Part 18 - The Suffolk Line 1745 to 1830

PART EIGHTEEN

 

The Main Suffolk Line - 1745 to 1830

 

This is the second of four sections of Part 18 of the Collett family

 

Updated May 2020

 

 

Cornelius Wade Collett [18M1] was born in 1744, one year after his parents, Cornelius Collett and Jane Wade, were married at Rendlesham.  He was baptised at Melton, where his father had been baptised twenty-five years earlier, the ceremony taking place of 24th March 1744.  Cornelius was 21 years of age when he married Elizabeth Randall by licence at Orford on 6th May 1765.  However, it was after only two years together that Cornelius Collett died and was buried at Orford, south of Aldeburgh, on 3rd July 1767.  It was always known that he died before his father, who passed away in 1790, since had he been alive at that time, he would have inherited Westerfield Manor

 

John Blomfield Collett [18M2] was born at Westerfield during 1745 where he was baptised on 9th March 1745, the second son of Cornelius and Jane Collett.  He was around 21 years old when he died and was buried at Westerfield on 21st November 1766

 

Mileson Collett [18M3] was born at Westerfield in 1747, and was baptised there on 11th September 1747, the youngest of the three sons of Cornelius Collett and Jane Wade.  Tragically it was only six weeks later that he was buried at Westerfield on 16th October 1747

 

Margaret Collett [18M4] was born at Melton in 1762 where she was baptised on 30th January 1762, the only known child of Cornelius Collett and his third wife Anne.  She only survived for another five days when she was buried at Melton on 4th February 1762, when she was named as the daughter of gentleman Cornelius Collett and his wife Ann

 

Margaret Collett [18M5] was born at Westerfield in 1770 and was baptised there on 19th October 1770, the only child of Cornelius Collett and his fourth wife Margaret Driver.  Margaret was 19 years old when her father died, by which time she was the only surviving child of Cornelius Collett, his three sons from a previous marriage having already passed away.  Under the terms of her father’s Will of 1789, Margaret and the heirs of her body were to receive all his real and personal estate and in default of these to his nephew and merchant banker Cornelius Collett (below) of Woodbridge and to William Goodwin of Earl Soham, in trust for sale and to divide the proceeds amongst the children of his late brother Anthony, the father of the aforementioned Cornelius.  During the following year, on 6th April 1790 at Westerfield, Margaret Collett married the Reverend John Davis Plestow clerk of St Mary le Tower in Ipswich, a fellow of St John’s College Oxford, who later became Rector of Harkstead in Suffolk.  Their marriage produced four children, one of whom was Catherine Margaret Plestow, who was baptised on 2nd September 1791, and another was Elizabeth Plestow who was born on 17th October 1792, and baptised on 23rd December 1792.  The other two children were a son and a daughter

 

Anthony Collett [18M6] was born at Eyke on 1st December 1744, and was baptised there on 27th January 1745, the eldest child of Anthony Collett and Mary May.  He married Catherine Trusson of Kelsale, near Saxmundham, who was the daughter of Gabriel Trusson of Kelsale, who was the High Sheriff of Suffolk in 1766, and his wife Catherine Bence.  Catherine Trusson was baptised at Kelsale on 14th February 1749, so it was one week after her twentieth birthday when she married Anthony Collett at Kelsale on 21st February 1769.  Once married the couple settled in the town of Walton, next to the port of Felixstowe, and it was while they were living there that all of their known children were born and where they were baptised.  As the eldest son of Anthony Collett of Eyke, Anthony was a major beneficiary under the terms of his father’s Will of 1783 in which he was referred to nine times.  The Will was proved in 1785.  (see Will in Legal Documents)

 

Anthony’s and Catherine’s eldest son Anthony Collett was educated at University College in Oxford and a note in the 1787-1793 University College Oxford records described the student’s father as ‘Anthony Collett of Walton in Suffolk’.  It would also appear that Anthony and Catherine lived all of their married life together at Walton, since it was there that Anthony Collett ‘esquire’ died on 31st July 1804 and was buried at Walton on 4th August 1804, at the age of 59.  He was followed by his wife who died fifteen years later, when she was buried there on 20th June 1819, aged 69.  At the time of her death she was described as ‘Catherine widow of Kelsale’ and her Will was proved on 20th July 1819.  The couple’s burial records at Walton read as follows: ”Anth Collett late of this par 31 Jul 1804 age 59, Cath his w only dau of Gabriel Trusson esq of Kelsale in this co. & Cath his w dau of Rev Tho Bence R. of Kelsale 20 Jun 1819 age 69”.  This is the second mention of the name Trusson in this family line (see Ref. 18J2).  The Trusson family had a long association with the Colletts.  In his Will of 1686, Thomas Trusson of Alderton makes reference to Elizabeth Collett, the wife of Cornelius Collett (Ref. 18J2).  See also Ref. 18O22, Ref. 18O51, Ref. 18P5, Ref. 18Q2, Ref. 18R5 and Ref. 18S2, for other connections with the Trusson name

 

18N1 – Anthony Collett was born in 1769 at Walton

18N2 – Thomas Collett was born in 1771 at Walton

18N3 – Catherine Collett was born in 1773 at Walton

18N4 – Charles Collett was born in 1774 at Walton

18N5 – Cornelius Collett was born in 1786 at Walton

18N6 – Cornelius Collett was born in 1789 at Walton

 

Mary Collett [18M7] was born at Eyke during September 1746, where she was baptised on 8th October 1746, the eldest daughter of Anthony Collett and Mary May.  It was originally thought that Mary was in her mid-thirties when she married William Wallis Mason on 5th May 1782 at Westcote, which lies midway between Stow-on-the-Wold in Gloucestershire and Burford in Oxfordshire.  However, new details provided by Doreen Howes in 2012 suggested that Mary and William, who may have been born in 1744, had four children by that date, although only one of them may have survived.  This would mean that they were most likely married in the early 1770s, and that the May date in 1782 was more likely to be the date on which Mary Mason nee Collett actually died.  This would also correspond with the known fact that her widowed husband William was remarried during the following years.  This would also then provide the reason why Mary was not named in her father’s Will which was written in June 1783.  Further information received from Avryll Sixtus in April 2013 confirms the following details of the life of Mary Collett and William Wallis Mason.  William was baptised at St Philip’s Church in Birmingham on 17th August 1742, the eldest son of John Wallis Mason and Sarah Richardson and it was on 29th January 1774 that he married Mary Collett the daughter of Anthony Collett

 

The baptisms of the four children of William Wallis Mason and his wife Mary were conducted at St Philip’s Church in Birmingham, and they confirm the children were Mary Mason who was baptised on 24th May 1775, William Wallis Mason who was baptised on 25th October 1776, Elizabeth Mason who was baptised on 28th November 1777, who died on 3rd February 1778, and Charles Mason who was baptised on 3rd October 1778, who died on 30th November 1778, although an alternative source suggests that he died on the same day that he was baptised.  It is possible that the couple’s eldest daughter Mary also died in infancy, since William Wallis Mason junior was the only child referred to in the Will of William Wallis Mason senior following his death in 1805.  It was jeweller, businessman and merchant William Wallis Mason, born in 1776 and the son of Mary Collett, who later married Mary Ward at St Peter’s Cathedral in Sheffield on 5th July 1805.  Mary was the daughter of Joseph Ward and Sarah Aslin, and over twelve years she presented her husband with six children born at Leek Wootton, Beverley and East Barnet.  They were William Wallis Mason (born in 1806), Mary Mason (born in 1808), Sarah Collett Mason (born in 1810), Henry Ward Mason (born in 1812), Charlotte Mason, and Eliza Ann Mason (born in 1818).  It was their eldest son William Wallis Mason, who had his own pharmacy business in Manchester who married Mary Anne Poole in 1834, and it was their son James Collett Mason (born in 1853) who married Jessie Susette Collett (Ref. 18P38) in Argentina during 1887

 

William Wallis Mason (born in 1776) was living at Chorlton in Manchester at the time of the census in 1841 when he and Mary had two domestic servants and it was there that he died at the end of 1849, with his widow Mary surviving him by nine years.  The Will of William Wallis Mason was written in 1809 at Beverley in Yorkshire, in which his brother-in-law Thomas Asline Ward was one of the executors.  Following the death of Mary Mason nee Collett on 5th May 1782, William Wallis Mason married Elizabeth Oliver on 13th February 1784 with whom he had a further nine children.  By marrying Elizabeth Oliver, William obtained land in Worcestershire as the result of a marriage settlement, also made during September 1782 between himself and the previous owner of the land, that being Elizabeth’s father.  Copies of the confirming document are held within Birmingham City Archives.  The land in question was partly made up of land originally forming Malvern Priory Demesne and lying to the south of the Priory, hence the name ‘Southfields’

 

As regards the children of William Wallis Mason and his second wife Elizabeth, the parish registers for St Philip’s Church in Birmingham [now Birmingham Cathedral] contain the baptism records for their nine children who were born between 1783 and 1798, two of whom died in infancy.  The nine children were Sarah Mason (born in 1784), James Mason (born in 1785), Oliver Mason (born in 1787), Philip Mason (born in 1788), Charles Mason (born in 1790), Samuel Mason (born in 1791), George Mason (1794-1795), Mary Mason (born in 1796), and Frederick Mason (1798-1800).  It would appear that only three of the seven surviving children were still living in 1842, and they were James Mason and Oliver Mason and their sister Mary Palmer who had married the Reverend Edward Palmer in 1833.  However, by the time the land at Malvern was put up for sale in 1846 only Oliver Mason and his sister Mary were still alive

 

Cornelius Collett [18M8] was baptised at Eyke on 27th March 1748, the son of Anthony Collett and Mary May.  Like many of his siblings, Cornelius was not referred to in his father’s Will of June 1783, although that may have been due the arrangement between Cornelius’ father Anthony and his brother Cornelius Collett (Ref. 18L1), Lord of the Manor at Westerfield, whose Will six years later would benefit Cornelius and his surviving siblings, as detailed below.  Under the terms his uncle’s Will of 1789, his only surviving child, his daughter Margaret and her children were to receive all his real and personal estate and in default of these to his nephew and merchant banker Cornelius Collett of Woodbridge and to William Goodwin of Earl Soham, in trust for sale and to divide the proceeds amongst the children of his late brother Anthony, that is Cornelius and his siblings

 

It was therefore sometime after that when Westerfield Manor was later sold to farmer Edward Edgar and his wife Barbara.  By 1820 the manor house was held by Mileson Edgar of Red House Park.  Ten years later it passed to his son Reverend Mileson Gery Edgar and, on his death in 1853, the manor was inherited by his nephew Captain Mileson Edgar of Red House Park.  It is of particular interest that Captain Mileson Edgar was the son of the Reverend Edward Raikes Edgar and his wife Mary Lynch Collett, the daughter of Charles Collett (Ref. 18N4) and Charlotte Lynch

 

Cornelius Collett is known to have married Susanna Page who was born at Clapton around 1740, with whom he had five children.  Susanna Collett died at Woodbridge on 30th January 1818, and was buried at Eyke on 6th February 1818, aged 77.  Following the death of her husband’s death at Eyke ten years later on 20th November 1828, Cornelius’ Will was proved on 17th December 1828.  In his Will he was referred to as ‘Cornelius Collett, banker of Woodbridge in Suffolk’, although it was at Eyke that he was buried with his wife on 23rd November 1828 at the age of 80.  It may be of interest that in Woodbridge today, there is a thoroughfare with the name ‘Collett Walk’.  It might therefore be assumed that this was named as a tribute to Cornelius Collett

 

18N7 – Cornelius Collett was born in 1774 at Woodbridge

18N8 – Susanna Collett was born in 1775 at Woodbridge

18N9 – Cornelius Collett was born in 1776 at Woodbridge

18N10 – Lucy Collett was born in 1777 at Woodbridge

18N11 – Elizabeth Collett was born in 1778 at Woodbridge

18N12 – Mary Collett was born in 1780 at Woodbridge

 

Robert Collett [18M9] was born at Eyke on 10th September 1749, where he was baptised on 18th September 1749, the son of Anthony Collett and Mary May.  He married Jane Brice of Southampton on 1st January 1780 at St Michael’s Church in Southampton.  Robert Collett, Merchant of London, died there on 28th July 1824, aged 77, while his wife Jane died nine years after in 1833.  Robert was yet another child of Anthony Collett not to be mentioned in his Will of June 1783

 

18N13 – Robert Henry Collett was born in 1781 at London

18N14 – William Brice Collett was born in 1785 at London

 

John Collett [18M10] was born at Eyke in 1750, where he was baptised on 22nd October 1750, the son of Anthony Collett and Mary May.  Tragically, when he was twenty-eight years old, he drowned off the coast of Ireland in 1778

 

Margaret Collett [18M11] was born at Eyke in 1752, and was baptised there on 15th March 1752, the daughter of Anthony Collett and Mary May.  Like some of her other siblings, Margaret was not mentioned in her father Anthony’s Will of 1783, which may indicate that she was already financially stable by then, as a result of her two marriages.  There is some confusion about the two marriages of Margaret Collett, although it is known that she married (1) Thomas Ward of Dedham and (2) John Russell of Woodbridge, but not necessarily in that order.  The marriage to Thomas Ward took place at Eyke on 7th June 1776.  Margaret died at Grundisburgh on 16th February 1812, where she was also buried

 

Elizabeth Collett [18M13] was born at Eyke on 8th March 1754 and was baptised there on 16th May 1754, the daughter of Anthony Collett and Mary May.  She was not a direct beneficiary under the terms of her father’s Will of 1783, although one thousand pounds was bequeathed to any future lawful issue that she might ever have that survived beyond the age of twenty-one.  Eight years after the death of her father Anthony, Elizabeth Collett married John Ebden on 29th October 1793 at Woodbridge.  John was born at Sisland in Norfolk on 21st January 1750 and was the youngest of the seven children of William Ebden and Honour (Honoria) Bardwell.  It was also at Sisland that he was baptised privately on 2nd February 1751, and again publicly on 21st February 1751.  The marriage to Elizabeth Collett was the second for John, he having previously married Sarah Norman on 7th January 1783.  Sarah, who was baptised on 14th June 1752 at St Cross South Elmham, died at Loddon in Norfolk on 10th January 1793.  That first marriage for John resulted in five children, with his second marriage to Elizabeth producing a further three children, all eight having been born at Loddon.  Following the death of Elizabeth Ebden in 1842, the following obituary was published in the Ipswich Journal on Saturday 30th April 1842.  “23rd inst., in the 88th year of her age, much regretted, Elizabeth, widow of John Ebden, Esq, of Haughley in the county, and mother of the Rev J C Ebden of this town.  She was daughter of the late Anthony Collett, Esq. of Eyke, and the last survivor of his numerous family”

 

As a young man John Ebden was a surgeon in the North American colonies before serving with the British Army in the American War of Independence, during which he was captured.  However, he was released on parole to continue his work as a surgeon.  After 4th July 1776 John returned to England and took up the position of Surgeon to His Majesty’s Hospital for Sick and Wounded Soldiers at Plymouth.  With his brother Thomas, Surgeon of Loddon, he later instituted "a convenient house at Loddon for the receipt of lunatic patients, whose occasional confinement will be softened by every care and attention that humanity can dictate".  That was Loddon House, on Beccles Road in Loddon, which was built in 1716.  However, it was only in 1827 that it was licenced as an asylum ‘for 25 lunatics’ and that only lasted until 1845 when it was eventually closed down

 

The eldest of Elizabeth’s and John’s three children was James Collett Ebden who was born at Loddon on 16th August 1794.  On 2nd September 1828 he married Elizabeth Wylde (1802-1880) at St Michael’s Church, Millbrook in Bedfordshire.  She was the daughter of Elizabeth Powney and Captain Sydenham Teast Wylde adjutant of the Somerset Yeomanry who was killed aged 24 when he was thrown from his horse while riding home from camp.  James Collett Ebden (pictured right) was educated at Stowmarket and became an Anglican Deacon in 1817 and a Priest in 1818.  He is known to have been the tutor to two of the Duke of Wellington’s great nephews and was the headmaster at Ipswich Grammar School from 1832 to 1843.  The Reverend James Collett Ebden died at Great Stukeley near Huntingdon on 15th February 1884, and his Will made on 4th November 1880, was proved on 15th July 1884.  Tragically his son, Samuel Collett Ebden, who was born at Ipswich on 19th February 1837, died on 3rd February 1849 at St Giles in Northampton as a result of earlier injuries sustained when he fell from an upstairs window of his father’s home at The Vicarage in Great Stukeley.  James Collett Ebden was 89 when he died.  He was a Fellow of Gonville & Caius College, Cambridge, but migrated to Trinity Hall as Fellow and Tutor.  He and Elizabeth had ten children, poor Samuel was the sixth, more importantly the third was Richard Powney Ebden, CB, Chief Clerk of the Colonial Office, the seventh was Francis Thomas Ebden, Indian Army Colonel and the ninth Edward James Ebden, ICS Commissioner, Bombay Presidency

 

His wife Elizabeth Wylde (1802-1880) kept a diary in which she made the following entries in 1867.

February 6th: Mr Collett and Miss Grant arrived in the afternoon.  Mr Collett leaves tomorrow.  Miss Grant is to stay for a fortnight

February 28th: Miss Grant took leave of us today and started out for Ipswich & Brightwell by the Midland Counties train to Cambridge from Godmanchester station.  Very sorry to part with her

 

Then, in letters to her youngest son Edward in India, she writes on 6th June 1869, you will have heard of Mr Collett’s death.  After undergoing the severe operation for lithotomy in London, and was doing well, a sharp attack of asthma on that weakness caused him to sink.  Your father buried him at Brightwell at the earliest request of the family.  It was a trying business for him, he having known him so many years.  There was no Will to be found, and poor Mrs Collett and Kate find themselves left wholly unprovided for.  If Woodthorpe is allowed by the Lunacy Commission to remain with his mother and sister, that would help them a little. but not sufficiently without aid from the County Clergy Charity.  Mrs Collett being 73 years of age & Kate by no means youthful now, your father is using every effort in the letter writing to promote their interests in Lincolnshire, her native county.  This is a reference to Woodthorpe Collett (Ref. 18N22), his wife and his unmarried daughter Catherine, being Kate

 

Exactly three years after the birth of their son James, Elizabeth gave birth to a daughter Juliet Ebden, who was baptised at Loddon on 13th August 1897, when her parents were confirmed as John Ebden and Elizabeth Collett Ebden.  Later in their life, Elizabeth and John Ebden and their family moved to Haughley, just north-west of Stowmarket, where they lived at Fir Tree House.  And it was there that John died on 4th September 1834 followed by Elizabeth on 23rd April 1842, both of them being buried at Haughley in Suffolk.  John Ebden’s Will was made less than a week before his death and was dated 29th August 1834, and was proved on 26th September 1834

 

John’s brother and fellow surgeon Thomas Ebden is of interest for other reasons.  He was born at Cringleford on 5th September 1743 and was baptised there six days later at St Peters Church on 11th September.  He married (1) Sarah Norman’s sister, but she died without issue.  Thomas then married (2) Mary Grimmer in 1785, the marriage producing eight children for the couple, although their first two sons died in infancy.  Thomas Ebden was buried at St Andrews Church in Barton Bendish on 4th December 1808 and his Will, made on 3rd June 1802 was proved at Norwich on 24th May 1810.  His seventh child was Sophia Ebden who was born at Barton Bendish on 12th July 1799.  She married James Collett (Ref. 18N25) in 1830, but tragically died in January 1836 although not before presenting James with a daughter Fanny Collett, and a son Ebden Collett.  James Collett was a nephew of Elizabeth Collett, he being the son of her brother Samuel Collett (below)

 

All of the original information relating to the Ebden family has been kindly supplied by Edward Anthony Maitland Ebden who was born at Kensington in London on 20th December 1955.  Sadly, Edward’s older brother William Nicholas Collett Ebden died in San Diego on 14th August 1973, three months before his twentieth birthday, following which he was buried at Eynsford in Kent.  During the years since the receipt of that initial information from Edward, other snippets of information have been gratefully received from Bill Ebden, Jack Ebden, and Edward Ebden himself

 

William Collett [18M14] was baptised at Eyke on 30th November 1755, the son of Anthony Collett and Mary May.  He was educated at Merton College in Oxford where he matriculated on 6th February 1783 aged 26.  The college record confirmed that he was the son of Anthony Collett of Eyke.  William was one of the three major beneficiaries in the 1783 Will of his father who died in 1785, the other two being his mother Mary and his eldest brother Anthony (above).  During the year following his matriculation, William Collett married Anna Carthew of Woodbridge on 13th July 1784.  She was the daughter of the Reverend Thomas Carthew, of Woodbridge Abbey, and his wife Elizabeth Morden, the first of his four wives.  Elizabeth was the daughter of the Rev Thomas Morden, who was the brother of Sir William Morden Harbord, and it was the Morden family connection that later helped secure the post of Chaplain at Morden College in Blackheath for the only son of William Collett, his namesake William Collett.  The six known children of William and Anna Collett were all born and baptised at All Saints Church in Swanton Morley

 

Later in his life William Collett became the Rector of Swanton Morley in Norfolk and died on 20th September 1825 at the age of 69.  Anna died at Clapham in Surrey on 27th December 1830 aged 70, where she was buried on 31st December 1830.  The order of the birth of their children below is an approximate assumption based purely on the dates that they were married, since the exact dates that they were born have not been established at this time.  Today, in All Saints Church in Swanton Morley there is a large marble memorial plaque over the doorway to the Vestry to William Collett and his family.  This says:

“Sacred to the Memory of The Rev. William Collett who died September 20th 1825 in the 70th year of his age.  During a period of more than 41 years he resided and officiated as the Minister of this Parish with Worthing, having been appointed Curate in 1784 and Rector in 1808.  Charlotte Collett died Feb 27th 1805 aged 18 years.  Anna Collett died Nov 16th 1806 aged 21 years.  Anna his widow, daughter of Rev Thomas Carthew of Woodbridge Abbey Suffolk- Died 24th Dec 1830 aged 70 years.  She was buried with her husband and their above-named children in the vault at the NE corner of the Church yard

 

Although not confirmed, some sources believe William and Anna had another daughter Sarah Collett, now added below.  However, unlike all of their other children, no baptism record for Sarah has been found, which places doubt on her being the child of William and Anna.  That Sarah or Sara Collett was originally believed to have married General George Whitmore, although that has now been disapproved thanks to new details received from Margaret Davison.  What is interesting in the details provided by Margaret is that William and Anna’s daughter Sophie had a daughter Sarah who did marry a member of the Whitmore family

 

18N15 – Anna Collett was born in 1785 at Swanton Morley

18N16 – Charlotte Collett was born in 1787 at Swanton Morley

18N17 – Sophia Collett was born in 1788 at Swanton Morley

18N18 – Mary Collett was born in 1789 at Swanton Morley

18N19 – Frances Elizabeth Collett was born in 1792 at Swanton Morley

18N20 – Sarah Collett – not confirmed1794 at Swanton Morley

18N21 – William Collett was born in 1796 at Swanton Morley

 

Nathaniel Collett [18M15] was born at Eyke during August 1757, where he was baptised on 20th August 1757, the son of Anthony Collett and Mary May.  Whilst he was not a direct beneficiary under the terms of his father’s Will, one thousand pounds was bequeathed to any future lawful issue that he might ever have, that survived beyond the age of twenty-one

 

Anne Collett [18M16] was baptised at Eyke on 27th July 1759, the youngest daughter of Anthony Collett and Mary May.  It was also at Eyke that Anne later married surgeon William Jones of Woodbridge on 22nd September 1793.  Anne was yet another sibling who was not mentioned in the Will of her father, which was written in 1783

 

Woodthorpe Collett [18M17] was born at Eyke where he was baptised on 16th December 1762, the son of Anthony Collett and Mary May.  Just like his brother Nathaniel (above), Woodthorpe was also mentioned in his father’s Will as receiving one thousand pounds towards payment of any future lawful issue that he might ever have, should he survive beyond the age of twenty-one.  He was married twice during his life, the first time to (1) Charlotte Spurling, the daughter of John Spurling esquire of Grundisburgh, whom he married at Burgh during July 1794, and with whom he had two children before Charlotte’s untimely death at Grundisburgh on 12th December 1796, following which she was buried there on 19th December 1796.  Eighteen months later, on 24th July 1798, Woodthorpe married (2) Letitia Skinner, the daughter of Francis Skinner of Ipswich, and that marriage produced a second daughter for Woodthorpe.  Woodthorpe Collett was 71 when he died at Clopton, near Grundisburgh, on 23rd December 1833, following which he was buried at Grundisburgh on 29th December 1833.  His wife Letitia Collett had already died at Clopton by then, she having passed away on 10th May 1830, and it was recorded that Letitia Collett, aged 69, at Grundisburgh on 15th May 1830

 

18N22 – Woodthorpe Collett was born in 1795 at Grundisburgh

18N23 – Charlotte Collett was born in 1796 at Grundisburgh

18N24 – Letitia Mary Collett was born in 1798 at Grundisburgh

 

Samuel Collett [18M18] was born at Eyke, and it was there that he was baptised on 10th April 1764, the youngest child of Anthony Collett and Mary May.  He was just approaching 21 years of age when his father died in 1785.  In his father’s Will, Samuel was named as the youngest son, but was not a major beneficiary although, like his two brothers Nathaniel and Woodthorpe (above), one thousand pounds was bequeathed to him for any future lawful issue that he might ever have, if he survived beyond the age of twenty-one.  Samuel was nearly 30 on 12th September 1793 when he married Sarah Day, the daughter of John Day of St John’s, although there is speculation that Sarah may have been his second wife.  It was nearly twelve years after they were married that Sarah presented Samuel with their only known child.  Samuel Collett of Foxhall died on 17th March 1825 at the age of 60, following which he was buried in the churchyard at Blyford, midway between Halesworth and Southwold.  His widow survived him by almost twenty years, during which time she had left Blyford to settle in Hethersett, near Norwich, where Sarah Collett died on 18th October 1844, at the age of 73

 

18N25 – James Collett was born in 1805

 

William Collett [18M22] was born at Stradbroke where he was baptised on 5th February 1759, the eldest son of Samuel Collett and Lucy Cowper.  New information kindly provided by Liz Whittaker in April 2010 revealed that William first married (1) Ann Wood on 14th September 1784, but with no issue.  According to the Suffolk Register of Marriages, Ann Wood was a widow.  The records also show that, as Anna Tharlow, she married John Wood at Fressingfield on 7th February 1780.  It was more recent information, provided by Robert Porter that indicated Ann Wood was formerly Anna Tharlow.  This new information also stated that she died at Fressingfield, where she was buried on 15th June 1786, less than two years after she had married William Collett.  Following the death of his first wife, William would have been around 32 when he married (2) Ann Flint at Fressingfield on 10th October 1791.  The record of that marriage included the letter W after his name, confirming his status as a widower.  Ann was much younger than William, having been born around at 1770. 

 

All of William’s and Ann’s first seven children were born while the family was living at Fressingfield in Suffolk, which lies just four miles south of county boundary with Norfolk, while no baptism record for their eighth child has yet been found.  Ann Collett died at Fressingfield, where she was buried on 21st May 1837, aged 71.  Seven months later William Collett was described as the father of the groom and a labourer on the marriage certificate for his eldest son and widower William Collett, on the occasion of his second marriage to Mary Ann Dye at Poringland Magna, near Norwich in December 1837.  According to the census in June 1841, and following the death of his wife, William was living at Barlow Green in Stradbroke with the family of John and Phillace (Phyllis) Sayer when he had a rounded age of 85 and was still apparently working as an agricultural labourer.  The maiden name of Phyllis Sayer was Collett, so she was more than like the youngest child of William Collett and Ann Flint.  However, less than five months later Phyllis Sayer nee Collett died at Stradbroke and it may have been from that time that William lived in the workhouse.  What is known for sure is that William Collett died at the age of 88 on 3rd April 1846 at Union House in Shipmeadow near Beccles in Suffolk.  The cause of death was simply given as ‘old age’, while the informant was the Master of the Union House.  And it was also at Shipmeadow that he was buried on 7th April 1846

 

18N26 – William Collett was born in 1793 at Fressingfield

18N27 – Henry Collett was born in 1795 at Fressingfield

18N28 – Charles Collett was born in 1799 at Fressingfield

18N29 – Samuel Collett was born in 1801 at Fressingfield

18N30 – Benjamin Collett was born in 1803 at Fressingfield

18N31 – John Collett was born in 1805 at Fressingfield

18N32 – Lucy Collett was born in 1807 at Fressingfield

18N33 – Phyllis Collett was born in 1810 at Fressingfield

 

Charles Collett [18M23] was baptised at Stradbroke on 28th November 1760, the son of Samuel and Lucy Collett.  It seems highly likely that he was the Charles Collett who married Ann Taylor at Halesworth on 30th March 1786

 

John Collett [18M24] was born at Stradbroke, where he was baptised on 20th January 1762, the son of Samuel and Lucy Collett.  Sadly, just three months later he died and was buried there on 17th April 1762, when he was described as John Collett, infant

 

John Collett [18M26] was baptised at Stradbroke on 16th March 1765, and was the youngest surviving son of Samuel Collett and Lucy Cowper.  He married Elizabeth Thurlow who was baptised in 1763 at Wingfield, where the couple’s first child was born, before the family settled in Saxmundham where their remaining children were all born.  It is possible, although not proved, that Elizabeth Thurlow may have been a sister or some other relative of Anna Tharlow, the first wife of John’s older brother William Collett (above).  Tragedy struck the young family in 1803, when John Collett was killed at Saxmundham after falling from a tree on 7th January 1803, although his age was stated as being 35, when actually he was around 38.  In 1841 there were two widows by the name of Elizabeth Collett still living in Saxmundham, one was 70 and the other was 82, one of which was undoubtedly the widow of John Collett.  It has now been confirmed that John and Elizabeth did have more children than was originally thought, and that it was their two youngest sons, Charles and William who were born at Saxmundham, who feature in Part 30 – The Suffolk & Norfolk Line

 

18M34 - John Collett was born in 1785 at Wingfield

18M35 - Ann Collett was born in 1791 at Saxmundham

18M36 - Hannah Collett was born in 1793 at Saxmundham

18M37 - Charles Collett was born in 1795 at Saxmundham

18M38 - William Collett was born in 1798 at Saxmundham

 

Lucy Collett [18M27] was born at Stradbroke where she was baptised on 2nd May 1766, the daughter of Samuel and Lucy Collett.  It was also at Stradbroke that she was buried on 16th December 1781, when she was recorded as Lucy Collet aged 15

 

Elizabeth Collett [18M28] was born at Stradbroke and was baptised there on 13th August 1767, the daughter of Samuel and Lucy Collett.  Around three months later she died and was buried at Stradbroke on 26th November 1767, when her surname was spelt using a single t

 

Martha Collett [18M29] was born at Stradbroke where she was baptised on 13th August 1769.  Curiously upon her death she was the only child in the tragic family of Samuel and Lucy Collett whose name was correctly spelt within the parish register when she was buried at Stradbroke on 1st July 1770

 

Philologus Collett [18M30] was born at Stradbroke and it was there that he was baptised on 23rd October 1770, the son of Samuel and Lucy Collett.  Sadly, he was ten years old when he was buried at Stradbroke on 16th November 1780, as confirmed by the parish register under the name of Collett

 

Anthony Collett [18M31] was born at Stradbroke where he was baptised on 28th October 1771, the last child of Samuel Collett and his wife Lucy Cowper.  He never reached his fourth birthday since he died during February 1775 and was buried at Stradbroke on 21st February 1775 as Anthony Collet, infant

 

Hannah Collett [18M32] was born at Wilby where she was baptised on 20th September 1772, the eldest child of William Collett and his first wife Hannah Mills.  Hannah never married, although she gave birth to a base-born son who was also baptised at Wilby when she was 20 years old.  It is possible the child was already a couple of years old by then according to one unconfirmed source.  Tragically it was only nine years later that she died at Wilby, where the parish register recorded the burial of Hannah Collett on 17th July 1801 at the age of 27 (sic)

 

18N39 – William Collett was born in 1792 at Wilby

 

William Collett [18M36] was born at Wilby where he was baptised on 5th June 1775, the second son of William Collett and Hannah Mills.  It was also at Wilby that William married Dinah Lockwood on 23rd December 1798.  Dinah was baptised at Wilby on 4th August 1776, the daughter of Evans Lockwood and Jemima Rumsey.  She was also the sister of Evans Lockwood who married William’s sister Ann Collett (below).  All of the children of William Collett and Dinah Lockwood were born and baptised at Wilby.  William and Dinah were residing in Wilby in 1841 when they were both 65, although Dinah’s age was incorrectly recorded as 55.  Living there with them was their unmarried son John Collett, who was 25.  William Collett died during the next decade since his widow was still living at Wilby within the Hoxne & Dennington registration district on the day of the census in 1851.  Dinah Collett, aged 77, died four years later during 1855

 

18N40 – Jemima Collett (twin) was born in 1800 at Wilby

18N41 – Dinah Collett (twin) was born in 1800 at Wilby

18N42 – Mary Ann Collett was born in 1802 at Wilby

18N43 – Dinah Collett was born in 1804 at Wilby

18N44 – Jemima Collett was born in 1807 at Wilby

18N45 – William Collett was born in 1809 at Wilby

18N46 – John Collett was born in 1814 at Wilby

18N47 – James Collett was born in 1817 at Wilby

 

Ann Collett [18M37] was born at Wilby and was baptised there on 30th March 1777.  Three years after her brother William (above) had married Dinah Lockwood, Ann Collett married her brother Evans Lockwood at Wilby on 9th November 1801.  Evans was the son of Evans Lockwood and Jemima Rumsey, and was baptised at Wilby on 16th October 1763.  Evans Lockwood was elected the Clerk of Wilby Parish Council on 15th February 1796.  Both Ann and Evans were buried at Wilby, Ann on 26th May 1842, and Evans on 7th May 1844.  It is likely that the couple had more than the one child mentioned here, but that child, Hezekiah Lockwood who was born at Wilby in 1806, is specifically referred to because he later married his cousin Ann Collett, the eldest daughter of John Collett (below)

 

Elizabeth Collett [18M38] was born at Wilby in 1779, and it was there that she was baptised on 27th July 1800, the daughter of William Collett and his first wife Hannah Mills

 

JOHN COLLETT [18M39] was born at Wilby where he was baptised on 26th January 1783, the youngest son of William Collett and Hannah Mills.  He was a tailor in Brundish and he married Susan Watling on 15th September 1803 at Tannington near Framlingham.  Susan was born in 1769 and was the daughter of George Watling and Susan Jessop.  All of their children were born and baptised at Wilby, except their eldest daughter Ann Collett who was born at Wetheringsett.  Susan Collett nee Watling was buried at Wilby on 5th August 1838, so by the time of the census in 1841 widow John Collett was 55, and had living with him at Wilby his daughters Frances, aged 25, and Hannah, aged 20.  After a further ten years John was still residing in Wilby at the age of 65, with just his daughter Fanny Collett, aged 35, for company.  It was five years later that John Collett died at Wilby, where he was buried on 30th April 1856

 

18N48 – Ann Collett was born in 1804 at Wetheringsett

18N49 – Robert Collett was born in 1806 at Wilby

18N50 – Harriet Collett was born in 1808 at Wilby

18N51 – Frances Collett was born in 1810 at Wilby

18N52 – Charity Collett (twin) was born in 1813 at Wilby

18N53 – Susan Collett (twin) was born in 1813 at Wilby

18N54 – Hannah Collett was born in 1815 at Wilby

 

Anthony Collett [18N1] was born at Walton near Felixstowe in 1769, where he was baptised on 6th April 1770, the eldest son of Anthony Collett and Catherine Trusson.  He attended University College at Oxford where he matriculated on 13th February 1787.  The college records also confirmed that he was the eldest son of Anthony Collett of Walton in Suffolk.  It was there that he gained a Bachelor of Arts degree on 17th December 1790, and a little later his Master of Arts on 28th June 1793.  He was presented by Lord Huntingfield in 1800 and to Heveningham in Suffolk by the Lord Chancellor in 1803, the latter making him the Rector of Heveningham.  He married Anne Rachel Curtis before the turn of the century and was later the incumbent at Heveningham Hall.  In 1813 Anthony paid out £420 for a modest two-up, two-down house in Ubbeston, about one mile from Heveningham, that was built in 1776 by Robert Baldry.  That house later became The Old Rectory and is still in existence today with a stone sill that records the year built and Baldry’s initials.  Baldry died in 1806, but not before he had rebuilt Heveningham Hall which was vacated by Anthony Collett in 1813

 

Anthony was a wealthy man, owning 600 acres of land and a year after buying the modest two-up two-down property he extended the building at the eastern end to accommodate his growing family.  The family remained living in the house until 1826, when it was passed to eldest son Anthony.  It was around that time, that it would appear Anthony Collett senior and his wife Anne left Ubbeston and moved, the ten miles east, to Aldringham near Leiston.  Their son Anthony did not stay long living in the house at Ubbeston, but moved to Bury St Edmunds, at which time the house was leased to local farmer Simon Smyth and his wife Phoebe and their two teenage children.  By 1841 the house had been further extended at the back to accommodate two live-in servants.  Three years prior to that date Anthony Collett senior had died at Heveningham during February in 1838, and it was there also that he was buried on 26th February 1838.  The parish register record that he 68 and a rector.  An article in the Gentleman’s Magazine reported his death as follows:  February 27th at Leamington aged 67, the Reverend Anthony Collett of Kelsale House in Suffolk, an acting magistrate of that county, Rector of Heveningham and perpetual curate of Aldringham-with-Thorpe(ness) and Great Linsted

 

Anthony’s Will was proved on 22nd May 1838 and was listed as the Will of ‘Reverend Anthony Collett, Rector, and Clerk of Heveningham in Suffolk’.  Sometime following the death of her husband his widow moved to Bury St Edmunds, where Anne Rachel Collett was living when she died in March 1849.  However, she was buried with her husband at Heveningham on 20th March 1849, aged 73.  Her Will was proved on 2nd May 1849 and was recorded as the Will of ‘Anne Rachel Collett widow of Heveningham’.  Less than three years before he died, on 22nd December 1835, the Reverend Anthony Collett, magistrate, had tried unsuccessfully to persuade a mob of 200 rioters at Bulcamp Workhouse near Blythburgh to disperse.  In the end he was forced to read them the Riot Act which was more successful, although they threatened to return later.  All of this was reported in a letter from Harry White, Clerk to the Guardians of the Blything Poor Law Union, to the Poor Law Commission, enclosing minutes of the meeting of the board of guardians of the Blything Poor Law Union, and resolutions relating to mob control.  The full story was told in Collett Newsletter No. 64, available upon request

 

18O1 - Anthony Collett was born in 1800 at Heveningham

18O2 - Anne Collett was born in 1802 at Heveningham

18O3 - Catherine Charlotte Collett was born in 1805 at Heveningham

18O4 – William Collett was born in 1812 at Heveningham

 

Thomas Collett [18N2] was born at Walton in 1771 and was baptised there on 7th July 1771, the son of Anthony Collett and Catherine Trusson.  He married Margaret Bushell with whom he had five children.  It is very likely that the children were all born at Minster-in-Thanet to the west of Ramsgate in Kent, since it was there, in the Church of St Mary, that they were all baptised within a few days of their birth.  Thomas Collett was known as ‘Thomas of Ringleton’ (in Kent) and towards the end of his life he lived at Woodnesborough near Sandwich in Kent, where he died in 1845 at the age of 73.  His wife Margaret died in 1838.  Whilst Ringleton does not appear to be a hamlet or a village settlement, it is possible that it is a reference to Ringleton Manor, which is situated just to the north-west of Woodnesborough

 

18O5 - Margaret Collett was born in 1804 at Minister-in-Thanet

18O6 - Thomas Collett was born in 1805 at Minister-in-Thanet

18O7 - George Collett was born in 1806 at Minister-in-Thanet

18O8 - Mary Collett was born in 1808 at Minister-in-Thanet

18O9 – Catherine Collett was born in 1810 at Minister-in-Thanet

 

Catherine Collett [18N3[ was born at Walton in 1773 and it was there that she was baptised on 16th April 1773, the only daughter of Anthony Collett and Catherine Trusson.  Catherine married Henry Pett Hannam of Northbourne near Deal in Kent, at Walton on 20th September 1797.  Once married Catherine and Henry settled in Northbourne where their children were born.  Only two are listed here, although there may have been others.  The couple’s eldest daughter Catherine Ann Hannam was born on 12th December 1799 at Northbourne in Kent and was only 34 years old when she died on 21st January 1834, while her mother Catherine Hannam nee Collett died twenty years later on 5th December 1854.  The younger daughter Harriet Pett Hannam, who was born on 20th July 1802 and also at Northbourne, married Anthony Collett (Ref. 18O1)

 

Charles Collett [18N4] was born at Walton in 1774 where he was baptised on 3rd November 1774, the son of Anthony Collett and Catherine Trusson.  Charles married (1) Charlotte Lynch at Walton-cum-Felixstowe in 1801.  During their short-married life Charlotte presented Charles with six children before she died at the end of 1813, possibly during the birth of the sixth child.  All of their children were born and baptised at Walton in Felixstowe, where Charlotte Collett died on 27th December 1813 and was buried on 1st January 1814 at the age of just 37.  Within the Walton burial records is the following poorly written entry:  ”Ch Altar tomb palisaded Charlotte w of Cha Collett 27 Dec 1813 age 37, 3 of their sons d. inf. Cha Collett 16 Aug 1842 age 67, Cath their 2nd dau w of Hen.......”.  Thereafter the handwriting is very difficult to read

 

It was during the year following the death of his wife that Charles Collett married (2) Elizabeth Harmsworth at Walton in 1814.  That second marriage produced a sixth child for Charles, who was also baptised at Walton.  Although it would appear that all of Charles’ children may have been born at Walton, by June 1841 the family was living at Woodbridge near Ipswich.  The census at that time recorded Charles Collett as being 65, while his wife Elizabeth was 60.  Living with the couple were three of their unmarried children.  They were son James who was 30, son William who was 20, and daughter Elizabeth who was 25.  All adult ages in that first full national census were rounded to the nearest 5 and 10 years.  Charles’ younger brother Cornelius Collett (below) had died during the months prior to 1841 and that may have been the reason why his youngest son Trusson Collett was staying with Charles and Elizabeth at Woodbridge.  Charles Collett died at Woodbridge on 16th August 1842 and was buried at Walton on 24th August 1842 aged 67, when he referred to as Charles Collett of Walton.  It was nine years after the death of her husband that Elizabeth Collett nee Harmsworth died at Bury St Edmunds during the last week of September, following which she was buried at Stanningfield on 27th September 1851, aged 75.  Six months prior to her passing, Elizabeth Collett from Newbury was 74, when she was living at Bury St Edmunds with her son William Collett who was the Curate at Stanningfield, who conducted his mother’s funeral service

 

18O10 – Mary Lynch Collett was born in 1807 at Walton-cum-Felixstowe

18O11 – Catherine Collett was born in 1807 at Walton-cum-Felixstowe

18O12 – Charlotte Collett was born in 1809 at Walton-cum-Felixstowe

18O13 – Elizabeth Collett was born in 1810 at Walton-cum-Felixstowe

18O14 – Charles Lynch Collett was born in 1811 at Walton-cum-Felixstowe

18O15 – Charles Collett was born in 1813 at Walton-cum-Felixstowe

The child of Charles Collett by his second wife Elizabeth Harmsworth:

18O16 – William Collett was born in 1818 at Walton-cum-Felixstowe

 

Cornelius Collett [18N5] was born at Walton in 1786 and was baptised there on 30th March 1787, the son of Anthony Collett and Catherine Trusson.  However, it would appear that he must have suffered an infant death, since the next child born to Anthony and Catherine was also given the name Cornelius.  Curiously though, while there are two baptism records for Cornelius Collett, both the sons of Anthony and Catherine, there is no burial record for a Cornelius between the two dates.  Furthermore, upon the death of Cornelius Collett (below), his date of birth was given as the date of the baptism of the first of the two Cornelius.  So was there only one of them, and could he have been baptised twice, just two years apart.  Alternatively, if there was only one, the first ‘baptism date’ may have been his birth date

 

Cornelius Collett [18N6] was born at Walton shortly after the death of his brother of the same name in 1787, and it was there also that he was baptised on 2nd March 1789, the youngest and last child of Anthony Collett and Catherine Trusson.  Cornelius Collett was around 35 years old when he married Amelia Daniel on 14th May 1822, the wedding taking place at Falkenham, in Suffolk, on Amelia’s twenty-eighth birthday.  Amelia was the daughter of Robert Daniel and his wife Alice Woodruffe, and was baptised at Falkenham near Felixstowe on 19th May 1794.  Following their marriage, Cornelius and Amelia settled in Beverley, within the East Riding of Yorkshire, just north of Kingston-upon-Hull.  However, it was at Amelia’s home town of Falkenham, that the couple’s first child was baptised, with the parish register stating the child was of Beverley.  During his life, he was referred to as ‘Cornelius Collett of Beverley’ in Yorkshire, and it was there where three of the couple’s four sons were born.  Cornelius Collett died at Beverley on 30th March 1840 and was buried there on 6th April 1840.  The Northern Star and Leeds General Advertiser, published on 4th April 1840, included the following death notice for him.  "On Monday last at his house in Beverley, Cornelius Collett, Esq.  He was born 30 March 1787 and died 30 March 1840, having just lived to complete his 53rd year."  It is very interesting that the stated date of his birth was actually the baptism date for his brother.  See the notes above on this subject

 

The first national census in June 1841 recorded Amelia Collett, aged 45 and a widow, living at North Bar Street in Beverley with just three of her four sons.  Her three sons were listed as Charles Collett and Samuel Collett, both aged 15, and Daniel Collett who was 12.  At that same time, Amelia’s youngest son Trusson Collett, who was nine years old, was staying with his uncle Charles Collett (above) at Woodbridge.  Twenty years after the death of Cornelius Collett, an item appeared in The Times newspaper on 7th September 1860.  The article reported that “Trusson, youngest son of the late Cornelius Collett Esquire of Beverley, had married Elizabeth Charlotte Collett”.  There was also a similar notice published in the Ipswich Journal on 8th September.  According to the Beverley census conducted in 1851, widow Amelia Collett from Falkenham was 56 and an annuitant, employed two female servants and one male servant, who had living with her at North Bar Street, her son Trusson Collett who was 18, with no stated occupation

 

Sometime later, Amelia left Beverley when she moved to London where, in 1861 she was living at Newton Street in Paddington at the age of 66, when she was a fund holder.  On that day, she was staying at the home of her married son Giuseppe Collett, formerly Trusson Collett, her youngest son.  The other two residents were Elizabeth C Collett, his wife, and his sister-in-law Catherine A Collett.  Within the following decade she moved again, that time to Spring Grove Road which runs between Heston and Isleworth, through Hounslow in Middlesex, where she had been reunited with her unmarried son Samuel.  In the census of 1871, Amelia Collett was 76 and a widow having an annuity, as had her eldest surviving son Samuel.  At the time of the death of Amelia Collett nee Daniel on 3rd September 1880, at the age of 86, she was recorded as being of Clare Lodge, Spring Grove in Isleworth.  However, it was at Ramsey near Harwich in Essex, where she was buried six days later on 9th September, where a headstone for her mother’s Woodruffe family refers to her as “the relict of Cornelius Collett of Beverley”

 

In addition to the burial of many members of the Woodruffe family, Ramsey’s churchyard also contains a record of the burial of William Woodthorpe, who died on 15th September 1806 at the age of 55.  He was the husband of Judith Woodthorpe who died on 17th April 1792 aged 38 years and the son-in-law of John Woodruffe (Judith’s father) who died on 2nd April 1788 aged 65, whose wife was Judith Woodruffe who died on 11th March 1808 aged 80.  Probate of the Wil of Amelia Collett was proved at the Principal Registry in London on 11th March 1881, when the two beneficiaries were her son Samuel Collett and Trusson Collett.  Why her other surviving son Daniel was not mentioned is curious

 

18O17 – Charles Collett was born in 1823 at Beverley, Yorkshire

18018 – Samuel Collett was born in 1824 at Beverley, Yorkshire

18O19 – Daniel Collett was born in 1828 at Beverley, Yorkshire

18O20 - Trusson Collett was born in 1831 at Beverley, Yorkshire

 

Cornelius Collett [18N7] was born at Woodbridge in 1774, where he was baptised at St Mary’s Church on 20th July 1774, the eldest son of Cornelius Collett and Susanna Page.  Tragically, it was less than a week later that baby Cornelius Collett was buried there on 25th July 1774

 

Susanna Collett [18N8] was born at Woodbridge around June 1775, and was baptised at St Mary’s Church on 2nd July 1775, the eldest daughter of Cornelius Collett and Susanna Page.  She later married attorney Rayner Cox, who was born at Harwich.  Sadly, the marriage only endured for a few years when, at the age of 25, Susanna Cox died in Hertfordshire, where she was buried on 8th October 1799

 

Cornelius Collett [18N9] was born at Woodbridge in 1776, where he was baptised at St Mary’s Church on 24th August 1776, the second son of Cornelius Collett and Susanna Page.  He was named after his older brother of the same name, who had died just two years earlier.  By 1797 he was Lieutenant Cornelius Collett of the Royal Navy.  Upon his death, he was buried at Woodbridge

 

Lucy Collett [18N10] was born at Woodbridge in 1777.  It was also there that she was baptised on 9th January 1778, the daughter of Cornelius and Susanna Collett, although sadly she died not long after that while still an infant

 

Elizabeth Collett [18N11] was born at Woodbridge, where she was baptised on 11th December 1778, the daughter of Cornelius Collett and Susanna Page.  She later married John Gurling (Girling) who worked at The Customs House in London, and they had a son.  The only other known fact about Elizabeth is that she died at Ingatestone (Inggleston) in Essex, where she was buried.  It may be of interest that William Collett (Ref. 18L38) married his second wife Mary Girling at Wilby in 1801.  Whether she was related in some way to john Girling is not known at this time

 

Mary Collett [18N12] was born at Woodbridge during July 1780, the youngest child of Cornelius Collett and Susanna Page, and was baptised at St Mary’s Church in Woodbridge on 25th July 1780.  She was 21 when she married William Whincosp at Woodbridge on 22nd March 1802.  William Whincosp of Bridfield was a surgeon

 

Robert Henry Collett [18N13] was born in London on 9th April 1781 and was baptised at All Hallows Church in Bread Street on 3rd may 1781, the eldest son of Robert Collett and his wife Jane Brice.  He was educated at Fulham School in London by Mr Owen, and from there he entered Trinity College in Cambridge on 4th July 1798 at the age of 18.  The university records confirm he was the son of Robert Collett of London, and that he was born in 1782.  He matriculated in 1799 and obtained his BA in 1803, followed three years later by his MA in 1806.  He married Frances Meyler Smith, the daughter of Henry and Frances Smith of Peckham House in Camberwell, Surrey, who was baptised on 6th April 1786 Hartburn in Northumberland.  The marriage took place at St Giles Church in Camberwell on 27th October 1809, following which the couple initially lived at Little Ilford in Essex, where their first nine children were born, before moving to Kent where their last two known children were born

 

It may also be of interest that Robert’s son William Lloyd Collett married Frances Harriett Smith, the daughter of one Henry Smith, who may well have been a relative of Robert’s wife.  Frances Meyler Smith, who was born in 1790, may have been almost ten years younger than her husband and lived on for almost another twenty years after his death, before she passed away on 26th August 1857.  Robert Henry Collett died at Brighton on 22nd July 1838 and his Will was proved on 4th September 1838.  In the Will, he was referred to as ‘Reverend Robert Collett, Clerk of Westerham’.  In addition to the previously listed seven children, it is now known that Robert and Frances had another daughter who died at Torquay on 16th October 1848 at the age of 18, and she may have been Jesse, Jessie, or Jessica

 

18O21 – Frances Jane Collett was born in 1811 at Little Ilford, Essex

18O22 – Mary Ann Collett was born in 1812 at Little Ilford, Essex

18O23 – Robert Henry Collett was born in 1814 at Little Ilford, Essex

18O24 – Caroline Collett was born in 1815 at Little Ilford, Essex

18O25 – Helen Maria Collett was born in 1817 at Little Ilford, Essex

18O26 – William Lloyd Collett was born in 1818 at Little Ilford, Essex

18O27 – Henry Gerard Collett was born in 1823 at Little Ilford, Essex

18O28 – Christopher Theophilus Collett was born in 1825 at Little Ilford, Essex

18O29 – Jessie Collett was born in 1827 at Little Ilford, Essex

18O30 – Philip Morden Collett was born in 1829 at Speldhurst, Kent

18O31 – John James Collett was born in 1832 at Westerham, Kent

 

William Brice Collett [18N14] was born in London on 27th May 1785 where he was baptised on 29th June 1785 at St Pancras Church in Soper Lane, the second of two children of Robert Collett and Jane Brice.  Nothing else is known about William, except that he was still a bachelor when he died on 19th September 1808 at the age of 24.  He was subsequently buried at Bow Church in London, where his father, who had died sixteen years later, was a merchant

 

Anna Collett [18N15] was born at Swanton Morley in 1785 and it was there in All Saints Church that she was baptised on 29th April 1785, the eldest child of William Collett, Curate of Swanton Morley, and his wife Anna Carthew.  Anna was only twenty-one when she died at Swanton Morley on 16th November 1806 and was buried in the family grave at Al Saints Church, her father conducting the burial ceremony, as he had done the previous year for Anna’s sister Charlotte (below)

 

Charlotte Collett [18N16] was born at Swanton Morley in 1787, where she was baptised on 28th January 1787, the second daughter of William and Anna Collett.  She was only 18 years old when she died on 27th February 1805 and was buried in the family grave at All Saints Church.  A memorial tribute to her father within the church also includes the names of Charlotte and her sister Anna (above) who died during the following year

 

Sophia Collett [18N17] was born at Swanton Morley in 1788, the third child of William Collett and Anna Carthew, and was baptised at All Saints Church on 17th February 1788.  She later married the much older John Deacon in November 1816.  John was a banker of London and of Mapledon Park in Kent and their marriage produced at least nine children.  By the time of the June census in 1841 six of their nine known children were living with the couple in the Marylebone Rectory registration district of London, while the three absent children were very likely attending a boarding school elsewhere, since they were back living with the family ten years later.  The 1841 Census listed the family as John Deacon who was 65, Sophia Deacon who was 50, their daughters Mary and Sarah, who both had a rounded age of 20, Helen Deacon who was 14, Harriet Deacon who was 10, Lucy Deacon who was nine and Catherine Deacon who was eight years old.  Ten years after that the family was once again recorded at Marylebone Rectory when it was comprised John Deacon who was 78, his wife Sophia who was 60, Mary who was 29, Sophia who was 27, Honora who was 26, John who was 25, Ellen who was 23, Harriet who was 20, Lucy who was 19 and Catherine who was 18

 

Sometime after 1851 the family left London, when they retired to the south coast and Hasting.  It was also during that decade that John Deacon died, leaving his widow Sophia, age 73, residing within the St Mary-in-the-Castle district of Hastings in 1861 with just three of her unmarried daughters.  They were Mary Deacon who was 42, Sophia Deacon who was 39 and Ellen B Deacon who was 34.  Sophia Deacon nee Collett died three years later at Hastings during 1864.  It is now established that Sophia’s daughter Sarah Deacon married the Reverend George Whitmore of Shropshire.  He was the younger son of the senior branch of the Whitmore family of Apley Park in Shropshire.  The Apley Whitmore family was related to the Wolryche Whitmore family at Dudmaston Hall in Shropshire, as well as the Whitmore family of Lower Slaughter in Gloucestershire, which included two General George Whitmores, one of whom allegedly married Sarah Collett, the younger sister of Sophia Collett, which has now been disproved by Margaret Davison, a current day descendant of the Whitmore family.  Sarah Deacon and George Whitmore had several children, including Geraldine Ellen Georgina Whitmore, their youngest daughter.  She married Percy Robert Kenyon-Slaney of La Florida, Rosario, Argentina, the son of Colonel Kenyon-Slaney of Hatton Grange in Shropshire, at St. Peter’s Church, Eaton Square, Belgravia, London in 1895

 

Mary Collett [18N18] was born at Swanton Morley in 1789 and was baptised there on 27th February 1789, the fourth daughter of William and Anna Collett.  It was also at Swanton Morley on 29th July 1811 that Mary married Thomas Leventhorpe of St Pancras London and Exmouth.  Their marriage only survived for eight years, when Mary died on 23rd September 1819

 

Frances Elizabeth Collett [18N19] was born at Swanton Morley in 1792 where she was baptised on 15th April 1792 the fifth child of William and Anna Collett.  She later married the Reverend John Preston Reynolds of Thetford, the son of Francis Riddell Reynolds of Great Yarmouth on 8th October 1818.  John was the brother of Phyllis Preston Reynolds, who married Frances’ brother William Collett (below), and he was educated at Caius College in Cambridge and later took on Necton Parish in Norfolk, where he served from 1845 to 1861 when he died.  His wife Frances Elizabeth Reynolds nee Collett passed away four years later during 1865.  The marriage produced at least two sons, both of them born at Little Munden in Hertfordshire most likely while John Preston Reynolds was the priest at All Saints Church in that village.  The first child John Collett Reynolds was born a year after Frances and John were married, during October 1819, while the second son William Collett Reynolds was born at there in 1826.  Both boys attended the King Edward Grammar School in Bury St Edmunds between 1831 and 1839

 

It may also be of interest that in 1814 John Collett Reynolds of Little Witchingham, north of Norwich, and James Collett Reynolds of Rumburgh near Bungay in Suffolk were farmers of 74 acres and 112 acres respectively.  It was from the family of the Reverend John Preston Reynolds and his wife Frances Elizabeth Collett that today we have the family of their great granddaughter Gillian Shackleton Hawley, who has been instrumental in putting together details for this section of The Suffolk Line.  In 2012 Gillian was living on the Writtlemarsh estate at Blackheath in London, the area formerly being the site of the home of Sir John Morden, which is situated next to Morden College where William Collett (below) was the chaplain.  And it was from Gillian’s ‘Yorkshire Shackleton Family’ that the explorer Sir Ernest Henry Shackleton (1874-1922) was descended

 

William Collett [18N20] was born at Swanton Morley near Dereham in Norfolk and was baptised at All Saints Church in Swanton Morley on 17th August 1796, the youngest child and only son of William Collett and Anna Carthew.  His early education was conducted at North Walsham School, Hingham School, and Fransham School where he matriculated in 1815.  He entered Trinity College in Cambridge on 18th November 1814 but after just over a year he migrated to Sidney (Sussex College) on 23rd February 1816.  He gained a BA in 1819, and achieved an MA in 1825, by which time he was a married man with two children.  The university records confirm that he was the son of William Collett, Rector of Swanton Morley in Norfolk.  He married (1) Phyllis Preston Reynolds, the daughter of Francis Riddell Reynolds of Great Yarmouth, and the sister of the Reverend John Preston Reynolds who married William’s sister Frances Elizabeth Collett (above).  The wedding took place at St Nicholas’ Church in Great Yarmouth on 24th October 1820 after which the couple settled in Bramerton, five miles to the east of Norwich, where their first five children were born.  By the time of the birth of their sixth and last child William and Phyllis were living in Thetford.  Tragically it was over a year after the birth of their sixth child that Phyllis Preston Collett nee Reynolds died on 4th June 1831, at the age of 29

 

Upon receiving his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1819 he was ordained as a deacon in Norwich on 12th December that year, and less than a year later, he was made a priest on 15th October 1820.  From 1821 to 1836 he was Vicar (and patron) of Surlingham St Saviour with St Mary in Norwich, which overlapped with him being curate of St Mary’s Church in Thetford from 1828 to 1862.  He was also the curate at Thetford Hospital for a while.  Four years after the death of his wife, William married (2) Ellen Clarke Bidwell on 2nd June 1835.  Ellen was the daughter of Leonard Shelford Bidwell and Sarah Clarke.  William’s second marriage to Ellen, who was thirteen years younger than her husband, added another seven children to his family and all of them were born at Thetford.  It was during that time in his life that William was the Rector of Bressingham, to the east of Thetford, from 1836 to 1841.  Following his time as the Rector of Thetford from 1841 to 1861 he spent the period from 1862 to 1865 as the Chaplain of Morden College at Blackheath in South-East London, which was founded by Sir John Morden in 1700.  The method by which he achieved that position was by submitting a family tree which confirmed his connection to Elizabeth Morden, the first of four wives of the Reverend Thomas Carthew of Woodbridge Abbey, who was William’s maternal grandmother, being the mother of William’s mother Anna Carthew

 

It was Elizabeth Morden's uncle, Sir William Morden, who inherited the Harbord family estate, at which time he was obliged to change his name to Harbord, following which the Harbords became Lord Suffield of Gunton Hall at Aylsham in Norfolk.  It was therefore fitting that one of his brother’s great grandchildren (William Collett) became the Chaplain at Morden College.  Upon his retirement as the outgoing chaplain, the position was filled by his distant cousin the Rev. Hon. John Harbord who held it from 1865 to 1892.  Such was the high regard for the Morden name, that William’s son Charles Preston Collett gave his daughter Margaret the second name of Morden, as did William’s cousin, Robert Henry Collett (above), who named his son Philip Morden Collett.  All of this information has been kindly provided by Gillian Shackleton Hawley, the great granddaughter of the Reverend John Preston Reynolds and Frances Collett (above)

 

The first national census to be held in the United Kingdom on 6th June 1841 used rounded ages for adults, while children’s ages generally reflected their actual age.  On that day in 1841 William Collett and his family were living at Thetford, where William’s rounded age was 40.  His wife Ellen was 30, and the children living with the couple at that time were Anna Collett, aged 19, Sophia Collett who was 13, Lucy Collett who was 11, Henry Collett who was five, Edward Collett who was three years old, and new born baby Mary Collett who was still under one year old.  Just seventeen months earlier William and Ellen suffered the loss of their daughter Ellen who was only a few months old.  The next census in 1851 for Thetford provided a better indication of their actual ages.  In that, William was 54 and Ellen was 41.  The same children as in 1841, with the exception of their son Henry, were still living with the couple, but with the addition of two extra children.  The children were Anna, aged 29, Sophia 22, Lucy 21, Edward 13, Mary 10, Ellen who was eight, and Laura who was six years old.  As ten years earlier William and Ellen had again suffered the infant death of one of their children, in this case it was their youngest and last child Alfred

 

By 1861 only five of William’s six daughters were still living with him and Ellen at the Rectory in Thetford.  The census revealed that William was 64, Ellen was 51, Anna was 39, Lucy was 31, Mary was 20, Ellen was 18, and Laura was 16.  Just four and a half years later, while William and Ellen were enjoying a holidaying at Whitby on the North Yorkshire coast, William died on 11th September 1866 at the age of 70, the same age that his father had died exactly forty years earlier.  In the north-east corner of the churchyard of All Saints Church at Swanton Morley near Dereham in Norfolk is the Collett family tomb wherein lie William’s father and mother, and his two eldest sisters Anna and Charlotte.  Whilst weathered after all these years, the inscription on the gravestone includes the following reference to William Collett, the only son of William Collett, Rector of Swanton Morley and his wife Anna Carthew.  “Also of their son The Revd. WILLIAM COLLETT, formerly of Thetford Norfolk, And afterwards Chaplain of Morden College, Blackheath, who died Sept. 11th 1866 in the 70th year of his age, And was laid to rest in Charlton Cemetery, Kent

 

In a letter dated 21st February 1873 sent from the Great Stukeley Vicarage by Eliza Ebden, the daughter of Elizabeth Collett (Ref. 18M13) and her husband John Ebden, to her sons Frank and Edward Ebden, she referred to an earlier exchange of correspondence in which a Mr Collett was mentioned.  She wrote “the Mr Collett you enquired about, who seems to be in the Civil Service, your father thinks is a son of the later William Collett of Thetford who died and was found at Whitby, the place they (he and his wife) were sojourning at for the sea air.”  That was indeed a reference to this William Collett and his second wife Ellen Bidwell, while the unnamed son mentioned in the letter, was very likely a reference to Edward Collett, who was in the Civil Service.  By the time of the census in 1871, William’s his widow, Ellen C Collett aged 61 and from Thetford, was living in the London area of Kingston-upon-Thames with her three youngest children, Mary Collett who was 30, Ellen A Collett who was 28, and Laura Collett who was 26.  Ellen’s eldest son Henry was in India by then, and her other son Edward Collett was living at Winchester in Hampshire.  Obviously upon the death of her husband Ellen and her family had to relinquish their occupation of The Rectory at Thetford

 

As regards the earlier children of William Collett, from his first marriage, his married son William Reynolds Collett was living at Humbleyard near Norwich in 1871, where two of his sisters Sophia Norgate and Lucy Collett were also living, while his brother, bachelor Charles Preston Collett, was living in the Westminster district of London.  According to the next census in 1881 Ellen C Collett of Thetford, a widow at 71, was living at Trafford House in Ewell Road at Kingston-upon-Thames with just two of her five children.  They were bachelor son Edward Collett who was 43, and unmarried daughter Ellen Collett who was 38, both of them from Thetford.  The family was still living at Kingston-upon-Thames ten years later when Ellen was 81.  Still living with her was her son Edward 53, and daughters Mary 50 and Ellen 48.  Upon the death of their mother during the 1890s, her three unmarried children left Kingston and moved into London, where they settled in the Kensington area of the city

 

18O32 – Anna Collett was born in 1822 at Bramerton, Norfolk

18O33 – William Reynolds Collett was born in 1823 at Bramerton, Norfolk

18O34 – John Collett was born in 1824 at Bramerton, Norfolk

18O35 – Charles Preston Collett was born in 1826 at Bramerton

18O36 – Sophia Collett was born in 1828 at Bramerton

18O37 – Lucy Frances Collett was born in 1830 at Thetford

The children of William Collett by his second wife Ellen Clark Bidwell

18O38 – Henry Collett was born in 1836 at Thetford

18O39 – Edward Collett was born in 1837 at Thetford

18O40 – Ellen Collett was born in 1839 at Thetford

18O41 – Mary Collett was born in 1840 at Thetford

18O42 – Ellen Anna Collett was born in 1842 at Thetford

18O43 – Laura Collett was born in 1844 at Thetford

18O44 – Alfred Collett was born in 1848 at Thetford

 

Woodthorpe Collett [18N22] was born at Grundisburgh in Suffolk in 1795 and was the son of Woodthorpe Collett and his first wife Charlotte Spurling, who were married at Burgh near Woodbridge in July 1794.  Sadly, his mother died during the following year, giving birth to his sister Charlotte (below).  Woodthorpe attended Woodbridge free school where he was a boarder on 4th February 1807 when he was described as Woodthorpe Collett of Clopton, a village one mile north of Grundisburgh.  He was educated at Katherine Hall in Cambridge (St Catherine’s College today), which he entered on 27th March 1817, after he matriculated at Easter that same year.  His admissions record confirmed that he was the son of Woodthorpe Collett, and the grandson of Anthony Collett, Lord of the Manor of Eyke in Suffolk.  He was awarded a BA in 1821 and on 17th June 1821 he was ordain Deacon of Buckden Parish Church, just south of Huntingdon.  The following year he accepted the position of stipendiary curate offered by George Pelham, the Bishop of Lincoln, which resulted in a move to Hainton, fifteen miles north-east of Lincoln, where he took up the post on 20th April 1824.  It was while he was living at Hainton that he met his future wife, the daughter of the Reverend Samuel Pyemont and Susanna Pyemont.  Subsequently, Woodthorpe Collett and Elizabeth Pyemont, of Linwood, were married there on 2nd February 1826, when Elizabeth’s father very likely conducted their wedding service.  Elizabeth was born at Linwood, where she was baptised on 20th May 1795, with the couple’s first child born at Linwood, near the end of that same year, and baptised at nearby Market Rasen in March 1827

 

He was awarded his Master of Arts degree in 1827 and that same year, on 18th October, he was working for John Kaye, the new Bishop of Lincoln, and had the use of a house at Wickenby, where he continued his work as stipendiary curate.  Wickenby lies between Lincoln and Hainton.  However, it would appear that the family only stayed at Wickenby for a short while since, by the time of the birth of the couple’s second child, Woodthorpe and Elizabeth were living in Suffolk.  And it was there, over the following years at Little Glemham, Sweffling, and Woodbridge, that all of their remaining children were born, all of which are situated within the area of the Plomesgate Hundred, around Ipswich.  The move to Suffolk was prompted by the offer of the position of Curate at Blaxhall, the next village to the east of Little Glemham while, it was during 1836 that, he became Headmaster of Woodbridge Grammar School, a post that he held until 27th December 1841.  By the time of June census in 1841, Woodthorpe and his family were still involved with the school, their residence described as being a school on Seckford Street.  He and his wife were both recorded with a rounded age of 40, while their eight children were listed as John Collett 13, Henry Collett 12, Charles Collett 10, Elizabeth Collett who was nine, Catherine Collett who was eight, Robert Collett who was seven, Bertha Collett who was five, and William Collett who was two years old.  Completing the household were two of Elizabeth’s sisters, Annis Pyemont who was 45 and Letitia Pyemont who was 35, and three domestic servants.  The couple’s missing eldest son Woodthorpe, who was 14, was attending boarding school at Lower Brook Street in Ipswich managed by the Ebden family

 

During 1842 Woodthorpe was appointed Principal of King’s College School at Nassau in the New Providence of Bahamas, and the following year he was made Rector of Normanton in Lincolnshire, a position he held from 1843 to 1854.  Sometime during the next few years, he and his family moved into the village of Hasketon, near Woodbridge, where they were living at the time of the census in 1851.  By that time the family comprised Woodthorpe from Clopton, who was 55 and the Rector of Normanton, his wife Elizabeth was also 55 and from Linwood, and just four of their nine children.  They were Charles who was 20, Elizabeth who was 18, Catherine who was 16 and Robert who was 15.  Youngest son William, aged 12, was attending the same boarding school at Lower Brook Street in within the St Mary Quay area of Ipswich, where his older brother Woodthorpe was being educated in 1841.  While the couple’s other son Henry, aged 21, was attending Trinity Hall College in Cambridge.  Their absent daughter Bertha Emily Collett from Woodbridge was 13 and was receiving her education with the Sanderson family at their home in Ipswich St Matthew, while it is known that their son John was away working on the steam ships, and that he perhaps never returned to England.  Also living at the same address in 1851, were two Linwood born sisters of Elizabeth’s family, they being Keeling Pyemont who was 60 and Letitia Pyemont who was 49.  In addition to them, the family employed two servants, who would have assisted Elizabeth with the schooling of five male pupils aged eleven years.  Interestingly, widow Letitia Pyemont aged 81, was the head of the household in 1881 when she had living with her, at 27 Park Terrace on Fonnereau Road in Ipswich St Margaret, her niece Bertha Emily Wright, nee Collett, the married daughter of Elizabeth Collett, nee Pyemont

 

One year earlier, at the time of the entry to Trinity Hall College of his son Henry Pyemont Collett in July 1850, Woodthorpe Collett was described in the college records as being the Clerk of Hasketon near Woodbridge in Suffolk.  It was not long after 1851 that Woodthorpe secured a new position at Brightwell to the east of Ipswich, which resulted in another move for him and his family.  From 1854 to 1868 Woodthorpe was the Reverend Woodthorpe Collett of Brightwell and of Kesgrave, the former being confirmed at the marriage of his eldest daughter Elizabeth Charlotte Collett on 5th June 1860.  In addition to that, Woodthorpe’s son, the Reverend H P Collett, assisted the Reverend James Collett Ebden (see Ref. 18M13) during the wedding ceremony of his sister at Brightwell Church.  According to the census in 1861 for the parish of Foxhall within the Woodbridge & Colneis registration district, Woodthorpe Collett from Clopton was 65 and a Perpetual Curate of Foxhill, his wife Elizabeth was 66 and, still living with the couple, were just three of their unmarried children.  They were Henry Pyemont Collett who was 32, Bertha Emily Collett who was 24, who had returned to the family after her absence in 1851, and William Michael Collett who was 23.  On that day, the family employed three domestic servants, when only one eight-year-old male pupil was still residing there.  The couple’s eldest son, Woodthorpe S Collett, aged 34, single, and born at Market Rasen, was a patient in a hospital in Harpenden

 

It was just over eight years later that Woodthorpe Collett died during a visit to London, where his death was recorded (Ref. 1a 327) at Marylebone.  At that time in his life, he and his family were living at Foxhall, just east of Brightwell, where he was buried on 14th June 1869 aged 73.  An article in the East Suffolk Gazette on 19th June 1869 reported that the Reverend Woodthorpe Collett, the incumbent of Brightwell-cum-Kesgrave, had died in his seventy-fourth year, thus placing his year of birth as the aforementioned 1796.  In a letter written on 6th June 1869 by Eliza Ebden, nee Wylde, wife of James Collett Ebden (above), to her youngest son Edward in India, she says “You will have heard of Mr Collett’s death.  After undergoing the severe operation for lithotomy in London, and was doing well, when a sharp attack of asthma on that weakness caused him to sink.  Your father buried him at Brightwell at the earliest request of the family.  It was a trying business for him, he having known him so many years.  There was no Will to be found, and poor Mrs Collett and Kate find themselves left wholly unprovided for.  If Woodthorpe [his eldest son] is allowed by the Lunacy Commission to remain with his mother and sister, that would help them a little. but not sufficiently without aid from the County Clergy Charity.  Mrs Collett being 73 years of age & Kate [35] by no means youthful now, your father is using every effort in the letter writing to promote their interests in Lincolnshire, her native county”.  Her perception of him having no Will was not correct, since the proving of his Will was completed at Ipswich on 10th July 1869, the main beneficiary being his widow Elizabeth Collett.  So, by the time of the census in 1871, Woodthorpe’s widow Elizabeth, aged 75, was living within the sub-district of Woodbridge known as Colneis, which lies between the Rivers Orwell and Deben.  Living there with her were three of her unmarried children and they were Woodthorpe S Collett, who was 44, Catherine A Collett, who was 37, and William M Collett, who was 32.  It was three years after that when Elizabeth Collett nee Pyemont died at Ipswich St Clement during March 1874, following which she was buried at Brightwell on 20th March 1874, aged 78

 

18O45 – Woodthorpe Schofield Collett was born in 1826 at Market Rasen, Lincolnshire

18O46 – John Collett was born in 1828 at Little Glemham

18O47 – Henry Pyemont Collett was born in 1829 at Little Glemham

18O48 – Charles Keeling Collett was born in 1830 at Little Glemham

18O49 – Elizabeth Charlotte Collett was born in 1831 at Sweffling

18O50 – Catherine A Collett was born in 1833 at Sweffling

18O51 – Robert Ebden Collett was born in 1835 at Woodbridge

18O52 – Bertha Emily Collett was born in 1837 at Woodbridge

18O53 – William Michael Collett was born in 1839 at Woodbridge

 

Charlotte Collett [18N23] was born at Grundisburgh in 1797, the second child and only daughter of Woodthorpe Collett and Charlotte Spurling, her mother tragically dying either during or shortly after she was born.  Charlotte Collett was living in the St Matthews district of Ipswich in 1861 when she was 65 and her place of birth was Clopton near Grundisburgh.  It was there also where she died six years later, towards the end of October 1867, although she was then buried at Grundisburgh on 1st November 1867

 

Letitia Mary Collett [18N24] was born after 1798, the year in which her father, Woodthorpe Collett, married his second wife Letitia Skinner.  Letitia was very likely born at Grundisburgh and was in her early thirties when she married Thomas Read at Wetheringsett in Suffolk on 13th January 1834, where Thomas had been born

 

James Collett [18N25] was born in 1805, the son of Samuel Collett and Sarah Day.  In 1830 James married Sophia Ebden of Barton Bendish, the seventh child of Mary Grimmer and her husband Thomas Ebden; Thomas being the brother of the James’ uncle John Ebden who had married Elizabeth Collett (Ref. 18M13).  The marriage of James and Sophia produced two children before great tragedy struck the family in 1836 when, first Sophia died during the month of January, and was followed later in the year by James, both of them passing away while the family was living at Loddon in Norfolk.  What happened to their two young children, at that time, has not been determined

 

18O54 - Fanny Collett was born in 1832 at Loddon, Norfolk

18O55 - Ebden Collett was born in 1834 at Loddon, Norfolk

 

William Collett [18N26] was born at Fressingfield in 1793 and was baptised there on 20th October 1793, the eldest child of William Collett and his second wife Ann Flint.  His early adult life appears to be shrouded in mystery, but recent discoveries in 2011 have determined that he was married three times, rather than just twice, as previously stated here.  However, it is still not known who his first wife was, except that when he married (2) Sarah Baldry on 8th November 1817 at Cookley to the west of Halesworth, when he was 24, he was already a widower.  It is also unclear as to how long he was married to Sarah Baldry, and whether or not their marriage produced any children.  What is known is that twenty years later, when he was 44, he married (3) Mary Ann Dye on 19th December 1837 at Poringland, which lies just five miles south of Norwich.  The couple’s marriage certificate revealed that they were both residents of Poringland Magna, that Mary was a spinster whose occupation was that of a servant, and whose father was John Dye, a butcher, while William was recorded as being a widower, who was also a labourer, as had been his father William Collett before him, who was confirmed as his father in the marriage register.  It would also appear that shortly after they were married, Mary Ann presented William with a son, and during the following few weeks the couple left Poringland and headed south across the county boundary into Suffolk, where the remainder of their children were born

 

Upon leaving Poringland, William and Mary Ann, together with their infant son William, settled in the village of Henstead, near Kessingland, and it was there that the child’s birth was registered during the first quarter of 1838.  That confirms Mary Ann was with-child at the time of her wedding, just four months earlier, so perhaps the move to Suffolk was forced upon the couple to overcome any embarrassment.  Over the next two years the couple’s second child was born while the family was still living at Henstead, although by the time of the June census in 1841 the family was living at New Court in Halesworth.  William Collett was 48, his wife Mary Collett was 25, and their two children were William Collett who was three, and Honor Collett who was one year old.  It would therefore appear that the family had moved to Halesworth shortly after daughter Honor had been born at Henstead.  And it was at Halesworth where all of the remaining children of William and Mary Ann were born, and where the couple spent the rest of their lives together

 

Five more children were born over the following ten years, although the family suffered the tragic loss of their son Daniel at the age of just three months, followed by the loss of their first daughter Honor eight years later.  By 1851, the family was still living at 189 New Court in Halesworth when it comprised agricultural labourer William, aged 57, his wife Mary Ann, aged 33, plus their five surviving children.  They were, William Collett, aged 13, Maria Collett who was seven, Eliza Collett who was four, Fanny Collett who was two, and John who was not yet one year old.  Towards the end of the next decade William and his family must have fallen on hard times because, on the day of the census in 1861, he was recorded as living in the Blything Union Workhouse at Bulcamp-with-Blythburgh in Suffolk.  William was described as an agricultural labourer and a married man from Fressingfield who was 67 who had living there with him his two sons John, who was eleven, and Charles who was eight, both of whom had been born at Halesworth.  It is thanks to Liz Whittaker that the three of them have been identified, where they have not been located up until 2013, because they were simply listed as W C, J C and C C

 

At that same time in 1861 his wife was still a resident of Halesworth, where she was employed as a charwoman.  On that occasion though she was not living at New Court, where the family had been living at the time the two previous censuses were conducted.  Instead Mary Ann Collett, aged 42, was living at Barrack Yard on Mill Hill Street in Halesworth with her daughters Maria 18, Eliza 13 and Fanny 11, and her youngest son Frederick who was five.  It therefore seems very likely that the accommodation where Mary Ann was living and working was not of a sufficient size to allow her husband and her two missing sons to stay there.  Ten years later Mary Ann Collett was still living at Barrack Yard where she died during the last few days of 1870 with her husband at her bedside, following which she was buried at Halesworth on 4th January 1871.  Just three months later William Collett, aged 77, was listed as a widower in the census that year.  According to the census return he was once again living at New Court, at number 112, in Halesworth, from where he was still working as a labourer.  Sharing the accommodation with William were his two youngest children, his sons Charles Collett, aged 17, and Frederick Collett who was 15.  By that time William’s eldest daughter Maria had been married for five years, while daughters Eliza and Fanny were still spinsters living and working away from home in London and Woodbridge respectively.  Also living at the same address with the three men in 1871 was spinster and domestic cook Susan Dye, who was 53 and the younger sister of the late Mary Ann Collett.  Amazingly for that time in history, William survived for a further six years, when he died during November 1877 while living at Barrack Yard in Halesworth.  It was therefore at Halesworth that labourer William Collett was buried on 14th November 1877 at the age of 85

 

18O56 – William Collett was born in 1838 at Poringland

18O57 - Honor Collett was born in 1840 at Henstead

18O58 - Daniel Collett was born in 1842 at Halesworth

18O59 - Maria Collett was born in 1843 at Halesworth

18O60 - Eliza Susannah Collett was born in 1847 at Halesworth

18O61 - Fanny Collett was born in 1849 at Halesworth

18O62 - John Collett was born in 1851 at Halesworth

18O63 - Charles Collett was born in 1853 at Halesworth

18O64 - Frederick William Collett was born in 1855 at Halesworth

 

Henry Collett [18N27] was born at Fressingfield in early 1795 and it was there that he was baptised on 26th April 1795, the eldest child of William Collett and Ann Flint.  On 5th March 1821 Henry married Elizabeth Colls at Rushall in Norfolk, to the west of Harleston, where Elizabeth was born in 1796 and was baptised on 19th January 1797, the daughter of Christopher Colls and Mary Goldspink.  On the couple’s marriage certificate, Elizabeth was described as being of Great Glemham, near Framlingham, where the couple initially settled, but where something must have happened to cause them to be evicted just over two months after they were married.  An entry in the great Glemham Parish Records dated 16th May 1821 referred to a Removal Order on Henry Collett labourer and Elizabeth his wife, back to Mettingham.  By the time of the census in 1841, Henry Collett, aged 45, and his wife Elizabeth, aged 44, were still living in Mettingham with just four of their nine children.  All of their children were born at Mettingham, where three of them also died while still very young.  They were the couple’s two eldest daughters and their third son.  In addition to these losses, their two ‘missing’ eldest sons had already left the family home prior to the census day in June 1841.  The remaining four children were Mary Ann Collett who was 12, Susan Collett who was 10, Robert Collett who was nine, and five years old Christopher Collett.  Ten years later in 1851, the only child still living with the couple was Robert Collett, aged 19, while labourer Henry was then 55, and Elizabeth 54.  Just over three and a half years after the census day in 1851 Henry Collett died at Mettingham, where he was buried at All Saints Church on 24th December 1854, aged 59.  His widow Elizabeth only survived him by fourteen months, when she was also buried at Mettingham on 24th February 1856

 

18O65 – William Collett was born in 1822 at Mettingham

18O66 – Henry Collett was born in 1824 at Mettingham

18O67 – Maria Elizabeth Collett was born in 1825 at Mettingham

18O68 – Samuel John Collett was born in 1826 at Mettingham

18O69 – Rachel Collett was born in 1827 at Mettingham

18O70 – Mary Ann Collett was born in 1828 at Mettingham

18O71 – Susan Collett was born in 1830 at Mettingham

18O72 – Robert Collett was born in 1831 at Mettingham

18O73 – Christopher Collett was born in 1836 at Mettingham

 

Charles Collett [18N28] was born at Fressingfield in 1798 and was baptised there on 6th January 1799, the son of William and Ann Collett.  No other information has been discovered regarding Charles, who was not listed in any of the national census records.  It is therefore possible that he died prior to 1841

 

Samuel Collett [18N29] was born in late 1800 or early 1801 at Fressingfield, where he was baptised on 12th April 1801, the son of William and Ann Collett.  He later married Marianne Read at Earsham near Bungay on 31st October 1826.  Marianne (Mary Ann) was older than Samuel by ten years and that may have been the reason why the only child attributed to the couple was their son Charles who was born at Earsham during the year after they were married.  Their son’s baptism record confirmed the parents as Samuel and Marianne Collett.  At the time of the 1841 Census, the family of three was still living at Earsham, near Bungay, within the Depwade & Harleston registration district.  Samuel Collett was 40, his wife Mary was 50, and son Charles Collett was 13 and confirmed as having been born at Earsham.  Following the departure of their son some years later, Samuel and Mary Ann were living alone in Earsham in 1851, where Samuel was 50 and a labourer, while his wife Mary was 60.  Ten years later, according to the census in 1861, Samuel Collett, aged 60, was a patient being cared for at Norwich General Hospital, while at that same time his wife Mary Ann, at 72, was still at their home in Earsham, within the Depwade & Harleston registration district.  Samuel obviously recovered from his injury or illness, and it was his wife who passed away during the following years.  In 1871, as widower Samuel Collett aged 70, he was once again recorded as residing at Earsham, although no record of him has been found after the census that year

 

18O74 – William Collett was born in 1827 at Earsham near Bungay, Norfolk

 

Benjamin Collett [18N30] was born at Fressingfield in 1802 and was baptised there on 8th May 1803, the son of William and Ann Collett.  He lived all his life at Fressingfield, where he worked as a labourer, and it was there that he was twice married, and there also that all his children were born.  He married (1) Bertha Philpot, who was born in 1803, when they were both 21, and the wedding took place on 26th February 1824 in the parish church of St Peter & St Paul in Fressingfield.  It was later that same year that the first of the couple’s seven known children was born.  That may have taken place at Fressingfield, although the baptism of Benjamin Anthony Collett, the son of Benjamin and Bessiah (?) Collett, took place at nearby Cratfield, just seven months after they were married.  Upon presenting Benjamin with their seventh child it would appear that Bertha died, either during the birth, or shortly thereafter.  The parish records confirmed that Bertha Collett nee Philpot was buried on 24th April 1834 at the age of 30.  Five years later Benjamin Collett married (2) Sarah Vincent at Fressingfield on 21st May 1839, with whom he had a further three children.  Sarah was the daughter of labourer David Vincent.  It would also appear that Benjamin’s sons John and Charles had also died during that time, since both of them were missing from the 1841 Census and Benjamin had, by then, named a subsequent son Charles from his second marriage to Sarah

 

According to the Fressingfield census of 1841 (within the Hoxne & Stradbroke registration district) Benjamin’s rounded age was 35 and Sarah’s was 30.  The children living with the couple were Benjamin 17, William 15, Keziah who was eight, Elizabeth who was seven, and Isaac who was six, from the first marriage, and brothers Charles who was two years old and baby George Collett who was just three months old, both from the second marriage.  A few years later Sarah presented Benjamin with their last child, daughter Sarah.  Also living with the family in 1841 was Benjamin’s father William Collett, aged 85.  By the time of the census in 1851, agricultural labourer Benjamin was 48, his wife Sarah was 43, and the three of their four children still living with them were Charles Collett who was 11, George Collett who was 10, and daughter Sarah A Collett who was seven years old.  At that time the family was living in New Street in Fressingfield and had living there with them Mary Munn who was 79.  Also living nearby in New Street was Benjamin’s eldest son from his first marriage; Benjamin Collett junior, who was married with his own family by that time, and his youngest son from his first marriage Isaac Collett who was 15

 

Benjamin’s eldest daughter Keziah, from his first marriage, was 18 at that time and was living and working in the South Ockendon & Orsett area of Essex, whilst the other two children from his first marriage, William and Elizabeth, have not yet been located in the census returns of 1851.  Over the next ten years the family members grew up and all of them had left their parent’s home in Fressingfield prior to 1861.  The census that year confirmed that Benjamin Collett was 61, and that Sarah was 56.  Their youngest son George was still living in the village, although by then he was married to Harriet.  Benjamin survived for only another nine months, before he died at the start of 1862 and was buried at St Peter’s & St Paul’s Church at Fressingfield on 22nd January 1862 aged 59.  The cause of death was phthisis, a form of tuberculosis commonly referred to as the cobbler’s illness.  Tragically later that same year, Benjamin’s eldest son Benjamin died of the same wasting disease at the age of 38.  Following the death of her husband, his widow Sarah married widower James Wright who was a labourer and the son of thatcher Jonathan Wright

 

18O75 - Benjamin Anthony Collett was born in 1924 at Fressingfield

18O76 - William Collett was born in 1926 at Fressingfield

18O77 - John Collett was born in 1928 at Fressingfield

18O78 - Charles Collett was born in 1929 at Fressingfield

18O79 - Keziah Collett was born in 1932 at Fressingfield

18O80 - Elizabeth Collett was born in 1933 at Fressingfield

18O81 - Isaac Collett was born in 1934 at Fressingfield

The children of Benjamin Collett by his second wife Sarah Vincent:

18O82 – Charles Collett was born in 1939 at Fressingfield

18O83 – George Collett was born in 1941 at Fressingfield

18O84 - Sarah Ann Collett was born in 1943 at Fressingfield

 

John Collett [18N31] was born at Fressingfield during 1805 and was baptised there on 29th September 1805, the youngest son of William Collett and Ann Flint.  John was around 20 years old when he married Catherine Baldwin at Ilketshall St Andrew in 1825.  Catherine was the daughter of John Baldwin and Catherine Freeman and was born at St James South Elmham, where she was baptised on 9th October 1803, St James South Elmham being around four miles north-east of Fressingfield.  It may be of interest to note that the parishes of Ilketshall St Andrew, Ilketshall St John, and Ilketshall St Lawrence cover an area south-east of Bungay and to the east of the Roman Road known as Stone Street (A144) from Halesworth to Bungay.  The three parish churches of St Andrew, St Lawrence, and St John the Baptist, lie within one kilometre of the centre of the village of Ilketshall St Andrew, while today the village of Ilketshall St John has become part of Ilketshall St Andrew, with Ilketshall St Lawrence just a couple of miles to the south

 

The marriage of John Collett of Fressingfield and Catherine Baldwin of St James South Elmham is known to have produced five children for the couple and, although there are six children listed below, it is the first children Sarah who requires further validation.  It is likely that all six children were born at Ilketshall St Andrew, even though son Charles said he was born at nearby Ilketshall St Lawrence in a later census return.  Certainly, at the time of the registration of birth of their son William at Ilketshall St Andrew in 1838, John Collett, an agricultural labourer, was named as the father, while the boy’s mother was recorded as Catherine Collett, formerly Baldwin.  The complete family, excluding Sarah, was living at Ilketshall St Andrew within the Wangford & Beccles registration district of Suffolk in June 1841.  According to the census that month, the family comprised John Collett, aged 35, his wife Catherine 37, and their children John who was 12, Charles who was nine, Lucy who was four, William who was two years old, and latest arrival Robert, who was not yet twelve months old.  Possible daughter Sarah would have left school by then and therefore may have already started work and be living apart from the family

 

At that same time, John’s wife Catherine, aged 56 and a labourer’s wife from St James (South Elmham), was recorded as a visitor at the Broad Street home in Bungay of Nathan Rumsby.  It is of interest that his housekeeper was unmarried Sarah Collett who was 34 and from Ilketshall St Andrew, and it seems highly likely that it was Sarah that Catherine was visiting as her mother.  By 1871 Catherine was once again living at Ilketshall St Andrew with her husband, where John Collett was 65 and his wife Catherine was 67, and by which time none of their children were still living were them.  Ten years later the census of 1881 recorded that the couple was living at Great Common in Ilketshall St Andrew, where John was employed on the land as a hay cutter, a change from his earlier occupation as a husbandman.  His place of birth was confirmed as Fressingfield and his age on that occasion was given as being 76, while his wife was 77 and her birthplace was confirmed as St James South Elmham.  Sometime during the following years, it would appear that John and Catherine were living in the Blything area of North Suffolk, since it was there that John died during the third quarter of 1887, following which he was buried at Ilketshall St Andrew on 4th September 1887 aged 84.  It was four years earlier that his wife Catherine had passed away, her death recorded at St Andrew in the second quarter of 1883, following which she was buried at Ilketshall St Andrew on 2nd May 1883, at the age of 79

 

18O85 – Sarah Collett was born in 1826 at Ilketshall St Andrew

18O86 – John Collett was born in 1829 at Ilketshall St Andrew

18O87 – Charles Collett was born in 1831 at Ilketshall St Andrew

18O88 – Lucy Collett was born in 1835 at Ilketshall St Andrew

18O89 – William Collett was born in 1838 at Ilketshall St Andrew

18O90 – Robert Collett was born in 1840 at Ilketshall St Andrew

 

Lucy Collett [18N32] was born at Fressingfield around 1807, the daughter child of William and Ann Collett.  It was also at Fressingfield where she married John Woolnough on 12th May 1828 with whom she had two known children.  The first of them was Eliza Woolnough who was baptised at Fressingfield on 12th September 1830.  By the time of the baptism of the couple’s second child the family was living at Tannington where John Woolnough was baptised on 13th May 1832.  Their son was born in the second half of February in 1832 and was just thirteen weeks old when he died at Tannington, although it was as John Woolner that his burial was recorded there on 22nd May 1832.  Around the time that her son was born at Tannington there was also recorded there the death of Lucy Woolnough at the age of only 24, following which she was buried at the Church of St Ethelbert on 19th February 1832.  It is therefore assumed that Lucy Woolnough nee Collett died during childbirth.  Less than two years later John Woolnough, a widower, married widow Ann Pendall at Tannington on 25th September 1834.  According to the census in 1841 John was living at Fressingfield with his new wife Ann and his daughter Elizabeth (previously Eliza), together with Ann’s daughter from her previous marriage, and two further children born to John and Ann.  During the next decade John Woolnough was made a widower for the second time in his life

 

Phyllis Collett [18N33] was very likely born around 1810 and she may have been the last child of William Collett and Ann Flint who was born at Fressingfield.  What is known for sure is that as Phillis Collett she married John Sayer at Stradbroke on 12th October 1833 and, by June 1841, she had presented John with four children at Barlow Green in Stradbroke.  The census on that occasion listed the family as John and Phillace Sayer, both with an incorrect rounded age of 25, Ann Sayer who was six, William Sayer who was five, Mariah Sayer who was three, and Betsy Sayer who was one year old.  Living with the family was William Collett, aged 85 and an agricultural labourer who was most likely Phyllis’ widowed father.  Tragically on 11th November 1841 Phillis Sayer nee Collett of Stradbroke died there of consumption and was buried at All Saints Church in the village on 18th November when her age was correctly recorded as 31

 

John Collett [18N34] was born at Wingfield in 1785, the son of John Collett of Stradbroke and Elizabeth Thurlow of Wingfield.  There was a John Collett aged 55 who was born in Suffolk who was residing at Wilby in 1841

 

Ann Collett [18N35] was born at Saxmundham in 1791, the eldest daughter of John and Elizabeth Collett.  She was only twelve years old when her father was killed after falling out of tree.  As the eldest daughter she remained living with her widowed mother until she married John Hines at Saxmundham on 27th May 1817

 

Hannah Collett [18N36] was born at Saxmundham during 1793, the daughter of John and Elizabeth Collett.  Hannah later married Frederick King at Saxmundham on 16th June 1812.  Over the following decade Hannah presented Frederick with three daughters.  Emma King was baptised at Saxmundham on 29th January 1815, Rachel King was baptised at Blyford near Halesworth on 22nd November 1818, and Ann King was baptised at Bulcamp, also near Halesworth, on 29th April 1821

 

Charles Collett [18N37] was born at Saxmundham in 1795, the son of John and Elizabeth Collett.  It was in 1803 when Charles was eight years old that his father died after he fell from a tree.  The continuation of the family line of Charles Collett is provided in Part 30 – The Suffolk & Norfolk Line starting at Ref. 30N4

 

William Collett [18N38] was born at Saxmundham on 14th March 1798 where he was baptised at the parish church on 6th April 1798, the youngest known son of John Collett and Elizabeth Thurlow.  He was six weeks short of his fifth birthday when his father fell from a tree and died at Saxmundham as a result of his injuries.  The continuation of the family line of William Collett is provided in Part 30 – The Suffolk & Norfolk Line starting at Ref. 30N5 and from there to Part 74 – The Suffolk to South Africa Line

 

William Collett [18N39] was baptised at Wilby on 10th September 1792, the base-born child of Hannah Collett, and may have been around two years old when he was baptised.  Tragically his mother died when he was about ten years old.  The continuation of the family line of William Collett is provided in Part 20 – The Suffolk to Australia Line

 

Jemima (or Jeremiah) Collett [18N40] was most likely a twin with sister Dinah (below).  They were both born at Wilby, where they were baptised in a joint ceremony on 25th May 1800, the children of William Collett and Dinah Lockwood.  Tragically, neither of them survived and both were buried together at Wilby on 8th June 1800, just two weeks after their baptism

 

Dinah Collett [18N41] was born at Wilby in 1800 and, with her likely twin Jemima (above), the pair of them were baptised at Wilby on 25th May 1800, where they were also buried two weeks later on 8th June 1800

 

Mary Ann Collett [18N42] was born at Wilby in 1802, where she was baptised on 17th October 1802, the third child of William and Dinah Collett.  Unlike her two older siblings, who both died when only a few weeks old, Mary Ann survived to reach the age of five and a half years, before she died and was buried at Wilby on 6th May 1808

 

Dinah Collett [18N43] was born at Wilby in 1804.  She later married (1) William Allum on 18th October 1824 at Worlingworth, a village in Suffolk next to Tannington.  William was born at Horham just two miles from Wilby, and it was at Wilby that the couple settled and where all of their children were born.  Although no record of the family has been found in the census of 1841, by 1851 they were still living in Wilby.  Dinah Allum from Wilby was 45, agricultural labourer William Allum from Horham was 50, their children still living with them were John 20, Jemima 18, Elizabeth 12, Hannah, aged 10, and Dinah who was four.  By that time the couple’s eldest son William had already left the family home, as had son Robert, aged 16, and Mary who was 15.  Just over eighteen months later William Allum died at Wilby on 1st October 1852, following which Dinah then married Jeremiah Allum at Stradbroke on 20th February 1860.  It seems very likely that Jeremiah was William’s brother or his cousin.  According to the next census in 1861 Dinah Allum and her husband Jeremiah were both 56, and living with them at Wilby within the Hoxne & Dennington registration district was Dinah’s youngest child Dinah Allum who was 15.  Ten years later the couple was living alone in Wilby when Dinah Allum was 67 and Jeremiah was 68, and they were still there in 1881, living at Cole Street in Wilby.  Dinah from Wilby was 77, while Jeremiah Allum from Brundish was 78, when he was still working as an agricultural labourer.  Dinah’s eldest son William Allum married Mary Ann Harding on 28th December 1853, while her second son John was married and had a daughter Elizabeth Allum who married James Harwood.  James and Elizabeth had a daughter Eva Harwood who was the mother of Colin Carver, and it was Colin’s daughter Alison Carver who helped in expanding the family of Dinah Collett and William Allum

 

Jemima Collett [18N44] was born at Wilby where she was baptised on 4th April 1807, the daughter of William and Dinah Collett.  She later married William Scales at Stradbroke on 15th May 1826

 

William Collett [18N45] was born at Wilby and baptised there on 14th May 1809, the eldest surviving son of William Collett and Dinah Lockwood.  He married Elizabeth around 1830 and the couple settled in Cambridge where most of their children were born.  Further work still needs to be undertaken to complete the details for this family

 

John Collett [18N46] was born at Wilby, and it was there also that he was baptised on 30th January 1814, the son of William and Dinah Collett.  He was 25 in the Wilby census of 1841 when he was still living there with his parents, and it was also at Wilby that he married Mary Ann during the late 1840s, and where their three children were born.  At the time of the next census in 1851 John was 37, while he wife Marian (Mary Ann) was only 22, and their first child was Dinah Collett who was one year old.  Two more children were added to the family at Wilby during the next ten years, so in the census of 1861 the family comprised John Collett, aged 44, his wife Mary A Collett, aged 34, and their three children, Dinah, who was ten, William, who was eight, and Mary who was six.  No record of the family has been found in 1871.  By 1881 John Collett was a widower living at Cole Street in Wilby, and at 66 he was still working as an agricultural labourer, mostly likely with his youngest son James, aged 18 and from Wilby, who was also an agricultural labourer.  Living with them at that time was John’s eldest daughter Dinah Brunning nee Collett, who was 30 and from Wilby, together with her husband Henry Brunning who was 25 and from Horham, and who was another agricultural labourer.  Also living in Cole Street, Wilby was John’s eldest son William, with his wife

 

18O91 – Dinah Collett was born in 1850 at Wilby

18O92 – William Collett was born in 1852 at Wilby

18O93 – Mary Collett was born in 1854 at Wilby

18O94 – James Collett was born in 1862 at Wilby

 

James Collett [18N47] was born at Wilby on 30th August 1817 and baptised there on 18th January 1818, the youngest son and last child of William Collett and Dinah Lockwood.  He married Lucy Mutimer on 19th October 1840 at Horham, which is north of Tannington and south of Stradbroke.  Lucy was born at Wilby in 1817, the daughter of Charles Mutimer and Elizabeth Cooke.  Just after they were married the couple was living in Wilby, where in June 1841 James was working as an agricultural labourer, when Lucy was anticipating the imminent arrival of their first child, their honeymoon baby.  James’ and Lucy’s first three children were all born at Wilby in Suffolk, while the remainder were born at Needham, just across the county boundary in Norfolk, after the family have moved there around 1845.  By the time of the census in 1851, the family was living at ‘the Street’ in Needham and was listed as labourer James, aged 33, his wife Lucy who was 34, Martha who was nine, Mary who was eight, Emma who was seven, William who was four, Dinah who was one year old, and Eliza who was only a few months old.  Three further children were added to the family during the next decade

 

In the next census for Needham in 1861, the family was still living in the same dwelling as ten years earlier, by which time James and Lucy were both 44, Mary was 18, Emma was 17, William was 14, Eliza was 10, James was eight, Rachel was five, and George was three years old.  The reason for the absence of their daughters Martha and Dinah, was that Martha was married by then, while Dinah, who would have been 11, may not have survived beyond childhood.  Ten years forward found a depleted Collett family still living at ‘the Street’ in Needham, near Harleston.  James was 53, while his wife Lucy was 54, and the only child still living there with them was their youngest child George who was 13.  Still living in the village was their youngest daughter Rachel who was 15.  During the 1870s James passed away leaving his widow Lucy living at 21 Opposite Row in Lakenham in Norwich in 1881, with just her son George for company.  Lucy, aged 63, was confirmed as having been born at Wilby, while her occupation was that of an SMS nurse.  George was still a bachelor at 23, and his place of birth was confirmed as Needham.  By 1891 Lucy was 74 and at that time she was still living with her son George who, by then had been married and widowed, although not before he was presented with three children by his late wife.  It was during the next decade that Lucy died, since she was no longer living with George in 1901

 

18O95 – Martha Collett was born in 1841 at Wilby

18O96 – Mary Collett was born in 1842 at Wilby

18O97 – Emma Collett was born in 1844 at Wilby

18O98 – William Collett was born in 1846 at Needham

18O99 – Dinah Elizabeth Collett was born in 1849 at Needham

18O100 – Eliza Collett was born in 1851 at Needham

18O101 – James Collett was born in 1852 at Needham

18O102 – Rachel Collett was born in 1855 at Needham

18O103 – George Collett was born in 1858 at Needham

 

Ann Collett [18N48] was born at Wetheringsett and was baptised on 24th June 1804 at Tannington, the eldest child of John Collett and Susan Watling.  She married her cousin Hezekiah Lockwood at Wilby on 29th November 1829.  Hezekiah, who was born at Wilby in 1806 and who died on 7th January 1872, was the son of Evans Lockwood and Ann Collett (Ref. 18M37), his mother Ann being the sister of Ann’s father John.  In 1881 Ann Lockwood nee Collett was an annuitant widow of 80 years living at Somersham in Suffolk at the home of her daughter Lydia.  Lydia Lockwood, who was born in 1830 at Coddenham in Suffolk, married Robert Sage who was born in 1826 at Flowton.  He was a farmer of nine acres and living and working with him in 1881 was his brother William Sage aged 67 and also of Flowton

 

ROBERT COLLETT [18N49] was born at Wilby where he was baptised on 23rd March 1805, the eldest son of John and Susan Collett.  He married his cousin Dinah Lockwood at Brundish, to the east of Tannington.  Dinah was the daughter of Hammond Lockwood and Elizabeth Everett, and was baptised at Sprowston on 4th April 1813.  All of Robert’s and Dinah’s children were also born and baptised at Wilby.  After the wealth enjoyed by previous generations of the Collett family, Robert and his family by contrast lived on the poverty line, with Robert having to find work as a bricklayer.  It was in Wilby that the family was living in 1841, when Robert was 30, his wife Dinah was 25, and their three children at that time were Elizabeth Collett, who was three, Hammond Collett, who was two years old, and Susan Collett who was still under one year old.  In 1850 Robert was sentenced at Ipswich to two weeks imprisonment for leaving his family chargeable to the Parish of Wilby.  At that time his wife Dinah and the children were living at the Hoxne Union Workhouse in Stradbroke, where the couple’s last child was born.  A year later, according to the census in 1851, Robert Collett was 45 and was still living at the Workhouse in Stradbroke with three of his children, curiously though, he was recorded as a widower.  The three children with him, at the Workhouse, were his eldest son Hammond who was 12, second eldest daughter Susan who was 10, and his son John who was six years old.  His son Robert had died four years earlier, but his three other children were living with his wife at London Road in Wilby.  Head of the household was Dinah Collett who was 37 and a pauper, and the three children with her that day were the couple’s eldest daughter Elizabeth who was 13, and their two youngest children, Ann who was two, and Alfred who was not yet one year old

 

According to the next census in 1861, Robert Collett from Wilby was 54 and a bricklayer’s labourer and his wife Dinah from Sprowston was 47, when they and their family was residing in Wilby.  The three children still living with the couple John Collett who was 17, Ann Collett who was 12, and Alfred Collett who was 10 years old.  Staying with the family on that occasion was Robert’s unmarried sister Frances Collett (below) who was 49.  Living nearby was the couple’s eldest son Hammond Collett, aged 22, while their eldest daughter Elizabeth Collett, also 22 and from Wilby, was living and working in the Kentish Town area of London.  Although the whereabouts of Robert and Dinah has not been identified in the census of 1871, it was just over two years later that Robert Collett died at Wilby on 28th September 1873, his death recorded at Hoxne (Ref. 4a 340) at the age of 67, after which he was buried at Wilby on that same day.  In the 1881 Census Dinah Collett was a widow aged 69.  The census return that year confirmed that she was born at Sprowston, and that she was living at the home of her son Alfred Collett at Framlingham Road in Wilby.  And, only two doors away from her, was her other son John and his family.  Dinah Collett survived for another seven years, when she died on 27th June 1888

 

18O104 – Elizabeth Collett was born in 1837 at Wilby

18O105 – Hammond Collett was born in 1839 at Wilby

18O106 – Susan Collett was born in 1841 at Wilby

18O107 – John Collett was born in 1843 at Wilby

18O108 – Robert Collett was born in 1845 at Wilby

18O109 – Ann Collett was born in 1849 at Wilby

18O110 – Alfred Collett was born in 1851 at Stradbroke

 

Harriet Collett [18N50] was born at Wilby and was baptised there on 14th February 1808, but survived for just short of one year, when she was buried at Wilby on 13th January 1809, the daughter of John Collett and Susan Watling

 

Frances Collett [18N51] was born at Wilby and was baptised there on 24th June 1810, the daughter of John and Susan Collett.  It is understood that she never married and in 1841, following the death of her mother, she was living at Wilby with her widowed father when she was recorded in error as Francis Collett, aged 25.  The only other member of the family living with them was Frances’ younger sister Hannah (below).  Twenty years later Frances Collett, aged 49, was living with her married brother Robert (above) and his family at Wilby, where she was described as the sister of the head of the household.  It was thirteen years later that spinster Frances Collett died at Wilby during March in 1874 and it was there also that she was buried on 26th March 1874 at the age of 65

 

Charity Collett [18N52] was a twin born at Wilby during the month of May 1813 and was baptised there in a joint ceremony with her twin-sister Susan (below) on 21st June 1813.  She was the daughter of John and Susan Collett, and sadly she died within four days of her baptism and was buried at Wilby on 25th June 1813

 

Susan Collett [18N53] was a twin born at Wilby during the month of May 1813 and it was there that she was baptised in a joint ceremony with her twin-sister Charity (above) on 21st June 1813.  She died two months later and was buried on 25th August 1813, at the age of three months, and just two months after the death of her twin-sister Charity

 

Hannah Collett [18N54] was born at Wilby and was baptised there on 16th July 1815, the last child of John Collett and Susan Watling.  Following the death of her mother in 1840 Hannah, aged 20, was living at Wilby with her father and her sister Frances in June 1841.  Ten years later she was a servant at a house in Wilby when she was 36.  Curiously in 1851 Hannah Collett of Wilby was living at Wickham Market when her age was stated as being 42 instead of 36.  She is known to have died after 1819

 

Anthony Collett [18O1] was born at Heveningham on 21st September 1800, where he was baptised that same day, the eldest child of Anthony Collett and his wife Anne Rachel Curtis.  At the age of 26 Anthony was given the family home at Ubbeston by his father, where lived until just after 1841, when he settled in Bury St Edmunds.  During his later life, he was known as Anthony Collett of Bury St Edmunds and held the position of Captain of East Suffolk.  Around the time he took over the house at Ubbeston, he married his cousin Harriet Pett Hannam who was born on 20th July 1802 at Northbourne in Kent, the daughter of H Pett Hannam and his wife Catherine Collett (Ref. 18N3).  By the time of the census in 1841, Harriet had presented Anthony with the first three of their four children.  The census return recorded the family living at the Ubbeston house left to him by his father, who had passed away two years earlier.  Anthony was 40, his wife Harriet was 37, and their three children were Harriet who was eleven, Maria who was seven, and Anthony who was five years old.  Three years later the name of Capt Anthony Collett was listed in the Ubbeston Directory of 1844.  Upon moving to Bury St Edmunds just after that, Anthony leased out the Ubbeston property, which he eventually sold in 1847 to a wealthy local philanthropist Edmund Holland, for £600.  And it was Edmund who presented the property to the Norwich Diocese for use as a rectory which still stands there to this day – see Anthony Collett (Ref. 18N1), the father of Anthony Collett

 

It was during the following year, in 1848, that the couple’s last child was born.  By 1851 the family living at Bury St Edmunds was made up of Anthony 50, Harriet 48, Harriet 21, Maria 17, Anthony 15, and Frances who was two years old.  Anthony Collett died at Bury St Edmunds during January in 1856 and was buried at Hawstead on 30th January 1856 at the age of 55.  Four years later in the census of 1861 Harriet, aged 57, was a widow living at Dover St James in Kent with three of her children.  They were Maria Collett who was 27, Anthony Collett who was 25, and Frances E Collett who was 12 years old.  It was a similar situation ten years later in 1871.  The family was still living within the area of Dover St James, where Harriet P Collett was 68, and living with her was her daughter Maria Collett who was 37, and her son Anthony Collett who was 35.  According to the next census in 1881, Harriet P Collett was 78 and her place of birth was confirmed as Northbourne in Kent.  On that occasion she was living at 6 Camden Crescent in Dover St James, and her income was stated as coming from ‘dividends and land’. 

 

Still living there with her, were her two unmarried daughters, Maria Collett and Frances Collett, neither of them credited with an occupation.  Maria was curiously recorded as being 40 rather than 47, while her place of birth was given as Ubbeston Green (midway between Framlingham and Halesworth).  Frances was also given the wrong age, being 30 instead of 32, although it did correctly give her birthplace as Bury St Edmunds.  The three ladies were supported by three female domestic servants and, at the time of the census, had staying with them John Perryston, a magistrate, and his niece Catherine Perryston.  Also, by that time, Harriet’s eldest daughter was married to the Reverend John Ley, while her son Anthony Collett was the Rector of Hastingleigh in Kent, and Vicar of Elmsted in Kent.  Harriet Collett nee Pett Hannam died during the 1880s, following which her daughter Maria went to live with her widowed sister Harriet Anne Ley in Torquay, who had also just recently lost her husband

 

18P1 – Harriet Ann Collett was born in 1929 at Ubbeston

18P2 – Maria Collett was born in 1933 at Ubbeston

18P3 – Anthony Collett was born in 1935 at Ubbeston

18P4 – Frances Ellen Collett was born in 1848 at Bury St Edmunds

 

Anne Collett [18O2] was born and baptised at Heveningham on 5th January 1802, the daughter of Anthony Collett and Anne Rachel Curtis.  It was also at Heveningham that Anne married the Honourable Fenton J Hort on 25th April 1826, and shortly after they were married the couple moved to Ireland, where their son Fenton J A Hort was born in 1828.  Fenton was the brother of Viscount Hort.  Fenton Hort junior later went on to become a Hulsean Professor of Divinity at Cambridge and by 1881 he was 52 and was a Clergyman Without Cure, Doctor of Divinity, Professor of Theology living at 6 St Peters Terrace in St Mary the Lesser in Cambridge with his four children.  These were Ellen M Hort 18, Francis F Hort 13, Mary D Hort 10, and Frederick A Hort who was eight years old

 

Catherine Charlotte Collett [18O3] was baptised at Heveningham on 26th July 1805, the daughter of the Reverend Anthony Collett, Rector of Heveningham and his wife Anne Rachel Curtis.  She married the Reverend Thomas John Blofield MA, the Rector of Hellesdon-with-Drayton near Norwich.  The marriage produced three sons for the couple.  In the January to June 1855 edition of the Gentleman’s Magazine, the death of Catherine’s husband was reported, in which he was referred to as the Reverend Thomas Calthorpe Blofield, Rector of Hellesdon

 

William Collett [18O4] was born in 1812 and was baptised at Heveningham on 17th April 1812, the youngest known son of the Rev. Anthony Collett and his wife Anne Rachel Curtis.  Tragically he died when he was only nine years old and was buried at Heveningham on 29th November 1821 when he was described as the son of Rachel Collett formerly Curtis

 

Margaret Collett [18O5] was born at Minster-in-Thanet, near Ramsgate in Kent, where she was baptised at the Church of St Mary on 24th January 1804.  Margaret was the eldest child of Thomas Collett of Ringleton (Manor near Woodnesborough?) and Margaret Bushell.  Margaret Collett never married and she died in 1865

 

Thomas Collett [18O6] was born at Minster-in-Thanet on 27th May 1805 and was baptised there in St Mary’s Church on 10th June 1805.  Just like his father before him, he too was later known as ‘Thomas Collett of Ringleton’.  He married Jane Tomlin of Ash in Kent and died on 15th August 1873.  Ringleton may be a reference to Ringleton Manor near Woodnesborough or may have been an area of Woodnesborough which is not known or recorded today

 

18P5 – Thomas Trusson Collett was born in 1840 at Ringleton, Kent

18P6 – Ann F Collett was born in 1842 at Woodnesborough, Kent

18P7 – James Tomlin Collett was born in 1843 at Woodnesborough, Kent

18P8 – George Collett was born in 1844 at Woodnesborough, Kent

 

George Collett [18O7] was born at Minster-in-Thanet on 2nd October 1806 and it was there that he was baptised on 12th October 1806 in the Church of St Mary.  He was the third of the five known children of Thomas Collett of Ringleton and his wife Margaret Bushell.  George later married (1) Sarah Crofts King who produced four children at Monkton before she died on 10th March 1850 at the age of 43.  Just over one year later George was 44, and had living with him at Walter’s Hall in Monkton just two of his children.  They were Georgiana Collett who was four, and George Collett who was three.  Around five or six years after that George married (2) Elizabeth Smith of Monkton, with whom he had a further five children, although only four of them survived.  A few years after he was married for a second time George Collett, aged 54, was living at Monkton near Minster-in-Thanet in 1861 with his much younger wife Elizabeth, who was 36.  Also living with them was the first three of their four children, together with George’s eldest child from his first marriage.  Catherine Collett was 25, while Cornelius Collett was three, Charles S Collett was one year old, and Isabella Collett was not yet one year old.  Over the following years it would appear that son Charles died, and that may also have been the case for George’s later daughter Emily who was born in 1862

 

Ten years later the census in 1871 placed George at 64 still living at Monkton, but on that occasion the only member of his family listed there with him was his son George A Collett who was 23.  At that same time his younger son Cornelius Collett of Monkton was attending school in Epsom at the age of 13.  Where his wife Elizabeth was, and their two daughters Isabella and Alice, has not been determined, but it is known that the two girls were still alive in 1881 although, again, no record of Elizabeth has been located at any time after 1861.  By the time of the next census in 1881, George Collett, aged 74, was listed as a retired farmer who had been born at Minster-in-Thanet.  The entry in the census return still indicated that he was married, but no trace of Elizabeth has been found.  George was living at Walter’s Hall in Main Road at Monkton in Kent with three of his unmarried children.  They were George Alfred Collett who was 33; Cornelius Collett who was 23; and Isabella Collett who was 20.  All three of them were confirmed as having been born at Monkton.  Missing on that occasion was George’s youngest daughter and last child by Elizabeth, who was attending a private school in 1881.  George Collett died less than a year later on 21st January 1882, just three months before his son Cornelius was married.  Of his younger family it was only his son Cornelius and his daughters Isabella and Alice who survived into the new century

 

18P9 – Catherine Collett was born in 1835 at Monkton, Kent

18P10 – George Collett was born in 1838 at Monkton, Kent

18P11 – Georgiana Collett was born in 1846 at Monkton, Kent

18P12 – George Alfred Collett was born in 1848 at Monkton, Kent

The children of George Collett and his second wife Elizabeth Smith:

18P13 – Cornelius Collett was born in 1857 at Monkton, Kent

18P14 – Charles S Collett was born in 1859 at Monkton, Kent

18P15 – Isabella Collett was born in 1860 at Monkton, Kent

18P16 – Emily Collett was born in 1861 at Monkton, Kent

18P17 – Alice Maud Collett was born in 1863 at Monkton, Kent

 

Mary Collett [18O8] was born at Minster-in-Thanet on 6th September 1808, the fourth child of Thomas Collett and Margaret Bushell, and was baptised in the Church of St Mary on 18th September 1808.  Mary later married Thomas Wickes Solly of Dent de Lion, Margate in Kent, with whom she had three sons and four daughters

 

Catherine Collett [18O9] was born at Minster-in-Thanet on 23rd August 1810, where she was baptised in St Mary’s Church on 7th October 1810 when she was confirmed as the daughter of Thos and Margaret Collett.  She was almost 31 when she married surgeon Henry (Harry) Gordon Harbord of Liverpool on 19th August 1841 at Woodnesborough in Kent.  However, the marriage only lasted for around ten years or so, but during the time it is understood that Catherine presented her husband with six children before she died, presumably during childbirth after the census in 1851.  The only baptism record so far found is for her eldest child, Harry Harbord, who was baptised at St Peter’s Church in Liverpool on 2nd May 1844, when his parents were confirmed as Henry and Catherine Harbord.  The following census in 1851 placed Catherine Harbord, aged 40, living at Minster-in-Thanet with only three of her children.  There were Harry Harbord, who was seven years old, Collett Harbord, who was four years old, and Catherine Harbord who was one year old.  Her sons Harry and Collett were born in Liverpool and were attending Marlborough School in Wiltshire at the time of the census in 1861 when H Harbord was 17 and C Harbord was 14

 

Ten years later Harry Harbord, aged 27, was a lodger at Aylesford in Kent, while Collett Harbord, aged 24, was Alfold in Surrey where he was supported by a housekeeper and a servant girl.  By 1881 Harry was 37 and was the Reverend Harry Harbord, Curate in Charge of All Saints at Highgate Espennett House in Hawkhurst, Kent where he was supported by two domestic staff. Around four years later he married Ellen Jane from was much younger than Harry.  By 1891 the marriage had produced the first three of their nine children and the family recorded at East Hoathly in Sussex comprised Harry who was 47, Ellen who was 33, Frances who was four, Kenneth who was two, and Stephen who was under one year old.  According to the next census in 1901 for East Hoathly, the couple’s oldest three children were away at boarding school, leaving Harry, aged 57, and Ellen Jane, aged 43, living there with their three youngest children at that time.  They were Geoffrey who was eight, Ellen who was six, and Arthur who was three

 

Mary Lynch Collett [18O10] was baptised at Walton in Felixstowe on 1st November 1807, the eldest child of Charles Collett and Charlotte Lynch.  The baptism was a joint ceremony with her possible twin sister Catherine (below).  Mary married Reverend Edward Raikes Edgar, the Rector of Trimley in Suffolk.  Mary and Edward’s second son was Mileson Edgar who was born in 1855 and who later was known as Captain Mileson Edgar.  Captain Mileson Edgar, of Red House Park, married Elizabeth Schreiber on 28th October 1878.  She was the daughter of the Reverend Thomas Schreiber, Rector of Bradwell in Essex.  Two years before he was born, his father’s brother, the Reverend Mileson Gery Edgar, died in 1853 leaving Westerfield Manor with his second wife Elizabeth Arkell, who held Westerfield Manor until her death on 11th June 1890.  The Manor House had been purchased from the Collett family in the early 1800s, it having been originally inherited by Anthony Collett (Ref. 18H8) from the Dameron family in 1600.  Upon the death of Elizabeth Edgar nee Arkell, Westerfield Manor was inherited by Captain Mileson Edgar of Red House Park and his wife Elizabeth Schreiber

 

Catherine Collett [18O11 was baptised at Walton on 1st November 1807 in a joint ceremony with her twin sister Mary Lynch Collett (above).  It is established that Catherine later married Henry Wilkin

 

Charlotte Collett [18O12] was baptised at Walton in Felixstowe on 21st January 1809, the daughter of Charles and Charlotte Collett

 

Elizabeth Collett [18O13] was baptised at Walton on 12th May 1810, the youngest of the four daughters of Charles Collett and his first wife Charlotte Lynch, who died around the end of 1813.  It is known that Elizabeth Collett later married Mr P Fletcher

 

Charles Lynch Collett [18O14] was born at Walton-cum-Felixstowe during 1811, the son of Charles Collett and his wife Charlotte Lynch.  It was in December two years that he died and was buried at Walton-cum-Felixstowe on 12th December 1813, with his mother dying just a few weeks later and also being buried there on 1st January 1814, following the birth of his brother Charles (below)

 

Charles Collett [18O15] was born at Walton-cum-Felixstowe during the first week of December in 1813, the last child born to Charles Collett by his first wife Charlotte Lynch.  Around the time that he was born his older brother Charles Lynch Collett died at two years of age, and not long after that the boys’ mother died, possibly because she did not recover from the latest birth.  Nine months after he was born, he too died and was buried at Walton-cum-Felixstowe with his brother and his mother on 6th August 1814

 

William Collett [18O16] was born at Walton-cum-Felixstowe where he was baptised on 4th December 1818, the only child of Charles Collett and his second wife Elizabeth Harmsworth.  He was educated at Ipswich Grammar School under his cousin James Collett Ebden, where he matriculated when he was 19.  Later that same year he was accepted into Peterhouse College in Cambridge on 1st October 1838.  The university records show he was the son of Charles Collett of Walton near Ipswich, and that he received his BA in 1843.  It was during the previous year that he was ordained as a deacon, prior to which he had been the Curate of Belstead in Ipswich.  According to the census in 1841, William Collett, with a rounded age of 20, was still living with his parents at Woodbridge near Ipswich.  Six years later in 1847, and after he was married, he was appointed Curate of Chelsworth, which lies midway between Bury St Edmunds and Ipswich, and today is known as Chelsworth.  However, another opportunity came his way later that same year.  Four years earlier, at Walton-cum-Felixstowe, William married (1) Mary Cecil Augusta von Linsingen on 29th August 1843.  Mary was the daughter of Count William von Linsingen the Chamberlain to George V, King of Hanover and his wife Mary Ann, and was born in London on 15th March 1815, and was baptised at St Lukes in Chelsea on 9th April 1815

 

William von Linsingen, K.C.B, G.C.H, had been a distinguished officer in the German Legion and from the age of fourteen he had been present in all of the continental wars, including the Seven Years War, when he was on the staff of the Duke of Brunswick.  When only a Lieutenant Colonel in 1794, he commanded a considerable corps of British and Hanoverian troops during the eight weeks defence of Menin in Flanders, not long after which he was taken prisoner.  During the years following this, he came to England to reform his regiment, the 1st Hussars of the German Legion, and was appointed to the rank of Major General in the British Service.  It was during the early 1800s that he is likely to have built a friendship with the Duke of Cambridge (see below).  In 1811 he was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant General and received the Orders of the Bath and of the Guelphs from his late Majesty the King, with whom he was a great favourite.  William and Mary Ann von Linsingen were prominent figures in the Ipswich area at that time, and up until 1824 the Count and his family lived at Birkfield Lodge on Belstead Road in Ipswich, which he built in 1818 and which today is the boys’ school of St Joseph’s College.  However, due to financial difficulties, he was forced to sell the property in 1824

 

After their wedding, William Collett and Mary Cecil Augusta settled in Chelsworth, where their first three children were born, although shortly before the birth of the third child, William was offered the post of Chaplain to the Duke of Cambridge, possibly through a recommendation from his father-in-law, the Count von Linsingen.  His new job took William and his family to Bury St Edmunds, and it was while they were living there that the next three children were born into the family.  Also, during the years from 1849 through to 1852, when William was living at 1 Westend in Bury St Edmunds, from where he performed the role of Curate at nearby Stanningfield.  By the time of the next census in 1851, William Collett was 32, his wife Cecil Collett was 36, and their four daughters were Sophia Collett who was six, Emily Collett who was five, Augusta Collett who was three, and Mary Collett who was one year old.  Living with the family that day, was William’s elderly mother Elizabeth Collett from Newbury in Berkshire who, in the month of September that same year, was buried at Stanningfield.  During the following year, William was made Rector of Hawstead near Bury St Edmunds, to where the family moved between 1852 and 1855, and it was while the family was living at Hawstead that the couple’s last child was born in 1856.  By April 1861, the larger family was living within the parsonage at Hawstead, south of Bury St Edmunds.  At that time the family comprised William, aged 42, Mary C A Collett, aged 46, and their seven children.  They were recorded as Sophie E Collett 16, Ellen M Collett 15, Augusta C Collett 13, Mary L Collett 11, William C Collett, who was nine, Agnes M Collett, who was six, and Frederick W Collett who was five years old.  It was just three years later that tragedy struck the family, when Mary Cecil Augusta Collett died at Hawstead during the first three months of 1864, aged 59

 

Nearly four years later, William married (2) Charlotte Johanna Caroline Stowiczek (1830-1926), from Hanover in Germany, at St George’s Church in Hanover Square in London on 15th June 1869.  That second marriage produced another two children for William, both of them born after the next census in 1871.  According to the census return that year, William and part of his original family was still living at Hawstead within the Thingoe & Rougham area.  William was 52, and his wife Charlotte was 41.  Only five of his children from his first marriage were still living there with him, and they were Sophie E Collett 26, Augustus C Collett 23, Mary L Collett 21, William C Collett 19, and Agnes M Collett who was 16.  It seems highly likely that Charlotte was with-child on the day of the census, since later that same year she gave birth to a daughter.  At the end of 1873 Charlotte presented William with another son, and the second of their two children, both of whom were both born at Hawstead.  However, tragedy was to strike the family again, when Charlotte Collett nee Stowiczek died at Hawstead on 11th January 1874 at the age of 44, very likely during, or shortly after, the birth of her son child.  It was also at Hawstead that she was buried on 17th January 1874.  The census of 1881 confirmed that widower William Collett, aged 62 and from Walton, was still the Rector of Hawstead and that he was still residing at The Rectory in Hawstead.  Still living there with him were his four unmarried daughters Ellen M Collett, aged 35, and Augusta Cecil Collett, aged 33, both born at Chelsworth, and Mary L Collett, aged 31, and Agnes M Collett, aged 26, who were both born at Bury St Edmunds.  In addition to the four older daughters from William’s first marriage, there was also Leonora J Collett who was nine years old, and John A Collett who was seven years of age, both of whom had been born at Hawstead, the two children from his second marriage.  The household was supported by three domestic servants, cook Priscilla Storey, 23 and from Norwich, housemaid Sally Coe, 21 and from Ixworth, and child’s nurse Clara Pettit, aged 19 from Hawstead

 

Sadly, for the two younger members of his family, William passed away just ten months after the census in 1881.  It is therefore assumed that those two children, aged just ten and eight years respectively, were subsequently brought up their four older half-sisters.  It was originally stated in error that the Reverend William Collett died on 21st November 1889.  However, new information supplied by Tony Copsey in January 2010, and confirmed by the records of the Cambridge Alumni, and the Suffolk burial records, places the death of William Collett at Hawstead as 1st February 1882, following which he was buried at Hawstead on 4th February 1882, aged 63.  It can now also be revealed that his death was reported in The Guardian Newspaper on 8th February 1882.  In 2010 Tony Copsey was the owner of a property that was once part of the Westerfield Estate which, up to 1868, was in the ownership of the Collett family.  Tony is mapping the history of the property and all those who lived there and his finding so far using the deeds he holds reveal that the Colletts sold the property in 1868 to the aforementioned Edgar family, with whom it remained until 1935

 

18P18 – Sophia Elizabeth Collett was born in 1844 at Chelsworth

18P19 – Ellen Mary Collett was born in 1845 at Chelsworth

18P20 – Augusta Cecil Collett was born in 1847 at Chelsworth

18P21 – Mary Louisa Collett was born in 1849 at Bury St Edmund

18P22 – William Charles Collett was born in 1851 at Bury St Edmund

18P23 – Agnes Maria Collett was born in 1854 at Bury St Edmunds

18P24 – Frederick William Collett was born in 1856 at Hawstead

The children of William Collett by his second wife Charlotte Stowiczek:

18P25 – Leonora Julia Collett was born in 1871 at Hawstead

18P26 – John Anthony Collett was born in 1873 at Hawstead

 

Charles Collett [18O17] was born on 8th May 1823, most likely at Beverley in the East Riding of Yorkshire, but was baptised three days later at Falkenham, near Felixstowe in Suffolk, on 11th May 1823, the first-born son of Cornelius Collett and Amelia Daniel from Falkenham.  The entry in the Falkenham parish register included the additional note that the child was “of Beverley, but at this time, in this parish”.  He had a rounded age of 15 in the Beverley census of 1841, when he was living with his widowed mother and two younger brothers at North Bar Street in Beverley.  Six years later, the death of Charles Collett was recorded at Beverley (Ref. xxiii 1) during the third quarter of 1847

 

Samuel Collett [18O18] was born at Beverley during 1824, where he was baptised at the church of St Mary & St Nicholas on 21st November 1824, the second of the four sons of Cornelius and Amelia Collett.  His father died in 1840 so, in the census the following year, Samuel had a rounded age of 15, when he was living at North Bar Street in Beverley with his widowed mother and his brother Charles (above) and Daniel (below).  Where he was in 1851 has not yet been discovered, while ten years after that, Samuel Collett was again living at North Bar Street in 1861, when he described as a bachelor and a gentleman at the age of 36, by which time his mother was residing in London.  During the next decade, Samuel was reunited with his mother in West London, where they were recorded in the Heston area census, near Hounslow in Middlesex, in 1871.  In the census return that year, Samuel Collett was unmarried, was 43 years of age (sic), and was living off an annuity, at Clare Lodge in Spring Grove Road.  Staying with him and his mother, was cousin Charlotte E Sewell from Middlesex, who was 12 years old.  His mother also employed a servant, Martha A Buck who was 43.  Spring Grove Road runs through Hounslow, between Heston and Isleworth.  Although not proved, it is possible that the death of Samuel Collett, recorded at St Olave Southwark in South London (Ref. 1d 128) during the second quarter of 1893, and aged 68, was Samuel Collett from Beverley.  But where he was in 1881 and 1891 is still a mystery

 

Daniel Collett [18O19] was born at Beverley in 1828 and it was there that he was baptised at the church of St Mary & St Nicholas on 10th August 1828, another son of Cornelius and Amelia Collett.  By the time he was 12 years of age, and following the death of his father during the previous year, Daniel and his widowed mother and two older brothers were recorded in the June census of 1841 at North Bar Street, in Beverley.  On leaving school, and completing a qualification as an engineer, Daniel Collett from Beverley was living at Thetford Market Place, in 1852, where he was 22, unmarried, and an engineer, a visitor in the home of the Bailey family from Essex.  Five years later, Daniel Collett, a civil engineer, was married at Hackney (Ref. 1b 470) during the fourth quarter of 1857 to (1) Elizabeth Pollard Canwell, who was known as Lizzie.  Once married, the couple settled at Melcombe Regis, in the Weymouth parish of Radipole where, in 1861, they were residing at 7 St Mary’s Street, where Daniel Collett from Beverley was 32 and an engineer in the census that year.  His wife was confirmed as Lizzie Collett from Brighton, who was 30, while living there with them was their two-year-old son Alfred M Collett, the family employing two servants, Ada Thomas and Sophie Butcher.  His wife is a bit of a mystery woman, in that Elizabeth Pollard Canwell was born in Northamptonshire, where she was baptised on 12th April 1829, the daughter of John and Elizabeth Canwell, so could they have moved to Brighton during the following years.  It is curious that there is no record of her or her parents in the census conducted in 1841 and 1851.  For the young Collett of Melcombe Regis, it was a similar situation in 1871, when the family of three was still living in the Melcombe Regis of Weymouth, but at 7 Grosvenor Road.  That census day Daniel Collett, aged 42 and from Beverley, was an engineer and an iron founder employing nine men and three boys.  His wife was listed as Lizzie P Collett, who was 40 and from Brighton, when their son was Alfred M Collett, aged 12 years, who had been born in Weymouth.  On that occasion Daniel and Lizzie were employing a general servant Sarah Seaward, who was 22

 

Over the next few years Daniel’s and Lizzie’s son Alfred attended Keble College in Oxford, where he matriculated on 15th October 1877 at the age of 18.  The record of his attendance confirmed that he was the only son of Daniel Collett of Melcombe Regis in Dorset.  However, it was two years earlier, while he was at university, that the death of Elizabeth Pollard Collett, nee Canwell, was recorded at Weymouth (Ref. 5a 189) during the third quarter of 1875, was she was 45 years old.  Around eighteen months after being widowed, the second marriage of Daniel Collett to Mary Sherwood Ireland was recorded at Cheltenham (Ref. 6a 587) during the first three months of 1877.  Mary was born at Cirencester in Gloucestershire in 1837, and was living with her parents, John James Ireland and his wife Ann Fanny Ireland at New Quay in Dartmouth, Devon, in 1841 aged four years.  At the age of ten years, Mary Sherwood Ireland was living in the Devon village of Slapton with her family, the eldest of three children.  According to the next census in 1881, the family home was again at 7 Grosvenor Road in Melcombe Regis, although, on the day of the census that year, Daniel Collett from Beverley was 52 and a civil engineer, who was visiting his younger married brother Trusson Collett (below) at his home at 178 Gold Hawk Road in Hammersmith.  His new wife, and his son Alfred, were recorded at their home in Melcombe Regis where, head of the household Mary S Collett from Cirencester was 44, and her stepson Alfred M Collett from Weymouth, was 22 and was described as a BA student at Oxford.  Working for the family were two general servants, Eliza Tompkins who was 20, and Fanny Bascombe who was 17

 

It was almost exactly eight years later that Daniel Collett died at Weymouth on 17th April 1889, his death recorded at Weymouth register office (Ref. 5a 189), at the age of 60.  Three days later, he was buried at the Radipole Parish Church of St Ann on 20th April 1889.  After a further five weeks, the Will of Daniel Collett was proved on 28th May 1889 when the two main beneficiaries were Alfred Master Collett and Mary Sherwood Collett.  There was also an additional person named in the Will, and that was Benjamin Hopkins.  Following the death of her husband, Mary moved west along the south coast and, at the time of the census two years later, Mary Sherwood Collett, aged 54 and from Cirencester, was living on her own means at 2 Brooklin Villa in Cockington, near Torquay.  Visiting her on that occasion was 57 years old spinster Sara L Hargreaves from Kent, when Mary was still employing a servant, Elizabeth Reynolds from Hampshire who was 26.  Over the following ten years, Mary returned to the county of her birth where, on the day of the census in 1901, she was reunited with her unmarried stepson Alfred at Cheltenham.  The census that year recorded her as Mary S Collett from Cirencester who was 64 and again living on her own means, when Mary still had sufficient funds to continuing employing a servant, on that occasion, Rose Newman who was 20 and from Stow-on-the-Wold.  Whilst Alfred remained living in Cheltenham, by the time of the next census, conducted in April 1911, Mary Sherwood Collett from Cirencester was 74 years old when she was boarder at the Lambeth, London, home of the Harry William Woods and his family. Sometime after visiting London, Mary returned once more to Cheltenham, and it was there, just over ten years after that day, that the death of Mary Sherwood Collett was recorded (Ref. 6a 497) during the last three months of 1921, when she was 84

 

18P27 – Alfred Master Collett was born in 1858 at Weymouth, Dorset

 

Trusson Collett [18O20] was born at Beverley in 1832, the last of the four sons of Cornelius Collett and Amelia Daniel.  He was nine years old in 1841, when he was staying with his uncle Charles Collett at Woodbridge.  He later married Elizabeth Charlotte Collett (Ref. 18O49) who was born at Sweffling near Saxmundham in 1831.  She was the eldest daughter of the Reverend Woodthorpe Collett, of Brightwell in Suffolk, and Elizabeth Pyemont, and it was at Sweffling that she was baptised on 5th July 1833.  The wedding ceremony took place at Brightwell Church to the south-east of Ipswich on 5th September 1860 and was reported in The Times on 7th September and in the Ipswich Journal the following day.  As her father was the incumbent clergyman at Brightwell, he had called upon two family members to officiate on that special occasion.  The first of them was the Reverend James Collett Ebden (Ref. 18M13), the Vicar of Great Stukeley in Huntingdon, who was assisted by Elizabeth’s brother, the Reverend Henry Pyemont Collett (Ref. 18O47).  The wedding notice, on page one of the 7th September 1860 edition of The Times newspaper, stated that “On the fifth inst. at Brightwell Church by the Rev. J Collett Ebden Rector of Great Stukeley, Huntingdon, assisted by the Rev. H P Collett brother of the bride, Trusson youngest son of the late Cornelius Collett Esq. of Beverley, Yorkshire to Elizabeth Charlotte eldest daughter of the Rev. Woodthorpe Collett incumbent of Brightwell, Suffolk”

 

 

After they were married, and at the time of the census in 1861, Trusson and Elizabeth were both 28 when they were living at Newton Street in Paddington in London, from where Trusson (curiously named Giuseppe) was working as a clerk for a wine merchant.  Two other people were recorded at the same address and they were Amelia Collett (nee Daniel), Trusson’s elderly widowed mother from Falkenham, and Elizabeth’s sister Catherine A Collett (Ref. 18O50) from Sweffling, who was 27.  It would appear that Elizabeth was probably with-child by that time, since their one and only child was born later that same year.  The birth took place at Beverley, where Trusson had been born.  Ten years later in 1871, the family was living at Maryland Villa in Hammersmith, although their daughter was absence on the day of the census.  Just Trusson and Elizabeth, both aged 38, were recorded there, with the third person being domestic servant Lane Gunter who was 26.  It was also in Hammersmith that they were still living in 1881, when the family was living at 178 Goldhawk Road (the A402 road in 2010), when Trusson’s occupation was still that of a clerk.  The census also confirmed he was 48 and that he had been born at Beverley.  His wife Elizabeth C Collett was also 48 and from Sweffling in Suffolk, and their daughter Emily Collett was in higher education at the age of 19, when her place of birth was confirmed as Beverley.  Visiting the family that day was Trusson’s older married brother and civil engineer Daniel Collett (above)

 

The family would appear to be fairly affluent, as the household also employed two female servants, who were Ellen M Podd who was 23 and from Holbrook in Suffolk, and Emma K Wort who was 18 and from Lyndhurst in Hampshire.  Ten years later, in 1891, Trusson was 58 and a merchant’s clerk, living at Willesden in North London with his wife Elizabeth, also 58, and unmarried daughter Emily Collett, aged 29, who was already looking forward to the days she would be married, later that same year.  Once again, the family was supported by two servants, Mary Adlam 51 and Emily Fiehlock 21.  By the time of the census in March 1901, Trusson and Elizabeth were both 68 and were still living in Willesden, at 21 Cavendish Road, just of the A5 Edgware Road between Brondesbury and Kilburn.  Trusson Collett was described as ‘living on his own means’.  Later that same year, and following the untimely death of their married, but widowed, daughter Emily Norton, Trusson and Elizabeth took over guardianship of their eight-year-old granddaughter Dorothy Annis Norton, whose father had died when the child was just two years old

 

According to the next census in 1911, Trusson Collett and Elizabeth Charlotte Collett were both 78 years old when, living with them at 21 Cavendish Road in Brondesbury was their granddaughter Dorothy Annis Norton who, at the age of 18, was still attending a school in Richmond.  The family of three was supported by two domestic servants Mary Emma Hodgson 53 and Ellen Jane Hobbs 39.  The photograph (above) of Trusson Collett was taken with his wife Elizabeth, most likely during 1912, just prior to her passing.  Elizabeth C Collett died at ‘Beaufort’ 21 Cavendish Road in Brondesbury on 7th March 1913, her death recorded at Willesden register office (Ref. 3a 369), when she was 80 years of age.  Five weeks later, her Will was proved on 15th April 1913 which named two beneficiaries, Trusson Collett and Charles Deighton-Brasher, her personal effects, valued at £1,264 14 Shillings 2d.  Trusson Collett was 90 years old when died passed away, his death being recorded at Willesden register office (Ref. 3a 298) during the last three months of 1922.  His Will was proved in London when the joint executors of his considerable estate of £7,421 6 Shillings 7d, equivalent to around £357K in 2013, were named as Percy Norton, a solicitor, and Dorothy Annis Talet, formerly Dorothy Annis Norton his granddaughter, and the wife of Frederick Paul Talet.  The probate process also confirmed that Trusson Collett of 21 Cavendish Road in Brondesbury, died on 29th December 1922

 

18P28 – Emily Collett was born in 1861 at Beverley, Yorkshire

 

Frances Jane Collett [18O21] was born at Little Ilford in Essex on 8th November 1811, where she was also baptised, the eldest child of Robert Henry Collett and Frances Meyler Smith.  She never married and in 1881, at the age of 70, she was living with her younger brother John Collett, at the home of their brother William Lloyd Collett (below) at his vicarage home in Coverdale Road in Hammersmith.  During the next decade Frances and her youngest brother John left London and retired to Brighton in Sussex.  According to the Brighton census in 1891, Frances J Collett was 78 and she and her brother John Collett were residing at 10 Charlotte Street in Kemp Town district of Brighton.  Just less than two years later Frances Jane Collett was 81 when she died at her home at 10 Charlotte Street in Brighton, her death being recorded at Brighton register office (Ref. 2b 132) during the final three months of 1892.  The probate process for her Will stated that she passed away on 18th December 1892 when her estate, valued at £25,152 19 Shillings 3d, was executed by her brother (below) the Reverend William Lloyd Collett of St Stephen’s Church in Shepherds Bush.  In modern day terms the estate would have had an equivalent value of something like £2.7 million.  Ten years after her death her brother John Collett (below) was still living at 10 Charlotte Street in Brighton when he passed away

 

Mary Anne Collett [18O22] was born at Little Ilford on 27th November 1812, the daughter of Robert and Frances Collett.  She was only 25 years old when she died on 16th September 1837

 

Robert Henry Collett [18O23] was born at Little Ilford on 4th March 1814, where he was baptised a month later on 12th April 1814, the third child and eldest son of Robert Henry Collett and Frances Meyler Smith

 

Caroline Collett [18O24] was born at Little Ilford in 1815 where she was baptised on 3rd August 1815, the fourth child of Robert and Frances Collett

 

Helen Maria Collett [18O25] was born at Little Ilford on 10th April 1817 and it was there also that she was baptised on 8th May 1817, another daughter of Robert and Frances Collett

 

William Lloyd Collett [18O26] was born at Little Ilford on 25th November 1818, and it was there also that he was baptised on 22nd December 1818, the son of Robert Henry Collett and Frances Meyler Smith.  He was educated at Queens College in Oxford where he was listed as William Lloyd Collett, the son of Henry Collett of Little Ilford in Essex.  He matriculated on 6th December 1838 when he was 20, and obtained a BA on 18th May 1842 and his MA on 14th May 1845.  It was between those two events that on 25th September 1843, at Gillingham in Kent, William Lloyd Collett married Frances Harriett Smith, the daughter of Henry Smith of Morden College in Blackheath.  What is interesting is that William’s father Robert Henry Collett (Ref. 18N13) also married a daughter of Henry Smith who might have been the father of that particular Henry Smith.  Frances was born at Charlton in Kent, which lies between Greenwich and Woolwich, and just across the River Thames from Little Ilford where William was born although, in some later census records, she gave her place of birth as Blackheath.  By the time of the census in 1851, William was 31 and Frances was 28, and living with them within the St Pancras & Kentish Town district of London were their two youngest children, Helen who was two years old, and Catherine who was under one year old.  By that time the couple’s three oldest children Frances, Anna and Mary were absence from the family home, due to them staying at Morden College with their grandparents Henry W Smith, aged 63 and Treasurer of Morden College, and his wife Susette Smith who was 47.  According to the Charlton census, Frances M Collett was six years old, Anna S Collett was five, and Mary Collett was three.  All three girls had been born at Gillingham near Shaftesbury in Dorset but, shortly after they were born, William and Frances left Gillingham and moved to Dover with their daughters, where their next child was born.  Just a year or so later the family was living in Winkfield near Bracknell in Berkshire, where the couple’s fifth child was born

 

Within a year of the census in 1851, William was appointed to the Church of St Stephen in Shepherd’s Bush, and with that post was accommodation for the family in Hammersmith.  During the next decade a further five children were added to the family while they were living at the St Stephen’s Church Parsonage in Hammersmith, where all of the five new children had been born.  The next census in 1861 confirmed that the family was living at the Parsonage and that William Lloyd Collett, aged 42 and from Little Ilford, was the perpetual curate of St Stephen’s Church.  The family was almost complete by then, except for the couple’s third and fourth child, daughters Mary and Helen Clara Collett, who were absence from the home on the day of the census.  It is likely that Mary had died during the previous decade, but that Helen, aged 12 years old, was probably attending boarding school.  The remainder of the family was listed as Frances H Collett, aged 38 from Charlton, Frances M Collett 16, Anna S Collett 15, Catherine H Collett 10, Robert W Collett who was eight, twins Alfred and Arthur Collett who were six, Isabella A Collett who was four, and Jessie S Collett who was just ten months old.  On that occasion the younger children had a French governess, 44 years old Elizabeth Masera, in addition to which they also had a nurse, Emily from Stepney who was 33

 

Sometime after 1861, William changed from being the perpetual curate of St Stephen’s, when he became the Vicar of St Stephen’s Church at Shepherd’s Bush, which was confirmed by the Hammersmith census of 1871.  Also, during that decade, the couple’s last child was added to their family and, although he was listed with the family in 1871, no record of him has been found after that time.  The census return for 1871 placed William Lloyd Collett, aged 52 and from Little Ilford, as living at St Stephen’s Vicarage on the Uxbridge Road in Hammersmith with his family, when his title was that of Vicar of St Stephen’s Church in Shepherds Bush.  With him was his wife Frances Harriet Collett who was 48 and from Charlton, and eight of their eleven children.  On that occasion it was the couple’s two eldest daughters who had left the family home by that time.  Anna would have been 25 and may have been married by then, whereas it is known that Frances never married and she would have been around 26 that year.  The eight children living with their parents at The Vicarage in 1871 were Helen Clara Collett aged 22, Catherine Collett aged 20, Robert William Collett aged 18, the twins Alfred and Arthur Collett who were both 16, Isabel Augusta Collett who was 14, Jessie Susette Collett who was 10 and Bernard Brockwell Collett who was five years old.  In addition to the four servants employed at the vicarage, two other members of the Collett family were staying there on that day, and they were William’s eldest unmarried sister Frances Jane Collett (above) who was 59 and from Little Ilford in Essex, and his younger brother John Collett (below) who was 38 and from Westerham in Kent.  Neither of them was described as having any occupation

 

The two siblings were still living with the family ten years later according to the census in 1881.  William Lloyd Collett was 62 and was still the Vicar of Stephen’s Church in Shepherds Bush, even though the address was changed.  Living with him at The Vicarage in Coverdale Road in Hammersmith was his wife Frances Harriet, aged 58, who then said she was from Blackheath in Kent rather than Charlton, together with four of their unmarried children.  They were Helen C Collett, aged 32 who was born at Dover, Alfred Collett, aged 26 and a civil engineer, Isabel A Collett who was 24, and Jessie S Collett who was 20, all of whom were recorded as having been born at Shepherds Bush.  Neither of the couple’s two sons Arthur and Bernard were with the family that day, Arthur having already died by then, while it was Bernard was attending The Priory School on the High Street in Marlborough.  Again, listed with the family were William’s sister Frances J Collett and his brother John Collett.  The household was supported by five domestic servants, they being a cook, a lady’s maid, a housemaid, a kitchen maid, and a parlour maid.  In 1891 a much reduced Collett family was still living at Hammersmith.  William L Collett was 72, his wife Frances H Collett was 68, and still living there with them was two of their unmarried daughters, Frances M Collett who was 47, and Catherine H Collett who was 40.  Towards the end of the following year the Reverend William Lloyd Collett of St Stephen’s Church in Shepherds Bush was named as the sole executor for the Will of his eldest sister Frances Jane Collett of Brighton.  It is also known that William and Frances retired to Brighton where the Reverend William Lloyd Collett died on 9th July 1896, where his death was recorded (Ref. 2b 126) during the third quarter of that year.  His address at that time in his life was 8 Marlborough Place in Brighton and the proving of his Will was placed in the hands of the Reverend George Booker, a clerk, Frances Mary Collett, a spinster, Edmund Vallack, esquire, and the Reverend Alexander Keith Ramsey, a clerk.  His personal effects were valued at £16,697 5 shillings 10d

 

Following the death of her husband his widow moved into the home of her brother-in-law John James Collett (below) at 10 Charlotte Street, taking with her two of her unmarried daughters.  By that time her son Alfred and her daughter Jessie had already left England to seek a new life in Argentina, where they were both married.  It was also at 10 Charlotte Street in Brighton that Frances H Collett, aged 78, was living on her own means in 1901.  Once again, she gave her place of birth as Blackheath, about two miles from Charlton.  Also living there with her were her daughters Frances M Collett aged 56 from Gillingham and Catherine E Collett who was 50 and from Winkfield.  All three of them were still residing at the home of her husband’s youngest brother John Collett, aged 68 and from Westerham, who was also living on his own means, like the three ladies.  Frances Harriett Collett nee Smith, from Charlton or Blackheath, died on 1st May 1909 when she was residing at 21 Clifton Terrace in Brighton with her two daughters Frances and Helen.  Her Will was proved in London on 5th June 1909 when her daughters Frances Mary Collett and Helen Clara Collett were named as the executors of her estate which was valued at £9,785 15 Shillings 3d.  Less than two year later the census April 1911 named just the three unmarried daughters of William Lloyd Collett as still living in Brighton, and they were Frances Mary Collett, who was 66, Helen Clara Collett, who was 62, and Catherine Hester Collett who was 60.  Another source for this family includes a son Bernard Collett but, so far, no other reference to him has been found anywhere else to verify this so, for the time being, his name has been omitted from the list of children below

 

18P29 – Frances Mary Collett was born in 1844 at Gillingham, Dorset

18P30 – Anna Sophia Collett was born in 1845 at Gillingham, Dorset

18P31 – Mary Collett was born in 1847 at Gillingham, Dorset

18P32 – Helen Clara Mary Collett was born in 1848 at Dover, Kent

18P33 – Catherine Hester Collett was born in 1850 at Winkfield, Berkshire

18P34 – Robert William Collett was born in 1852 at Shepherds Bush, Middlesex

18P35 – Alfred Collett (twin) was born in 1854 at Shepherds Bush, Middlesex

18P36 – Arthur Collett (twin) was born in 1854 at Shepherds Bush, Middlesex

18P37 – Isabel Augusta Collett was born in 1856 at Shepherds Bush, Middlesex

18P38 – Jessie Susette Collett was born in 1860 at Shepherds Bush, Middlesex

18P39 – Bernard Stockwell Collett was born in 1866 at Shepherds Bush, Middlesex

 

Henry Gerard Collett [18O27] was born at Little Ilford on 12th August 1823, and it was there that he was baptised on 11th September 1823, the son of Robert and Frances Collett

 

Christopher Theophilus Collett [18O28] was born at Little Ilford on 4th September 1825 and was baptised there on 5th October 1825, another son of Robert and Frances Collett.  He attended Magdalen College in Oxford, where he matriculated on 21st October 1841 and where he was recorded as the fourth son of Robert Collett of Ilford in Essex.  Curiously in this particular family tree he only has two known older brothers, so whether the college record was incorrect or one of his brothers had died prior to then, has not been determined at this time.  Just like his sister Mary (above), Christopher also died when he was around 25 years of age, when he died on 19th October 1847

 

Jessie Collett [18O29] was born at Little Ilford on 25th September 1827 where she was baptised on 8th November 1827, the youngest daughter of Robert Henry Collett and Frances Meyler Smith.  The only other known detail regarding Jessie, is that she died at Torquay on 16th October 1848 when her age was incorrectly record as being only 18, instead of 21

 

Philip Morden Collett [18O30] was born at Speldhurst in Kent on 14th July 1829, the son of Robert Henry Collett and Frances Meyler Smith, but sadly he died at Tonbridge on 8th March 1830.  His second name may have been taken from Morden College which was attended by one of his older siblings

 

John James Collett [18O31] was born at Westerham near Sevenoaks in Kent on 17th June 1832, the youngest child of Robert Henry Collett and Frances Meyler Smith.  Although no positive record of John or his family has been found in 1841, when they are believed to have still been living at Westerham, by the time of the census in 1851 John Collett from Westerham was 18 and was living at Plympton St Mary in Devon.  He was the only Collett listed in that registration district at that time, which may be significant, since it was at Torquay in Devon three years earlier that his older sister Jessie Collett died in 1848 at the age of 18.  It is possible that he was on vacation in Devon, or visiting relatives, or even attending the grave of his sister.  Whatever the reason for him being there, it is known that he was educated at Wadham College in Oxford where he was listed as the son of Robert Henry Collett of Westerham in Kent.  And it was at Wadham that he matriculated that same year on 18th June 1851 when he was 19

 

John never married and in 1881, at the age of 48, he was living with his older sister Frances J Collett at the Hammersmith home of their brother William Lloyd Collett (above) and his wife Frances at The Vicarage in Coverdale Road.  During the years after that, John and his sister Frances left London, when they retired to Brighton.  That was confirmed in the census of 1891 when John Collett, aged 58, was living at 10 Charlotte Street in the Kemp Town district of the town, not far from Brighton Pier, with his sister Frances J Collett, who sadly died towards the end of 1892.  In March 1901, and following the death of his brother William Lloyd Collett (above) five years earlier, John Collett of Westerham was 68 when he was still living at 10 Charlotte Street in Brighton.  Living there with him was William’s widow Frances Harriet Collett and her two daughters Frances and Catherine.  All four of them, were described as living on their own means.  It was just eleven months later that John James Collett died at 10 Charlotte Street in Brighton on 17th February 1902 at the age of 69, his death recorded at Brighton register office (Ref. 2b 163)

 

In March 1901, and following the death of his brother William Lloyd Collett (above) five years earlier, John Collett of Westerham was 68 when he was still living at 10 Charlotte Street in Brighton.  Living there with him was William’s widow Frances Harriet Collett and her two daughters Frances and Catherine.  All four of them, were described as living on their own means.  It was just eleven months later that John James Collett died at 10 Charlotte Street in Brighton on 17th February 1902 at the age of 69, his death recorded at Brighton register office (Ref. 2b 163).  The Will of John Collett was originally settled in the sum of £23,115 13 Shillings 5d but was re-sworn in February 1903 when his estate was confirmed as £22,682 14 Shillings 5d.  During the probate process he was credited with property at 88 High Street in Sevenoaks, Kent, and at 10 Charlotte Street in Brighton where he died.  Probate was granted to his unmarried nieces Helen Clara Collett and Frances Mary Collett, two of the daughters of his live-in sister-in-law Frances Harriet Collett, and the Reverend Alexander Keith Ramsey and Edmund Vallak esquire

 

Anna Collett [18O32] was born in 1822 at Bramerton to the east of Norwich.  Following the death of her mother Phyllis Preston Reynolds in 1831 her father William Collett remarried in 1835, at which time the family was living at Thetford where Anna was 19 in 1841.  The subsequent census records revealed that she was not married during the following twenty years.  In 1851 and 1861 she was 29 and 39 respectively, when she was still living with her father and her stepmother at Thetford, where her father was the rector.  However, it was six weeks after the census day in 1861 that Anna Collett married John Michael Croker at Thetford on 28th May 1861, when her father was confirmed as William Collett.  It was during the following year that Anna presented John with a son at Norwich, where they were living in 1871 when John M Croker was 49, as was Anna, while their son John W Croker was nine years of age. 

 

Sometime after that Anna was made a widow with the death of her husband.  By 1881 she was head of the household at Cantley, a village lying midway between Norwich and Great Yarmouth.  Anna Croker from Bramerton was 59 and described as holding railway stocks and mortgage, which may suggest that John Michael Croker died from injuries he sustained while working on the railway.  Living there with Anna was her son John W Croker who was 19 with no stated occupation who had been born in Norwich.  Supporting the two of them were three servants, a housemaid, a cook and an errand boy.  Mother and son were still together ten years later, as confirmed by the census in 1891 when they were still residing in Cantley.  Anna Croker was 69 and her unmarried son was 29.  By that time, they had just two domestic servants working for them.  Just over seven years after that the death of Anna Croker nee Collett was recorded at Norwich (Ref. 4b 97) during the last three months of 1898 when she was 76.  The probate process stated that Anna Croker, a widow of Heighham Hall Asylum in Norwich died on 5th October 1898.  Probate of her personal effects amounting to £4,192 2 Shillings 3d was granted to John Brown Aldis, a bank inspector, and John Empson Toplis Pollard, a solicitor

 

William Reynolds Collett [18O33] was born at Bramerton on 20th May 1823, where he was baptised one week later on 28th May 1823, the eldest son of William Collett and Phyllis Preston Reynolds.  His early education was conducted at Yarmouth Proprietary School, where he matriculated in 1841.  It was then that he was accepted into Caius College in Cambridge on 25th March 1841 at the age of 18.  The college record also confirmed that he was born at Bramerton, the son of William Collett, former Cambridge scholar and Vicar of St Mary’s Church at Thetford.  He graduated from Caius College in Cambridge with a Bachelor of Arts (13th Wrangler) degree in 1845, obtained his Master of Arts degree in 1848, and was a Fellow of Caius College from 1845 to 1857.  He was ordained as a deacon at Ely in 1846, and became priest in 1849.  It was from around that time, and into the 1850s, that he was the librarian for both Gonville and Caius Colleges, which is acknowledged in the records at the British Library.  He later married Mary Hoste who was three years older than William, and she was the daughter of Colonel Sir George Charles Hoste who fought at the Battle of Waterloo, and a painting of him in uniform can be seen in the National Portrait Gallery in London.  Sir George was later employed as a gentleman usher by Queen Adelaide, following the death of King William IV in 1837, and was also sent out to Canada to secretly investigate the state of defences of British North American Provinces.  From 1856 until 1902 William Reynolds Collett was the Rector of Hethersett with Canteloff in Norfolk, and lived at The Hethersett Rectory in Wymondham.  The next two census returns, for 1861 and 1871, placed William R Collett of Bramerton as living with his wife Mary within the census registration district of Henstead & Humbleyard, near Norwich.  Their ages were 37 and 40, and 47 and 50 respectively.  In 1871 William’s two sisters Sophia Norgate nee Collett, and Lucy Collett, were also living nearby in Hethersett

 

Ten years later in 1891, William Reynolds Collett, aged 67 and from Bramerton, was still living in Hethersett, with his wife Mary who was 70, within the sub-registration district of Humbleyard.  Also living with the couple at that time was William’s unmarried sister Lucy Frances Collett (below), who was 61 and born at Thetford.  It was during the following year that William was made the Honorary Canon of Norwich, a title that he held from 1892 until his death in 1902.   However, prior to his own death, his wife Mary had passed away before the end of the century, and to honour her memory William organised the rebuilding of the chancel at Hethersett Church.  Perhaps rather oddly, William W Collett, aged 77 and from Bramerton in Norfolk, was recorded at Hastings on the occasion of the March census in 1901, when he was described as a clerk in Holy Orders.  Apparently, it was following the death of his wife that William joined with other well to do individuals at the Alexandra Hotel in Hastings, where he was staying in 1901.  It was just over eighteen months later that William Reynolds Collett died at Hethersett on 11th October 1902, at the age of 79.  His proved Will confirmed that he left part of his estate, amounting to £946 9 Shillings 3d, to his half-brother Edward Collett of Thetford, which explains how Edward, at the age of 64, came to be married and how he managed to set up a new life for himself.  During his life William Reynolds Collett was the author of two books, and they were ‘A List of Early Printed Books’ (in the College Library), which was published in 1850, and ‘Women’s Work in the Church’, which was published during 1863

 

John Collett [18O34] was born at Bramerton in 1824 and was baptised in nearby Norwich on 10th July 1824, the son of William Collett and his wife Phyllis Preston Reynolds who died at Thetford in 1831

 

Charles Preston Collett [18O35] was born at Bramerton in 1826 and was baptised there on 25th April 1826, the son of William and Phyllis Collett.  He was called to the bar of the Inner Temple at Lincoln’s Inn during 1861 and from 1869 to 1871 he was the Puisne Judge of the High Court at Madras in India.  On 2nd April 1871 Charles was recorded in the census return in Great Britain as being aged 44 and living at St James Square in Westminster, London.  He was not married at that time.  It was following his return to England from India that he married Lucy Ellen Daniels around 1872 while still living in London.  Lucy was born at Islington in 1843 and was seventeen years younger than Charles.  So, at the time of their wedding, Charles would have been 46 compared to Lucy who would have been 29.  It was around that time in their lives that a letter, written by Eliza Ebden in November 1871 address to her sons, gave the place of residence of their cousin Charles Collett as being in Foxley Road in Kennington, not far from the Kennington Oval, the road still being there today

 

That may have been their address at the time of their wedding but, shortly after, the couple moved across the River Thames to initially settle in the Kensington area, where their first two children were born, before they made the bigger move to Devon.  The census in 1881 confirmed that Charles had lived and worked in India, since the census return described him as a ‘barrister at law (not in practice) – Madras Civil Service, retired’.  At that time, in early April 1881, Charles and Lucy were living at Highclere House on the Warberry Road in Tor-Moham, a parish of Torquay.  Charles was 54 and of Bramerton, while Lucy was 37 and of Islington in Middlesex.  The first two of their five children were recorded as having been born at St Mary Abbot in Kensington, while the remainder of their children were born after the family had settled in Torquay.  The five children were Phillis Carthew Collett, who was seven, Margaret Morden Collett, who was six, Charles M Collett, who was four, Laura Leslie Collett, who was two, and Arthur Preston Collett who was only seven months old

 

In addition to their five children, the family also had staying with them a visitor by the name of Lucy Frances Collett (below).  She was a spinster lady, aged 50, and had been born at Thetford and was one of Charles’ younger sisters.  Charles must have been fairly affluent, as his home was served by six servants.  They were the cook Selina Heard, nurse Elizabeth Inkill, Elizabeth Martin the upper housemaid, Clara Meinbery the parlour maid, Elizabeth Dunstan the under housemaid, and Louisa Spencer the under nurse.  During his life Charles was the author of three books, they being ‘The Treaties on the Law of Injunctions and the Appointment of Receivers under the Code of Civil Procedures’ which was published in 1859, ‘The Manual of the Law Torts and the Measure of Damages’ published in 1866, and ‘The Law of Specific Relief in India’ published in 1882, which was based on the Community Act 1877

 

Charles Preston Collett died on 28th January 1891 at the age of 64.  Probate of the Will of Charles Collett Esq, late of Highclere House on Warberry Hill in Torquay was proved at the Principal Registry by Lucy Ellen Collett of Highclere House, his widow.  Two months after his death his widow was named as the head of the household at Highclere House in Tor-Moham.  Lucy E Collett was 47 and only had her two youngest children still living there with her and they were Laura L Collett who was 12, and Arthur P Collett who was 10 years old, both of them born at Torquay.  Also living with the family of three at that time, perhaps helping Lucy to cope with life after the recent loss of her husband, was her younger unmarried sister Ann E Daniels who was 34 and from Islington, where Lucy had also been born.  In addition to her sister, Lucy and her two children were supported by five servants, comprising two cooks, two housemaids, and one children’s maid

 

No record of Lucy or any of her children has been found in the 1901 Census although it is established that she never remarried.  Ten years later in 1911 her daughter Laura Collett had moved to London and was still a spinster living in the Lewisham area of the city.  No record of the other four children has been found in 1911.  However, Lucy Ellen Collett nee Daniels was a resident of Bath when she died on 28th November 1933.  Probate of the personal effects of Lucy Ellen Collett of Ormonde Lodge on Sion Hill in Bath valued at £5,466 13 Shillings 6d, was granted in London on 5th February 1934 to her two sons Charles Morden Collett and Arthur Preston Collett, neither having a stated occupation as they had both retired by then.  The amount of her estate was later re-sworn as £5,484 1 Shillings 6d

 

18P40 – Phillis Carthew Collett was born in 1873 at Kensington, London

18P41 – Margaret Morden Collett was born in 1874 at Kensington, London

18P42 – Charles Morden Collett was born in 1876 at Torquay, Devon

18P43 – Laura Lesley Collett was born in 1878 at Torquay, Devon

18P44 – Arthur Preston Collett was born in 1880 at Torquay, Devon

 

Sophia Collett [18O36] was born at Bramerton during 1828 and was baptised at Norwich on 13th May 1828, the daughter of William and Phyllis Collett.  Her mother died when she was only three years old, and she was recorded as being aged 13 in the 1841 Census and was 22 years of age ten years later in 1851.  On both occasions she was living at Thetford with her father and his second wife.  It was during the next decade that she married the much older Colonel Charles Norgate.  Charles had been baptised at Hethersett near Norwich on 3rd December 1805, the son of Thomas Starling Norgate and his wife Mary Susan Norgate.  At the time of the census in 1861, the childless couple was living at Humbleyard near Norwich, where Charles Norgate was 55, and his wife Sophia Norgate was 33.  However, during the next ten years Charles Norgate died, so by the time of the next census in 1871 Sophia Norgate, aged 42, was still living at Humbleyard, but had living with her, her niece Gertrude R Norgate, aged 19

 

Ten years later the widow Sophia Norgate, aged 52, was living in a private house at Turnpike Road in Hethersett.  The 1881 census revealed that Sophia was an annuitant supported by two domestic servants.  They were Mary A Emms, aged 29 and a cook from nearby Ketteringham, and housemaid Maria Lightning, aged 25 from Hempnall.  Mary Emms’ younger sister Louisa Emms of Ketteringham was one of three servants at The Hethersett Rectory, the home of Sophia’s brother William Reynolds Collett (above).  She was still living at Hethersett in 1891 when she was 62 and, on that occasion, she had living there with her, her unmarried sister Lucy Frances Collett (below) who was 61.  Looking after the two elderly sisters were two domestic servants Georgiana Brown and Alice Bennett.  It was the same situation again in March 1901 when Sophia Norgate was 72 and her sister Lucy Frances Collett was 71.  It is understood the Sophia Norgate nee Collett died at Hethersett during the next few years, and she was followed by her sister Lucy in 1908

 

Lucy Frances Collett [18O37] was born at Thetford in 1830 where she was baptised on 27th February 1830, the last known child of William Collett and his first wife Phyllis Preston Reynolds.  Lucy was just sixteen months old when her mother died, after which her father remarried.  Lucy was 11 years old in the June census in 1841, was 21 by March 1851 and was 31 in the April census of 1861.  On all three occasions she was living with her father and her stepmother at Thetford.  Following the death of her father in the late 1860s, Lucy moved to Humbleyard near Norwich, where she either lived with her married sister Sophia Norgate, or her married brother William Reynolds Collett (above).  Confirmation was provided by the census in 1871, when unmarried Lucy F Collett, aged 41, was living within the Henstead & Humbleyard registration district of Norfolk, where her brother married William and widowed sister Sophia were also still living.  However, she never married and, ten years later in 1881, she was listed as a visitor at the Torquay home of her brother Charles Preston Collett (above).  The census recorded that she was 50 years old and that she was supported by ‘interest from private property’

 

During the next decade she left Devon, possibly following the death of her brother Charles, and returned to live with her older widowed sister Sophia Norgate (above) at Hethersett, between Wymondham and Norwich.  And it was there that she was living with Sophia in April 1891 at the age of 61 and again in March 1901 when she was 71.  Both of the sisters died during the first decade of the new century, with the death of Lucy Frances Collett being recorded at Norwich (Ref. 4b 76) during the last three months of 1909, when she was 79.  Probate states that spinster Lucy Frances Collett of St Clements Hostel in Norwich died on 27th December 1909 and that it was her married sister Sophia’s son Charles Bladwell le Grys Norgate, a solicitor, who administered her estate of £9,843 2 Shillings 2d

 

Henry Collett [18O38] was born at Thetford on 6th March 1836 where he was baptised on 27th May 1836, the eldest child of William Collett by his second wife Ellen Clark Bidwell.  He was five years old in the 1841 Census for Thetford and, by the time he was 15 in 1851, he was being educated at Tonbridge School in Tunbridge Wells in Kent, when the census return also confirmed he was born at Thetford.  He later attended the Addiscombe Military Academy College in Croydon.  The property there was acquired by the British East India Company in 1809 when it was converted into a military academy.  The company imported tea, coffee, silk, cotton and spices, and maintained its own private army.  The officers of that army were trained at Addiscombe before setting off for India.  In 1858, after the India Rebellion of 1857, also referred to as the First War of Indian Independence, the British East India Company went out of existence.  The college closed in 1861 and was sold to developers in 1863 for £33,600. It was then razed to the ground with dynamite, and all that is left today are the two buildings 'Ashleigh' and 'India' on the corner of Clyde Road and Addiscombe Road, together with the former gymnasium on Havelock Road, now converted into private apartments

 

Following his graduation from the academy, Henry left England and sailed to India, where he joined the Bengal Indian Army in 1855, rising through the ranks to become Lieutenant-Colonel in 1879.  In the Second Anglo-Afghan War from 1878 to 1880, he acted as quartermaster-general on the staff of Frederick Roberts, First Earl Roberts.  He eventually reached the rank of Colonel in 1884 and was made KCB in 1891, and from 1892 to 1893 he commanded the Peshawar district with the rank of major-general.  He retired from the army in 1893 and was honoured by Queen Victoria, when he became General Sir Henry Collett Knight of the British Empire.  He returned to England before the end of the century and was recorded as being 65 years old, while living at Kensington at the time of the census of 1901.  His occupation was stated as being ‘Colonel retired from the Indian Army’.  Living with bachelor Henry in 1901 was his brother Edward Collett and sisters Mary and Ellen Collett (all below) and sadly, it was not long after the March census day, that Henry passed away, his death being recorded on 21st December 1901 at Kew in London.  The Will of Sir Henry Collett KCB, a retired colonel in the British Army, of 21 Cranley Gardens in Kensington was proved in London on 27th January 1902.  Probate was granted to Henry’s brother Edward Collett, esquire (below), who also appears to be the main beneficiary of his estate valued at £9,852 12 Shillings, which was re-sworn later that same year at £10,912 12 Shillings.  During his life Henry Collett was a keen botanist, collecting plants in Afghanistan, Algeria, Burma, the Canaries, Corsica, India, Java, and Spain.  He was made a fellow of the Linnean Society in 1879.  At his death he was working on a book on the flora of Simla, which was published posthumously as ‘Flora Simlensis’ in 1902.  In the photo below, he is studying his maps

 

 

Just over one hundred years later, as a tribute to his work in the field of botany, he was honoured by husband and wife rose breeders Viru and Girija Viraraghavan of Tamil Nadu in India by the naming of a white climber rose ‘Sir Henry Collett’ which has been registered with the International Rose Registration Authority based in the U.S.A.  The story behind this is that Henry Collett found that species of rose in the 1880s when he was in the Shan Hills of Burma.  It is believed that he saw it through a pair of binoculars, as something bright white in the distance, when he was trekking in these hills.  He then collected material of the plant and sent it to a Monsieur Crepin, who was at that time the leading taxonomist based in Brussels.  It was Sir Henry Collett who suggested the name ‘rosa gigantea’.  His personal account of ‘the find’ was recorded in the Journal of the Linnean Society, which was reproduced many years later in Gardener’s Chronicle on 11th May 1912 and this read as follows:

 

“It was found on a plateau at 4-5,000 feet where the traveller was at once struck with the temperate character of the flora.  The trees were mostly Oaks and Pines, whilst the herbaceous plants were represented by species of Ranunculus, Viola, Hyperium, Clematis, etc.  Only two species of Rosa were seen, and both were new.  The beautiful R. Gigantean is particularly conspicuous, climbing over the tall forest trees, from the tops of which the long, pendulous branches, covered with very large white flowers, hang down in rich profusion.  The Rose, which has larger flowers probably than any other wild species, is seen from a considerable distance in the jungle, reminding one more of a large Clematis than of a rose.  It is only locally abundant, chiefly in dark shady valleys.”  The other rose referred to by Sir Henry Collett, in his statement above, was believed to be Rosa Collettiana, which had yet to be cultivated at that time

 

Edward Collett [18O39] was born at Thetford on 4th October 1837, the second son of William Collett and his second wife Ellen Clark Bidwell.  He was three years of age at the time of the 1841 census for Thetford, and was still living with his family at Thetford in 1851 when he was 13.  He may have been out of the country in April 1861 but, with the death of his father in the late 1860s he had returned to England by 1871 and, at the age of 33, Edward Collett was living at Winchester.  His place of birth was confirmed as Thetford, as it was in 1881 when he was 43 when he was living with his widowed mother Ellen at Trafford House in Ewell Road in Kingston-upon-Thames.  His occupation at that time was that of a duty office clerk with the Inland Revenue Legacy (C S C).  He was still living with his mother at Kingston ten years later but, following her death in the 1890s, he left Kingston and moved to Kensington, where he was living with three of his siblings by March 1901.  By then Edward was a retired civil servant at the age of 63, and his place of birth was once again confirmed as Thetford.  The house in which he was living was also home to his brother Henry Collett (above) and his sisters Mary and Ellen Collett (below).

 

Just nine months later Edward’s brother Henry passed away, and that appears to have resulted in Edward and his two sisters leaving London.  While his two sisters moved to Hampshire, Edward became a married man and moved to Surrey.  Under the terms of the Will of his older half-brother William Reynolds Collett (above) who died in 1902, Edward inherited nearly one thousand pounds which enabled him to marry Ada Rebecca Moore and establish a new life for himself.  Ada was born at Thetford in 1857 and was around twenty years younger than Edward.  According to the information in the census return for 1911, the couple had been married for eight years, when they were living at ‘Moorside’ in Tilford Road in the village of Churt, in the parish of Frensham.  Edward Collett was 73 and from Thetford, and Ada Rebecca Collett was 53 and also from Thetford.  The elderly couple was supported by two domestic servants, housemaid Mabel Sexton 28, and Charlotte Ayling 24, who was the cook.  Once again Edward’s occupation was confirmed as a civil servant, when he was described as a retired civil servant.  The death of Edward Collett of Moorside, Tilford Road, Churt near Farnham in Surrey occurred on 13th December 1918 and probate of his estate of £15,712 12 shillings 8d was granted to the Public Trustee and Ada Rebecca Collett, his widow.  Just less than six years later his widow Ada Rebecca Collett nee Moore passed away on 5th June 1924 while living at 21 De Montfort Street in Leicester.  Her Will was proved at London on 25th September 1924.  With no family to inherited her fortune of £25,831 19 Shillings 8d it passed into the hands of the Public Trustee

 

Ellen Collett [18O40] was born at Thetford in 1839 where she was baptised on 9th December 1839.  Tragically she did not survive and died at Thetford on 22nd January 1840

 

Mary Collett [18O41] was born at Thetford on 9th October 1840 and was baptised there on 2nd December 1840, the eldest surviving daughter of William Collett and his second wife Ellen Clark Bidwell.  She was under twelve months old for the Thetford census of 1841, and by the time of the next census in 1851 she was 10 years old.  In 1861, at the age of 20, Mary was still living at Thetford Rectory with her parents.  However, following the death of her father towards the end of the 1860s, Mary’s mother was forced to leave the Rectory in Thetford, where her father had been the rectory for many years.  That upheaval in their life, resulted in Mary, and her two younger sisters (below), accompanying their mother to Kingston-upon-Thames, where they were living in 1871.  On that occasion Mary Collett from Thetford was 30.  Ten years later, at the time of the 1881 census, Mary Collett, aged 40 and of Thetford, was still a spinster when she was living with her mother’s sister and her husband at Upper Beulah Hill Haddon in Croydon.  Her aunt was Lydia Grohawk nee Bidwell, who was 55 and from St Lukes in Middlesex.  Lydia’s husband was retired farmer Francis W Grohawk, aged 62 of Letheringsett in Norfolk, and living with the couple was their four children, plus five servants.  In addition to Mary Collett, also living with the family was Lydia’s two older maiden sisters (and Mary’s aunts) Laura Bidwell, aged 60, and Octavia Bidwell, aged 59, both of them from Thetford and both living on independent means.  Forty-year old Mary Collett was also listed as being of independent means, indicating a degree of wealth and affluence.  How long Mary was living with her aunt has not been established, but on the death of her father in the 1870s, her mother Ellen Collett had moved Kingston-upon-Thames

 

Sometime during the next ten years Mary had left Croydon and moved the short distance to Kingston where she was living with her mother and younger sister Ellen (below) in 1891 at the age of 50.  Upon the death of their mother, Mary and her sister Ellen moved into the centre of London and in 1901 the pair of them was living with their brothers Henry and Edward Collett (above) at Kensington.  By then Mary was 60 and the census record confirmed she had been born at Thetford and was living on her own means.  With the death of their brother Henry Collett in December 1901, the two sisters left London and moved to Hampshire, where in April 1911 they were still living together at Christchurch.  According to the census that year, Mary Collett from Thetford was 70 years old.  Less than six month later spinster Mary Collett died at Swanton Morley Street off Valerie Road in Bournemouth on 23rd September 1911 when probate was granted on 13th October 1911 to her sister Ellen Anna Collett (below) and Mary Catherine Bidwell, both spinsters, for her estate worth £18,575 13 Shillings 3d, which was re-sworn at £19,268 8 shillings 11d

 

Ellen Anna Collett [18O42] was born at Thetford on 27th October 1842, the second daughter named Ellen of the Rector of Thetford William Collett and his wife Ellen.  Daughter Ellen was still living at Thetford with her family in March 1851 at the age of eight years, and was still there in April 1861 when she was 18.  Following the death of her father in the late 1860s Ellen’s depleted family left Thetford and moved to Kingston-upon-Thames where she and her mother Ellen, and sisters Mary (above) and Laura (below) were living in 1871.  At that time in her life unmarried Ellen A Collett from Thetford was 28.  Ellen was still living with her mother ten years later in 1881, when also living with them at Trafford House in the Ewell Road in Kingston was Ellen’s brother Edward Collett (above).  Once again Ellen, aged 38, was not married, nor was she credited with having an occupation.  At that time the three members of the Collett family were supported by three domestic servants, Elizabeth J Hancock, aged 29 who was the cook, Emma A Gardiner, aged 38 who was a parlour maid, and Helen Mitchell, aged 16, who was an under-house maid

 

Over the following decade Ellen and her mother were joined at Kingston by her older sister Mary (above) who was living there with them in 1891 when Ellen was then 48.  The next few years saw the sisters lose their mother, after which they moved to London and, in 1901, they were living in Kensington with their brothers Henry Collett (above), who had returned from India, and Edward Collett (above).  Just like her sister Mary, 58 years old Ellen was also listed in the census as living on her own means, while having been born at Thetford.  Sometime after the death of their brother Henry Collett in December 1901, the two sisters left London and moved to Hampshire, where in April 1911 they were still living together at Christchurch.  The census return for the Christchurch registration district listed Ellen Anna Collett from Thetford as being 68.  In October 1911, following the death of her sister Mary (above), Ellen Anna Collett inherited her sister’s home at Swanton Morley Street on Valerie Road in Bournemouth where she was living when she died on 12th June 1921.  Probate of her personal effects valued at £16,337 14 Shillings 9d was granted to her niece Phillis Carthew Collett, a spinster, and Charles Alfred Morton Lightly, a solicitor

 

Laura Collett [18O43] was born at Thetford on 9th October 1844 where she was baptised on 8th March 1845, the youngest surviving children of Rector William Collett and his second wife Ellen Clark Bidwell.  She was six years old in the census of 1851 and was 16 in 1861, while living at Thetford with her family.  Laura would have been in her early twenties when her father died and, upon that sad event, she and her family had to vacate the rectory at Thetford and seek alternative accommodation.  A few years later, according to the census in 1871, Laura and her mother, and her two older sisters, were living at Kingston-upon-Thames, when she was described as Laura Collett, aged 26, from Thetford.  What happened to Laura after that time is not known for sure.  However, the marriage of Laura Collett and George Coppin at Hartismere in Suffolk (Ref. 4a 715) during the first three months of 1872 relates to Laura Collett (Ref. 20P4) from Wortham whose family line can be found in Part 20 – The Suffolk to Australia Line

 

Alfred Collett [18O44] was born at Thetford during 1848 and was baptised there on 31st October 1848 when he would have been the youngest child of William Collett and Ellen Clark Bidwell had he survived.  The burial of the infant Alfred Collett was recorded at St Mary’s Church in Thetford on 18th January 1849

 

Woodthorpe Schofield Collett [18O45] was born at Linwood, near Market Rasen in Lincolnshire at the end of 1826, the first-born child of Woodthorpe Collett and Elizabeth Pyemont.  It was at Market Rasen where he was baptised on 11th March 1827.  He was 14 at the time of the census in June 1841, when he was at school in Ipswich St Clement.  He later attended Clare College in Cambridge, which he entered on 2nd April 1846, having already completed his matriculation that same year.  While at Cambridge he was awarded a Browne Medal, and obtained his BA in 1850.  He was a Senior Fellow from 1851 onwards and achieved his MA in 1853.  He followed in his father’s footsteps by entering the church but, unlike his father Woodthorpe Collett, he never married.  In the census of 1851, he was a visitor at the home of the Quick family at Denmark Hill in Lambeth, where Woodthorpe Collett from Market Rasen was unmarried at 24, when he was said to be a tutor.  Three years later in 1854 he was ordained a deacon, and became a priest at Ely in 1855.  However, six years later the census in 1861 placed Woodthorpe S Collett from Market Rasen as being single, 34 years of ag, and a patient in a Harpenden hospital, his occupation being that of a clergyman.  Just four years after that, according to Crockford’s Clerical Directory, Woodthorpe Schofield Collett was unbeneficed in 1865, which means that he no longer held a church office which provided an income

 

It may have been that action, coupled with the death of his father in 1869, that resulted in Woodthorpe returning to the family home in Colneis, near Woodbridge, since it was there that he was living in 1871, at the age of 44, with his widowed mother Elizabeth, and unmarried siblings Catherine and William (below).  Ten years later, in the census of 1881, and following the death of his mother, he was recorded as being 54 and a clergyman from Lincolnshire, who was living at 13 Windsor Road in Ealing, Middlesex, the home of his married brother Charles Keeling Collett (below).  No obvious record of him has been found in the census of 1891 and 1911, but in March 1901 he was living at Preston, a sub-district of Brighton in Sussex, where he was 73 and his place of birth was given incorrectly as Ipswich.  It was while he was still living in Brighton that he died on 26th January 1913, at the age of 85, the death also being reported in The Times newspaper on 29th January 1913.  His Will was proved at Brighton on 19th April 1913, when the two main beneficiaries were named as Cathrine Anne Deighton Braysher (who died at Staines in 1917) and Charles Deighton Braysher (who also died at Staines, in 1915, who was a visitor at the home of Woodthorpe’s married sister, Bertha Wright (below) in 1881

 

John Collett [18O46] was born in 1828 in Suffolk, possibly at Little Glemham south-west of Saxmundham, and was 13 years old in 1841, when he was living at Woodbridge with his parents Woodthorpe and Elizabeth Collett and the rest of his family, but minus his older brother Woodthorpe (above).  It is established that John was later employed by the P & O Steam Ship Company, but with no further recording of him found in any subsequent census after 1841, it is possible that he had the opportunity to leave Great Britain and settle elsewhere in the world

 

Henry Pyemont Collett [18O47] was born in 1829 at Little Glemham, where he was baptised on 18th October 1829, the son of Woodthorpe Collett and Elizabeth Pyemont.  He was 12 years old in the June census of 1841, and he later attended Trinity Hall at Cambridge University, which he entered on 4th July 1850, where he gained a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1854.  The record at Trinity Hall confirmed that he was the third son of Woodthorpe Collett, clerk of Hasketon, Woodbridge in Suffolk.  It was at Cambridge in the census of 1851 that he was simply recorded as Henry Collett, aged 21, a scholar.  Ten years later, in the next census in 1861, he was still a bachelor when he was living with his parents at Woodbridge where he was recorded as Henry Pyemont Collett, aged 37, instead of Henry Pyemont Collett who was 31.  It was during the following months that he married Isabella Lamb Frazer, and that may have taken place in Wolverhampton, where Isabella was born, or in the Leicestershire village of Shenton, where the couple’s first children was born.  Within the following year, the family moved to Denver in Norfolk, just south of Downham Market, where their other two sons were born

 

Two years prior to the 1861 Census, Henry was ordained as a priest in 1859 and by 1861 he was a priest in Norwich.  Overlapping with that, from 1859 to 1862 he was the Curate of Kesgrave in Suffolk.  The four years from 1863 to 1867 he was P C of Fordham, after which, from 1867 to 1874, he was appointed Vicar of St Mary’s Church at Tilney-cum-Islington in Norfolk, midway between Wisbech and King’s Lynn, which is where the family was living at the time of the census in 1871.  The details in the Wisbech & Terrington St Clement census listed the family as Henry Pyemont Collett, aged 41 from Little Glemham, his wife Isabella Lamb Collett, aged 38 and from Wolverhampton, and their three children Edward Pyemont Collett who was eight years old and born at Shenton to the north of Hinckley, Henry Francis Collett who was six, and John Anthony Collett who was four years old, both confirmed as having been born at Denver in Norfolk.  Also supporting the family on that occasion were two servants, Elizabeth Pitcher, aged 20 from Denver, and Ann Elizabeth Ebbeson who was 19 and from Fakenham

 

There appears to be a gap in the life of Edward Pyemont Collett from 1874 to 1876, but from then on until 1878 he was the Vicar of Ixworth in Suffolk.  Sometime during the next year or two, the family left Suffolk and by the time of the next census in 1881 Henry, aged 51, was teaching at a school in Hasting, while he was living at 12 Springfield Road in Hastings St Leonard with his two oldest sons.  Edward P Collett was 18, and Henry F Collett was 16 and was still undertaking his education.  Although listed in the census return as a married man, neither his wife, nor his youngest son, were residing with Henry on the actual day of the census.  Instead, the household was completed by two servants, cook Emily Hoile, aged 21 and from Kent, and maid Elizabeth Woodland, aged 19 and from Ashford in Kent.  However, the wider census of 1881 revealed that Isabella L Collett was visiting her elderly mother, a clergyman’s widow, Phoebe A Frazer, at her home in Lower Green, Tettenhall in Staffordshire.  Isabella was 48 and her place of birth was Wolverhampton

 

At that same time, the couple’s missing youngest son, John A Collett, aged 13, was a pupil boarder at Norton House College in Luton.  Whether in error or not, his place of birth was given as Leicester like his eldest brother, although later in his life he said he was born at Denver, near Downham Market in Norfolk.  Upon his retirement, Henry and Isabella moved north to the Lake District.  At the time of the census in 1891 Henry P Collett was 61, and his wife Isabella L Collett was 58, at a time in their lives when they were living in the Cartmel area, between Ulverston and Grange-over-Sands.  During that decade Henry and Isabella left the Lake District when they moved south to Dawlish on the south Devon coast.  And it was at Dawlish that Henry Pyemont Collett died towards the end of March in 1898 and, according to a record within the Cambridge Alumni, he had been living at Dawlish where he ‘remained without a cure’.  Upon his death his body was taken to Brightwell in Suffolk, where he was buried near his father on 1st April 1898 at the age of 68.  Following his passing, Isabella was still living in Dawlish in March 1901 where, according the census at the end of that month, she was a widow aged 68, who had living with her, her unmarried son John.  No record of her has been found in the census of 1911, so it is likely that she had passed away by then

 

18P45 – Edward Pyemont Collett was born in 1862 at Shenton, Leicestershire

18P46 – Henry Francis Collett was born in 1864 at Denver, Norfolk

18P47 – John Anthony Collett was born in 1866 at Denver, Norfolk

 

Charles Keeling Collett [18O48] was born at Little Glemham in 1830.  He was listed with his family at Woodbridge in the census of 1841, when he was 10 years old and was 20 in 1851 when he and his family were residing in the village of Hasketon near Woodbridge.  No record of him or his family has been found within the next two census returns.  At some time in his life Charles was a bank clerk and during the first two years of the 1860s he married Eliza Skinner who was born at Dacca in India in 1828.  According to the 1881 Census, Charles Keeling Collett, aged 50 of Little Glemham, and his wife Eliza Skinner Collett, aged 52 of Dacca, were living at 13 Windsor Road in Ealing.  Windsor Road today is adjacent to the Ealing Broadway Centre in London.  Living with them was their son ‘Charles Hubert Edger’ and Charles’s older brother Woodthorpe Schofield Collett (above).  The family employed two domestic servants, and these were the cook Amelia Morton aged 24 of Stafford and housemaid Ann Williams aged 18 of Penryn Coch in Wales.  Although the census return gave their son’s place of birth as Paddington in London, it is known that Charles Hubert Edgar Collett was baptised at Brightwell-cum-Foxhall on 12th July 1863, the son of Charles and Eliza Collett, and that he was born there on 30th December 1862.  It was around eighteen months later when Charles Keeling Collett died at the age of 51, with his death being recorded at the Brentford register office (Ref. 3a 56) during the last three months of 1882

 

18P48 – Charles Hubert Edgar Collett was born in 1862 at Brightwell

 

Elizabeth Charlotte Collett [18O49] was born at Sweffling near Saxmundham in 1831, where she was baptised on 5th July 1833, the daughter of the Reverend Woodthorpe Collett.  She was nine years old in the census of 1841 and in 1851, at the age of 18, she and her family were living within the village of Hasketon near Woodbridge.  She later married Trusson Collett (Ref. 18O20) the son of Cornelius Collett (Ref. 18N6) of Beverley in Yorkshire on 5th September 1860, as reported in The Times and the Ipswich Journal.  For the continuation of this family go to Trusson Collett.  The photograph of Elizabeth (below) was possibly taken around 1913, the same year that she died, and also included in the picture with her was her husband Trusson Collett, whose photograph can be seen under his name above

 

 

Catherine A Collett [18O50] was born in 1833 and very likely at Sweffling, although shortly after, she and her family moved to Woodbridge where they were living at the time of the census in 1841 when Catherine was recorded as being eight years old.  According to the next census in 1851 Catherine Collett from Sweffling was 16 when she was living with her large family at Hasketon near Woodbridge.  No record has so far been found of her in the census of 1861 although, following the death of her father in 1869, Catherine A Collett, aged 37 and unmarried, was once again living with her widowed mother within the Colneis sub-district of Woodbridge

 

Robert Ebden Collett [18O51] was born at Ipswich St Peter on 17th June 1835, the son of Woodthorpe Collett and Elizabeth Pyemont, and was baptised at St Peter’s Church in Ipswich on 5th March 1836.  By June 1841 he and his family were living in Woodbridge, where Robert was recorded in error as being seven years old, whereas in 1851 he was 15 and still living with his family which was recorded in the village of Hasketon near Woodbridge.  As with his sister Catherine (above), no record has so far been found of him in any of the census records from 1861 onwards.  However, the record of the death of Robert E Collett aged 78 was registered at Woodbridge in Suffolk (Ref. 4a 107) during the second quarter of 1914

 

Bertha Emily Collett [18O52] was born at Woodbridge in 1837, where she was living with her family in 1841 at the age of five years.  On the day of the census in 1851 Bertha Emily Collett aged 13 and from Woodbridge was a visitor and a pupil at the Ipswich home of forty-two-year old Ann Sanderson who had living with her just her three children Ellen Agnes 17, Annie 11 and Keary Edgar who was six.  At that time Bertha’s own family had settled in the village of Hasketon near Woodbridge which on that occasion had Bertha’s aunt Letitia Pyemont and her brother living with the family, with whom she appears to have had a more permanent connection later in her life.  After a further ten years Bertha Emily Collett, aged 24, was back living with her family in the parish of Foxhall, as confirmed by the 1861 census conducted within the Woodbridge & Colneis registration district.  It was within the next three years that Bertha married William Wright, the couple living in the Woodbridge & Colneis area for the census in 1871.  By that time Bertha had already presented William with the first two of the couple’s three known children, even though neither child was living with them on the day of the census when their daughter Bertha would have been four years of age and their son Algernon would have been one year old.  Nor have they been located elsewhere.  However, after the subsequent birth of the couple’s third child two years later William A Wright, who was born around 1835, died leaving Bertha a widow at the age of around thirty-eight with three children to look after

 

The next census in 1881 revealed that Bertha Emily Wright from Woodbridge was 40 and was living with her elderly aunt and annuitant Letitia Pyemont aged 81 from Linwood in Lincolnshire, her mother’s unmarried sister, at 27 Park Terrace on Fonnereau Road in Ipswich St Margaret.  Bertha was described as the niece of Letitia Pyemont, a widow and an annuitant, while with her were her three children.  They were Bertha L P Wright who was 14 and born at Aldeburgh, Algernon Wright who was 11 and born at Trimley, and son Francis Wright who was seven years of age and born in Ipswich. The combined family was served by two servants Matilda Cann 31 and Lydia Harvey 29.  Visiting the families was Charles Deighton Braysher from Cambridge who was 43 and a beneficiary under the terms of the Will of Bertha’s eldest brother Woodthorpe Schofield Collett (above), following his death in 1913.  Bertha Emily Wright nee Collett died on 3rd February 1920 while at the Cottage Hospital in Felixstowe and her Will was proved in London on 12th May that same year when probate of her personal effects of £273 5 Shillings 3d was granted to Anthony Keeling Collett, a journalist.  He was her nephew, the eldest son of Bertha’s brother William Michael Collett (below)

 

William Michael Collett [18PO53] was born at Woodbridge in 1839, the youngest of the nine children of Woodthorpe Collett and Elizabeth Pyemont.  He was baptised at Woodbridge on 2nd April 1839, and it was also at Woodbridge that he was living with his family in 1841, when he was two years old.  The census in 1851 included William Collett, aged 12, was attending a national school at Lower Brook Street in the St Mary Quay district of Ipswich, which was attended by his eldest brother Woodthorpe in 1841.  He was later educated at Queen Elizabeth’s School in Ipswich which was an Endowed Grammar School and at which he matriculated on 31st October 1857, when he was 19.  He then secured an open scholarship at Trinity College, Oxford in 1858 and achieved a First-Class Classical Moderations degree in 1860.  That was followed two years later by a Second-Class Classical School degree and a Bachelor of Arts degree.  In the next census in 1861, William Michael Collett from Woodbridge was 23 and an undergraduate at Oxford, on that occasion, he was enjoying some time away from his studies, when he was recorded with his family at The Heath in Foxhall

 

William obtained his Master of Arts in 1864 and, a year after that, he secured an open Fellowship at Oriel College Oxford and held the position of Fellow until 1874.  In 1865 he was a tutor and assistant master at Wellington College.  The earlier census in 1871 recorded William Collett, aged 32, still living with his widowed mother Elizabeth at Colneis, following the death of his father two years prior.  It was in 1874 that he was appointed the Rector of Cromhall in Gloucestershire, and shortly after that he was married to Alice Burnett who presented him with two sons.  The marriage of William and Alice was conducted at St Peter’s Church in Southampton on 23rd June 1874, when the groom was confirmed as the son of Woodthorpe Collett, and the bride’s father was named as Robert Edwin Burnett.  By the time of 1881 Census, William was living at The Rectory in Cromhall Lygon, which is near Wotton-under-Edge.  The census return confirmed that he was 42 and had been born at Woodbridge, and that he was the Rector of Cromhall.  His wife Alice, who was born at Paddington, was 33 years old.  Living with the couple were their two sons Anthony, who was three, and John who was seven months old, both of them having been born at Cromhall.  The family was supported by housemaid Rhoda Booth, aged 29 of Hatherley, and nursemaid Rosa Higgs aged 21 of Yate

 

In 1882 the Rev. W M Collett was represented at court by A H Turner solicitor, regarding the non-payment of rent charges amounting to £24 9s 11d that was owed to him by the occupier of Ashworth House near Wotton-under-Edge, the property of Henry Isaac Brown of Bristol.  Nine years later, William Michael Collett from Woodbridge was 52 and a married man, when he was the Rector of Cromhall and was living there in 1891, with just two domestic servants.  On that same day, his wife Alice Collett, then aged 42 and living on her own means, was residing at Claremont Crescent in Weston-super-Mare with her son Anthony Collett who was 13.  Boarding there with them was Sir Richard Musgrave, bart, who was eighteen and from Cumberland.  At the same time, absent son John was attending school in Oxford and at 10 years of age, he was a boarder at Bevington Road in the St Giles area of the city.  It is rather odd, that no recorded of William and Alice, either together or in a separated state, has been identified in the census of 1901.  That census day, the couple’s eldest son was living in Theale, Berkshire, having completed his university at Oriel College in Oxford, while their youngest son was a civil engineering student and a boarder at the Heysham home of the Elliott family near Lancaster.  It was during the following year, that the death of William Michael Collett was recorded at Thornbury register office (Ref. 6a 162) during the second quarter of 1902, at the age of 63.  His Will was proved on 22nd November 1902 at Gloucester, when the sole beneficiary was his widow Alice Collett.  The probate process also confirmed that William died on 24th May that year.  His obituary was printed in the Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser on 29th May 1902, when he was referred to as the Reverend W Michael Collett.  By 1911, Alice Collett from London was 64 and a widow with private means, who was living in the Warwickshire town of Rugby with her youngest son John and two domestic servants.  During the next two decades, Alice Collett returned to Somerset, and it was at Bath register office that her death was recorded (Ref. 5c 720) during the first three months of 1931, when she was 83

 

18P49 – Anthony Keeling Collett was born in 1877 at Cromhall, Gloucestershire

18P50 – John Colet Collett was born in 1880 at Cromhall, Gloucestershire

 

Ebden Collett [18O55] was possibly born at Loddon in Norfolk around 1834.  He was the younger of the two children of James Collett and Sophia Ebden who both died in 1836.  What happened to two-year old Ebden and his sister Fanny, who was four, after those two tragic events, is not known.  What is known is that Ebden Collett was named on the passenger list of the ship ‘Doric’ which sailed out of Lyttelton in New Zealand on Thursday 5th April 1894 bound for London, England, as reported in the Christchurch Star newspaper.  It was reported later that same year that he returned to Auckland in New Zealand, when he departed from the Port of London on 27th December 1894 on board the ship Ionic when he was described as a labourer

 

William Collett [18O56] was born during the first months of 1838, the eldest son of William Collett and his second wife Mary Ann Dye.  He was most likely born at Poringland near Norwich where his parents were married on 19th December 1837.  The birth therefore took place only a few weeks after the couple’s wedding day and was immediately followed by their departure from Poringland and their arrival at Henstead in Suffolk, where the birth was registered during the first quarter of 1838.  After just a couple of years of living at Henstead, where his sister Honor (below) was born, the family of four moved the eight miles south to the town of Halesworth.  And it was there they were living at New Court in June 1841, when William was three years old.  His place of birth appears to have been given as Pantan in Norfolk which does not exist, so this may simply be an error in translation.  Ten years later in 1851 William was still living with his parents who were still living at New Court in Halesworth.  He was then 13 and was already working as a basket maker.  On that occasion there was a slight variation on the place of his birth in the census record, which stated it was Porlan

 

One possible record of him has been found within the census of 1861 when a William Collett was 22 and a Private (service no. 1964) with the Third Battalion Military Training School at Aldershot in Hampshire.  However, it was five years later that bachelor William Collett of Halesworth, a labourer and the son of William Collett, was married at Blything on 1st October 1866 to Eliza Whale a spinster of full age.  Eliza was the daughter of labourer Arthur Whale, while the two witnesses were named as John Alden and Maria Alden, the latter being William’s younger married sister (below).  In the earlier census of 1851, the Whale family had been residing at Hound, a village in Hampshire about two miles from Burlsedon and, in 1861, when Eliza Whale was working as a domestic servant, she gave her place of birth as Hound.  By early April in 1871 the childless couple was based at St Germans & Anthony near Torpoint and Devonport in Cornwall where William Collett was 32 and a Private in the 57th Battalion, while he wife Eliza was 29.  On that occasion William said his place of birth was Porlan and Eliza said hers was Burlsedon.  What is very interesting is that it has been discovered that Poringland is pronounced Porlan.  Tragically not long after the census day that year William Collett either died or was killed in action because on 24th July 1873 Eliza Collett, a widow, married bachelor George Turner at the Register Office in Stoke Damerel.  George was a Private with the 7th Company Royal Marines.  Eight years after they were married George and Eliza were living at 4 St Pauls Street, East Stonehouse in Plymouth, where George Turner from Bristol was 42 and still a Royal Marine, and Eliza Turner from Netley in Hampshire was 38

 

Honor Collett [18O57] was born at Henstead in 1840 and shortly after she was born, she and her family moved the short distance to Halesworth, where they were living in June 1841.  On the occasion of the first national census Honor Collett was one year old when she and her family were living at New Court in Halesworth.  Sadly, Honor died when she was just 10 years old, following which she was buried in the graveyard of St Mary’s Church at Halesworth on 16th February 1850

 

Daniel Collett [18O58] was born at Halesworth during June in 1842, the third child of William Collett by his third wife Mary Ann Dye.  Tragically he was only three months old when he died on 7th September 1842 and was buried at Halesworth four days after on 11th September.  The baptism of Daniel Collett took place at Halesworth just three days prior to his death, on 4th September, while the cause of his death was recorded as being inflammation

 

Maria Collett [18O59] was born at Halesworth on 17th October 1843.  In 1851 she was eight years old and was living with her parents at 139 New Court in Halesworth.  Ten years later when she was 18, she was working as a servant at a private boys’ school at Belvedere Cottage on Bungay Road in Halesworth.  Just over four years later in 1865 Maria married (1) John Alden at St Nicholas’ Church in Great Yarmouth, with whom she had five children.  Their marriage certificate recorded that John was a fisherman and that his address was The Row 112, while Maria’s address was the Naval Asylum in Great Yarmouth.  It is assumed, since she was a house servant at her previous address, that she was also a live-in servant at the Naval Asylum.  Row 112 in Great Yarmouth was also previously known as Chambers the Sailmaker’s Row, when the premises were occupied by many trades folk and included public houses.  It was not until 1804 that the numbers were added.  Whilst Maria’s parents gave her correct age in the two censuses of 1851 and 1861, Maria constantly stated that she was younger than her actual age in all of the subsequent census records.  This was particularly noticeable after she married for a second time, when her new husband was her junior by fifteen years.  The figures in brackets [ ] represent her real age

 

One year after she was married Maria and her husband were named as the witnesses at the wedding of her older brother William (above) to Eliza Whale.  After a further five years of married life with John, Maria had already presented her husband with their first two children, when the family was living at Raglan Street West in Lowestoft.  Maria was aged 25 [28], John was ten years older at 35 and their children were Louisa Alden, who was four, and Anna M Alden, who was two.  The census reference to Louisa was incorrect, as it should have been her daughter Lavinia.  Maria was with child on the day of the 1871 Census and the couple’s only son John Frederick W Alden was born later that same year.  Over the next six years the marriage produced a further two children for Maria and John, they being Ellen Mary Alden who was born in 1874 when the family was still living at Raglan Street West, and Elizabeth Alden who was born on 16th March 1878

 

The family left Lowestoft around 1875 and set off north for a new life in East Yorkshire.  By the spring of the following year, they were living at 16 Temple Court on Cogan Street in Kingston-upon-Hull, where the first of two tragedies was to affect the family.  It was at that address that the death of two-year old Ellen Mary Alden was registered on 13th April 1876.  Some good news followed later during the next year, when Maria discovered she was once again with child, which would hopefully help to compensate for the loss of their daughter.  Sadly, for Maria it was during her pregnancy that she received the news of the death of her husband in 1877 at the age of 41.  As a fisherman it seems very likely that that he may have died during a fishing trip, as no registration of his death has so far been found in any records.  Maria’s new baby was born while she and her children were still living at 16 Temple Court, and the registration of the birth of daughter Elizabeth confirmed her father as John Alden deceased.  Sometime over the next year or so, Maria and her children left Temple Court and, by April 1881, part of the family was living at 2 Kings place in the Parish of Holy Trinity in Hull.  The census record stated that Maria of Halesworth was a widow aged 32 [38].  Her occupation was given as laundress and living with her was her son John who was 10 and daughter Elizabeth who was three.  Boarding with the family was dressmaker and 66 years old widow Sarah Johnston of Brixham in Devon.  Maria’s son John became a fisherman like his father and, just as his father did, he too died in the North Sea on 17th February 1906 at the age of 35

 

As she approached her fortieth birthday, Maria started a new life with (2) George William Wright with whom she had a further three children, all of them born at Hull.  George was fifteen years younger than Maria having been born in Middlesex in 1858.  According to the 1891 Census, Maria aged 42 [48] was the wife of George Wright and they were living at 6 Liverpool Street in Newington Hull.  Living with them were Maria’s three children from her first marriage, Lavinia, John and Elizabeth, plus Lavinia’s base-born daughter Edith Alden.  And in addition, the house was also home to Maria’s and George’s two children, Ada Wright who was six, and William Wright who was three years old.  Three years later Maria’s new children by George, had been joined by brother Ernest, so by the turn of the century the family comprised Maria 52 [58], George 43, and their children Ada, William and Ernest.  Maria’s grand-daughter Edith Alden was still in the care of her grandmother, since the child’s mother (Lavinia) was then married and had moved away to make a fresh start in Leeds.  The 1901 Census also revealed that George was a tobacconist, confectioner and baker, and that he and his extended family were living at 395 Hessle Road in Hull at that time

 

By the time of the next census in 1911, Maria was 61 and had been married to George for 28 years.  The couple was still living at 395 Hessle Road in Hull, where George's occupation was given as Tobacconist, with Maria being described as assisting in the business.  Living with them were their two sons William Henry Wright, aged 24, who was an unmarried labourer working at the Fish Dock, and Ernest Wright, aged 17, who was an engine cleaner on the railway.  Also living with them was widow Fanny Frost, nee Collett (below) who was Maria's younger sister.  The house at Hessle Road comprised seven rooms, including a kitchen, but excluding a scullery and a bathroom.  It was at that same address that Maria died nearly seventeen years later on 3rd March 1928 at the age of 84.  George Wright, being that much younger than his wife, survived for another seven years before he passed away on 10th June 1935.  His youngest son was born at Hull on 7th October 1893 and he married Nellie

 

18P51 – Ada Wright was born in 1884 at Hull

18P52 – William Henry Wright was born in 1887 at Hull

18P53 – Ernest Wright was born in 1893 at Hull

 

Eliza Susannah Collett [18O60] was born at Halesworth in 1847 and at the age of 13 she was living with her mother at Barrack Yard on Mill Hill Street in Halesworth.  To seek work, Eliza eventually moved to London where in 1871 she was living at Queens Gate Place in Kensington, where she was employed as a cook.  Eliza was still a spinster ten years later and was still working as a cook, but in Sussex.  She was 32 and was living and working at the home of wealthy widow Gertrude Martyn at Roffey Lodge on the Crawley Road in Horsham.  Eliza’s place of birth was confirmed as Halesworth.  To say her employer, Gertrude Martyn, was a wealthy widow may be an understatement.  For three years earlier she had financed the building of the 300 seat All Saints Church in Roffey in Horsham, in memory of her late husband.  As a direct result, the new parish of Roffey was also created in 1878 to coincide with the opening of the church

 

And it was while in Sussex that Eliza met and marriage John Mann who was born in 1853 at Wisborough Green in Sussex.  The 1881 Census placed 28 years old John Mann as the gardener at the home of William Swift in Devonshire Road in Eltham in Kent.  William Swift, at 46, was also a gardener as was his brother George 38 who was also living at the home, along with John Mann’s older brother Jessie Mann, aged 33.  It was shortly after 1881 that Eliza and John were married and the marriage produced two children for the couple, they being John William Mann, who was born at Mottingham in Kent in 1884, and Ruth Isabella Mann, who was born at St Albans in 1886

 

Fanny Collett [18O61] was born at Halesworth in 1849 and was 11 years old in 1861 when she was living with her mother at Barrack Yard on Mill Hill Street in Halesworth.  Ten years later Fanny was working as a servant at the Sun Inn in the Thoroughfare at Woodbridge in Suffolk.  She later married William Frost in 1874, but it would appear from the 1881 Census that they did not have any children.  The census return that year recorded William Frost, aged 36 of Woodbridge, as a mariner, and that he was living at New Street in Woodbridge with his wife Fanny who was 30 and from Halesworth.  Living with them was Fanny’s brother Frederick Collett (below) who was 25 and also of Halesworth.  Twenty years after that, in March 1901, Fanny Frost aged 50 was living with her husband William Frost at 28 New Street in Woodbridge, from where 55 years old William was employed as a canal porter.  Ten years later, according to the census in April 1911, childless widow Fanny Frost was 59 years old, and was living with her older married sister Maria Wright nee Collett (above) and her family, at 395 Hessle Road in Hull

 

John Collett [18O62] was born at Halesworth on 26th November 1850 and was therefore under one year old at the time of the 1851 Census.  During the latter part of that decade the family must have encountered some difficulty which resulted in John’s father taking him and his younger brother Charles (below) to live at the Blything Union Workhouse in Bulcamp-with-Blythburgh.  And it was there that the three of them were recorded in 1861 when J C from Halesworth was eleven years old.  By 1871 John Collett from Suffolk said he was 22 when he was working as a waiter within the Westminster area of London, while not far away in Kensington was his unmarried sister Eliza (above).  Whilst no record of him has been found in the census of 1881, John Collett from Suffolk was still residing within the Westminster St James census registration district of London in 1891 when he was 42.  It is possible, according to one unconfirmed source, that he travelled to America shortly after that, since it was in Boston, Massachusetts, that he was married during the 1890s and where he died in 1930

 

Charles Collett [18O63] was born at Halesworth on 11th May 1853, the son of William Collett and his third wife Mary Ann Dye.  When Charles was eight years of age, he and his father and his brother John (above) were staying at the Blything Union Workhouse in Bulcamp-with-Blythburgh in 1861, but on leaving school he became a blacksmith, which was his stated occupation in April 1871 when he was 17.  At that time in his life he was living with his widowed father and brother Frederick Collett (below) at 112 New Court in Halesworth.  Around the time that he was twenty, Charles met Elizabeth Field who had his child when she was around 18 years of age.  The marriage of Charles Collett and Elizabeth Alice Field took place in Suffolk in front of the witnesses Shadrach Reynolds and Caroline Amelia Kett, the event recorded at Mutford (Ref. 4a 995) during the first three months of 1874.  Most likely Elizabeth was already with-child and to avoid a disgrace to their families the couple then fled to County Durham and it was at Edmondsley near Chester-le-Street that the child was born later that same year

 

Shortly after the child was born the family moved to Sunderland where their second daughter was born, and a couple of years after that Charles and Elizabeth were living in Kingston-upon-Hull when their son was born.  The frequency of the family moves may stem from the fact that Charles was a journey blacksmith and was therefore constantly travelling to seek new work.  By the time of the 1881 Census, the family was living at 4 Johnsons Place in the Holy Trinity district of Hull.  Charles was confirmed as being 26 and born at Halesworth, while his wife Elizabeth was 24 and born at Ipswich.  Charles was still working as a blacksmith at that time.  Their children were Florence who was six, Elizabeth who was four, and Charles who was just one year old.  During that same year, while the family was still living in Hull, Charles’ third daughter Maria was born, but she later died in Ipswich in 1900 at the age of just 19

 

Between 1881 and 1891 the family moved back to Elizabeth’s hometown of Ipswich, to live at Vine Cottage in the St George’s district of the town.  Charles’ occupation on the occasion of the 1891 Census was stated as being a shopkeeper and blacksmith.  He was 37, his wife 36, Elizabeth was 14, Charles was 12, and Maria who was nine.  The couple’s eldest daughter Florence would have been 16, although no trace of her has been found.  Ten years later Charles, aged 47, and Elizabeth, aged 45, were still living in Ipswich in 1901, when their address was The Drift in Britannia Road in the St Margaret’s area of the town, from where Charles continued his work as a blacksmith.  According to the next census in 1911, the couple was still living at The Drift in Britannia Road in Ipswich.  By then Charles Collett, aged 57, was a market gardener, while his wife Elizabeth was 56.  The census return confirmed that they had been married for thirty-six years and that during that time they had four children, three of whom were still alive and not living with them by then.  However, there were two other people staying at the house, and they were their granddaughter May Johnson who was 10 years old and the daughter of Florence May Collett, and 22 years old Walter Briggs who was a gardener and possibly an employee of Charles Collett

 

18P54 – Florence Mary Collett was born in 1874 at Edmondsley

18P55 – Elizabeth Honor Collett was born in 1876 at Sunderland

18P56 – Charles Frederick W Collett was born in 1879 at Kingston-upon-Hull

18P57 – Maria Collett was born in 1881 at Kingston-upon-Hull

 

Frederick William Collett [18O64] was born at Halesworth in 1856 and at the age of five he was living with his mother and sisters Eliza and Fanny (above) at Barrack Yard on Mill Hill Street in Halesworth.  Ten years later at the age of 15 he had left school and was working in Halesworth as a baker, while still living with his widowed father and brother Charles (above) at 112 New Court.  The census of 1881 revealed that Frederick, then aged 25, was unmarried and was employed as a footman while living at the home of his married sister Fanny Frost (above) and her husband at New Street in Woodbridge.  It would appear that not long after April 1881 Frederick moved north, perhaps to Kingston-upon-Hull to be reunited with his sister Maria and brother Charles (both above).  It this is true, there is a possibility that while he was in Hull he somehow met or encountered the Mallinson family.  In 1881 Samuel Mallinson aged 30 was the store manager of J Shaws (Provisions) at 3 Livingstone Arcade on the Anlady Road in Hull.  Samuel was married to Maria Alice who was six years younger than her husband and by whom she had had three children at that time.  By April 1891 Samuel Mallinson was an inmate at the Borough Asylum in Hull, so had separated from his wife and family.  Maria and her children had left Hull and were living at Leeds with Frederick Collett

 

According to the 1891 Census, Frederick Collett, as head of the household, was living at 5 Clare Street in Leeds.  Also listed as living at the same address as boarders were (Maria) Alice Mallinson and her four children, the youngest of which was Frederick Mallinson aged one year who was reputed to be Frederick Collett’s son.  By the turn of the century Frederick was 42 and was working as a waiter.  As before, he was head of the household, but then at 1 Belmont Road in Harrogate, where his housekeeper was 44-year-old Maria Alice Mallinson.  Also living at the same address was dressmaker Ellen Mallinson who was 24, Fred Mallinson who was 11, and Marjorie Mallinson who was eleven months old.  It now transpires that the two younger children were indeed the children of Frederick William Collett, as revealed in the next census in 1911.  One unexplained curiosity is recorded in the Harrogate census of 1911 and that relates to the fact that Frederick William Collett aged 52 gave his place of birth as Woodbridge rather than Halesworth some 20 miles away.  On that occasion he was residing at 3 Cheltenham Parade in Harrogate, a boarding house managed by him, and living there with him was his wife Alice Marie Collett who was 54, and their two children Frederick William Collett who was 21 and Marjorie Collett who was 10.  The boarding house had six boarders on that day and they were William Henry Hartley who was 28, Arthur Andrew Dibnah who was 48 with his wife Rose Anna (47), Thomas (55) and Elizabeth Chiyokicko (40), plus Annie Long who was 21

 

18P58 – Frederick William Collett was born in 1890 at Leeds

18P59 – Marjorie Collett was born in 1900 at Harrogate

 

William Collett [18O65] was born at Mettingham in 1822, where he was baptised on 16th April 1822, the eldest child of Henry Collett and Elizabeth Colls.  He had left the family home by June 1841, when he was 18 years old, although he was still living within the Wangford & Beccles registration district which included Mettingham.  He came from a farming background and was a farm labourer for most of his life.  It was five years later during the second quarter of 1846 that William married Mary Ann Bradnum, the marriage being registered at Wangford.  Mary Ann was born in 1822 at Kirby Cane in Norfolk, midway between Bungay and Beccles.  According to the Mettingham census of 1851, William was 28, Mary was 29, and by then only two of their four surviving children were recorded with them, they being Matilda who was three, and Harriet who was not yet one year old.  It is possible, following two child deaths in the family during the preceding years, the missing children Benjamin and Charlotte were elsewhere at that time, since both are known to have survived to adulthood.  Either side of the birth of their daughter Matilda, it is understood that a further two children were born to William and Mary Ann at Mettingham, neither of whom survived.  They were William who was born in 1847 and Emma who was born on 14th September 1848.  Emma only lived for a couple days and was buried at Mettingham on 17th September 1848, while William was buried there three months later on 24th December 1848

 

The Collett family was still living at Mettingham, in a dwelling on Great Road, at the time of the next census in 1861, when William, an agricultural labourer, and Mary Ann were both 39.  On that occasion they had eight children living there with them, although the eldest child was then Benjamin.  The eight children with William and Mary Ann in 1861 were, Benjamin, who was 11, Harriet, who was 10, Joseph, who was nine, William, who was eight, Sarah, who was six, Dinah, who was five, George, who was two, and James who was under one year old.  By that time, the couple’s eldest surviving daughter, Matilda, had left school and was a servant at Home Farm in Gorleston, the home of farmer James and Charlotte Boggis.  It may be of interest that the two eldest Boggis children had been born at Kirby Cane, and therefore it may have been through Matilda’s mother that her employment with the family had been arranged at Home Farm

 

The marriage of William and Mary Ann Collett produced a total of twelve surviving children, and all of them were born at Mettingham, where the births were also registered.  Sometime after their family was complete William and Mary Ann left Mettingham and moved north towards Great Yarmouth where they settled down to live at Burgh Castle, overlooking Breydon Water.  The reason for the move was a new job opportunity for William, as a labourer at the cement works, which also came with accommodation provided by his employer as confirmed in the census of 1871 when the family was residing at ‘the cement works’ in Burgh Castle.  On that occasion the family comprised William aged 48, Mary Ann aged 49, and their children William, aged 17, Dinah, aged 13, George, aged 12, James, aged 10, Jemima, who was eight, Cornelius, who was seven, and Henry who was five years.  Their eldest son Benjamin had already left the family home by that time, as had daughters Harriet and Sarah who were living and working in Yarmouth, and son Joseph who was living within the same area as his family.  Sometime before April in 1871 William’s and Mary Ann’s eldest surviving child, their daughter Matilda, had left Home Farm at Gorleston to seek work in London.  And it was there, in Islington, that she was recorded as living and working in the census of 1871, at the age of 23.  It was there also that later she secured work for two of her sisters, with all three of them working in London in 1881

 

According to the 1881 Census, only youngest son Henry aged 15 was still living with his parents at 14 Butt Way in Burgh Castle.  William was confirmed as being 58 and born at Mettingham, at a time in his life when he had returned to working as a farm labourer.  Mary Ann was also 58 and her place of birth was confirmed as Kirby Cane.  Farm labourer William and his wife Mary Ann were still living in Burgh Castle ten years later in 1891 when they were both 69.  Their address on that occasion was Porter’s Lane, and living there with them was their unmarried daughter Matilda, and their grandson George who was nine and attending school.  And it was there also that the couple was still living after a further ten years in March 1901, when they were both 79.  During the following year Mary Ann Collett died at Burgh Castle and her death was recorded at Mutford R D during the fourth quarter of 1902.  William Collett was a widower for less than two years, when he died in 1904 and his death was also registered at Mutford R D, during the second quarter of the year

 

18P60 – William Collett was born in 1846 at Mettingham

18P61 – Maud Matilda Collett was born in 1848 at Mettingham

18P62 – Emma Collett was born in 1848 at Mettingham

18P63 – Charlotte Collett was born in 1849 at Mettingham

18P64 – Benjamin Collett was born in 1850 at Mettingham

18P65 – Harriet Collett was born in 1851 at Mettingham

18P66 – Joseph Collett was born in 1852 at Mettingham

18P67 – William Collett was born in 1854 at Mettingham

18P68 – Sarah Collett was born in 1855 at Mettingham

18P69 – Henry Collett was born in 1856 at Mettingham

18P70 – Dinah Collett was born in 1857 at Mettingham

18P71 – George Collett was born in 1858 at Mettingham

18P72 – James Collett was born in 1860 at Mettingham

18P73 – Jemima Collett was born in 1862 at Mettingham

18P74 – Cornelius Bradnum Collett was born in 1863 at Mettingham

18P75 – Henry Collett was born in 1865 at Mettingham

 

Henry Collett [18O66] was born at Mettingham on 6th March 1823 and was baptised there seventeen days later on 23rd March 1823, the second son of Henry and Elizabeth Collett.  He was a farm labourer at Mettingham for much of his life, and it was there that Henry Collett married (1) Maria Myall on 14th August 1842.  Maria was born in 1826, the daughter of William and Mary Myall.  The marriage produced six known children for the couple while they were living at Mettingham, although only three survived, before Maria died in February 1854.  Seven years earlier, and after Henry and Maria had been married for five years, Henry was catch red-handed stealing a pocket knife, for which he was sentenced to serve one month’s hard labour in 1847.  In 1851 Henry and Maria were living at Low Road in Mettingham with their three surviving children, having already suffered the death of their second daughter.  Henry and Maria were both 28, and their three children were Mary Ann (Marianne) who was eight, Ellen who was four, and James who was one year old.  Maria was pregnant with the Henry’s fifth child on the day of the census and after two months the couple’s penultimate child was born, but sadly he did not survive, nor did their last child who was born three years later

 

Just over six months after the death of their last children Henry’s younger unmarried sister, Susan Collett (below), was expecting the birth of a base-born child which Henry and Maria agreed to take into their family as their own.  Tragically Maria did not live long enough to see her ‘adopted’ daughter baptised at Mettingham in April 1854, as she passed away two months before the event.  Maria Collett was buried at Mettingham on 7th February 1854, at the age of 30.  Four months after the death of his wife, Henry married (2) Catherine Ellis at Mettingham on 5th June 1854.  Catherine was the former wife and widow of Richard Ellis, with whom she had had five children.  Catherine was many years older than Henry, although there was a wide variation in their ages in the subsequent census returns.  At the time of her death it was revealed that she was born at Mettingham in 1809 as Catherine Brighton – see note below

 

By the time of the next census in 1861, the family living at Great Road in Mettingham comprised Henry who was 39, his new wife Catherine who was 57, and Henry’s two children from his first marriage, Eleanor who was 13, and James 12.  It is possible that Catherine’s age was a transcription error, her actual age being more likely 52.  Also living with the family was Maria Collett who was seven, the birth daughter of Henry’s sister Susan Collett.  Ten years later, in the Mettingham census of 1871, Henry was 47 and Catherine was 60.  On that occasion Henry’s children were no longer living with the couple, although living and working nearby within the Beccles & Wangford registration district was Henry’s ‘adopted’ daughter Maria Collett of Mettingham who was 18

 

The couple was still residing in Mettingham by 1881, when they were living in a dwelling simply referred to as being on the High Road.  Henry was 56 and his wife Catherine was 70.  Less than thirty months after the census day, Henry Collett died and was buried at Mettingham on 16th August 1883 aged 63.  Catherine then had nearly eight years as a widow, during widow time she left Mettingham to settle in nearby Shipmeadow.  Following her death, Catherine Collett of Shipmeadow and late of Mettingham, was buried at Mettingham on 3rd May 1891, when she was 83, and recorded as the daughter of John Brighton.  It may be of interest that, Robert Collett (Ref. 18O90) married Lydia Ann Brighton who was born in 1838, the daughter of Robert and Mary Brighton

 

18P76 – Mary Ann Collett was born in 1843 at Mettingham

18P77 – Maria Collett was born in 1844 at Mettingham

18P78 – Eleanor Collett was born in 1847 at Mettingham

18P79 – James Collett was born in 1849 at Mettingham

18P80 – Walter Collett was born in 1851 at Mettingham

18P81 – George Collett was born in 1853 at Mettingham

 

Maria Elizabeth Collett [18O67] was born at Mettingham on 25th August 1825, and was baptised there on 4th September 1825, the eldest daughter of Henry Collett and Elizabeth Colls.  It would appear that an illness hit the family in 1834, because in December that year Maria Elizabeth, and her sister Rachel (below), both died while only nine and seven years old respectively.  Maria Elizabeth Collett was buried at Mettingham on 18th December 1834, just thirteen days after her younger sister

 

Samuel John Collett [18O68] was born at Mettingham on 25th September 1826 where he was baptised on 15th October 1826, the son of Henry and Elizabeth Collett.  Tragically he only survived for just over three months when he died at Mettingham, where he was buried on 3rd January 1827 aged 14 weeks

 

Rachel Collett [18O69] was born at Mettingham on 24th April 1827 where she was baptised on 4th November 1827, the second daughter and the fifth of nine children of Henry and Elizabeth Collett.  Tragically she died when she was seven years of age and was buried at Mettingham on 5th December 1834, just less than two weeks before her sister Maria Elizabeth Collett (above) also passed away

 

Mary Ann Collett [18O70] was born at Mettingham on 22nd February 1828, and it was there also that she was baptised on 28th March 1828, the daughter of Henry and Elizabeth Collett.  At the time of the census in 1841, Mary Collett was listed as being 12 years old, while living with her parents at their Mettingham home.  It was over eight years later on 12th October 1849 that Mary Ann Collett married James Porter at Weybread, just south of Harleston, after the reading of banns.  James was baptised at Ellough near Beccles on 25th October 1821, the son of John and Charlotte Porter.  Once married, Mary Ann and James initially settled in the village of Weybread, where the first of their nine children was born in 1850.  However, by the end of March in 1851, James and Mary Ann, together with their daughter Ann Elizabeth, were living at Hoxne near Diss, before they moved to Ilketshall St Andrew, where the couple’s next six children were born.  By 1861 the family living at Tooks Common in Ilketshall St Andrew comprised, agricultural labourer James Porter who was 38, his wife Mary Ann of Mettingham who was 31, together with five of their children, they being Ann, John, Eliza, Emma, and William

 

Around 1865 the family moved again, when they travelled the two miles to Ringsfield to the west of Beccles, and it was there that Mary Ann’s last two children were born.  Just after the birth of the last child, the family moved once more, that time to 16 High Road in Worlingham near Beccles, where they were living at the time of the census of 1871, when James was 49 and Marian was 42.  The census that year listed the children as William who was 10 (born 1860), Alice who was eight, (born 1862), Dinah who was six (born 1864), Harry who was four (born 1866), and George who was two years old (1868-1872) who suffered an infant death during the following year.  The older children had already left the family home by then, and they were Anna (born 1850), John (born 1852), Eliza (born 1855), and Emma (born 1857).  By 1881 James Porter was 59 and he was living with his wife and their two youngest surviving sons at 7 Bull’s Green in the village of Toft Monks in Norfolk, just north of Beccles.  Mary Ann was 52, and both of their sons, William aged 20 and Harry at 14, were employed as agricultural labourers, like their father

 

The couple was still living at 7 Bull’s Green in Toft Monks in 1891 with their son Harry, when James was still employed as an agricultural labourer.  Mary Ann Porter passed away in the latter months of 1893 while the couple was still at Toft Monk, her death being registered at Loddon.  James Porter continued to live there following the death of his wife, and it was there also that he was later buried on 5th May 1900.  Of their nine children, two are of particular interest since they both married their Collett cousins, and they are the couple’s fourth child Emma Porter, and their eighth child Harry Porter, both as listed below.  The third child listed below is also of interest, but for a different reason.  William Charles porter was the great grandfather of Robert Porter who, in September 2010, generously provided a great deal of new information about this particular Collett family, and that shown at the start of Part 19

 

18P82 – Emma Porter was born in 1857 at Ilketshall St Andrew

18P83 – William Charles Porter was born in 1860 at Ilketshall St Andrew

18P84 – Harry Porter was born in 1867 at Ringsfield

 

Susan Collett [18O71] was born at Mettingham on 6th July 1830, and was baptised there on 22nd August 1830, the daughter of Henry and Elizabeth Collett.  She was 10 years old in the Mettingham census of 1841 when she was living there with her family.  Ten years later in 1851 Susan was still living with her parents when she was 20, but two years later she gave birth to a base-born daughter, who was named in honour of her older sister Maria Elizabeth (above) who had died when Susan was only four years old.  The child’s name may also have been a tribute to her niece Maria Collett, the late daughter of her older brother Henry Collett.  The reason for making this assumption stems from the fact that Susan’s daughter was then taken into the family of her brother Henry, as confirmed by the Mettingham census in 1861.  Around that time in her life Susan was employed as a silk winder, just over three years later she married Edward Moyse, the son of labourer Edward Moyse.  The wedding took place at Mettingham on 3rd October 1857 and resulted in a number of children for the couple, although no census records of the family have been found to date

 

18P85 – Maria Elizabeth Collett was born in 1854 at Mettingham

 

Robert Collett [18O72] was born at Mettingham on 5th December 1831 and it was there also that he was baptised on 1st January 1832, the son of Henry and Elizabeth Collett.  Robert was nine years old, and 19 years old, in the two censuses carried out at Mettingham in 1841 and 1851.  On both occasions he was living there with his parents, and for the latter he was working as an agricultural labourer.  It was at Mettingham on 24th May 1857 that Robert married (1) Eliza Barber who was born in 1836 at St Michael South Elham, the daughter of Robert and Mary Ann Barber.  By the time of the 1861 Census, the marriage had produced just one child for Robert and Eliza.  The census record for Mettingham revealed that Robert was 29 and an agricultural labourer, and that Eliza was 24, and that they were living in Castle Road.  Their son Henry, who was born at Mettingham, was one year old and was later referred to as Harry Collett in the census of 1871, and subsequent records

 

A second child for the couple was born at Mettingham eight years after their first, but tragically Eliza died at Mettingham shortly after on 16th December 1868, and was buried at Mettingham on 20th December 1868 aged just 32.  It is therefore conceivable, although not proved, that Robert and Eliza may have had other children between 1859 and 1867 who did not survive.  An obituary was printed in the East Suffolk Gazette which said “COLLETT - On the 16th December, at Mettingham, greatly lamented, aged 32, Eliza, the wife of Mr Robert Collett, of Mettingham”.  It was almost a year after the death of his wife that Robert married (2) Ellen Beckett who was many years younger, having been born at nearby Bungay, where she was baptised at St Mary’s Church on 23rd August 1846.  The record of that second marriage, at Depwade Rural District during the third quarter of 1869, confirmed that Robert Collett was a widower.  Ellen Beckett was the daughter of inn keeper William Beckett and his wife Susannah (Susan) Godbold.  In 1871, at Halesworth, was Maria Godbold from Beccles who was 18 and the niece of cabinet market George Collett from Newington in Surrey, who was working with her uncle as a cabinet makers assistant.  She had been baptised at Beccles in Suffolk on 20th June 1852, the youngest daughter of William and Mary Ann Godbold, who were living at Blyburgate, in Beccles, in 1861

 

Once married, the couple left Mettingham and moved the one mile across the county boundary to the village of Broome in Norfolk, just a short distance from Bungay, where Robert’s and Ellen’s first three children were born.  The move to Broome was the result of Robert taking over the beer house in Broome.  According to the 1871 Census, Robert Collett from Mettingham was 38 and a beer seller, whose wife was Ellen Collett from Bungay who was 25.  At that time, they were listed as living at the Beer House in Broome within the Loddon registration district with their four children, Harry who was 11, Alice who was three, Clara who was two, and new arrival Elizabeth who was not yet one year old.  A new job opportunity arose in 1872 which resulted in another family move, on that occasion to the adjoining village of Ditchingham, just to the north of Bungay, where Robert took over the running of the Black Horse Inn.  It was at Ditchingham that they were living when their next four children were born.  And the family was still there in the spring of 1881.  The census recorded that Robert was 47 and of Mettingham and was working as a beer retailer at the Black Horse Inn on the Loddon Road in Ditchingham

 

His wife was Ellen, aged 36 from Bungay, and their eight children were Alice who was 13, Clara who was 12, Elizabeth who was 10, Horace who was nine, Florence who was eight, Kate who was seven, Robert who was six, and daughter Jessie who was three years old.  The two oldest girls were listed as silk winders, although Clara was also listed as still being at school so was probably a part-time silk winder.  Robert and Ellen added to their family in the 1880s with two more children, the first of which was born at Ditchingham, while the later arrival was born after the family had moved back to Broome, where Robert resumed work as an agricultural labourer.  And it was from that time onwards that the family lived at Yarmouth Road in Broome.  According to the census of 1891 the family was recorded as Robert of Mettingham aged 57, an agricultural labourer, his wife Ellen (recorded as Eleanor) was aged 45 from Bungay, while the five children still living with them were Ellen E Collett who was 20 and Robert Collett who was 16, Jessie Collett who was 13, Arthur Collett who was seven and Sidney W Collett who was two years of age  All of the children were simply recorded as having been in Norfolk.  On that day, Robert and Ellen’s daughter Florence had already left the family home, and was preparing for her marriage to Henry Bird, with whom she had three children before 1901.  Tragically, just over two years after the day of the census in 1891, Robert and Ellen’s daughter Ellen Elizabeth Collett died at Broome on 2nd August 1893 at the age of 23.  Four years later, Robert and Ellen were still living in Broome, when Robert Collett died at Yarmouth Road on 1st October 1897, at the age of 64

 

By the time of the census in 1901, Ellen Collett was widow at the age of 54.  At that time, all of her children, with the exception of the two youngest, had left the family home.  The census for Broome listed the family as Ellen Collett from Bungay 56, and her sons Arthur Collett 17 and from Ditchingham, and Sidney who was 12 and from Broome.  Curiously her sons’ ages did not correspond with their ages in 1891.  The family also had living with them at that time, Ellen’s granddaughter Ellen Bird aged three years, who was also born at Broome and who was the youngest of the three children of Ellen’s daughter Florence Collett and her husband Henry Bird.  Rather oddly though, in 1901 Florence Bird of Broome was aged 29 and was recorded as living in the London Borough of West Ham with her ‘brother-in-law’ George Bird of Ditchingham aged 31 who was a carpenter’s labourer.  Ten years later Florence and George Bird had five children and were living in Lambeth.  By April 1911, Ellen Collett of Bungay was 64 and was no longer living in Broome, but instead, was living in the Ipswich area of Suffolk with her three unmarried sons and a grandson.  They were Horace Collett, Arthur Collett, Sidney Collett, and Harold Elden who was 16 and born at Broome, the son of Clara Elizabeth Elden, nee Collett, her eldest child who already had a large family and was expecting the birth of her last child.  The census return also stated that Ellen had given birth to ten children, only four of whom were still alive in 1911

 

18P86 – Albert Collett was born in 1857 at Mettingham

18P87 – Henry Collett was born in 1859 at Mettingham

18P88 – Alice Collett was born in 1867 at Mettingham

The children of Robert Collett and his second wife Ellen Beckett:

18P89 – Clara Elizabeth Collett was born in 1869 at Broome, Norfolk

18P90 – Ellen Elizabeth Collett was born in 1870 at Broome, Norfolk

18P91 – Horace Collett was born in 1872 at Broome, Norfolk

18P92 – Florence Collett was born in 1873 at Ditchingham, Norfolk

18P93 – Kate Collett was born in 1874 at Ditchingham, Norfolk

18P94 – Robert Collett was born in 1876 at Ditchingham, Norfolk

18P95 – Jessie L Collett was born in 1878 at Ditchingham, Norfolk

18P96 – Arthur Collett was born in 1883 at Ditchingham, Norfolk

18P97 – Sidney W Collett was born in 1888 at Broome, Norfolk

 

Christopher Collett [18O73] was born at Mettingham in 1836 and was baptised there on 25th February 1836, the son of Henry and Elizabeth Collett.  It was at Mettingham where his parents are known to have lived for part of their life together and where Christopher was recorded as being 15 in 1851.  He married Lucy Jones at Chediston, near Halesworth on 16th October 1858, where she had been baptised on 6th August 1838, the daughter of labourer Thomas Jones and his wife Maria.  It was during the year following their wedding day that Lucy presented Christopher with their first child, who was born at Mettingham.  By the time of the census in 1861, the family of three was living at Chediston where Christopher, aged 25, was working as an agricultural labourer, Lucy was 23 and their son George was one year old.  During the following year the couple’s second child was born while the family was still living at Chediston, before the family made a more permanent move to Wrentham, four miles north of Southwold

 

Four of Christopher’s and Lucy’s remaining five children were all born while the family was living at Wrentham.  According to the census in 1871, the family was living at Cuckholds Green in Wrentham and comprised Christopher Collett, aged 34 and from Mettingham, who was an agricultural labourer, his wife Lucy Collett, who was 33 and from Chediston, and with them were their five children.  The three oldest children, who were all attending the village school, were George Collett, aged 11 who was born at Mettingham, Ann L Collett, who was nine and born at Chediston, and Frederick C Collett, who was four and born at Wrentham.  The two younger Wrentham born children were Walter H Collett who was two, and Alfred Collett who was one year old.  One more child was born to the Christopher and Lucy while they were still living at Wrentham, but shortly after, around 1873, a major family move took place which resulted in them leaving Suffolk and heading north to Lancashire.  It was at Winton, in Eccles, where Christopher and Lucy set up their new home, and it was there also that their final child was born in 1874.  Less than two years later the first of three tragedies hit the family with the death of their son Walter Harry, who death was reported to the registrar at Barton-upon-Irwell, which today is a district within the town on Eccles

 

It was in the next census in 1881 that the family was confirmed as living at 33 King Street in Barton-upon-Irwell.  Christopher Collett from Mettingham was 44 and was working as a farm labourer.  Lucy Collett from Chediston was 42, and the children still living in the family home with them were Catherine Collett 19 of Chediston, Fred C Collett 14, Alfred Collett 11, Henry Collett who was eight, and Walter Collett who was six years old.  The youngest son was confirmed as having been born at Winton in Lancashire, but the place of birth of his three older brothers was incorrectly recorded as Rendham in Suffolk, rather than Wrentham.  It was at the end of the following year that Christopher Collett, aged 44, died at Barton-upon-Irwell, his death being recorded at Barton register office (Ref. 8c 381) during the last quarter of 1882.  At some time in his life, in addition to being an agricultural labourer, Christopher also worked as a coachman.  The third tragedy to strike the family was the likely death of son Alfred, for whom there is no record after 1881.  Nearly six years after the death of her husband, the widow Lucy Collett married Samuel Bower at Barton-upon-Irwell during the third quarter of 1888.  Samuel was a general labourer and was born at Wilmslow in Cheshire around 1834.  By the time of the census in 1891, Samuel, aged 56, and Lucy, aged 52, were residing at 9 Elizabeth Street in Barton-upon-Irwell, with just Lucy’s youngest son William Collett, aged 16, still living with her, while her two unmarried sons, Christopher (Frederick) and Henry, were living nearby Barton-upon-Irwell

 

It was a similar situation in 1901 except that by Samuel and Lucy were listed as living at 23 Ellesmere Street in Eccles, where general labourer Samuel Bower from Wilmslow was 66, and his wife was incorrectly named as Lacy Bower from Chediston in Suffolk who was 61.  Lucy Bower formerly Lucy Collett nee Jones died ten years later during the first three months of 1911, her death being registered at Barton-upon-Irwell.  Just after she passed away, Samuel was recorded in the census of 1911 living at 5 Byron Street in Patricroft, the home of William Collett and his wife Eda, his late wife’s youngest son Walter William Collett

 

18P98 – George Collett was born in 1859 at Mettingham

18P99 – Ann Catherine Collett was born in 1862 at Chediston

18P100 – Frederick Christopher Collett was born in 1866 at Wrentham

18P101 – Walter Harry Collett was born in 1868 at Wrentham

18P102 – Alfred Collett was born in 1870 at Wrentham

18P103 – Henry Collett was born in 1872 at Wrentham

18P104 – Walter William Collett was born in 1874 at Winton, Eccles

 

Charles Collett [18O74] was born at Earsham, near Bungay, around six to seven months after his parents were married there.  He was baptised at Earsham on 8th June 1827, the only known son of Samuel Collett and his wife Marianne Read.  In 1841, when he was 13, Charles was still living with his parents at Earsham, although he had left the family home there by 1851, when he was 22 and living and working as a domestic groom, just six miles away at Loddon, at the home of elderly couple George and Mart Kett.  Two years after that, Charles Collett, aged 24 married Ellen Rix, aged 26, at All Saint’s Church in Norwich (Ref. 4b 195) on 9th May 1853.  Charles was a servant and the son of labourer Samuel Collett, Ellen was the daughter of George Rix, another labourer, while the witnesses were James and Sarah Dickenson

 

Their first child was born at Brooke, near Loddon, with further children added to the family over the following years, the second and third being born at Hampstead in London, the next being born after the family had returned to Brooke, with the last two being born following the family’s move to Norwich.  Sadly, either during, or not long after the birth of their last child, Ellen died around 1868 or 1869.  At the time of the census in 1861 Charles and Ellen and their young family were living in Hampstead, where Charles, aged 32 and from Earsham, was employed as a servant.  Living near to where Charles was working was Ellen Collett, who was 33, with her three children, Alfred A A Collett who was six, Charles G Collett who was three, and Henry C Collett who was under one year old.  By the time of the next census in 1871, Charles Collett from Earsham was 42 and was living with his six children in the Parish of St Margaret in the West Wymer district of Norwich.  His children were recorded as Alfred Collett, aged 17 from Brooke, Charles Collett, aged 14 from London, Henry Collett, aged 10 also from London, Herbert Collett who was seven and born at Brooke, George Collett who was four and Eliza Collett who was two, both of them born in Norwich

 

What happen to four of the children after 1871 is not known at this time but, in 1881, Charles and two of his sons were agricultural labourers, living as lodgers at the Jolly Butchers Inn on Ber Street in Norwich.  Charles senior was 52 and from Earsham, Charles junior was 21, while Herbert was 16 and from Hampstead (sic).  So far, Charles’ son Henry has not been located after 1871, nor has a record of his birth been located in London.  It is also established that Charles Collett senior died in early 1885 and was followed a year later by his fourth son Herbert who died in Norwich during 1885.  The death of Charles Collett was recorded at Norwich (Ref. 4b 1829) during the first three months of 1884, when he was 55 years old.  That leaves unanswered questions regarding Charles’ two youngest children, George and Eliza, who were placed with other families sometime after 1871, whilst his two eldest sons were married during the 1880s

 

18P105 – Alfred Ernest Collett was born in 1854 at Brooke, near Loddon

18P106 – Charles George Collett was born in 1858 at Hampstead, London

18P107 – Henry C Collett was born in 1860 at Hampstead, London

18P108 – Herbert Albert Collett was born in 1863 at Brooke, near Loddon

18P109 – George Collett was born in 1866 at Norwich

18P110 – Eliza Collett was born in 1868 at Norwich

 

Benjamin Anthony Collett [18O75] may have been born at Fressingfield, but was baptised at nearby Cratfield.  He was born on 31st August 1824, just six months after his parents were married at Fressingfield, and was baptised at Cratfield on 22nd September 1824, less than a month after he was born.  He was the eldest son of Benjamin Collett and Bertha Philpot, but sadly around the time he was ten years old his mother died, possibly during the birth of his brother Isaac (below).  He was nearly 16 years old when his father remarried and by the time of the first national census at Fressingfield in June 1841 Benjamin was 17.  Just over two years later Benjamin married Sarah Ann Spalding at Fressingfield on 26th December 1843.  Sarah Ann Spalding was born at Earl Soham around 1820, the daughter of James Spalding and Hannah Rose, making her four years older than Benjamin.  One year before they were married Sarah gave birth to a base-born child Sarah Ann Spalding who was born at Fressingfield, where she was baptised on 23rd December 1842, the child of Sarah Ann Spalding.  Young Sarah may, or may not, have been fathered by Benjamin Collett, but once married she too adopted the Collett name.  During the remaining years of that decade the couple had a further six children, although only two of them survived and were living with Benjamin and Sarah at Fressingfield by the time of the census in 1851

 

The census return that year listed the family living in New Street in Fressingfield as sawyer Benjamin Collett, who was 28, his wife Sarah Ann Collett, who was 31 and from Earl Soham, their daughter Sarah A Collett, who was eight, and their son Harry Collett who was not yet one year old, both of them born at Fressingfield.  Also living nearby in New Street was Benjamin’s father Benjamin Collett with his second wife Sarah Collett nee Vincent.  During the 1850s Sarah presented Benjamin with three more children as confirmed in the Fressingfield census of 1861.  The census return listed Benjamin Collett, aged 37, and Sarah Collett, aged 40, with their three most recent children, Jane who was seven, Keziah who was four, and Anthony who was two years old.  All of them having been born at Fressingfield.  Their eldest daughter Sarah would have been eighteen years old and may have already been married to William Brundish by that time.  The photograph below, taken on glass and damaged over time, shows the ‘1861 family’ of Keziah, Benjamin, Sarah holding Anthony, and Jane, just prior to Benjamin’s death.  The group is standing outside a house that is today the Fox & Goose public house in Fressingfield

 

 

It was during December 1861 that Sarah’s daughter Keziah died and, just nine months after losing her daughter, Sarah was made a widow by the death of her husband.  It was in the first week of September that Benjamin Anthony Collett died at Fressingfield, where he was buried on 6th September 1862.  The cause of death was given as phthisis which was a wasting disease usually contracted by those working with cattle or leather and commonly referred to as the cobbler’s illness.  It was the same form of tuberculosis that also killed Benjamin’s father at Fressingfield earlier that same year.  It is possible that Benjamin was buried in a family grave with his father at St Peter’s & St Paul’s Church in Fressingfield.  It was also in June 1862 that Sarah Ann Collett nee Spalding produced the last of her children, who was only three months old when her father passed away.  Nine years later Sarah, aged 52, was a widow still living at Fressingfield with just two of her children.  They were Jane who was 19 and Anthony who was 12

 

What happened to the family during the next decade is not known for sure, but around 1875 Sarah left Fressingfield, when she moved to Kent to be with her daughter Sarah Ann Collett (formerly Spalding) who was the wife of William Brundish of Fressingfield by then.  Sarah Ann Collett and William Brundish were married around 1863 and their first five children had been born while they were still in Suffolk, while two further children were born after the family had moved to Erith in Kent.  According to the 1881 Census Sarah Collett of Fressingfield, aged 62, was a washerwoman and mother-in-law to head of the household William Brundish, a general labourer who was 39.  At that time, he and his wife and family were living at 25 Bottle Road in Erith

 

18P111 – Sarah Ann Collett (formerly Spalding) was born in 1842 at Fressingfield

18P112 – Samuel Collett was born in 1844 at Fressingfield

18P113 – Jane Collett was born in 1845 at Fressingfield

18P114 – Sam Collett was born in 1846 at Fressingfield

18P115 – Matilda Collett was born in 1847 at Fressingfield

18P116 – Edward Collett was born in 1849 at Fressingfield

18P117 – Harry James Collett was born in 1850 at Fressingfield

18P118 – Jane Collett was born in 1852 at Fressingfield

18P119 – Keziah Collett was born in 1856 at Fressingfield

18P120 – Anthony Harry Collett was born in 1858 at Fressingfield

18P121 – William Collett was born in 186244 at Fressingfield

 

William Collett [18O76] was born at Fressingfield in 1826, where he was baptised on 12th October 1826, the second son of Benjamin and Bertha Collett.  At the time of the census in 1841 William was 15 and was still living with his family at Fressingfield, by which time his father Benjamin was then married to Sarah, following the death of William’s mother in 1834.  William was a soldier in the army and it is established that he married Ann from Ravenglass in Cumberland around 1847, following which the couple was living in Ireland for the first three years of their life.  In the spring of 1851, William Collett, aged 24, was a private with the 4th Dragoon Guards based at Brecon Barracks.  His family was billeted at Brecon St Mary, where his wife Ann, aged 21, was living with the couple’s first two children, Henry who was two, and Bethiah who was one year old

 

Ann may have been expecting the couple’s third child on the day of the census in 1851 and, by the time it was born, the family was living at Dartmoor in Devon.  Two further children were added to the family during the following six years, the first born at Fressingfield and the last at Whitehaven.  And it was at St Bees near Whitehaven that the family was living at the time of the census in 1861.  By that time William had retired from the army, when he was described as an outdoor Chelsea Pensioner at the age of 34.  His wife Ann was 31, and completing the family were sons Henry aged 12, John who was nine, and William who was five, and daughters Bethia Ann who was 10, and Elizabeth who was three years old.  It was sometime during the next decade that William Collett had died, perhaps from an injury sustained while he was in the guards.  According to the census return for 1871 his widow and four of his five children were living at 103 Scotch Street, at a lodging house in St Bees.  Ann Collett, at 41, was a housekeeper, and the children with her on that occasion were, Bethia Ann Collett who was 21, John Collett who was 19, William Collett who was 15, and Elizabeth Collett who was 13

 

Ten years later in 1881, the widow Ann Collett from Ravenglass was 52 and was a laundress living at 41 Hawke Street in Barrow-in-Furness.  The only one of her children still living with her by then, was her son William Collett who was 25 and who had been born at Fressingfield, like his late father.  Four other people were listed at the address, and the first of these was Ann’s grandson William Collett who was five and who had been born at Berwick-on-Tweed.  It has been assumed that he was the son of William Collett whose wife, and the mother of son William, had died possibly during a subsequent childbirth.  Three of the other four children of Ann were married by then, although no record married daughter Bertha, or bachelor son John, has been located in the census at that time.  The other three people residing at 41 Hawke Street in 1881 were all boarders, and they were Job Roberts, aged 45 from Liverpool, Charles Littlewood, aged 27, from Crewe, both of them boiler makers, and 21 years old Agnes Irving, a jute weaver from Ireland.  No record of Ann Collett has been found in the next census of 1891 when she would have been 61.  So, the two options are, that she may have remarried or passed away during the 1880s

 

18P122 – Henry Collett was born in 1848 at County Mayo, Ireland

18P123 – Bethia Ann Collett was born in 1850 at Mullingar, Ireland

18P124 – John Collett was born in 1851 at Dartmoor, Devon

18P125 – William Collett was born in 1855 at Fressingfield

18P126 – Elizabeth Collett was born in 1857 at Whitehaven, Cumberland (Cumbria)

 

John Collett [18O77] was born at Fressingfield on 19th May 1828, and was baptised there on 26th May 1828, the third son of Benjamin Collett and Bertha Philpot.  Tragically he died almost immediately after his baptism and was buried at Fressingfield on 31st May 1828 at the age of just twelve days

 

Charles Collett [18O78] was born at Fressingfield in 1829 and it was there that he was baptised on 2nd August 1829, the fourth son of Benjamin Collett and Bertha Philpot.  Like his brother John (above), Charles also died very young, when he was buried at Fressingfield on 14th August 1831, and was followed by his mother who was buried there in 1834

 

Keziah Collett [18O79] was born at Fressingfield in 1832 and was baptised there on 12th August 1832.  The baptism record confirmed that her parents were Benjamin and Bertha Collett.  According to the Fressingfield census in 1841, Keziah Collett was eight years old when she was living there with her father and his second wife Sarah.  According to the census in 1851 Keziah Collett of Fressingfield was 18 years old and was living and working in the South Ockendon & Orsett area of Essex. Although unlike her brother John and Charles (above) who died in infancy, Keziah Collett did reach adulthood before she died in 1854, when she was buried at Fressingfield on 3rd December 1854 at the age of 22

 

Elizabeth Collett [18O80] was born at Fressingfield in 1833.  According to the Fressingfield census in 1841, Elizabeth was seven years old when she was living there with her parents Benjamin and Bertha Collett, her brother Isaac (below), and her two half-brothers Charles and George (below)

 

Isaac Collett [18O81] was born at Fressingfield in 1834 the same year his mother Bertha died.  The fact that no baptism record for Isaac has been found may indicate that his father Benjamin took the death of his wife badly and could not bring himself to baptise the child, which he may have blamed for the death of Bertha.  By the time of the Fressingfield census in 1841 Isaac was six years old and was living with his father, who by then had remarried, his sister Elizabeth (above), and his two half-brothers Charles and George (below).  Ten years after that Isaac was recorded as being 15, by which time he had moved out of his father’s house and had started work, while still living nearby in Fressingfield.  Isaac Collett died at Fressingfield during the first week of 1852, where he was buried on 9th January 1852, aged just 16

 

Charles Collett [18O82] was born at Fressingfield in 1839, and was baptised there on 26th April 1840.  The Fressingfield baptism record confirmed that Charles was the son of Benjamin Collett and his second wife Sarah Vincent who were married at Fressingfield on 21st May 1839, making him their first child.  It was the Fressingfield census in June 1841 that placed Charles’ birth towards the end of 1839, when his age was stated as being two years old, the argument being that had he been born during the first four months of 1840 he would have only been one year old.  For the next census in 1851 Charles Collett was 11 years old which would fix his birth around the end of 1839 or very early in 1840.  At that time, he was living at New Street in Fressingfield with his parents and his two younger siblings George and Sarah (below).  On leaving school he took up working on the land, but by the time of the census in 1861, at the age of 21, Charles Collett from Fressingfield was a gunner in the Royal Artillery and was base at Fort Monkton in Alverstoke in Hampshire.  No later record of Charles has been discovered, which might indicate that he was killed in action

 

George Collett [18O83] was born at Fressingfield where he was baptised on 18th April 1841, when his parents were confirmed as Benjamin and Sarah Collett.  His birth was recorded at Hoxne (Ref. 13 436) during the first quarter of 1841 and, according to the June census that year, he was three months old, meaning that he was born during March that year.  He was 10 years old in the census of 1851 when he was living with his family at New Street in Fressingfield.  Twenty years later in 1861, at the aged 19, George was the only child still living at the family home in Fressingfield with his parents Benjamin and Sarah Collett.  Before the end of that year, George married Harriet Cracknell on 13th November 1861, Harriet being the daughter of labourer Benjamin Cracknell of Saxtead.  Harriet was also born at Fressingfield around 1841.  Over the following eighteen years the marriage produced nine children for George and Harriet and all of them were born at Fressingfield.  The Fressingfield census of 1871 listed the family as George 30 and Harriet 29, and their children Harry Collett who was eight, Mary Ann Collett who was six, Benjamin Collett who was five, Keziah Collett who was two, and George Collett who was under one year old

 

During the next decade more children were added to the family, which also had to suffer the tragic loss of eldest daughter Mary Ann and son William.  And it was at Fressingfield that the family was still living ten years later in 1881.  Their place of residence was listed as Catchpool Gardens where agricultural labourer George was 40, as was his wife Harriet.  The only children that were missing were the two eldest sons who had left home to seek work elsewhere.  The children still living at the address were Benjamin 15, Keziah 12, George 10, Esau who was six, William who was five, and Sarah who was two years old.  Son Benjamin had left school and was employed was as an agricultural labourer like his father.  Later that same year, in 1881, the family moved the three miles east to Cratfield where, towards the end of the year, son James was born.  Another move quickly followed, since by the time of the birth of their ninth and last child, George and Harriet were living at Cratfield around the mid-1880s.  However, by the time of the next census in 1891, George and Harriet and some of their family were recorded living at St Cross South Elmham near Harleston, within the Wangford & Bungay registration district of north Suffolk.  George and Harriet were both 50, while living with them were William 15, Sarah 12, James who was nine, and May who was five years old

 

According to the 1901 Census, George Collett, aged 60, was a stockman on a farm at Pixey Green near Stradbroke.  Living with him was his wife Harriet also 60 who gave her place of birth as Saxtead.  The only members of the family still living with them were three of their youngest four children.  They were William Collett, aged 25 and a non-domestic groom, Sarah Collett, aged 22 and a domestic housemaid, and James Collett, aged 19 who was an ordinary farm labourer.  The couple’s youngest child, May Collett, was 15 and was a general domestic servant living and working with a family at Fressingfield-cum-Withersdale.  Her place of birth was confirmed as being Cratfield.  Ten years later George Collett was 70 and Harriet his wife was 69, and at that time the couple was still living at Stradbroke, although no other member of the family was living with them by then.  George Collett survived for another thirteen years after then, when his death was recorded at Hartismere register office (Ref. 4a 879) in Suffolk during the second quarter of 1924 when he was 83

 

18P127 – Henry Collett was born in 1862 at Fressingfield

18P128 – Mary Ann Collett was born in 1864 at Fressingfield

18P129 – Benjamin Collett was born in 1866 at Fressingfield

18P130 – Keziah Collett was born in 1868 at Fressingfield

18P131 – George Collett was born in 1870 at Fressingfield

18P132 – William Collett was born in 1872 at Fressingfield

18P133 – Esau Collett was born in 1874 at Fressingfield

18P134 – William Collett was born in 1876 at Fressingfield

18P135 – Sarah Collett was born in 1878 at Fressingfield

18P136 – James Collett was born in 1881 at Cratfield

18P137 – May Collett was born in 1885 at Cratfield

 

Sarah Anne Collett [18O84] was born at Fressingfield in 1843, the youngest child of Benjamin Collett and Sarah Vincent, and was baptised there on 9th July 1843.  At the time of the census in 1851 Sarah was seven years old when she was living at New Street in Fressingfield with her parents and older brothers Charles and George (above).  She was eight years old when she died at Fressingfield, where she was buried on 7th September 1851

 

Sarah Collett [18O85] was born at Ilketshall St Andrew in 1826, and may have been the eldest child of John Collett of Fressingfield and Catherine Baldwin of St James South Elmham.  However, no record of her baptism has been found, nor was she recorded with her family at Ilketshall St Andrew in the census of 1841.  Sarah Collett of Ilketshall St Andrew was 26 in the census of 1851, when she was living and working at Henstead near Kessingland.  Towards the end of the next decade, Sarah took up employment as housekeeper to widower Nathan Rumsby and his four young children at their home in Broad Street in Bungay.  That would have taken place around 1858 when Nathan Rumsby’s wife had passed away.  That situation was confirmed by the census in 1861 in which Sarah Collett from (Ilketshall) St Andrew was unmarried at the age of 34 and was working as a housekeeper to 31 years old Nathan Rumsby, who was a fitter in a smith’s shop, and his four children aged two to eight years.  Also listed in the same census as a visitor at the same address, was Catherine Collett from St James (South Elmham), a labourer’s wife aged 56 who, it is believed, was the mother of Sarah Collett whom she was visiting at that time.  With no record of Sarah Collett found after that time, it may be assumed that she was married during the 1860s

 

John Collett [18O86] was born at Ilketshall St Andrew on 1st January 1829, where he was baptised on 22nd February 1829, the eldest son of John Collett and Catherine Baldwin.  At the time of the first national census in June 1841, John was 12 years old and was living with his family at Ilketshall St Andrew.  A few years later he left school, having obtained his School Certificate.  He joined the army at Halesworth when he was seventeen years and nine months.  He was initially with the 16th Regiment, but later transferred to the 54th Regiment.  John spent a total of twenty years and two days with the army, of which eight years and eight months was spent in India.  The records also confirm that he held the rank of a private with the 54th Regiment.  He married (1) Mary Penney on 8th April 1857 at Stoke Damerel, a parish in Devonport, and within a few years the couple was living in India, where their two daughters were born.  The first child was born at Cawnpore, and the second one at Maradabad in Calcutta.  Within two years of the birth of their second child the family was extended by the addition of a son, who was also born while John and Mary were still living in Calcutta.  John finally retired from the army in May 1873 and was the recipient of the Indian Mutiny Medal and Good Conduct Medal.  He also received two good conduct awards from the army

 

Upon leaving the army John and Mary returned to Ilketshall St Andrew, where he took up work as a labourer.  Sadly, Mary Collett nee Penney died in April 1874 from cancer of the womb.  It was on 7th April 1874 that Mary was buried at Ilketshall St Lawrence at the age of 40.  Presented with being a widower with three young children to support, in addition for the need to keep working, John placed his three children with the family of his younger married brother William Collett (below).  Not long after the passing of his wife, John met and married (2) Charlotte Mary Carver on 23rd July 1875.  Charlotte was the daughter of John and Charlotte Carver, and was ten years younger than John and had been born on 13th January 1840 at Homersfield, which lies between Harleston and Bungay.  Tragically the marriage lasted only six weeks when John Collett died from a stroke on 5th September 1875.  His death certificate incorrectly gave his age as 43, whereas he was actually 46 years old on the first of January that year.  Following his passing, John Collett was buried that same day with his first wife Mary in the churchyard at Ilketshall St Lawrence, on the outskirts of Ilketshall St Andrew.  The burial record gave his age as 42

 

In the eighteen months after the death of her husband, John’s widow had a liaison with another man which resulted in the birth of a base-born daughter for Charlotte, almost two years after John Collett had died.  The child was baptised at Ilketshall St Andrew in August in 1877, and the later census records also confirm that the child was born in 1877, so she could not have been the child of John Collett.  It was perhaps for that reason that Charlotte then gave up the child, when she passed her daughter into the care of farm labourer William Howlett, with whose family the child was living in 1881.  By that time, the widow Charlotte Collett, aged 41 and from Homersfield, had left Ilketshall St Andrew and was working twenty-five miles away, as a cook at the home of farmer John Read at Gosling Hall Farm in Debenham, between Stowmarket and Framlingham.  However, during the next decade Charlotte returned to Ilketshall St Andrew where she met Frederick Barber, whose wife had recently died.  Frederick was born at Bungay in 1845 and was therefore five years younger than Charlotte Collett.  Perhaps it was more to help look after his six children that Charlotte married Frederick, and by 1891 the couple was still living at Ilketshall St Andrew

 

Charlotte Barber was 51, Frederick was 46, and the only one of his six children still living with his father was the youngest child, his son Charles Barber who was 11.  Ten years later the same three were still living there when Charlotte from Homersfield was 60, Frederick from Bungay was 56, and son Charles from Ilketshall St Andrew was 20, both men being agricultural labourers.  By April 1911, the census that year confirmed exactly the same situation.  Still living at Ilketshall St Andrew was Charlotte Barber, aged 71, together with Frederick Barber, aged 66, and his son Charles Barber who was unmarried and 30 by then.  John Collett’s two daughters from his first marriage, Elizabeth and Sarah, were both living and working in London by that time, see their separate entries for more details.  Only his son John was still living with his brother’s family at that time

 

18P138 – Elizabeth Collett was born in 1861 at Cawnpore, India

18P139 – Sarah Collett was born in 1862 at Maradabad, India

18P140 – John Christian George Collett was born in 1864 at Calcutta, India

The base-born child of Charlotte Collett nee Carver, the widow of John Collett:

18P141 – Harriet Collett was born in 1877 at Ilketshall St Andrew

 

Charles Collett [18O87] was born at Ilketshall St Andrew on 19th March 1831, and was baptised there on 24th April 1831, the second of the four sons of John and Catherine Collett.  In 1841 Charles Collett, aged nine years, was living with his family at Ilketshall St Andrew, and he was still living there with his family ten years later in 1851, when he was 19.  It was around five years later that Charles married Mary Ann Ellis in the Mutford area during the third quarter of 1856.  She was born on 23rd October 1825 at Thurlton in Norfolk, between Beecles and Great Yarmouth, where she was baptised on 13th November 1825, the base-born daughter of Charlotte Ellis.  It was at Reedham, on the River Yare, that the couple initially settled, and it was there that their first son was born and baptised in 1858, after which the family moved to Oulton where they were living in 1861.  It was also at Oulton where their second son was born three years later.  The census return for 1861 recorded the family as Charles Collett, aged 30, from Ilketshall St Andrew, his wife Mary who was 34, and their son George who was three years old.  Also living there, and possibly with Charles and his family, was his younger brother Robert Collett (below).  Curiously during the previous year Charles Collett, aged 31, was baptised at Oulton on 10th June 1860, and that event may have coincided with a change in his religious beliefs.  It has also been noted that his eldest son was baptised for a second time at Oulton in 1864 in a joint ceremony with his younger brother, again perhaps indicating a change of faith

 

By early April in 1871, Charles and Mary were recorded with their two sons in the census for Gorleston living at 4 Common Lane in Southtown, from where Charles was an agricultural labourer.  Charles Collett was 40, his wife Mary A Collett was 44, and their children were listed as George Collett, who was 13, and Charles Collett who was seven years old.  Charles’ eldest son George had left home by the time of the census in 1881, leaving the family of three still living at 4 Common Lane.  Charles was 50 and was employed as a dock labourer, while Mary was 54, and Charles junior was 16 and his place of birth was confirmed as Oulton.  In 1891 the couple was living at East Marsh Road in Burgh Castle, where Charles, aged 60, was once again working as an agricultural labourer, and his wife Mary was 64.  Living with them on that occasion was their grandson George L Collett, aged five years, the son of Charles George Collett.  Just after the start of the new century, in March 1901, Charles Collett, at 70 years of age, was a dairyman living at Common Road in Gorleston with just his wife Mary, aged 74 and from Thurlton

 

18P142 – George Collett was born in 1858 at Reedham, Norfolk

18P143 – Charles George Collett was born in 1864 at Oulton, near Lowestoft

 

Lucy Collett [18O88] was born at Ilketshall St Andrew in 1835 and where baptised there on 18th December 1836, the daughter of John Collett and Catherine Baldwin.  In 1841, at the age of four years, Lucy was living with her family at Ilketshall St Andrew.  At the time of the next census in 1851, her age was given as 16, when she was still living with her family at Ilketshall St Andrew, where she was also living in 1861 when she was recorded as being 24 and hay trusser, like her father and her brother William (below).  It was during the following year that Lucy Collett, aged 26, married George Gowing at Wangford on 22nd March 1862.  George, who was 22, was born at Wrentham near Wangford, where he was baptised on 19th July 1840, the son of William and Sarah Anne Gowing.  He was later known as George Gowing of Ringsfield, the next village to Ilketshall St Andrew.  Immediately after the wedding, Lucy returned to Ilketshall St Andrew with her husband, where they lived for the remainder of their lives and where they raised three sons and four daughters, they being Harry Gowing, Emma Gowing, Charles Gowing, Julia Gowing, Ellen Gowing, Sarah Gowing, and James Gowing.  The couple’s first four children were confirmed in the census of 1871 as being aged seven years, six years, five years, and three years

 

The next census in 1881 confirmed the family was living in a dwelling house at Great Common in Ilketshall St Andrew, where George Gowing, aged 41, was employed as an agricultural labourer and hay cutter, while his wife Lucy was 45 years old.  By that time their eldest son Harry, aged 17, was working as an indoor farm servant at nearby Shipmeadow at Codfish Hall Farm, the home of bachelor farmer John Riches.  Lucy’s and George’s eldest daughter Emma, who would have been 16, has not been located in 1881 and may have died during the 1870s.  Of the remaining children Charles, at the age of 15 was working with his father as an agricultural labourer and hay cutter, while the four younger children were still attending school.  They were Julia who was 13, Ellen 10, Sarah 6, and James who was five years old

 

Twenty years later in 1901 all of the children, with the exception of youngest son James, had left the family home at Ilketshall St Andrew, leaving just Lucy aged 64 and George aged 60, whose occupation by then was that of a thatcher.  Their son James Gowing was 25 and was employed as a thatcher’s assistant, working with his father.  Of the other members of the family, sons Harry aged 37 and Charles aged 34 were also still living in Ilketshall St Andrew.  Harry was married to Mary Ann aged 37 of Rumburgh by whom he had two children these being Herbert aged 10 and Edith aged 8.  Both children had been born at Ilketshall St Andrew where Harry was employed as an agricultural labourer.  Son Charles was also working as an agricultural labourer and was married to Elizabeth aged 38 of Reydon in Suffolk with whom he had six children.  These were all born at Ilketshall St Andrew and were Harriet aged 12, George 10, Ellen 8, Hubert 7, Laura 4 and baby Ernest who was not yet one year old.  There is still a strong presence of Gowing family members living in that area of Suffolk in 2008

 

William Collett [18O89] was born at Ilketshall St Andrew on 18th October 1838, the son of John Collett and Catherine Baldwin.  The birth was registered on 16th November that year, when William’s father was named as John Collett, an agricultural labourer, and his mother was recorded as Catherine Collett, formerly Baldwin.  William was two years old in the June census of 1841, and was 11 at the time of the census in 1851 when, on both occasions, he was living with his family in Ilketshall St Andrew, within the Wangford & Beccles registration district of North Suffolk.  Ten years later, in 1861, he was one of only two children still living in the family home in Ilketshall St Andrew when, at the age of 22, he was employed as a hay trusser, working alongside his father and his sister Lucy (above).  It was as a labourer that William Collett married Emma Rackham on 19th November 1864 at Ellingham near Bungay.  The witness's where Rachel Words, Rose Wilson and Mary A Cobb or Lobb.  Emma was born at Heckingham in Norfolk on 19th July 1837 and was the daughter of John Rackham and his wife Elizabeth Balls although, by the time of the census in 1841, Emma Rackham, who was four years old, was living at Heckingham with the family of Benjamin and Hannah Rackham.  Ten years later she was 14 and was living and working in the Norwich Mancroft registration district and, after a further ten years when she was 24 in 1861, she was living and working as a domestic servant within the Wangford & Beccles registration area

 

Eighteen months prior to their wedding day William Collett and Emma Rackham were both named as the witnesses at the wedding of William’s brother Robert (below) at Ilketshall St Andrew.  It would appear that William and Emma spent their early years together in the village of Ilketshall St Andrew where their three children were born, the first two children being baptised at the Church of St Andrew, with the third being baptised at the Church of St John the Baptist.  The little village of Ilketshall St Andrew has three churches within one kilometre of the village centre, and they are the two churches mentioned above, plus the Church of Ilketshall St Lawrence which also serves the village of that name to the south of St Andrew.  By 1871 William and Emma had suffered the loss of their third child, who died at three weeks just two years earlier.  The census that year recorded the family as living at Great Common in Ilketshall St Andrew when William Collett was 33, his wife Emma was 34, and their three children were Sarah Collett who was five, John Collett who was three, and new baby William Collett who was only two months old.  Tragically, like the first William born into the family, that second William also died before reaching his second birthday.  Upon the death of his sister-in-law, Mary Collett nee Penney in 1874, William and Emma took into their family the three children of John Collett (above), they being Elizabeth who was 13, Sarah who was 12, and John who was 10 [18P138, 18P139, 18P140]

 

By 1881 two of their own children had left the home of William and Emma, so they and their family were recorded as follows, where they were living in Ilketshall St Andrew but near the church of St John the Baptist.  William was an agricultural labourer at the age of 43.  His wife Emma was 44 and the only one of their children still living with the couple, was their son John who was 13.  Also living with the family in 1881, and working with son John, was the boy’s cousin John Collett, who was 16 and who had been born in India.  His relationship to head of the house William was nephew, and he was the son of William’s older brother John (above) who spent some time in India with the British Army, but who had died in 1875, following the death of his wife in 1874.  At that time William’s and Emma’s daughter Sarah was working within the village, at The Rectory attached to the Church of St John the Baptist

 

Sometime during the next decade William was offered a new job that took him and his family from Ilketshall St Andrew to the village of Reydon Smear, just outside Southwold.  The move, and the change of career, was confirmed by the census in 1891, when William Collett was 52 and a farm bailiff at Easton Farm, his wife Emma was 53, and their son John Collett was 23.  Also living within the same registration district, but not with the family by that time, was John Collett aged 26 and from India.  Another family move happened during the 1890s which took William and Emma the few miles north to Lowestoft, which is where they were living at the time of the census in 1901.  By that time William was employed as a general labourer at the age of 60, while Emma was 61, and their address was 3 Waterloo Terrace on the Beccles Road, in the St Peter’s Street district of the town.  Emma Collett nee Rackham died on 25th May 1908, and three years later in the census of 1911 William Collett, a widower of 73, was working as a labourer at a market garden while lodging at the White Horse Inn in Lower Thurlton, between Beccles and Loddon.  Charles Prime aged 48, the publican at the White Horse was also a market gardener

 

18P144 – Sarah Collett was born in 1865 at Ilketshall St Andrew

18P145 – John Collett was born in 1867 at Ilketshall St Andrew

18P146 – William Collett was born in 1869 at Ilketshall St Andrew

18P147 – William Collett was born in 1871 at Ilketshall St Andrew

 

Robert Collett [18O90] was born at Ilketshall St Andrew where he was baptised on 9th August 1840, the youngest child of John Collett and Catherine Baldwin.  And it was there that he was living with his family in June 1841, when he was recorded as being one year old.  By the time of the next census in 1851, Robert Collett was 10, when he was confirmed as the youngest member of his family, which was still living at Ilketshall St Andrew.  However, by the time of the census in 1861, Robert Collett from Ilketshall St Andrew, aged 22, was a fisherman on board the boat ‘Glance’ out of Lowestoft harbour, and was very likely living with his married brother Charles (above) and his family.  It was just over two years later, on 7th May 1863 at Ilketshall St Andrew that Robert Collett married fieldworker Lydia Ann Brighton, the daughter of agricultural labourer and husbandman Robert Brighton and his wife Mary, who was baptised at Ilketshall St Andrew on 6th January 1839.  The witnesses at the wedding ceremony were William Collett and Emma Rackham, Robert’s older brother (above) and his future wife, whom he married six months later.  After they were married Robert and Lydia settled in Ilketshall St Andrew where their only known children were born, although their daughter died only eight months after she had been born

 

Furthermore, the death of the child may also have coincided with the death of Robert Collett sometime after 1866 and before 1871, although it is more than likely that he died as a result of an accident while at sea.  The absence of both of them was confirmed by the details in the census of 1871, which placed Lydia Ann Collett as a widow at the age of 31, and living with her was her son Robert who was seven years old.  At that time, they were living in a dwelling by the Common in Ilketshall St Andrew which was four doors along from the Hare & Hounds Inn.  Also living there with them was Lydia’s mother Mary Brighton, aged 77, who was described as the widow of an agricultural labourer, who was on parish relief.  All three occupants of the property were confirmed as having been born at Ilketshall St Andrew.  On that occasion Lydia was employed as a field worker on a local farm, in order to support her and her son

 

It was seven years later on 2nd March 1878 that Lydia Ann Collett married widower William Artis at Ilketshall St Andrew where they were both living at that time.  William Artis was born at Ilketshall St Lawrence in 1829, the son of William and Hannah Artis.  It was at Wangford in 1855 that he had first married Amy Girling, who had been born there in 1841, and with whom he had four daughters and a son.  His first daughter, Sofia Artis, was born at Wangford on 19th June 1856, but shortly after the family moved to Ilketshall St Andrew where the next three children were born.  They were Sarah Artis born in 1860, Matilda Artis born in 1872, Alfred Artis born in 1874, and Julia Artis who was born in 1877.  In 1871 William Artis, aged 42, and his wife Amy, aged 40, were living at Ilketshall St Andrew with just four of their five children, eldest daughter Sofia being the missing child.  It was during the following years that Amy Artis and her three youngest children appear to have died as a result of some illness

 

By the time of the census in 1881, Lydia Ann Artis, and her second husband William Artis, were living at Carlton Colville, just south of Lowestoft.  William was employed as a farm labourer and his place of birth was confirmed at Ilketshall St Lawrence, while Lydia Ann’s place of birth was confirmed as Ilketshall St Andrew.  Rather oddly William gave his age as 49, when he was actually 51, and Lydia was incorrectly recorded as Lydianna Artis aged 37, instead of Lydia Ann Artis, aged 41.  By that time Lydia’s son Robert Collett was working as a fisherman on board the boat ‘Au Revoir’ which had sailed out of nearby Pakefield, bound for Falmouth, early that year.  So, the only person living with Lydia and William in 1881 was William’s only surviving child, Sarah Artis, who was 21.  Ten years later in 1891, the couple was still living at Carlton Colville, where William Artis was recorded as 56 (instead of 61), and Lydia Artis was 52.  It was only in March 1901 that William admitted that he was older than he had previously stated.  According to that census, William was 71, and an agricultural labourer, living at Gisleham to the south of Carlton Colville, with his wife Lydia who was 61 and from Ilketshall St Andrew

 

Following the death of her husband, during the first ten years of the new century, Lydia Artis settled in the nearby village of Rushmere, where she was living in April 1911.  She was described as being 71 and a widow and an old age pensioner from Ilketshall St Andrew.  Living there with her were two of her grandchildren from the family of her son Robert Collett, who has not been located in England in 1911.  In addition to her two granddaughters, Norah and Florence Collett, also living with Lydia as a lodger, was Robert Lydamore who was 73 and a farm labourer from Rushmere.  It must be assumed that Lydia died shortly after 1911, but what happened to her two granddaughters has not yet been discovered

 

18P148 – Robert Collett was born in at Ilketshall St Andrew

18P149 – Mary Anne Collett was born in at Ilketshall St Andrew

 

Dinah Collett [18O91] was born at Wilby in 1850, the daughter of John and Mary Ann Collett, who was one year old in the Wilby census of 1851, and 10 in the 1861 census.  She married Henry Brunning of Horham who was a few years younger than Dinah having been born in 1855.  By 1881 the marriage had not produced any children for the couple, who were living with Dinah’s father at Cole Street in Wilby.  Dinah Brunning of Wilby was 30 and her agricultural labourer husband Henry was 25

 

William Collett [18O92] was born at Wilby in 1852, the second child and eldest son of John and Mary Ann Collett.  William was eight years old in the Wilby census of 1861, but curiously there was no apparent record of William and his family in 1871.  During the 1870s William married Jane from Horham, and by 1881 the childless couple was living at Cole Street in Wilby, close by his widowed father and his sister Dinah (above) and his brother James (below).  William, aged 27, was an agricultural labourer, and his wife Jane was 26.  The couple was still residing in Wilby ten years later when William was 39 and Jane was 38, and they were still there in March 1901.  William Collett, aged 47 and from Wilby, was employed as a horseman working on a local farm, and his wife Jane from Horham was 46.  No record of either of them has been unearthed in the next census in 1911

 

James Collett [18O94] was born at Wilby in 1862 and was 18 at the time of the Wilby census of 1881.  By that time, he was an agricultural labourer working with his widowed father John Collett, the pair of them living at Cole Street in Wilby.  No later record of James has been found in Great Britain after that time

 

Martha Collett [18O95] was born at Wilby on 13th July 1841 and was the eldest child of James Collett and Lucy Mutimer.  In 1845 Martha and her family left Suffolk when they moved over the county boundary into Norfolk and settled in the village of Needham where, in 1851 Martha was nine years old.  It was in the village of Wissett, near Halesworth, on 12th December 1860 that Martha, aged 19, married Joseph Peck who was 23.  Joseph was born at Westhall near Halesworth on 16th September 1837, the son of Samuel Peck and Susan Gipson.  The marriage of Martha and Joseph produced twelve children for the couple, all of whom were born at Chediston less than a mile south of Wissett.  These were: Samuel Peck (born 06.09.1861); William Peck (born 01.12.1863); James Peck (born 24.08.1865 who died 27.08.1865); Susan Peck (born 07.06.1867 who died 05.07.1868); Joseph Peck (born 23.03.1869); Catherine Peck (born 13.05.1870 who died 12.11.1926); George James Peck (born 28.01.1872); Lucy Mary Peck (born 10.06.1873); Charles Peck (born 19.02.1876); Rachel Peck (born 07.09.1877); Harry Peck (born 10.12.1879); and Amy Peck (born 02.04.1882)

 

Mary Collett [18O96] was born at Wilby during 1842, the daughter of James Collett and Lucy Mutimer.  When she was around three years of age her family left Wilby went they settled in the village of Needham near Harleston in Norfolk.  And it was there that she was living with her parents in 1851, at the age of eight, and again in 1861 when she 18.  It is assumed that she was married during the next few years, since she was not recorded as Mary Collett in 1871

 

Emma Collett [18O97] was born at Wilby on 19th March 1844, the daughter of James and Lucy Collett, but very soon after, her family settled in Needham near Harleston where she was seven years old in 1851.  Emma was not living with her family at Needham in 1861, but seven years later she married Henry Godfrey at Needham on 2nd March 1868.  Tragically the marriage only lasted for four years, when Emma Godfrey died at Rushall in Suffolk on 6th February 1872

 

William Collett [18O98] was born at Needham on 3rd August 1846, the son of James and Lucy Collett.  At the age of four years and 14 years he was living with his family at Needham.  During the 1870s he married Martha who was very likely ten years older than William.  By 1881, the couple was living at Mill Lane in Attleborough where 24 (sic) years old William from Needham was employed as a corn miller. That must be an error in transcription, since he was actually 34.  His wife Martha was born at Alburgh near Harleston and was listed as being 44.  However, no trace of either of them has been found in any later census

 

Dinah Elizabeth Collett [18O99] was born at Needham on 20th July 1849, the daughter of James Collett and Lucy Mutimer, and was one year old in the Needham census of 1851.  However, her absence from the family home in 1861, may suggest that she suffered an infant death

 

Eliza Collett [18O100] was born at Needham on 9th February 1851, and was just two months old in the census for Needham in 1851.  She was also listed as living there with her family in 1861, when she was 10, but thereafter no record of her has been found in 1871, by which time she may have been married

 

James Collett [18O101] was born at Needham on 23rd August 1852, the son of James and Lucy Collett, and he was eight years old in the Needham census of 1861.  It would appear that he was married in the late 1870s, but tragically, shortly after they were married his wife died, possibly during childbirth.  By April 1881 James was a childless widower at only 28 years of age.  The census for that year placed him as a visitor at 7 Cox Buildings, George Street in Great Yarmouth the home of his sister Rachel French nee Collett (below).  James’ birthplace was stated as being Needham and his occupation was that of a blacksmith journeyman.  No further record of James has been discovered in Great Britain after that time

 

Rachel Collett [18O102] was born at Needham on 24th April 1855, the daughter of James and Lucy Collett.  Rachel was five years old by the time of the Needham census in 1861, when she was living there with her parents but, although she was still living in Needham ten years later, the census confirmed that she had left the family home and was living and working elsewhere in the village at the age of 15.  A few years later Rachel married William French and in 1881 the couple was living at 7 Cox Buildings on George Street in Great Yarmouth.  William, who was born at Norwich, was employed as a boiler-maker journeyman.  Although the marriage of Rachel, aged 25, and William, aged 22, had produced no children at that time, there were three other people staying at the same address.  They were Rachel’s widowed brother James Collett (above), boarder Charles Collerson, who was 18 and a railway engine cleaner from Norwich, and visitor Emma Langton, a dressmaker aged 22 of Great Yarmouth.  No trace of the couple has been found in 1891, although by the time of the census in March 1901 they had a son and a daughter and were living at Gorleston, just south of Great Yarmouth.  William French was 40 and an engine fitter, Rachel was 40 (sic), and their two children were Charles who was 13, and Emily who was 10, both of them born in the Southtown district of Great Yarmouth.  Ten years later in April 1911 the family was still together and living in the Gorleston area, when William French was 51, Rachel French was 53, William Charles French was 23, and Emily Rachel French was 20

 

George Collett [18O103] was born at Needham on 10th February 1858, the youngest child of James Collett and Lucy Lutimer.  He was three years old and 13 years old in the Needham census returns for 1861 and 1871 when he was still living with his parents.  However, with the death of his father during the 1870s, George was the only child still living with his widowed mother Lucy in 1881.  On that occasion George was 23, unmarried, and was employed as a platelayer working on the railway, while living at Lakenham in Norwich at a dwelling described as ‘opposite 21 Row’.  George married (1) Amy shortly after the census day and the marriage produced three children for the couple while they were living in Norwich.  However, tragically Amy died either during or not long after the birth of their third child, since George was a widower by the time of the census in 1891.  With three young children and no wife, George had living with him his mother Lucy at 43 Mill Street in the Lakenham district of Norwich in April 1891.  By that time George Collett, aged 33 and from Needham, was working as a labourer, while his mother Lucy Collett, aged 73 and from Wilby, was acting as his housekeeper and was described simply as his relative.  George’s three children were recorded as scholars Ruth Collett, who was seven, and David Collett, who was six, and Philip Collett who was three years old.  Curiously the children’s place of birth was ditto-ed under their father’s place of birth, so appeared in error as Needham

 

During the next decade George’s mother passed away, following which the family of four continued to live in Norwich, where George was working as a platelayer at the age of 43 in 1901.  His daughter Ruth, as the oldest child at the age of 17, was listed as having no occupation.  That was probably because she was very likely acting as housekeeper for her father and her two brothers, David who was 16, and Philip who was 13.  On that occasion the children’s place of birth was recorded correctly as Norwich.  Sometime over the next few years George married (2) Hannah and by April 1911 the couple was still living in Norwich.  George Collett was 53 and his wife Hannah was 56.  Still living with the couple, were George’s two sons David and Philip, but by that time George’s daughter Ruth was living and working in Hackney, London.  In October 1914 George and Hannah were still living in the Lakeham district of Norwich City Centre, at 40 Harford Street which runs between Hall Road and City Road, when George learned of the death of his son David Collett at the Battle of Loos

 

18P150 – Ruth Collett was born in 1883 at Norwich

18P151 – David Collett was born in 1885 at Norwich

18P152 – Philip Collett was born in 1887 at Norwich

 

Elizabeth Collett [18O104] was born at Wilby in 1837 and was the first child born to Robert Collett by his wife Dinah Lockwood.  Unlike most of their other child, no baptism record for the child has been found to date, but she was living with her parents at the time of the following censuses were conducted.  In the Wilby census of 1841 she was three years old, and ten years later she was with her mother at the age of 13, who was living separately from Elizabeth’s father who had fallen on hard times.  Upon leaving school Elizabeth secured work in London, and according to the census in 1861 Elizabeth Collett from Wilby was living and working in the Kentish Town area of London at the age of 22.  With no record of her found in the census of 1871, it must be assumed that she was married by then

 

HAMMOND COLLETT [18O105] was born at Wilby and was baptised there on 31st March 1839, the eldest son of Robert Collett and Dinah Lockwood.  He was born into a poverty-stricken family, although their ancestors had been extremely wealthy.  In the June census of 1841 Hammond Collett was two years old when he was living at Wilby with his family.  At the age of 11, in 1850, Hammond and his siblings were living with his mother Dinah at the Hoxne Union Workhouse, while his father served a two-week sentence in Ipswich prison.  However, by the time of the census on 30th March 1851 Hammond was still living at the Hoxne Union Workhouse, but on that occasion, he was with his father Robert, his sister Susan (below), and his brother John (below), while his mother and his others siblings were elsewhere.  It was around the time of the 1861 Census that Hammond was working as a carter for a local farmer in Wilby, when he was dismissed from the job.  In 1863 he was a witness at the wedding of his sister Susan Collett (below).  It is interesting to note that both signed their names in the marriage register which, despite coming from an impoverished family, indicates the educated status of the family from the previous wealthier generations.  A little while later he moved to Brentford to seek work where, in 1864 he secured employment as a malt-man working for one of the many breweries that flanked the River Thames within the Brentford area.  It was through his work that he met Isaac Bradford a maltster at the brewery and through whom he was introduced to his daughter Mary Bradford

 

Hammond married Mary during the first quarter of 1865 at Brentford, Mary having been born on 26th December 1840 at Kingston-upon-Thames, her mother being Hannah Bradford nee Iles.  The first child born to Hammond and Mary was a daughter, who sadly did not survive, although two further children were born to the couple prior to the census in 1871.  On that occasion that family of four was living in the Chiswick area of Brentford, where Hammond was 31, Mary was 30, son Hammond I Collett was two, and daughter Mary A Collett was one year old.  By the time of the next census in 1881, a further four children had been added to the family, with a final child born during the following year.  The census return for 1881 recorded the family residing at Back Lane in Chiswick where they were listed as Hammond Collett, aged 41 and from Wilby, his wife Mary Collett, aged 40 and from Kingston-on-Thames, and their six surviving children.  They were Hammond Collett, aged 12, Mary A Collett, aged 11, Alfred Lewis Collett, who was nine; Robert Collett, who was five; Ada E Collett, who was three; and John Collett who was just six months old.  Curiously the place of birth for the two youngest children was given as being Brentford, while all of the other children had been born at Chiswick

 

After another ten years the family was complete when it was still living in the Chiswick area in 1891.  Hammond was 51, Mary was 50, Mary A Collett was 21, Alfred L Collett was 19, Robert Collett was 15, Ada E Collett was 12, John Collett was 10, and the last child Rosetta Collett, was eight years old.  Just after the turn of the century Hammond Collett of Suffolk, aged 62, was working as a general labourer at Chiswick.  He was living there with his wife Mary and their daughters Ada and Rosetta, close to where their married son Hammond was living with his family.  Eight years later Hammond (senior) died in 1909 at 70 years of age.  His wife lived on for a few more years and in April 1911 she was living with her son Robert and his family in Chiswick, where she was described as widow Mary Collett aged 70

 

18P153 – Annie Collett was born in 1866 at Brentford, London

18P154– Hammond Isaac Collett was born in 1868 at Chiswick, London

18P155 – Mary A Collett was born in 1870 at Chiswick, London

18P156 – Alfred Lewis Collett was born in 1872 at Chiswick, London

18P157 – ROBERT COLLETT was born in 1875 at Chiswick, London

18P158 – Ada E Collett was born in 1878 at Chiswick, London

18P159 – John Collett was born in 1880 at Chiswick, London

18P160 – Rosetta Collett was born in 1882 at Chiswick, London

 

Susan Collett [18O106] was born at Wilby where she was baptised on 28th February 1841, the eldest daughter of Robert Collett and Dinah Lockwood.  She was just a few months old at the time of the Wilby census in June 1841, and ten years later in 1851, when Susan was 10 years old, she was living at the Hoxne Union Workhouse with her father, and her brothers Hammond and John.  It was also at Wilby that she married Amos Sharman of Brundish on 30th April 1863.  Both Susan and her brother Hammond Collett (above), who was a witness at the wedding ceremony, signed the register.  Amos Sharman was a labourer like his father David Sharman, and was a widower when he married Susan.  By 1881 Susan and Amos and their family were still residents of Wilby, living at Wilby Green.  Their children were Elijah aged 13; Georgiana aged 11; David who was nine; Alvina who was seven; and Arthur J Sharman who was five, and all of them born at Wilby.  Amos Sharman died at Brundish after 1881, as did his wife Susan Sharman nee Collett

 

John Collett [18O107] was born at Wilby and baptised there on 2nd July 1843, the son of Robert and Dinah Collett.  He married Sarah Mallett of Pimlico around 1866.  Their first two children were born at Chelsea with the remainder being born and baptised at Wilby, and buried there as well.  In 1881 the family was living at Framlingham Road in Wilby.  John was a 34 years old bricklayer and his wife Sarah was aged 36.  With them were their children John aged 13, Ephraim 11, Robert 9, Alfred 8, James 5, Charles 4, Sarah 3, and Emily aged 6 months, the first two being born at Chelsea with the rest born at Wilby.  Also living at Framlingham Road in Wilby at that time was John’s brother Alfred Collett (below) and his family who were near next-door neighbours, with just one property in between.  John and his family were still living there in 1981 when he was 48 and Sarah was 47.  The children still living with them on that occasion were John Collett, aged 23, Robert Collett, aged 19, Alfred Collett, aged 18, James Collett, aged 16, Charles Collett, aged 15, Sarah Collett, aged 13, and Emily Collett who was 10 years old, with the couple’s three youngest children having died in infancy some years before

 

Just after the turn of the century John Collett, aged 57, and Sarah Collett, aged 56, were still living at Wilby.  Sarah’s place of birth was confirmed as Pimlico while John occupation was that of a bricklayer.  Following the death of his wife Sarah during the first decade of the new century, John left Wilby and moved the seven miles west to Hartismere near Eye to live with his married son Alfred Louis Collett and his family where he was 67 in April census of 1911.  It seems very likely that John Collett was the last member of the family to live in Wilby after many centuries of continuous residency, since no one of the Collett name was living there in April 1911

 

18P161 – John Collett was born in 1867 at Chelsea, London

18P162 – Ephraim George Collett was born in 1869 at Chelsea, London

18P163 – Robert Collett was born in 1871 at Wilby

18P164 – Alfred Lewis Collett was born in 1873 at Wilby

18P165 – Harry Collett was born in 1874 at Wilby

18P166 – James Collett was born in 1875 at Wilby

18P167 – Charles Collett was born in 1876 at Wilby

18P168 – Sarah Ann Collett was born in 1878 at Wilby

18P169 – Amelia Betsy Collett was born in 1879 at Wilby

18P170 – Emily Collett was born in 1880 at Wilby

18P171 – Mary Ann Collett was born in 1882 at Wilby

18P172 – Ernest Collett was born in 1884 at Wilby

18P173 – Arthur Collett was born in 1885 at Wilby

 

Robert Collett [18O108] was born at Wilby where he was baptised on 11th May 1845.  He died when he was one year and six months old and was buried at Wilby on 11th December 1846, the son of Robert and Dinah Collett

 

Ann Collett [18O109] was born at Wilby in 1849 and was baptised there on 5th August 1849.  The baptism record confirmed that she was the daughter of Robert Collett and his wife Dinah.  She later married David Bridges at Wilby on 31st December 1873.  David was a labourer of Tannington and was the son of Israel Bridges, himself a labourer

 

Alfred Collett [18O110] was born in the Hoxne Union Workhouse in Stradbroke near Wilby early in 1851, the last child of Robert Collett and Dinah Lockwood whose birth was recorded at Hoxne (Ref. xiii 506) during the first three months of that year.  He was under one year old in the Wilby census of 1851 when he and his mother and two older siblings were living at London Road in Wilby, when his place of birth was recorded as Stradbroke.  On the same census day, his father, and another three older siblings, were living at the Hoxne Union Workhouse in Stradbroke.  Alfred was 10 years old in the Wilby census of 1861, when he and his reunited family were still living in Wilby, where it was said he had been born.  No record so far has been found for Alfred in 1871, but just over three years later he became a married name.  It was also at Wilby that he married Caroline Smith on 14th June 1874, the daughter of labourer John Smith who was born at Brundish around 1853.  All of the early children of Alfred and Caroline were born and baptised at Wilby, while the later children were born at nearby Stradbroke.  According to the 1881 Census, Alfred, aged 30 and from Wilby, was a cattle drover living at Framlingham Road in Wilby.  Living with him was his family, comprising his wife Caroline, aged 27 of Brundish, sons Cornelius and David, who were six and five, and daughters Elizabeth and Anna, aged three years and ten months respectively.  Also living with them was Alfred’s widowed mother Dinah Collett.  Living at the next house but one from Alfred and his family in Framlingham Road in Wilby, was his brother John Collett (above) with his family

 

Ten years later, at the time of the census in 1891, Alfred and his family were residing at Laxfield Road in Stradbroke.  Alfred and Caroline were both 40, when Alfred was working as a drover, while their children were Cornelius 17, David 15, Elizabeth 14, Anne 12, and Katy who was seven years old.  With no reference to daughter Dinah, it may be assumed that she had died by then.  Sometime during the last decade of the century, Alfred found himself in some sort of trouble since, within the census of 1901, he was described as an inmate and a prisoner in Ipswich, where he was confirmed as Alfred Collett from Stradbroke who was 52 and a cattle drover.  On that same day, his wife Caroline Collett was living at Wootten Green in Stradbroke with her youngest surviving daughter Kate Collett, aged 18, and a granddaughter Ethel Minnie Collett from Stradbroke who was three years old.  Head of the household Caroline was 48 and a general domestic servant from Brundish.  However, the couple was eventually reunited and was residing at Wootten Green by the time of the next census in 1911.  Alfred Collett of Wilby was 60 and again working as a cattle drover, while his wife Caroline Collett of Brundish was 58.  Still living with the couple was their granddaughter Ethel Collett, aged 13 and from Stradbroke.  It therefore seems likely, in the absence of any better information, that granddaughter Ethel Minnie Collett was the base-born child of their daughter Annie, because it is now established that Elizabeth became a married woman in 1898, her marriage and the birth of Ethel Minnie both recorded at Hoxne during the same three months in 1898.  Subsequently, Elizabeth appears with her husband and children in the census of 1901 and again in 1911.  Furthermore, no record of daughter Annie Collett has been discovered in either of the census returns for 1901 and 1911, which may indicate she died during the birth or shortly thereafter.  Less than two years later Alfred Collett died at Wootten Green, when his death at the age of 62 was recorded at Hartismere register office (Ref. 4a 1159) during the first three months of 1913

 

18P174 – Cornelius Collett was born in 1874 at Wilby

18P175 – David Collett was born in 1876 at Wilby

18P176 – Elizabeth Collett was born in 1877 at Wilby

18P177 – Annie Collett was born in 1880 at Wilby

18P178 – Dinah Collett was born in 1882 at Stradbroke

18P179 – Kate Collett was born in 1884 at Stradbroke