed executors of the Will.

 

 

 

 

18J10

Rebecca Collet was born at Whitchurch around 1634 another daughter of Joseph and Amy Collet.  Rebecca married Thomas Piddington of Bierton at Whitchurch on 20th June 1658.  By the time of the death of her mother Rebecca and Thomas may have not longer been alive, since it was their son Thomas Piddington who was named in the Will of Amy Collet as her grandson.

 

 

 

 

18J12

Martha Collet was born at Whitchurch around 1645, possibly the youngest of the five daughters of Joseph Collet and Amy Wills.  She married Daniel Harding at Whitchurch on 13th July 1667 with whom she gave birth to a daughter Martha.  At the time of the death of her mother Amy in 1680 Martha, Daniel and their daughter were all still alive and were named in her Will.

 

 

 

 

18J13

Elizabeth Collett may have been born just after her parents, Anthony Collett and Elizabeth Manning, were married around 1640.  She was born at Westerfield, and it was there also that she married Mr Everitt of Worlingworth, north-west of Framlingham.

 

 

 

 

18J14

Cornelius Collett was born at Westerfield around 1642 and he married (1) Martha Fox at Hollesley by licence on 21st June 1675, with whom he had a daughter who was born at Hollesley.  Martha was born around 1652 and was the sister of Elizabeth Fox who married Samuel Collett (Ref. 18I9), and the daughter of William and Catherine Fox of Hollesley.  Martha died in 1679 and was buried on 5th December 1679 at Hollesley, east of Ipswich and north of Felixstowe.  Cornelius was then married by licence to (2) Elizabeth Dowsing on 28th July 1680 at Grundisburgh, by whom he had a further four children, all born at Westerfield.  Elizabeth was the daughter of Bence Dowsing and Elizabeth Trusson of Alderton.  Their marriage took place within a year or so of Cornelius’ mother’s Elizabeth Collett marrying Elizabeth’s father Bence Dowsing, and one year before the passing of his mother.

 

 

 

Cornelius, Lord of the Manor of Westerfield, died sometime after the conception of the couple’s last child in 1685, but prior to 3rd June 1688 when his Will was proved.  In that document he was referred to as ‘Cornelius Collett gent of Westerfield and Hollesley’.  The administration of his estate was granted to his widow Elizabeth, through which process Westerfield Manor was passed onto his eldest Cornelius.  Six years after Elizabeth had married Cornelius, her grandfather Thomas Trusson died and his Will of 1686 listed ‘Elizabeth, the wife of Cornelius Collett’ as one of the beneficiaries.  It is also interesting that the couple’s youngest son Anthony produced a grandson who went on to marry a Catherine Trusson.

 

 

 

18K12

Deborah Collett

Baptised on 01.08.1676 at Hollesley

 

The following are the children from Cornelius’ second marriage to Elizabeth Dowsing:

 

18K13

Elizabeth Collett

Baptised on 24.06.1681 at Westerfield

 

18K14

Mary Collett

Baptised on 24.06.1683 at Westerfield

 

18K15

Cornelius Collett

Baptised on 12.05.1685 at Westerfield

 

18K16

Anthony Collett

Baptised on 25.04.1686 at Westerfield

 

 

 

 

18J15

Anne Collett, whose date of birth may have been around 1644, was born at Westerfield where she married John Langley of Ipswich.

 

 

 

 

18J16

Mary Collett was born at Westerfield in 1646 and it was there also that she married Thomas Browning of Copdock, near Ipswich, in 1668.

 

 

 

 

18J17

Rebecca Collett, whose date of birth was very likely around 1649, was born at Westerfield where she married John Revett of Bramfield on 28th December 1669.

 

 

 

 

18J18

Candace Collett, whose date of birth was very likely around 1652, was born at Westerfield, the youngest known child of Anthony Collett and Elizabeth Manning.  It was also at Westerfield that she married John Hasell of Akenham, by licence, on 1st February 1675.

 

 

 

 

18J19

Samuel Collett was born in 1671 and was the only surviving son of Samuel Collett and Elizabeth Fox.  When he was still in his late teenage years, and being the only surviving male adult member of the Collett family at that time, Westerfield Manor was conveyed to him as part of the settlement of the estate of his cousin Cornelius Collett (above) in 1688.  Under the terms of the 1688 Will, the manor house was to have been inherited by Cornelius’ eldest son who, at the time of his death, was only three years old, so the property was conveyed to Samuel as a trustee. 

 

 

 

A few years later Samuel Collett married Hannah Hammond, the daughter of William Hammond, gent of Ufford, and his wife Hannah Villiers of Ufford, where Hannah was baptised on 8th April 1667.  The marriage is known to have produced ten children for Samuel and Hannah, and all of them born and baptised at Westerfield.  However, the couple’s last child was born just after Samuel had passed away, since he was referred to in the Westerfield parish register as the son of Samuel deceased and Hannah.

 

 

 

Samuel Collett died on 1st April 1710, following which he was buried at Westerfield 5th April 1710.  The Will of Samuel Collett was proved five years after his death, on 5th July 1715.  The memorial stone in Westerfield Church bears the name of Samuel Collett, and also refers to his four brothers and four sisters who did not survive beyond childhood, although no names for the eight siblings are provided.  It was at Ufford, where she was born, that his widow Hannah Collett nee Villiers was buried on 20th March 1753 at the age of 86.

 

 

 

18K17

Samuel Collett

Born in 1693 at Westerfield

 

18K18

William Collett

Born in 1695 at Westerfield

 

18K19

Hannah Collett

Born in 1697 at Westerfield

 

18K20

John Collett

Born in 1699 at Westerfield

 

18K21

Ketturah Collett

Born in 1700 at Westerfield

 

18K22

Richard Collett

Born in 1701 at Westerfield

 

18K23

Henry Collett

Baptised on 30.06.1706 at Westerfield

 

18K24

Hannah Collett

Baptised on 07.08.1707 at Westerfield

 

18K25

Elizabeth Collett

Baptised on 22.10.1708 at Westerfield

 

18K26

Cornelius Collett

Born in 1710 at Westerfield

 

 

 

 

18J20

Elizabeth Collett was born at Westerfield around 1675.  She died at Tattingstone south of Ipswich around 1741, but was buried at Westerfield.

 

 

 

 

18J23

Katherine Collett was baptised at Eye in Suffolk on 25th August 1668, the daughter of Henry Collett and Anne Bishop.

 

 

 

 

18J24

JOHN COLLETT was born at Eye where he was baptised 20th September 1670, the son of Henry Collett and Anne Bishop.  It was also at Eye that John married Anne around 1693, and where all of their children were born and baptised.  John Collett was an established member of the community in Eye, where he held the position of councilman.  He was still living at Eye when he died, following which he was buried there on 18th July 1721, when his name was recorded as John Collet (sic).  His wife Anne survived him by nearly nineteen years when she too died at Eye, where she was buried on 13th January 1740.

 

 

 

18K27

Henry Collett

Born in 1694 at Eye

 

18K28

John Collett

Born in 1696 at Eye

 

18K29

Ann Collett

Born in 1697 at Eye

 

18K30

Samuel Collett

Born in 1700 at Eye

 

18K31

Rebecca Collett

Born in 1701 at Eye

 

18K32

Cornelius Collett

Born in 1702 at Eye

 

18K33

Robert Collett

Born in 1704 at Eye

 

18K34

PHILOLOGUS COLLETT

Born in 1707 at Eye

 

18K35

William Collett

Born in 1710 at Eye

 

18K36

Charles Collett

Born in 1712 at Eye

 

18K37

Francis Collett

Born in 1715 at Eye

 

18K38

Elizabeth Collett

Born in 1717 at Eye

 

 

 

 

18K1

Thomas Collet was born at The Hale in Wendover in 1657, the first of the six children of John Collet and Ellen Halsey.  Tragically he did not survived and died shortly after he was born.  The record of his baptism at Wendover on 10th July 1657 confirmed he was the son of John Collet.

 

 

 

 

18K2

Mary Collet was born at The Hale in Wendover in 1658 and was baptised at St Mary’s Church on 16th July 1658, the daughter of John Collet.  It would appear that she never married and died during the first month of 1735 and was buried at St Mary’s Church on 30th January 1735.  Administration of her personal effects was granted to Robert Kipping on 14th May 1737 at the Archdeaconry Court of Buckinghamshire.  Robert Kipping (Ref. 63J3) who was born in 1691 and who died in 1746 was also the first guardian of Robert Collet (Ref. 63L2) who was born in 1726 and who died in 1750 leaving no heir, and therefore the last Collet of the Manor of The Hale of Wendover.

 

 

 

 

18K3

Elizabeth Collet was born at The Hale in Wendover in 1660 and was baptised at St Mary’s Church on 15th July 1660, the daughter of John Collet.  She never married and died during 1724, when she was buried at St Mary’s Church in Wendover on 20th March 1724.  In her Will dated 25th April 1723 she was described as a spinster of The Hale even though she was referred to as ‘Old Mrs Collet’ in the burial record.  The Will was proved at the Archdeaconry Court of Buckinghamshire on 17th June 1724.

 

 

 

 

18K4

John Collet was born at The Hale in Wendover in 1662 and was baptised at St Mary’s Church in Wendover on 18th April 1662, the son of John Collet.  It was in 1682 when he was sworn of the homage of the Manor of The Hale but only seven years later he died in Ireland, where he was buried in 1689.  It is possible that he was in Ireland with the English Army to quell the Jacobite Rebellion which took place that same year. However, it appears he was married and already had a daughter by that time.  Curiously though, the child’s baptism was delayed, perhaps while she and her mother made arrangements to return to Wendover, where John’s daughter was baptised on 13th August 1701.

 

 

 

18L1

Martha Collet

Baptised 13.08.1701 at Wendover

 

 

 

 

18K5

Thomas Collet was born at The Hale in Wendover in 1665, the fifth child of John Collet who was baptised at St Mary’s Church on 3rd October 1665.  Like his brother John (above), Thomas Collet, an apprentice, was only twenty years of age when he suffered a premature death in 1685.  With the death of the two eldest brothers the Manor of The Hale was passed to their brother William (below).  Thomas was buried on 2nd February 1685 when he was described as of St Mildred’s, Poultry in London, a haberdasher’s apprentice.

 

 

 

 

18K6

William Collet was born at The Hale in Wendover in 1670, the last child of John Collet and Ellen Halsey, and was baptised at St Mary’s Church on 14th November 1670.  It was in 1692 that he was first sworn of the Manor of The Hale, which happened again in 1732.  Between those two dates he married the much younger Elizabeth Kipping (Ref. 63J2) of Wendover with whom he had four sons, although only one survived to adulthood.  Elizabeth was born in 1689 and was baptised at Wendover on 19th May that year, the daughter of John Kipping (Ref. 63I1).  Two of her siblings were also involved with the Collet family and they were her older sister Hannah Kipping (Ref. 63J1) who married Richard Stratfold (see Section Two of Part 63 – The Stratfold-Collet Family of Wendover), and her younger brother Robert Kipping (Ref. 63J3) who was the first guardian of Robert Collet, Elizabeth’s youngest son.

 

 

 

William Collett of The Hale died during the last few days of 1735 and was buried at St Mary’s Church on 29th December 1735.  His Will was proved on 7th January 1736 at the Archdeaconry Court of Buckinghamshire.  Sadly his wife Elizabeth Collet nee Kipping had already passed away by then in 1728, when she may have died giving birth to a fifth child who also did not survive.

 

 

 

18L2

William Collet

Born 1716 at Wendover

 

18L3

John Collet

Born 1717 at Wendover

 

18L4

Thomas Collet

Born 1722 at Wendover

 

18L5

Robert Collet

Born 1726 at Wendover

 

 

 

 

18K7

William Collet was born at Berkhamsted in 1694 and was baptised at St Peter’s Church in Great Berkhamsted on 26th October 1694, the only child of Joseph Collet by his first wife Mary who died during the following year.  In 1715 his occupation was that of a draper, according to the Will of his aunt Rebecca Collet (Ref. 18J5).  He married Mary Woodbridge around 1745, although they were only married for thirteen years when William died in 1758.  Eight years earlier he had contested the 1750 Will of Robert Collet (Ref. 18L5), the last Collet of The Hale, when the estate was bequeathed to his cousin Robert Stratfold (Ref. 63L2), on that occasion William was referred to as the ‘heir at law’ of Robert Collet whereas Robert Stratfold was only his ‘cousin by marriage’.

 

 

 

In actual fact William Collet, the son of Joseph Collet of Berkhamsted and the second cousin of Robert Collet of The Hale, was the rightful heir to the Manor of The Hale Estate and as a result he endeavoured to contest the succession of Robert Stratford right up to his death.  The suit was indexed in the Chancery Proceedings 1714-1758 Collet v Stratfold.  The plaintiff was William Collet of Berkhamsted St Peter, gentleman.  The Bill of Complaint was sworn on 9th November 1754

 

 

 

 

18K8

Joseph Collet was born at Berkhamsted in 1703 and was baptised at St Peter’s Church in Great Berkhamsted on 6th October 1703, the eldest of the three children of Sarah Goslin, the second wife of Joseph Collet.  Although no details are known regarding his wife, Joseph had a son who died only fifteen years after his father.  At the time of his death in 1750 his Will referred to him as Joseph Collet in Wingrave, which is a village near Aylesbury.

 

 

 

18L6

John Collet

Date of birth unknown; died 1765

 

 

 

 

18K9

John Collet was born at Berkhamsted in 1707 and was baptised at St Peter’s Church in Great Berkhamsted on 5th April 1707, the son of Joseph and Sarah Collet.

 

 

 

 

18K10

James Collet was born at Berkhamsted on 10th September 1709 and was baptised at St Peter’s Church in Great Berkhamsted one week later on 18th September 1709, the last child of Joseph Collet and Sarah Goslin whose mother died when James was only five years old.

 

 

 

 

18K11

Mary Collet was born in 1694 the daughter of Edmund and Mary Collet.  Mary later married Charles Wordsworth and their son Richard was a pupil at St Paul’s School in London.  Richard Wordsworth was also known as Richard Colet and he died in 1763 when administration of his personal effects was processed at Canterbury.  Upon the death of Mary’s father in 1729 the Will of Edmund Collet of St Botolph’s Aldergate in London granted administration of his estate to his daughter Mary Wordsworth.  Richard Wordsworth, aka Richard Colet, was a Steward of the Feast at St Paul’s School in 1717 and was a subscriber to Doctor Samuel Knight’s ‘Life of Dr John Colet’.  At the time of his death his mother Mary was still alive, when administration of his estate was granted to his mother Mary Wordsworth of the Ann & Mary Transport Ship.

 

 

 

 

18K12

Deborah Collett was baptised at Hollesley near Ipswich on 1st August 1676, the only daughter of Cornelius Collett and Martha Fox.  Her mother died when Martha was only two years old, possibly during the birth of a second child, who also did not survive.

 

 

 

 

18K13

Elizabeth Collett was baptised at Westerfield on 24th June 1681, the eldest of the four known children of Cornelius Collett and his second wife Elizabeth Dowsing.

 

 

 

 

18K14

Mary Collett was baptised at Westerfield on 24th June 1683, and was the daughter of Cornelius Collett and Elizabeth Dowsing.  She later married Richard Woodthorpe, gentleman of Trimley, and later generations of the Collett family used Woodthorpe as a Christian name.

 

 

 

 

18K15

Cornelius Collett was baptised at Westerfield on 12th May 1685, the son of Cornelius Collett and Elizabeth Dowsing.  Upon the death of his father in 1688, Westerfield Manor passed from Cornelius to his three years old son Cornelius.  However, because of his age, the manor house was conveyed in trust to Samuel Collett (Ref. 18J19), the son of Samuel Collett and Elizabeth Fox.  Cornelius married (1) Margaret Crisp on 16th October 1718 at Melton near Woodbridge in Suffolk.  Margaret died less than two years after their wedding day and just one year after the baptism of the couple’s second son at Melton.  She was buried at Westerfield on 22nd February 1721.  It would appear that Cornelius then took a second wife, although no details are known.

 

 

 

Cornelius, Lord of the Manor of Westerfield, also died at Melton, but was buried at Westerfield on 30th April 1742, when his surname was recorded as Collet.  His Will of 23rd July 1741 was proved on 30th May 1742.  In his Will the manor house at Westerfield was referred to as being inherited by his eldest son Cornelius (below).  It is very likely that their first two sons were born at Melton, where they are known to have been baptised, in addition to which their father was referred to as Cornelius Collett of Melton.  However, a few years later the family was once again living in Westerfield, and it was there that a further son was born to Cornelius and his second wife (?).

 

 

 

18L7

Cornelius Collett

Baptised on 27.08.1719 at Melton

 

18L8

Anthony Collett

Baptised on 18.02.1720 at Melton

 

18L9

Henry Collett

Born in 1725 at Westerfield

 

 

 

 

18K16

Anthony Collett was baptised at Westerfield on 25th April 1686, the youngest child of Cornelius Collett and Elizabeth Dowsing. 

 

 

 

 

18K17

Samuel Collett was born at Westerfield in 1693, the eldest child of Samuel Collett of Westerfield and Hannah Hammond of Ufford.  When he was in his mid-thirties, Samuel was married by licence to the widow Mary Clark of Theberton, the marriage taking place on 25th November 1727 at Theberton in Suffolk, just north of Leiston.  The marriage resulted in the birth of two children for Samuel and Mary, and both of them were born at Theberton, where sadly the first child was buried one month after the baptism of the second child.  Samuel and Mary were living at Westerfield when Samuel died in 1760, following which he was buried there on 5th April 1760.

 

 

 

18L10

Samuel Collett

Baptised on 12.10.1731 at Theberton

 

18L11

Mary Collett

Baptised on 15.03.1732 at Theberton

 

 

 

 

18K18

William Collett was born at Westerfield in 1695 and it was there that he was baptised on 13th February 1695, the son of Samuel Collett and Hannah Hammond.  Very little else is known about William except that in 1738 it would appear that he was the Clerk of the Peace at the Open Sessions in Ipswich.  A licence for religious worship at the Quay Meeting House in Woodbridge granted to Daniel Ralph and dated 15th April 1738 was printed in a local newspaper.  This read as follows, with the original spelling:

 

 

 

‘These are to certifye to whom it may concern that the dwellyng house of Daniel Ralph, in Woodbridge, in the County of Suffolk, is designed to be used as a place of religious worship for His Majesty's Protestant Subjects dissenting from the Church of England as witness my hand this Fifteenth day of April, in the Eleventh Year of the Reign of our Sovereign Lord George the Second, by the Grace of God of Great Brittain, France and Ireland King, Defender of the Faith and so forth in the year of our Lord 1738

 

 

 

On the reverse of the original certificate was the statement This is a true Copy of the Originale delivered to Mr. Wm Collett, Clerk of ye Peace, in ye Open Sessions at Ipswich, the day and year within mentioned by me.  Stephen Abbote, of Woodbridge”

 

 

 

It is interesting to note that a relative of William Collett also held the post of Clerk of the Peace from around 1750 to 1802 when he died, and that was Henry Collett (Ref. 18L9).

 

 

 

Of further interest is the fact that amongst the 31 students with the Collett name listed in the Cambridge Alumni, there is a John Collett born around 1738 who was the son of William Collett of Woodbridge.  No other William having any association with Woodbridge has been found so, for that reason, this William has been credited with a son John in the absence of any better information.  However, in addition to this, the IGI does provide details of the baptism of John Collett at St Mary’s Church in Woodbridge on 4th January 1738, who was the son of William and Frances Collett. 

 

 

 

A further search through the IGI has revealed at least another three children born to William and Frances who were also baptised at St Mary’s Church in Woodbridge, and they were all born before their son John.  In addition to all of this a certain James Collett, a resident of Woodbridge St Mary at the time of his death in 1820, was buried there on 14th May 1820 at the age of 78, when he was described as a Chelsea Pensioner.  William’s wife Frances appears to have died shortly after the birth of the couple’s last child, since it was also at Woodbridge St Mary that gentleman and widower William Collett died during the first five weeks of 1747, following which he was buried in St Mary’s Church on 9th February 1747.

 

 

 

18L12

Frances Collett

Born 1727 at Woodbridge

 

18L13

William Collett

Born 1730 at Woodbridge

 

18L14

Samuel Collett

Born 1736 at Woodbridge

 

18L15

John Collett

Born 1737 at Woodbridge

 

18L16

James Collett – not confirmed

Born 1741 at Woodbridge

 

 

 

 

18K19

Hannah Collett was born at Westerfield in 1697 where she was baptised on 28th October 1697, the daughter of Samuel Collett and Hannah Hammond.  Tragically she survived for less than two years, when Hannah died and was buried at Westerfield on 7th June 1699, where she was described as the daughter of Samuel and Hannah Collet (sic).

 

 

 

 

18K20

John Collett was born at Westerfield during 1699, where he was baptised on 7th June 1699 the son of Samuel and Hannah Collett.  Following the burial of his mother at Ufford in 1753, gentleman John Collett was also buried there on 11th September 1763.

 

 

 

 

18K21

Ketturah Collett was born at Westerfield during 1700, the daughter of Samuel and Hannah Collett, and was baptised there on 22nd December 1700.  It is also known that she was still alive at the time of the death of her father in 1710, and it was on 11th May 1735 that ‘Keturah Collett’ was buried at Ufford.

 

 

 

 

18K22

Richard Collett was born at Westerfield in 1701, and it was there that he was baptised on 8th March 1701, the son of Samuel and Hannah Collett.  He married Elizabeth Wenham of Ufford by licence at Swilland, to the north of Ipswich, on 24th July 1724.  The couple initially settled at Cransford, near Framlingham, where their first child was born, before moving to Yoxford, where their next six children were born.

 

 

 

Over the first eleven years their marriage produced a total of eight children for the couple, including two sets of twins, although the family also suffered the tragedy of three infant deaths.  However, just after the birth of the seventh child, Richard Collett died at the age of 34, following which his widow married Samuel Dennington of Ufford by licence at Westerfield on 14th November 1735.  This last statement may not now be true, because records exist that indicate Richard Collett, age 75, died at Halesworth in 1777, following which he was buried at Ufford on 11th May 1777.  His widow Elizabeth Collett, age 81, and also residing in Halesworth at the time of her death at the end of the following year, was buried at Ufford on 9th December 1778.

 

 

 

18L17

Hannah Collett

Baptised on 13.11.1724 at Cransford

 

18L18

Elizabeth Collett           twin

Born in 1726 at Yoxford

 

18L19

Richard Collett             twin

Born in 1726 at Yoxford

 

18L20

Randolph Collett           twin

Baptised on 04.10.1728 at Yoxford

 

18L21

John Collett                  twin

Baptised on 04.10.1728 at Yoxford

 

18L22

Rebecca Collett

Born in 1730 at Yoxford

 

18L23

Millicent Collett

Born in 1733 at Yoxford

 

18L24

Jane Collett

Baptised on 26.03.1735 at Theberton

 

 

 

 

18K26

Cornelius Collett was born at Westerfield in 1710 where he was baptised on 19th July 1710, the youngest of the ten children of Samuel Collett and Hannah Hammond.  Sadly his father had died just over three months prior to the birth on 1st April that year, and further tragedy hit the family when Cornelius only survived for a few months, when he died at Westerfield and was buried there on 9th November 1710.

 

 

 

 

18K27

Henry Collett was born at Eye in 1694, where he was baptised on 23rd August 1694, the eldest child of John and Anne Collett of Eye.

 

 

 

 

18K28

John Collett was born at Eye in 1696 and was baptised there on 15th October 1696, the second child of John and Anne Collett.  It was also at Eye that he married (1) Mary around 1717 and with whom he had eight children before she died at Eye in 1731, where she was buried on 21st September 1731, when she was described as the wife of John Collet (sic).  The couple’s first child was born at Rishangles, although shortly after that the family settled in the town of Eye, where Mary’s next seven children were born prior to her passing.  The children were also baptised at Eye, and the last three were apparently baptised many years after the death of their mother.

 

 

 

Following the death of his first wife, John Collett then married (2) Elizabeth around 1732, and the only children they apparently had, was a set of twins.  Elizabeth Collett was buried on 13th January 1740, although no date is known for the passing of her husband.

 

 

 

18L25

John Collett

Born in 1718 at Rishangles

 

18L26

Francis Collett

Born in 1720 at Eye

 

18L27

Mary Collett

Born in 1722 at Eye

 

18L28

Katherine Collett

Born in 1724 at Eye

 

18L29

Elizabeth Collett

Born in 1726 at Eye

 

18L30

Mary Collett

Born in 1728 at Eye

 

18L31

Ketturah Collett

Born in 1730 at Eye

 

18L32

Rebecca Collett

Born in 1731 at Eye

 

The two twin children of John and Elizabeth Collett were:

 

18L33

Mary Collett

Born in 1734 at Eye

 

18L34

Joseph Collett

Born in 1734 at Eye

 

 

 

 

18K29

Ann Collett was born at Eye in 1697, and it was there that she was baptised on 7th March 1697.  It was also there that she was buried on 17th January 1712, around the time she was nearly 15 years old.

 

 

 

 

18K30

Samuel Collett was born at Eye on 6th December 1700, where he was baptised on 26th December 1700, the son of John and Anne Collett.  Samuel was nearly 24 years old when he married Susan Martha Nicholls at Eye on 6th October 1724.  Once they were married, the couple settled in Wilby, where all of their children were born and baptised.  Samuel Collett was a tanner at Wilby, where he died in 1776 but was buried at Eye on 28th January 1776, leaving a Will he had made on 5th March 1772.  Sometime after the death of her husband, Susan moved to nearby Stradbroke.  She was born in 1699 and died at Stradbroke six years after her husband in 1782.

 

 

 

18L35

Martha Collett

Born in 1725 at Wilby

 

18L36

Ann Collett

Born in 1727 at Wilby

 

18L37

Samuel Collett

Born in 1730 at Wilby

 

18L38

Elizabeth Collett

Born in 1732 at Wilby

 

18L39

Samuel Collett

Born in 1734 at Wilby

 

18L40

Susan Collett

Born in 1736 at Wilby

 

18L41

John Collett

Born in 1738 at Wilby

 

 

 

 

18K31

Rebecca Collett was born at Eye in 1701 and was baptised there on 30th April 1702, the daughter of John and Anne Collett.

 

 

 

 

18K32

Cornelius Collett was born at Eye in 1702 and it was there that he was baptised on 1st January 1703, the son of John and Anne Collett.

 

 

 

 

18K33

Robert Collett was born at Eye in 1704 where he was baptised on 22nd February 1705, the son of John and Anne Collett.  Robert was around 28 years old when he died at Eye, where he was buried on 2nd February 1733, although the parish register recorded his surname as Collet.

 

 

 

 

18K34

PHILOLOGUS COLLETT was born at Eye in 1706, and baptised there on 1st March 1707, the son of John and Anne Collett.  He later became a farmer at Wilby, where he married Ann Feaveryeare on 6th October 1730.  Ann was baptised at Wilby on 10th April 1710, and was the daughter of James Feaveryeare and Ann Gilbert.  And it was at Wilby that their three sons were born.  In 1768 Philologus Collett of Wilby was required to pay £50 to the churchwardens of the parish on behalf of his son William as a condition of the bastardy bond for the unborn child of Sarah Dale.  The document is also interesting for the way in which Philologus wrote his name simply as Phill Collett.  Ann Collett nee Feaveryeare died at Wilby, where she was buried on 10th August 1789, while no record of her husband passing has been found.

 

 

 

18L42

Samuel Collett

Baptised on 29.07.1731 at Wilby

 

18L43

Philologus Collett

Baptised on 15.08.1738 at Wilby

 

18L44

WILLIAM COLLETT

Baptised on 29.06.1749 at Wilby

 

 

 

 

18K35

William Collett was born at Eye in 1710, where he was baptised on 14th October 1710, the son of John and Anne Collett.  William was 29 years old when he died, after which he was buried at Eye on 16th December 1739.

 

 

 

 

18K36

Charles Collett was born at Eye in 1712 and it was there that he was baptised on 22nd March 1712, the son of John and Anne Collett.

 

 

 

 

18K37

Francis Collett was born at Eye in 1715 and was baptised there on 1st April 1715, the youngest son of John and Anne Collett.  Tragically he only survived for just over one year and was buried at Eye on 9th June 1716.

 

 

 

 

18K38

Elizabeth Collett was born at Eye in 1717 where she was baptised on 19th August 1717, the youngest and last child of John and Anne Collett.

 

 

 

 

18L2

William Collet was born at The Hale in Wendover in 1716, the eldest of the four sons of William Collet and Elizabeth Kipping.  It was as Wm Collet that he was baptised at St Mary’s Church in Wendover on 22nd April 1716, the son of Wm and Elizth Collet.  William was only eighteen years old when he died, one year before his father, and was buried at St Mary’s on 3rd December 1734.

 

 

 

 

18L3

John Collet was born at The Hale in Wendover in 1717, the son of William and Elizabeth Collet.  He was baptised at St Mary’s Church in Wendover on 10th November 1717, but died shortly after and was buried there on 21st November 1717.

 

 

 

 

18L4

Thomas Collet was born at The Hale in Wendover in 1722, the son of William and Elizabeth Collet, while it was during 1723 that he died.

 

 

 

 

18L5

Robert Collet was born at The Hale in Wendover in 1726, the youngest of the four sons of William Collet and Elizabeth Kipping.  He was only two years old when his mother died while, by the time he was born, two of his three older brothers had also passed away.  He was baptised at Wendover on 27th May 1727 when his parents were confirmed as William and Elizabeth Collet.  Robert was educated at Trinity College in Oxford where he matriculated on 3rd November 1743 at the age of 17.  The university records refer to Robert Collett as the son of William Collett of The Hale in Wendover. 

 

 

 

He was sworn of homage of the Manor of The Hale at a Manorial Court held on 16th September 1748, the last Collet of the Manor of The Hale in Wendover.  It was during that period of history when Hale House was burnt down and it was Robert who rebuilt it in 1748, his initials R C being etched on the front of the house.  Sadly two years later Robert was unmarried and was only twenty-four when he died in 1750.  Four years earlier the legal guardian of Robert Collet, Robert Kipping – his mother’s younger brother, had died and at that time Robert Collet, the sole heir of William Collet, had not reached the age of majority. 

 

 

 

Therefore his Will made later and proved at Canterbury in 1750 bequeathed the family estate to his cousin Robert Stratfold (Ref. 63K1) on condition that he change his name to Robert Collet.  “I Robert Collet, gentleman of The Hale in the Parish of Wendover, give and devise unto my cousin Robert Stratfold [written as Stretfold] the elder all and every manors, messuages, cottages, lands, tenements, tithes, hereditaments and estate whatsoever lying in the several parishes of Wendover, Weston Turville, Ellesborough, and Aston Clinton or elsewhere in the County of Bucks.”  Thus the estate was left in trust for Robert Stratfold (Ref. 63L2), the infant son of his cousin Robert Stratfold the elder who was only three years old at the time of the death of his uncle.  The Will continued “the said Robert Stratfold the son, to procure an Act of Parliament for changing his name to Collet when of age or sooner; also that he and his heirs shall hereafter use the name and arms of my family”. 

 

 

 

The untimely death of unmarried Robert Collet brought to an end the direct succession to The Hale Estate and, although there were others of the name living, the estate was bequeathed to one who had no blood-kinship to the Collet stock.

 

 

 

At this point, the History of The Hale in Wendover is continued in

Part 63 – The Stratfold-Collet Family of Wendover starting at Ref. 63K1

 

 

 

 

18L7

Cornelius Collett was baptised at Melton on 27th August 1719, the son of Cornelius and Margaret Crisp.  Upon the death of his father in 1742, Cornelius inherited Westerfield Manor and became Lord of the Manor.  It was during the following year that he was married.  He married (1) Jane Wade on 2nd March 1743 at Rendlesham, next to Eyke and just east of Woodbridge.  Jane died after only nine years of the marriage, but not before presenting Cornelius with three sons who were born at Westerfield.  However, the youngest of the three sons died a month after he was born and, whilst the other two did reach adulthood, they both died before the passing of their father. 

 

 

 

Jane Collett was buried at Westerfield on 20th January 1753, leaving her husband with his two eldest sons.  It is understood, although not confirmed, that Cornelius was married again shortly after the death of Jane, but that his second wife did not survive for long, as he was married for a third time shortly thereafter.  His second, or more likely his third wife, was Anne and the only records so far found to confirm this are the baptism and the burial records at Melton for their daughter Margaret Collett in 1762 when she was listed as ‘the daughter of Cornelius Collett, gentleman, and his wife Ann’.

 

 

 

Many years later, and three years after the death of his second son John Bloomfield Collett, Cornelius was married for a fourth time, by licence, to the much younger (4) Margaret Driver on 19th September 1769 at Westerfield.  She was the daughter of Thomas and Rebecca Driver and was born around 1742 and was baptised at Little Bealings on 23rd December 1742.  Margaret presented Cornelius with a daughter during the following year, and by that in his life Cornelius’ remaining eldest son had been married for five years.

 

 

 

The marriage of Cornelius and Margaret endured for just over twenty years, but sadly sometime during those two decades, Cornelius’ only surviving son passed away.  So by the time he was nearing the end of his life, he had no son to whom he could pass on Westerfield Manor.  Cornelius Collett died at Westerfield on 10th February 1790 and was buried there on 13th February 1790, aged 71.  His Will made on 27th March 1789, to which there was a codicil dated 7th September 1789, was proved on 18th February 1790.

 

 

 

Under the terms of the Will of Cornelius Collett, it was his daughter Margaret, and the heirs of her body, who were to receive all his real and personal estate.  In the event that she did not survive or have issue, the estate would pass in default jointly to his nephew Cornelius Collett (Ref. 18M8), a merchant banker of Woodbridge and William Goodwin of Earl Soham, in trust for sale and the proceeds to be divided amongst the children of his late brother Anthony (below).

 

 

 

Cornelius’ widow, and fourth wife, Margaret Collett, died near thirty years after her husband, when she passed away on 3rd September 1819 and was buried at Westerfield on 10th September 1819.  The Will of Margaret Collett ‘widow of Westerfield’ was proved on 3rd November 1819.

 

 

 

18M1

Cornelius Wade Collett

Born in 1744 at Melton

 

18M2

John Blomfield Collett

Born in 1745 at Westerfield

 

18M3

Milleson Collett

Born in 1747 at Westerfield

 

The following is the only child of Cornelius Collett and his wife third (?) wife Anne:

 

18M4

Margaret Collett

Born in 1762 at Melton

 

The following is the only child of Cornelius Collett and his fourth (?) wife Margaret Driver:

 

18M5

Margaret Collett

Born in 1770 at Westerfield

 

 

 

 

18L8

Anthony Collett was baptised at Melton on 10th February 1720, when his parents were confirmed as Cornelius and Margaret Collett.  It was at Wantisden near Woodbridge and Melton, that he married Mary May on 9th February 1743.  She was born at Melton on 18th February 1721, the daughter of Mary and Robert May of Westwood Lodge, Sutton and of Eyke, the High Sheriff of Suffolk in 1758.  And it was at Eyke, that Anthony Collett Esquire, Lord of the Manor of Eyke, died on 27th February 1785 at the age of 64 and was buried there on 4th March 1785.  His Will, made on 14th June 1783, was proved on 30th April 1785.  Another reference to Anthony was that he was Squire of the Manor of Orford, south of Aldeburgh.

 

 

 

All of the children of Anthony and Mary were born at Eyke, although the only ones named in Anthony’s Will, with his wife Mary, were his sons Anthony, William, Nathaniel, Woodthorpe and Samuel, and his daughter Elizabeth.  (see Will in Legal Documents).  The Will indicated that Anthony was the owner of extensive lands and property within the County of Suffolk, including Walton, Trimley Saint Martin and Trimley Saint Mary, all near Felixstowe, Eyke, Melton and Bromeswell near Woodbridge, Capel Saint Andrews and Shottisham, and Knodishall and Gromford near Aldeburgh.

 

 

 

Mary Collett nee May died fourteen years after her husband, and was also buried at Eyke on 2nd December 1799 following her death on 25th November 1799, when she was aged 77.  A marble memorial stone set in the floor of All Saints Church in Eyke reads as follows:

‘In a vault beneath this stone are deposited the remains of Anthony Collett Esq, late of this parish who died Feb 27th 1785 aged 64 years and also the remains of Mary his wife (late May spinster) who died Nov 25th 1799 aged 77 years’.

 

 

 

The name of Anthony’s and Mary’s son Woodthorpe Collett and later generations of his family, was derived from the earlier link between the Collett and Woodthorpe families, when Anthony’s aunt Mary Collett (Ref. 18K14) married Richard Woodthorpe of Trimley.

 

 

 

During the summer of 2013 Mark Perry made contact regarding the fact that during the 1960s his father Stephen Perry had inherited a number of antiques and interesting Victorian items from John Colet Collett (Ref. 18P50) known to his father as ‘Uncle Jack Collett'.  One of the item had obviously been handed down through many generations and this was a fragile leather wallet with the gold lettering ‘Anthony Collett Eyke Suffolk 1760’, the former property of this Anthony Collett when he was forty years old, perhaps even a birthday present from his wife.

 

 

 

18M6

Anthony Collett

Born in 1744 at Eyke

 

18M7

Mary Collett

Born in 1746 at Eyke

 

18M8

Cornelius Collett

Born in 1747 at Eyke

 

18M9

Robert Collett

Born in 1749 at Eyke

 

18M10

John Collett

Born in 1750 at Eyke

 

18M11

Margaret Collett

Born in 1752 at Eyke

 

18M12

Samuel Collett

Born in 1753; infant death at Eyke

 

18M13

Elizabeth Collett

Born in 1754 at Eyke

 

18M14

William Collett

Born in 1756 at Eyke

 

18M15

Nathaniel Collett

Born in 1757 at Eyke

 

18M16

Anne Collett

Born in 1759 at Eyke

 

18M17

Woodthorpe Collett

Born in 1761 at Eyke

 

18M18

Samuel Collett

Born in 1764 at Eyke

 

 

 

 

18L9

Henry Collett was born at Westerfield in 1725, the son of Cornelius Collett and his second wife Elizabeth.  He became Clerk of the Peace for the County of Suffolk, a position that he held for over fifty years.  Henry died on 16th July 1802 at the age of 78 and the records show that he died at Westerfield, although he never held the manor there, which had been inherited by his older brother Cornelius.  Henry Collett married Rebecca Clark on 5th September 1750, and it was at Westerfield that he died and was buried on 16th July 1802 at the age of 77.  His widow Rebecca Collett nee Clark was at Bath in Somerset when she died during the following year, when she too was buried at Westerfield on 17th November 1803 at the age of 80.

 

 

 

 

18L10

Samuel Collett was born at Theberton in Suffolk in the first six months of 1731, and it was there also that he was baptised on 12th October 1731, the first of two children of Samuel Collett and his wife Mary Clark.  Exactly six months after his baptism ceremony, he was buried at Theberton on 12th April 1832.

 

 

 

 

18L11

Frances Collett was born at Woodbridge in 1727, and was baptised at the Church of St Mary in Woodbridge on 17th June 1727, the daughter of William Collett and his wife Frances.  Tragically it was there also that she was buried later that same year on 10th November 1727, when her family was confirmed as residing at Woodbridge St Mary.

 

 

 

 

18L13

William Collett was born at Woodbridge in 1730, where he was baptised on 24th December 1730, the son of William and Frances Collett.

 

 

 

 

18L14

Samuel Collett was born at Woodbridge during 1736 or slightly earlier, and was baptised at St Mary’s Church on 27th October 1837, the son of William and Frances Collett.

 

 

 

 

18L15

John Collett was born at Woodbridge in late 1737 and was baptised there at St Mary’s Church on 4th January 1738.  It was on 5th July 1756 that John Collett, the son of William Collett of Woodbridge in Suffolk, was admitted into Trinity College in Cambridge at the age of 17.  Prior to that time, John was educated at Bury School in Bury St Edmunds by Mr Garnham, from where he matriculated in 1756.  Five years after joining Trinity College he was awarded a Bachelor of Art degree in 1761, and was ordained as a priest at Norwich on 28th October 1762.

 

 

 

 

18L18

Elizabeth Collett was a twin with her brother Richard (below) and was baptised at Yoxford on 2nd December 1726, the second daughter of Richard Collett and his wife Elizabeth Wenham. Sadly both Elizabeth and her twin brother only survived for a short while, when they died at Yoxford, where there were buried on 14th December 1726.

 

 

 

 

18L19

Richard Collett was the twin brother of Elizabeth (above) who was baptised at Yoxford on 2nd December 1726, and was buried there on 14th December 1726.  Both he and his twin sister were recorded in the burial record as Collet.

 

 

 

 

18L22

Rebecca Collett was born at Yoxford around 1730 and was the daughter of Richard and Elizabeth Collett.  It was also at Yoxford that she was buried on 17th June 1731.

 

 

 

 

18L23

Millicent Collett was born at Yoxford where she was baptised on 2nd June 1733, the daughter of Richard and Elizabeth Collett.  It was also at Yoxford that she was buried on 21st October 1733.

 

 

 

 

18L25

John Collett was born at Rishangles, where he was baptised on 8th February 1718, the eldest child of John and Mary Collett.

 

 

 

 

18L26

Francis Collett was the son of John and Mary Collett and was born after the couple settled at Eye, where it is thought he was born around 1720.  The only other fact known about Francis Collett is that he died at Eye, where he was buried on 7th June 1776.

 

 

 

 

18L27

Mary Collett was the eldest daughter of John Collett and his first wife Mary, and she was baptised at Eye on 27th February 1722.  Tragically she died at Eye thirty months later and was buried there on 1st September 1724.

 

 

 

 

18L28

Katherine Collett was born at Eye where she was baptised on 11th November 1724, the eldest surviving daughter of John and Mary Collett.

 

 

 

 

18L29

Elizabeth Collett was born at Eye and it was there that she was baptised on 10th March 1726, the daughter of John and Mary Collett.

 

 

 

 

18L30

Mary Collett was born at Eye and her baptism entry in the parish records state that her parents were John and Elizabeth Collett.  However, Mary was born around 1728 and was the daughter of John Collett and his first wife Mary, who died when Mary was around three years old.  Why her baptism was delayed, like that of her sisters Ketturah and Rebecca (below) is not known, but all three sisters were baptised in a joint ceremony at Eye on the same day in 1737.  That took place there thirty months after the baptism of the twins of John Collett and his second wife Elizabeth.

 

 

 

Therefore Mary Collett, who was born in 1828, was baptised at Eye, in the present of her father John Collett, and his second wife Elizabeth, on 20th April 1737 together with her sisters Ketturah and Rebecca.  It is also understood that Mary Collett died at Eye where she was buried on 24th July 1791.

 

 

 

 

18L31

Ketturah Collett was born at Eye around 1730 and was the daughter of John Collett and his first wife Mary.  Within a year or so of her birth, her mother died while possibly giving birth to the last child of the family.  Following the death of her mother, her father remarried and it was only after the christening of the next two children, a set of twins, that the baptism of Ketturah, her older sister Mary, and her younger sister Rebecca, was considered.  It was in that way that Ketturah and her two sisters were baptised at Eye on 20th April 1737.  Ketturah was around forty years of age when she was married by licence to James Ball at Halesworth on 2nd August 1771.

 

 

 

 

18L32

Rebecca Collett was the last child born to John Collett and his first wife Mary who died in 1731, the same year that Rebecca was born.  Whether because she was blamed for causing the death of her mother, her widowed father delayed the child’s baptism for some reason until she was around six years old.  Also having delayed baptisms were Rebecca’s two immediately older sisters Mary and Ketturah (above).  It was only after their father remarried, and then only following the baptism of a set of twins from that second marriage, that John Collett arranged for the three sisters to be baptised at Eye on the same day, on 20th April 1737.  In so doing, the sisters’ parents were named as John and Elizabeth Collett.

 

 

 

 

18L33

Mary Collett was one half of a set of twins born at Eye in 1734 to John Collett and his second wife Elizabeth.  Mary was baptised at Eye on 25th October 1734 in a joint ceremony with her twin brother Joseph (below).  Sadly she did not reach two years of age, when she died during 1736.

 

 

 

 

18L34

Joseph Collett was born at Eye, the twin brother of Mary Collett (above).  He was baptised in a joint ceremony with his twin sister, which took place at Eye on 25th October 1734.  However, just over a fortnight later, Joseph Collett died at Eye where he was buried on 10th November 1734.

 

 

 

 

18L35

Martha Collett was born at Wilby during 1725, and it was there that she was baptised on 10th April 1726, the first child of Samuel Collett and Susan Martha Nicholls.  She was around 25 years old when she married Henry Cornish at Worlingworth on 20th September 1750.  The marriage is known to have produced children for Martha and Henry.

 

 

 

 

18L36

Ann Collett was born at Wilby in 1727 where she was baptised on 29th August 1727, the daughter of Samuel and Susan Collett.  Although she was the second daughter of the family, it was Ann who was the first one to be married.  It was around her twentieth birthday that she married the slightly older James Rumsey who was born in 1723.  The wedding took place at Ubbeston, five miles east of Wilby on 4th November 1747.

 

 

 

 

18L37

Samuel Collett was born at Wilby in 1730 and baptised there on 10th November 1730, the first born son of Samuel and Susan Collett.  Tragically he was only four years old when he died at Wilby, where he was buried on 17th September 1735.

 

 

 

 

18L38

Elizabeth Collett was born at Wilby during 1732 and was baptised there on 5th September 1733, the daughter of Samuel and Susan Collett.

 

 

 

 

18L39

Samuel Collett was born at Wilby in 1734, where he was baptised on 30th December 1734.  He was the eldest surviving son of Samuel Collett and Susan Martha Nicholls, having been named after his deceased old brother who died earlier that same year.  Samuel Collett married Lucy Cowper by licence at Dennington on 9th October 1753.  Lucy was baptised on 2nd April 1731 at Bredfield, just north of Woodbridge, the daughter of Thomas and Lucy Cowper. 

 

 

 

Apart from their first child, who was born at Bredfield, all of the remainder of the children of Samuel and Lucy were born at Stradbroke.  It was also at Stradbroke that Samuel Collett died during 1783 and where he was buried as Samuel Collet (sic) on 6th May 1783, when he was laid to rest with the majority of his children who had been buried there over the previous twenty years.  Also within the Stradbroke burial records is an unnamed entry for 22nd April 1780, and it is conceivable that this might relate to Samuel’s wife Lucy.

 

 

 

18M19

Samuel Collett

Baptised on 26.11.1753 at Bredfield

 

18M20

Anne Collett

Baptised on 20.05.1755 at Stradbroke

 

18M21

Catherine Collett

Baptised on 05.01.1757 at Stradbroke

 

18M22

William Collett

Baptised on 05.02.1759 at Stradbroke

 

18M23

Charles Collett

Baptised on 28.11.1760 at Stradbroke

 

18M24

John Collett

Baptised on 20.01.1762 at Stradbroke

 

18M25

Richard Collett

Baptised on 16.02.1763 at Stradbroke

 

18M26

John Collett

Baptised on 16.03.1765 at Stradbroke

 

18M27

Lucy Collett

Baptised on 02.05.1766 at Stradbroke

 

18M28

Elizabeth Collett

Baptised on 13.08.1767 at Stradbroke

 

18M29

Martha Collett

Baptised on 13.08.1769 at Stradbroke

 

18M30

Philologus Collett

Baptised on 23.10.1770 at Stradbroke

 

18M31

Anthony Collett

Baptised on 28.10.1771 at Stradbroke

 

 

 

 

18L40

Susan Collett was born at Wilby in 1736 and was baptised there on 16th June 1736, the youngest daughter of Samuel Collett and Susan Martha Nicholls.  She was still living at Wilby when she married William Chenery at St Mary’s Church on 23rd August 1763.

 

 

 

 

18L41

John Collett was the last child of Samuel Collett and Susan Martha Nicholls, and was born at Wilby in 1738, where he was baptised on 11th January 1739.

 

 

 

 

18L42

Samuel Collett was born at Wilby, where he was baptised on 29th July 1731, the eldest child of Philologus Collett and Ann Feaveryeare.  It was also at Wilby that he was buried on 17th September 1735, following his death at the age of four years.

 

 

 

 

18L43

Philologus Collett was born at Wilby and was baptised there on 15th August 1738, the eldest surviving child of Philologus Collett and Ann Feaveryeare.  He was later married by licence to Rebecca Tovell at Huntingfield on 7th March 1758.  Once married, the couple settled in Wilby, where their three known children were born.

 

 

 

18M32

Anne Collett

Baptised on 04.05.1760 at Wilby

 

18M33

Philologus Collett

Baptised on 12.01.1761 at Wilby

 

18M34

Rebecca Collett

Baptised on 22.02.1764 at Wilby

 

 

 

 

18L44

WILLIAM COLLETT was baptised at Wilby on 29th June 1749.  During his early life William worked as a labourer for his father Philologus Collett, and a few years before he was first married he fathered a base-born child.  In the bastardy bond for the unborn child of Sarah Dale prepared by the churchwardens of Wilby and made on 22nd May 1768 in the eighth year of the reign of King George III, Philologus was required to pay £50 on behalf of his nineteen years old son William.  Whilst his father signed the document as ‘Phill Collett’, the document also revealed that William could not write, thus marking him as the first in this Collett line unable to do so for at least 300 years.

 

 

 

Three years later William married (1) Hannah Mills on 3rd December 1771 at Heveningham, east of Halesworth in Suffolk.  Hannah was born in 1750 and, during the next twelve years, she presented William with five children while the couple were living at Wilby.  It was also at Wilby that Hannah died and was buried on 11th March 1798.

 

 

 

William then married (2) Mary Girling on 24th November 1803 at Wilby.  She was born in 1744 and was buried at Wilby on 29th March 1834.  She survived her husband by eleven years, William having died at Wilby, where he was buried on 6th February 1823.  The above reference to the village of Heveningham is the earliest so far found in connection with the Collett family.  However, a letter written on 2nd August 1732 by Sam Manning, a dissenting teacher at Halstead in Essex, to J Morley Esquire of Halstead makes reference to a Collett - see copy of the letter reproduced below.

 

 

 

Sir, the narrative which I give you in relation to witchcraft and which you are pleased to lay your commands upon me to repeat, is as follows.  There was one Master Collett, a smith by trade, of Heveringham in the County of Suffolk, formerly servant in Sir John Duke’s family in Benhall in Suffolk who as twas customary with him, assisting the maid to churn, and not being able to make the butter come, threw a hot iron into the churn, under the notion of witchcraft in the case.  Upon which a poor labourer then employed in carrying of dung in the yard, cried out in a terrible manner.

 

“They have killed me, they have killed me” keeping his hand upon his back intimating where the pain was, and died upon the spot.  Mr Collett, with the rest of the servants then present, took off the poor man’s clothes and found to their great surprise the mark of the iron that was heated and thrown into the churn, deeply impressed upon his back.  This account I had from Mr Collett’s own mouth who, being a man of unblemished character, I verily believe to be matter of fact.

 

I am Sir, your obliged humble servant, Sam Manning

 

 

 

18M35

Hannah Collett

Baptised on 20.09.1772 at Wilby

 

18M36

William Collett

Baptised on 05.06.1775 at Wilby

 

18M37

Ann Collett

Baptised on 30.03.1777 at Wilby

 

18M38

Elizabeth Collett

Born in 1779 at Wilby

 

18M39

JOHN COLLETT

Baptised on 26.01.1783 at Wilby

 

 

 

FOOTNOTE:  On another internet website the father of John Collett (Ref. 18M39) a tailor born in 1783, is said to be James Collett who died at Halesworth on 28.11.1818 aged 73, placing his year of birth as 1745.  He was a breeches maker of Halesworth and his wife was Ann Smith who died at Halesworth on 24.09.1837 aged 86), while they were married at Halesworth (Boyd’s Marriage Index).  In February 1783 James had an apprentice, John Chapman, working with him in Halesworth.  James was the son of William Collett and Mary Brooks who were married at Halesworth on 24th June 1731, the grandson of William Collett and Mary Sheming (Sherning), and the great grandson of John Collett and Margaret Barfoot, with the latter’s father being named as Reynold Collett. 

 

 

 

Of additional interest, while focusing on the town of Halesworth, are James Collett, a butcher, and George Collett, a cabinet, who were both listed in the Halesworth Directory on 1844.  Further work therefore needs to be done on this.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

APPENDIX ONE

 

 

 

At an earlier time, in the 1500s, there were members of the Collett family living around Blythburgh, Westleton and Dunwich.  Brief details are known for likely brothers Robert of Westleton, William of Blythburgh and Thomas of Westleton, plus their four married sisters, from the information provided in the Wills of Robert Collett in 1559 and William Collett in 1568.  The two Wills also have a common link with Robert Coppin of Dunwich being the supervisor for both documents.

 

 

 

The father of this family was William Collett (Ref. 18d1) and his son Robert Collett (Ref. 18e1), who died in 1559, was married to Beatrix, while the wife of William Collett (Ref. 18e2) was Agnes.  The children of William and Agnes were Erasmus Collett (Ref. 18f1), Agnes Collett (Ref. 18f2) and Rachel Collett (Ref. 18f3), and they were all under adult age at the time of the death of their father in 1568.  It is also known that Agnes gave birth to the couple’s fourth children (Ref. 18f4) after he died.  Thomas Collett (Ref. 18e3) of Westleton was married and had a son William Collett (Ref. 18f5), and possibly another son Matthew Collett (Ref. 18f6).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

APPENDIX TWO

 

 

 

Moving forward two hundred years, the next mention of Westleton comes in 1771 when Elizabeth Collett (Ref. 18m1) married (1) George Howlett of Westleton at Dunwich on 10th Jun 1771 (transcribed from Westleton Fiche No. 5 of 18).  Ten years later George Howlett died at Westleton on 12th March 1781 and was buried at St. Peter's Anglican Church (National Burial Index for England and Wales), following which his widow Elizabeth Howlett nee Collett marries (2) William Briggs at St Peter’s Church in Dunwich on 4th February 1783.  William Briggs was a widower who had been born in 1757.  That second marriage for Elizabeth produced four children, the first two baptised at Westleton, the next two at Dunwich.   They were James Briggs 1783, Jonas Briggs 1785, Mary Briggs 1790, and Benjamin Briggs 1791.  A current day descendent of this Elizabeth Collett is Pat d'Easum in Western Canada, who also kindly provided the details below.

 

 

 

The National Archives (Ref. #6 1205-1900) Dunwich Town Records includes, under the sub-section Sacrament Certificates, the incomplete details of the baptism records for five William Colletts as followed.  William Collett (Ref. 18l1) of Dunwich – 27th October 1716 (EE6/1144/175/13), William Collett (Ref. 18l2) of Dunwich - 24th December 1718 (EE6/1144/175/18), William Collett (Ref. 18l3) of Dunwich - 18th October year not clear (EE6/1144/175/20), and William Collett (Ref. 18l4) of Dunwich – 30th July again year not clear (EE6/1144/175/39).  It is therefore possible that a surviving William Collett may have been the father of Elizabeth (above).

 

 

 

Another of the Dunwich Town Records (EE6/1144/185/36) dated 21st February 1764 also provides the name of James Collett (Ref. 18m2), who was very likely related in some way to both Elizabeth and William.  It reads:  “Notice to quit property late Sir Jacob Garod Downing now belonging to Lady Downing.  Contents served by Lady Downing, dated 16th August 1764 on” - and there then is a list of 13 names of which at number 12 is the name James Collett.  The words then continue:  “Robinson Property which you held or occupied at his death as Tenants to him by Parol agreement and not under any Demise, on lease from said Sir Jacob Garod.”

 

 

 

The last of the Collett references noted within the Dunwich Town Records may well refer to this same James Collett as it was recorded that same year (EE6/1144/36 – 1764).  “Examination of Collett, Moore, Hobart, Bayspole and Foster, sons of freemen who were unable to have the Freedom of the Borough unless they gave each a bond.  After Michaelmas 1764 freedom could be obtained without giving bond.