PART EIGHTEEN

 

The Main Suffolk Line - 1830 to 1870

 

This is the fourth of five sections of Part 18 of the Collett family

 

Updated June 2015

 

 

 

18P1

Harriet Anne Collett was born at Ubbeston in 1829, where she was baptised on 9th August 1829, the eldest of the four children of Anthony Collett and Harriet Pett Hannam.  The village of Ubbeston in Suffolk lies midway between Framlingham and Halesworth.  By 1841 Harriet was 11 years old and was still living at Ubbeston with her family.  Not long after that, the family moved to Bury St Edmunds, where Harriet was 21 in 1851.

 

 

 

She later married the considerably older, Reverend John Ley, Rector of Waldron in Sussex, and the couple initial settled in Devon.  John Ley is reputed to have owned land in Canada, although this has not been verified.  According to the Torquay census of 1881, John Ley, age 76, was Clerk in Holy Orders for the Care of Souls who had been born at Ashprington near Totnes in Devon.  His wife was described as Harriet Anne Ley, age 51, a clergyman’s wife from Habberton (meaning Ubbeston) in Suffolk.  The couple’s address was given as Tor Church, Beechcroft Road in Tormoham, where they were supported by two female servants.

 

 

 

At that time Harriet’s unmarried sister Maria (below) was still living with their mother at Dover.  However, during the 1880s, Harriet’s husband and her mother both died, at which time the two sisters lived together at Torquay, as confirmed by the census in 1891 when Harriet A Ley was 61 and her sister Maria was 57.  That arrangement continued for a further three years, until 1894 when Maria died.

 

 

 

Following the death of her sister, Harriet left Devon when she moved to Guildford in Surrey, where she spent the remainder of her years.  That was confirmed by the census returns in 1901 and 1911; in the first of which she was listed as Harriet Anne Ley, age 71 and from Ubbeston, who was living on her own means, and again in 1911 when she was 81.

 

 

 

 

18P2

Maria Collett was born at Ubbeston in late 1833 and was baptised there on 11th January 1834, the second child of Anthony and Harriet Collett.  She was seven years old in the Ubbeston census of 1841.  Over the following years her family went to live in Bury St Edmunds where she was living with them in 1851 at the age of 17.  With the death of her father during the 1850s, Maria’s mother moved to Dover St James where the family was recorded in 1861 and 1871, when Maria Collett was 27 and 37 respectively.  She never married and in 1881 she was still living with her widowed mother Harriet Pett Collett and her sister Frances Ellen Collett (below) at 6 Camden Crescent in Dover St James.  Her place of birth in the census that year was given as Ubbeston Green. 

 

 

 

After the death of her mother during the 1880s, Maria moved to Torquay to live with her widowed sister Harriet (above).  It was there in 1891, at the age of 57, that Maria was living within the Newton Abbot & Torquay census registration district with her sister.  Also staying nearby at a lodging house in Torquay at that time was her brother Anthony (below).  It was just three years later that Maria Collett of Ubbeston died in 1894.

 

 

 

 

18P3

Anthony Collett was born at Ubbeston in 1835, where he was baptised on 13th November 1835, the only son of Anthony Collett and Harriet Pett Hannam.  He was five years old in the Ubbeston census of 1841, but shortly after his family moved to Bury St Edmunds, where he was still living with his family in 1851 aged 15.  He was initially educated at Bury School under Doctor Donaldson, and then on 3rd March 1854 Anthony Collett from Ubbeston entered Trinity College in Cambridge.  He was 18 years old and the son of Anthony Collett of Bury St Edmunds.  He gained his Bachelor’s degree in 1859 and his Master’s degree in 1869.

 

 

 

Upon completion of his BA, Anthony was ordained as a deacon at Canterbury, and in 1860 he was ordained a priest.  From 1859 until 1874 he was the curate at St Mary’s Church in Dover.  It was after the death of his father during the late 1850s, that Anthony and his sisters Maria (above) and Frances (below), travelled with their mother to Dover St James where they were living in 1861, when Anthony was 25.  Anthony and Maria were still living with their mother at Dover St James ten years later in 1871, when Anthony was 35.  After 1874 and up to 1880 Anthony was the Curate of Hastingleigh, where he assisting the frail Gostwyck Prideaux who had suffered a stroke.

 

 

 

From 1880 to 1895 Anthony Collett was Rector of Hastingleigh with Elmsted, and Vicar of Bredhurst from 1895 to 1905.  Hastingleigh and Elmsted are adjacent villages to the east of Ashford in Kent.  By the time of the census in 1881, bachelor Anthony was 45 and was living at The Rectory in Hastingleigh.  His place of birth was recorded incorrectly as Abbeston in Suffolk.  At The Rectory he had two servants, housekeeper Mary A Hedge age 30, and George Wyborn, groom and gardener age 24.

 

 

 

Whether because of the recent death of his eldest sister’s husband, Anthony Collett was temporarily staying at Endsleigh House, a lodging house in Church Road, Torquay in 1891, not far from where his eldest sister Harriet Anne Ley was living, and with her their sister Maria.  The census that year also confirmed that Anthony was 55 and from Ubbeston, and that he was Rectory of Hastingleigh.

 

 

 

Three years later his sister Maria died at Torquay, and by March 1901 Anthony was living at Boxley near Maidstone in Kent with his youngest sister Frances.  Anthony Collett, age 65 and from Ubbeston, was a Church of England clergyman, while his sister Frances E Collett from Bury St Edmunds was 52.  The two siblings were still living together ten years later, but by then they were living at Canterbury.  Anthony was 75, and his sister was 61.

 

 

 

Towards the end of his life Anthony resided at Barton Fields in Canterbury, and it was there also that he suffered a tragic end to his life, when he was found dead in his bath on 10th December 1924.  And it was at Elmsted Church that he was buried with two of his sisters on 15th December 1924.  The following obituary appeared in the Kentish Express newspaper two days after the discovery.

 

 

 

“The Reverend Anthony Collett, aged 89, was found dead in the bath at his Canterbury residence.  At the inquest a verdict of natural causes was returned. The reverend gentleman was formerly Curate at St Marys Dover, Rector of Hastingleigh, and Vicar of Bredhurst.”

 

 

 

Eight days later the same newspaper ran the following article on 20th December regarding his funeral at Elmsted:  As briefly announced in our last issue, the Rev. A. Collett M.A. of Ellerslie, New Dover Road, Canterbury was found dead under tragic circumstances at his residence on Thursday week.  The deceased gentleman, who was 89 years of age, was apparently in his usual health considering his advanced years and had walked into the town with Miss Blofield who was staying with him.  They subsequently had dinner and prayers and after, saying Good Night, Mr Collett went to his bath.  About midnight Miss Wilson, a maid, not having heard Mr Collett leave the bath room, became anxious, woke up the other maid and they went to the housekeeper’s room.  The housekeeper receiving no response to her knock at the door, called Miss Blofield, who called in Mr Simmons living nearby.  He, bursting open the door, found Mr Collett lying face downwards in the bath with his head covered with water.

 

 

 

The bath was emptied, the deceased gentleman removed, and Dr Stewart Wacher sent for, who on arrival found that death had taken place an hour or so earlier.  At the inquest at which a verdict of Death by Natural Causes was returned, Dr. Wacher said death might have been due to accidental drowning or a heart attack before falling into the water. He had attended Mr Collett for the past three years for giddiness due to a weak heart action.  The late Mr Collett, who was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge, and ordained in 1859, had spent the whole of his active ministry (over 47years) in Kent.  He was Curate of St Marys Dover until 1874, Curate of Hastingleigh with Elmsted 1874-1880, Rector of Hastingleigh with Elmsted 1880-1895 and Vicar of Bredhurst 1895-1906.  Since his retirement he had resided at Canterbury, where he had frequently assisted at church services.  He was a member of several societies and took a keen interest in the Kent and Canterbury Hospital and other charitable institutions; he was highly respected and beloved by many.

 

 

 

During the time he was at Elmsted the reverend gentleman was instrumental in carrying out many much needed improvements to the churches.  In the years 1877 and 1879 both the Elmsted and Hastingleigh churches were completely restored and re-seated, and later a new organ was installed at Elmsted.  Mr Collett was responsible for the erection of the new Elmsted Vicarage, at Bodsham, and presented the village with the splendid Parish Hall at the Parish Room, Tamley Lane in Hastingleigh.

 

 

 

The funeral took place on Monday at the little church on the hill at Elmsted.  The service, which was of a very simple nature as befitted a man of such unostentatious character, was conducted by the Rev. H Hammond of Elmsted and the Rev. G.C. Clairmonte of Petham.  The hymn ‘On the Resurrection Morning’ was sung and as the cortege left the church for the graveside while Miss Emily Hayward, the organist, played the Dead March in Saul.  The coffin was of plain unpolished oak, with a small brass plate and a large wooden cross on the cover.  The immediate followers were Mr and Mrs Hamman, Mrs J Harvey, Mr J D Harvey, Miss Blofield, Mr and Mrs Collett Mason, Mr and Mrs J Reeves, and the household servants, while those present in church and at the graveside included Colonel Irby, Messrs CF Tappenden (Cubison Tapenden), S Hopkins, J Taylor, W Wetherell, the school master of Bodsham, and H Hopkins, the Misses Kirke-Smith, Mrs Spicer and Mrs M Hopkins.

 

 

 

Floral tributes were received from Mr and Mrs Reginald Collett, Tony and Bernard, LCAJ and MC Blofield, Mr J S and Mr J D Harvey, Mr and Mrs F M Furley and Mr Walter Furley, Mrs C H Wilkie, Mrs Rogers, Misses Helen and Catherine Collett, Mr and Mrs Collett Mason, Miss Upton, A H Garnon-Williams and Lottie, G J Thompson, Mr and Mrs Reeves, Mr Ley, Mr and Mrs P J Hannam, Ellen and Winifred the housekeepers, managers of St Paul’s Church Schools, Samaritans Committee of the Kent and Canterbury Hospital, and scholars and teachers of St Paul’s School in Canterbury.

 

 

 

At the same hour, a short service was held at St Alphege Church in Canterbury, where the late Mr Collett was a regular worshipper.  The Rev. A A Carter (Rector) officiated, and the lesson was read by the Rural Dean (the Rev E L Ridge).  Among those present were the following ladies of the Samaritan Fund Committee of the Kent and Canterbury Hospital, Mrs G K A Bell (president), Mrs E L Holland, Mrs Brunker, Mrs Williams, Mrs Rogers, and Miss Edwards.  Others present included Admiral Sir R Henderson and Lady Henderson, with Admiral Sir W Henderson, Canon T G Gardiner, Rev. J T Hales, Rev. J G Kemp, Rev. C H Barton, Miss Wilkie, Miss Blomfield, Mrs Graham Wills, Mrs R G Hodgson, Mrs Skinner, Mr F P Carroll (secretary of the Kent and Canterbury Hospital), Miss Purchas (matron at the Kent and Canterbury Hospital), Mr T A Bowen, Mr R Stanbridge and others.

 

 

 

The Rev. Collett’s elder sister Maria is also buried the graveyard of St James Church at Elmsted, together with his other sister Frances Ellen, both not far from his own grave which lies under the shade of an ancient Yew tree to the left of the main entrance to St James Church. 

 

Inside the church is the commemorative plate shown here, the inscription on which is reproduced below.

http://www.hastingleigh.com/images/collett-plaque.JPG

 

 

 

In Memory of

Rev. Anthony Collett, M.A., Camb.

Who for 20 years

Was in Spiritual Charge of the parishes of

Elmsted and Hastingleigh

and by whose efforts both these churches were restored

He died at Canterbury on 10th Dec 1924 aged 89 years

and was buried in this churchyard

 

 

 

Immediately below the brass plaque is another in remembrance of his mother Harriet Pett Collett.  In 2011 the formerly home of Anthony Collett at 54 New Dover Road in Canterbury was being used by the Youth Hostel Association.  In addition to all of this, Collett Close, in the neighbouring hamlet of Bodsham in Kent, is named in his honour, following his creation of a school there and the building of the Bodsham Vicarage.

 

 

 

 

18P4

Frances Ellen Collett was born at Bury St Edmunds in 1848, the youngest of the four children of Anthony and Harriet Collett.  It is curious that, unlike her three older siblings, no baptism record for her has been found, particular bearing in mind the family’s close connection with the church.  It was as Frances Collett age two years that she was listed with her family in the Bury St Edmunds census of 1851.  With the death of her father sometime in the following decade, the remainder of Frances’ family moved to Dover St James, where Frances, age 12, was living with her mother Harriet, her brother Anthony, and one of her sisters, Maria, in the census of 1861.

 

 

 

It has not been determined where Frances was ten years later in 1871, but after a further ten years, and at the age of 30 (rather than 32), she was still not married and was living with her widowed mother Harriet Pett Collett and her sister Maria Collett at 6 Camden Crescent, Dover St James in Kent.  Following the death of her mother during the 1880s, Frances E Collett, age 42 was living at Elham in Kent, five miles inland from Folkestone.  During the next decade she was reunited with her brother Anthony, and by March 1901 the siblings were living together at Boxley near Maidstone in Kent, when Frances E Collett from Bury St Edmunds was 52.

 

 

 

The April census of 1911 listed Frances under her full name of Frances Ellen Collett from Bury St Edmunds, by which time she was 61.  On that occasion she was still living with her brother Anthony but, by that time, the two of them had left Boxley and instead were living in Canterbury.  It was in 1915 that Frances Ellen Collett passed away, having spent the previous twenty years acting as the housekeeper for her brother.

 

 

 

 

18P5

Thomas Trusson Collett of Ringleton, which may have been Ringleton Manor, was born in 1840 and married his cousin Georgiana Collett (below) in 1865.  She was born at Monkton in Kent in either 1836 or 1837.  It would appear that, following their wedding, the couple initially settled down to live at Upper Clapton in London Borough of Hackney, where their first two children were born.  Sometime in the early 1870s the family then moved to Kent where they lived in the village of Woodnesborough near Sandwich which was where their other two children were born.  Surprisingly a search of the 1881 Census has so far not revealed the whereabouts of Thomas or Georgiana and the three youngest members of their family, although it is known that their children were educated in England and ended their lives in the country, where they also died.

 

 

 

What the census does reveal was that their eldest son, Thomas Collett aged 13, was attending The Lines Private School at Sutton Valence in Kent as a boarder.  That may be a reference to Sutton Valence Grammar School, which was later attended by Thomas’ younger brother Charles Collett prior to going to Cambridge University.  Their father, Thomas Trusson Collett, sadly died just over four months after the national census day that year, when he passed away on 19th August 1881, aged just 41, when Thomas and Charles were only 13 and 5 years old respectively.  The death of Thomas Trusson Collett was recorded at the Kent register office in Eastry (Ref. 2a 467).

 

 

 

According to the next census in 1891, widow Georgiana was still living at Woodnesborough within the Eastry & Sandwich registration district in Kent.  ‘Georgianna’ Collett was 44, and living there with her were all four of her child.  Thomas Collett was 23, William G Collett was 21, Charles Collett was 15, and Katharine Collett was 12 years old.

 

 

 

During the next ten years Georgiana’s three sons left the family home at Woodnesborough, so by the time of the census in March 1901 it was just her daughter who was still living there with her.  Georgiana Collett from Monkton was 54, while Katharine Collett of Woodnesborough was 22.  Neither lady was credited with an occupation.  It was the same situation ten years later in April 1911, when Georgina Collett was 64, and still living with her Woodnesborough in Kent was her unmarried daughter Katharine Collett who was 32.  By that time Georgiana’s son Charles had died from injuries he sustained in a cycling accident in 1903.

 

 

 

18Q1

Thomas Collett

Born in 1867 at Upper Clapton

 

18Q2

William George Collett

Born in 1869 at Upper Clapton

 

18Q3

Charles Collett

Born in 1875 at Woodnesborough

 

18Q4

Katharine Collett

Born in 1878 at Woodnesborough

 

 

 

 

18P6

Ann F Collett was born at Woodnesborough in 1842 and she never married.  In 1881 she was living with her brother George Collett (below) at No. 5 St Mary’s Road in Camberwell in Surrey.  She died in 1941.

 

 

 

 

18P7

James Tomlin Collett was born at Woodnesborough in 1843, the son of Thomas Collett and Jane Tomlin.  Tragically he survived for less than a year, when he died at Woodnesborough in 1844.

 

 

 

 

18P8

George Collett was born at Woodnesborough in 1844, the son of Thomas and Jane Collett. 
He matriculated in 1862, following which he was accepted at Corpus Christi College in Cambridge on 26th May 1862, when he was confirmed as the second son of Thomas of Ringleton, Woodnesborough in Kent.  After four years he obtained his Bachelor of arts degree in 1866 and his Masters degree after a further three years in 1869.

 

 

 

He was ordained as a deacon in 1874 and the following year he became a priest in the city of Worcester.  In addition to that he was the Curate of Lozells in Birmingham up to 1876, when he was appointed the Curate at Redhill in Surrey from 1876 to 1878.  There then followed a four year term up to 1884 when he was the Curate at Peckham, after which he was the Vicar at Peckham until 1892.  From 1892 he was the Vicar of Basildon in Berkshire, up until 1910. 

 

 

 

He never married and at the time of the census in 1881 George Collett was a Rochester Diocesan Clergyman, with a Master of Arts degree, living at 5 St Mary’s Road in Camberwell.  Listed at the house with him was his older sister Ann F Collett (above), age 39, plus four servants.  During the latter years of his life he resided at Dane Park House in Ramsgate, where he died on 8th May 1918, at the age of 74.

 

 

 

 

18P9

Catherine Collett was born at Monkton in Kent in 1835, where she was baptised on 30th November 1835, when she was named as the child of George Collett and Sarah Crofts.  She was living at Monkton with her father and stepmother in 1861 when she was 25.  It was shortly after that when she married cashier and wine trader Benjamin T Whittington.  In 1881 the couple were living with their four children at 19 St Johns Road in Islington.  The youngest child at the time was her nine years old son Collett A Whittington.  Catherine died a few years later in 1884.

 

 

 

 

18P10

George Collett was born at Walter’s Hall in Monkton in 1838, the eldest son of George Collett and Sarah Crofts King, although tragically he died in 1844 aged just six years.

 

 

 

 

18P11

Georgiana Collett was born at Monkton in 1846, and was baptised there on 9th July 1846, the daughter of George and Sarah Crofts Collett.  Following the death of her mother in 1850, she was four years old in the census of 1851, when she was living at Walter’s Hall in Monkton with her widowed father and younger brother George (below).  She was under twenty years of age when she married her cousin Thomas Trusson Collett (above) of Ringleton in 1865.

 

 

 

 

18P12

George Alfred Collett was born at Walter’s Hall in Monkton in 1848 and was the son of George and Sarah Crofts Collett.  George was only two years old when his mother died in March 1850, and was three years old in the census of 1851 when he was living at Walter’s Hall with his father and sister Georgiana (above).  At the time of the census in 1881 George was 33 when he was living with his father George Collett, his half-brother Cornelius Collett, and his half-sister Isabella Collett (below) at Walter’s Hall on Main Road in Monkton.  The census stated that he earned his income from land.

 

 

 

Shortly after the census date George married Georgina Ching Clemson who was born at Monkton in 1850.  The couple’s first son was born at Camberwell, whereas their next two children were born at Ramsgate, and the last two at Monkton, where the family had settled by 1887.  The census in 1891 for the Minster registration district, which included Monkton, listed the family as George A Collett 43, Georgina C Collett 40, George C Collett who was eight, Alfred Collett who was seven, Dorothy Collett who was five, Harold W Collett who was four and Percy S Collett who was two years old.

 

 

 

By the turn of the century, George and Georgina were still living at Monkton and, according to the census in 1901, George Alfred Collett was 53 and he, and his eldest son George Clemson aged 18, were both listed as being farmers.  George’s wife was recorded as Georgina Ching Collett, who was 50 and from Monkton on the Isle of Thanet, and their daughter Dorothy was 15 and her place of birth was given as St Lawrence Ramsgate.  The couple’s three sons, who were absent from the family home on that occasion, were Alfred who was 17, Harold aged 14, and Percy aged 12, who were all recorded as living within the Margate area in 1901, where it seems highly likely that certainly the two younger boys were attending boarding school.

 

 

 

George Alfred Collett died during 1907, and the only members of his family for whom a record has been found in the census of 1911 are his sons George and Harold and his daughter Dorothy.  No other record for his remaining two children has so far been found.

 

 

 

18Q5

George Clemson Collett

Born in 1882 at Camberwell

 

18Q6

Alfred Collett

Born in 1883 at Ramsey

 

18Q7

Dorothy Collett

Born in 1885 at Ramsey

 

18Q8

Harold Willis Collett

Born in 1887 at Monkton

 1

18Q9

Percy Stapleton Collett

Born in 1888 at Monkton

 

 

 

 

18P13

Cornelius Collett was born at Walter’s Hall in Monkton on 26th December 1857 and was the first child of George Collett by his second wife Elizabeth Smith, following the death of his first wife some seven years earlier.  Cornelius was three years old in the census of 1861 he was one of three children living with his parents at Monkton.  He attended Ewell School, where he was 13 in 1871, and from where he matriculated in 1878.  Later that same year, on 1st October 1878, he commenced his higher education at Corpus Christi College in Cambridge.  Upon entry he was referred to as Cornelius Collett of Canterbury, the son of George Collett of Walter’s Hall, Monkton, Ramsgate in Kent.

 

 

 

According to the census in 1881, Cornelius Collett, age 23, was unmarried and described as a Cambridge undergraduate while he was living with his father George Collett and his brother George Alfred Collett (above) at Walter’s Hall on Main Road in Monkton.  It was just over one year later when Cornelius Collett was married by licence to Edith Mary Solly at St Mary’s Church in Lewisham in London on 26th April 1882.  He was a bachelor of 24 whose rank or profession was simply recorded as gentleman who was residing at 4 Selby Villas in Penge, the son of gentleman George Collett deceased who had only passed away three months earlier.  His bride Edith was only 19 and was described as a spinster of 3 Esmonde Villas in Lewisham, the daughter of gentleman George Bushell Solly.  The witnesses at the wedding were Edith’s father and Reginald M Mortimer.

 

 

 

However, it was in July of the following year that Cornelius is alleged to have beaten his wife, who subsequently commenced divorce proceedings, the detailed papers for which are re-produced below.  It was on 12th September 1884 that the humble petitioner Edith Mary Collett of 4 Selby Road in Anerley near Croydon in Surrey the lawful wife of Cornelius Collett showeth that after the said marriage (as detailed above) your petitioner lived and cohabited with her said husband at Anerley and that there is no issue of the marriage.  That the said Cornelius Collett has treated your petitioner with great unkindness and cruelty and has frequently struck beat and otherwise assaulted her. 

 

 

 

On or about the tenth day of July 1883 the said Cornelius Collett abused and struck your petitioner on the neck several blows violently and behaved cruelly towards her.  In or about the month of August 1883 the said Cornelius Collett turned your petitioner out of the house at midnight in her nightdress and made her stand bare-footed outside the street door for about half an hour and would not allow her to re-enter the house.  On 28th February 1884 the said Cornelius Collett struck your petitioner leaving the marks of his finger and causing her face to swell.  That the said Cornelius Collett is in the habit of getting drunk and whilst in that state abuses and cruelly illuses your petitioner.

 

 

 

That on or about June 14th 1884 the said Cornelius Collett committed adultery with some woman whose name is unknown to your petitioner and thereby contracted a venereal disease.  That on or about the month of June 1884 the said Cornelius Collett wilfully communicated to your petitioner a venereal disease.  That the said Cornelius Collett has frequently committed adultery with diverse other women.  Wherefore your petitioner prays that her said married may be dissolved and that she may have such further and other relief in the premises as to this honourable court may seem fit.  Signed Edith M Collett.

 

 

 

On 18th September Edith applied to the High Court of Justice for recovery of money for lodging and physician expenses, stating that her husband had since emptied their home at Anerley and had sold all the furniture, a sum of £1,200 being stated.  She continued that Cornelius was intending to dispose of his milk farm in Beckenham and on realising the whole of his estate was planning to move abroad.  In a rebuttal received by the High Court, Cornelius stated that the proceeds from the sale of the milk farm at Beckenham will not exceed £250 and that he still had considerable outstanding debts to settle, while the money from the sale of the furniture had already been used to pay off some of those debts.  He continued by saying that in order to save costs he had moved to Stone Farm, the weekly rent for which does not exceed £2 10 Shillings.  He also denied that he was intending to move abroad and stated that he had already paid his wife the sum of £15 on 15th October, that being £3 per week, and could afford to pay no more.

 

 

 

On 14th Day of November 1884 Edith made a sworn signed statement at 78 Vincent Square in London regarding additional information relating to the contents of the petition of 12th September (above).  This stated that in London on 14th June her husband had been with a known prostitute by the name of Lily, and that on other unknown dates he had been with another prostitute known as Kate.  This was accepted by the High Court of Justice. 

 

 

 

 

18P14

Isabella Collett was born at Walter’s Hall in Monkton towards the end of 1860 when she was confirmed as the daughter of George Collett and Elizabeth Smith.  A shortly later she was baptised at Monkton on 30th January 1861, when her parents were once again confirmed as George and Elizabeth Collett, with whom she was living at Monkton in the census of 1861 when she was still under one year of age.

 

 

 

Where Isabella was at the time of the next census in 1871 is not known, but ten years after that Isabella Collett, age 20, was living with her father at Walter’s Hall on the Main Road in Monkton.  As the senior lady in the house she had no occupation, instead it seems likely that she managed the two female servants on behalf of her father and her old half-brother George Alfred Collett and her brother Cornelius Collett (above).  The two servants supporting the family were Harriet Gilham who was 30 and the family’s cook, and Sarah Setterfield, age 24, who was a maid.

 

 

 

It would appear that Isabella never married and in 1891 at the age of 30 she was living within the Uckfield & Framfield registration district of Sussex.  Over the next ten years she left Kent and moved into London where, in March 1901, she was recorded as being 40 and residing in the Kensington area of the city.  On that occasion the census confirmed that her place of birth was Monkton, and that she was living on her own means.  Ten years later she was still living in the Kensington district of London when she was 50 years old, although her name was recorded incorrectly as Esabella Collett from Monkton.

 

 

 

 

18P15

Emily Collett was born at Walter’s Hall in Monkton in 1861, the daughter of George Collett and Elizabeth Smith, although it would appear that she suffered and infant death since she was not listed with her family in any subsequent census return.

 

 

 

 

18P16

Alice Maud Collett was born at Walter’s Hall in Monkton in 1863.  No record of her has been located in 1871 and by 1881, at the age of 18, Alice Maud Collett she was attending a private school at 20 Sinclair Road in the Fulham district of London, the establishment of the sisters Maria Jane Lambley and Emily Harriet Lambley of Hillmorton in Warwickshire.  Alice Maud Collett later married the Reverend T W Tidmarsh the Rector of Slapton, and their wedding day was very likely prior to the next census in 1891 since no Alice Collett of Monkton has been identified in that.  Similarly no record has been found for Alice Slapton either, in 1891, 1901 or 1911.

 

 

 

 

18P18

Sophia Elizabeth Collett was born at Chelsworth on 12th November 1844, the eldest child of William Collett and Mary Cecil Augusta von Linsingen.  She never married and in 1881 at the age of 32 she was a visitor at the home of Richard D Gough, the 81 years old Magistrate for Brecon at Yniscedwyn House in Lower Ystradgynlais in Brecon.  She was living at Chelsea in London during the summer of 1899, and it was there, as Elizabeth Collett age 54, that she died on 15th August 1899.  Following the death, her body was taken to Hawstead where her father had been the Rector of Hawstead, and where she was buried with her parents on 18th August 1899.

 

 

 

 

18P19

Ellen Mary Collett was born at Chelsworth on 5th March 1846, where she was baptised on 1st June 1846, the daughter of William and Mary Cecil Augusta Collett.  Her mother died in 1864, following which her father married for a second time, but that was short-lived since his second wife died in 1874.  So by 1881 Ellen M Collett from Chelsworth was 35 and was the eldest child still living with her widowed father at the Rectory in Hawstead, just ten months before he died.  Later in her life she was referred to as Ellen Mary Collett of Bury St Edmunds, and it was there that she was living in 1891 at the age of 45, when she was recorded as Ellen M Collett from Chelsworth.

 

 

 

She was still living there in both 1901 and 1911.  For the census in the first of these Ellen Mary Collett of Chelsworth was 55 and living on her own needs, and living with her was her half sister Leonora Julia Collett.  It was the same situation ten years later in April 1911, when Ellen Mary Collett, age 65 and from Chelsworth, was living at Bury St Edmunds with her half-sister Leonora Julia Collett (below) who was 39.

 

 

 

 

18P20

Augusta Cecil Collett was born at Chelsworth on 16th December 1847, and it was there also that she was baptised on 27th April 1848, the daughter of William and Mary Cecil Augusta Collett.  She never married and was still living with her two-times widowed father at Hawstead in 1881 at the age of 33.  Her father died ten months later, and it may have been as a result of that event, that Augusta was persuaded to emigrated to North America, to where her younger brothers Frederick William Collett and John Anthony Collett (below) had already planned to live. 

 

 

 

Although no record of her has so far been found in the US Census of 1900, it is established that she was living in Sonoma County near San Francisco in 1908.  In the years running up to then, Augusta was instrumental, with others, including Mrs Anna Finlaw, in forming the Saturday Afternoon Club, a local church group.  It was during 1908 that the ground-breaking ceremony took place to mark the commencement of the construction work on the clubhouse, as depicted in the photograph below.  Mrs Anna Finlaw is holding the shovel and Augusta Collett is one of the ladies on the left of her.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Augusta was still living in Sonoma County of California in 1910 when she was listed in that year’s census.  Over the following years, it would appear that she devoted her life to the Church of the Incarnation in Santa Rosa, the history of which pays tribute to Augusta C Collett and Anna Finlaw for much of the carving within the church, including the altar, the choir stalls, the reredos (a screen behind the altar see below), and the litany desk.

 

 

 

The building today is the oldest church structure in Santa Rosa, having been built in 1873.  It suffered bulging walls during the earthquake of 1906, when it served as a morgue and a hospital for the devastated city of Santa Rosa.  However, the carvings are as beautiful today as they were when they were originally created by Augusta and Anna, as detailed here in the screen behind the altar.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Augusta Cecil Collett never took up American citizenship, and was described as a resident alien in the census of 1930.  By that time in her life she was 82 and had living with her at Santa Rosa, her widowed brother Frederick W Collett (below) who was 73, and who died there early in the following year.

 

 

 

All of the new information about Augusta and her brother Frederick was gratefully received in 2010 from Neil and Heidi Blazey of Santa Rosa, who currently live in the same house that was once occupied by Augusta Cecil Collett, albeit not at the same location, since it was moved to its present site in 1924.

 

 

 

It was on 2nd November 1935 that Augusta Cecil Collett was living at 576 Mendocino Avenue in Santa Rosa when she died, where a gravestone bearing her name also includes her date of birth and the date of her passing.  It simply reads ‘Augusta C Collett - Dec 16 1847 – Nov 2 1935’.  On the day after she died, an obituary appeared in the Santa Rosa newspaper Press Democrat, which read as follows, under the headline

Funeral services will be held Monday afternoon for aged woman

 

 

 

“Miss Augusta C Collett died yesterday in her little vine-covered Mendocino Avenue home surrounded in the summertime by its roses and other blooms of which she was fond, and in the fall and winter time with the vari coloured foliage.  She lived and died in the atmosphere she loved the best.  Since childhood she was a devoted member of the Episcopal church and throughout her more than forty years’ residence in Santa Rosa she was constantly engaged in the activities of the Church of the Incarnation, which stands near her home.  Across the way from her home, in Tenth Street, is the clubhouse of the Saturday Afternoon Club, another environment in which she loved to linger.  She was a charter member of the Saturday Afternoon Club.

 

 

 

For many years Miss Collett was treasurer of the Church of the Incarnation, a member of the Vestry, president for a long period of the Altar Guild, and a member of the other guilds of the parish.  Up to within six months of her passing, Miss Collett seldom was absent from the services of the church.  Her childhood faith was long established.  Her father was a distinguished clergyman of the Church of England and at one time was rector of one of the most famous parishes in England, Bury St Edmunds in Suffolk.  More than half a century ago, Miss Collett and other members of her family came to this state.  During her long residence here she made several journeys back to the old home land.

 

 

 

She was a gifted woman, well educated and particularly devoted to art work.  She did the principal carving of the beautiful reredos and altar in the Church of the Incarnation and statuary of the Angels at the entrance to the chancel.  She also carried out the carving of the choir stalls.  In this work she was assisted by a very warm friend, the late Mrs Anna Love Finlaw, who lived across the way from her in Mendocino Avenue.

 

 

 

Miss Collett was a native of England, where she was born more than 87 years ago.  A sister, Lenora Collett, still resides in England.  A brother, John Collett of Seattle, survives and was here with his sister at the time of her passing.  Her death yesterday was particularly reviewed by many of the older members of the local parish and it recounted among other traits her great and sincere devotion to her church and its activities.

 

 

 

The funeral rites will take place at 2 o’clock Monday afternoon from the Church of the incarnation, with the Rev. Egbert B Clark Jr. Officiating.  The choir of the church will sing.  Pallbearers will be R S Knight, Dawson Dixon, W W Shuhaw, Attorney Fred W McConnell, J Y Bittel, and John Lamb.  The body is at the Hampton- Burgen undertaking parlours.  It is thanks to Neil Blazey that we are able to publish this newspaper article.”

 

 

 

At the end of her life the Estate of Augusta Cecil Collett amounted to $14,827.98, and in her Will she left a substantial bequest to the Church of the Incarnation in Santa Rosa, and to her half-sister Leonora Julia Collett in Bury St Edmund, England and her half-brother John Anthony Collett in Vashon, Washington (both below).  Again thanks to Neil Blazey we now have a copy of her Will, the Codicil, and the Petition for Probate.  Reproductions of each, extracted from the original document entitled “In the Matter of the Estate of Augusta Cecil Collett deceased”, can be found in Legal Documents under the headings ‘Will 1934 Augusta C Collett’, ‘Will 1934 Codicil for Augusta C Collett’, and ‘Will 1935 Petition for Probate Augusta C Collett’.

 

 

 

 

18P21

Mary Louisa Collett was born at Bury St Edmunds in 1850 and in 1881 she was thirty-one and was still a spinster living with her widowed father William at The Rectory in Hawstead.  Upon the death of her father during February in 1882, Mary travelled to south London to live with her brother William Charles Collett (below), taking her half-brother John Anthony Collett (below) with her.  It was while she was living there that she later became a deaconess in London.  According to the census in 1891, unmarried Mary Collett, age 39 rather than 41, was living at Wimbledon with her unmarried brother William C Collett who was actually 39, and their half-brother John A Collett, age 17, who was one of the two children of their father’s second marriage.

 

 

 

While William remained living in the Wimbledon area, Mary Louisa Collett moved to the Hackney area of London during the last decade of the century, and it was there that she was living in March 1901.  The census return for Hackney described her as Mary Collett, age 51 and from Bury St Edmunds, who was a deaconess of the Church of England.  She was still living in Hackney ten years later in April 1911, when the census that month listed her as Mary Louisa Collett from Bury St Edmunds who was 61.  It is therefore assumed that she lives her whole life as a single lady.

 

 

 

 

18P22

William Charles Collett was born at Bury St Edmunds on 2nd August 1851.  In 1881 he was 29 and was a colonial managing clerk working in Wimbledon, where he was in lodgings at 13 Ridgeway, the home of master tailor William Kearns.  Following the death of his father in February 1882, William was joined at Wimbledon by his sister Mary Louisa Collett (above) and his half-brother John Anthony Collett (below), as confirmed by the Wimbledon census of 1891.

 

 

 

The census that year confirmed that William C Collett from Bury St Edmunds was 39, that his sister Mary Collett was 39 (sic) and also from Bury, while their half-brother John A Collett from Hawstead was 17.  Sometime after that William’s sister moved to Hackney and his half-brother emigrated to America.  As for William, he remained living in the Wimbledon area, where he was recorded in both of the next two census returns.  According to the North Wimbledon census in 1901 he was working as a manager for a fibre merchant at the age of 49, while his place of birth was again confirmed as Bury St Edmunds.  Ten years after that William Charles Collett age 59 and from Bury St Edmunds was unmarried and was living alone at Wimbledon within the Kingston-upon-Thames area of south London.

 

 

 

 

18P23

Agnes Maria Collett was born at Bury St Edmunds in 1854.  She married the Reverend A Woodforde, the Vicar of Locking in Somerset.

 

 

 

 

18P24

Frederick William Collett, who was born at Hawstead in 1856, was the youngest child of the Reverend William Collett and his first wife Mary Cecil Augusta von Linsingen who died when he was eight years old.  He was educated at Dedham Grammar School where he was a pupil at the age of 14 in 1871.  Sometime after leaving school, and certainly prior to 1879, he emigrated to North America.  That was confirmed by the US Census in 1880, in which Frederic Collett from England was working in an auger shop, while he was living with William Coon and his wife Maria at Hamden in New Haven, Connecticut.  This would indicate that, on his arrival at New York during the previous years, he did not travel very far, before securing work and settling down.  What is curious is that he gave his age as 22, rather than 24.  It was two years later that Frederick married Emily who was born in England around 1860, of English parents.

 

 

 

According to the US Census in 1910 Frederick and Emily had two children living with them who were both born while the couple was living at New Haven in Connecticut.  The ages of the two children may indicate that there could have been two older children born around 1883 and 1885, plus others between 1888 and 1893.

 

 

 

The New Haven census of 1910 listed the family of four as Frederick Collett, age 53, who was working as a grocer with his own store, his wife Emily E Collett who was 49, and their daughters Grace A Collett, age 23, who was unmarried and employed as a nurse, and Hazel M Collett who was 16.  The census return also confirmed that Frederick and Emily had been married for 28 years, and that they were then both nationalised American citizens.  It is known that, by that time, Frederick’s older unmarried sister Augusta Cecil Collett (above) had sailed from England to America, but that she had travelled across the country to live in California.  In 1910 she was recorded in the town of Sonoma, just north of San Francisco.

 

 

 

During the next twenty years Frederick’s wife died, and by the time of US Census of 1930, which was conducted on the first April that year, widower Frederick W Collett, age 73, was living at the house owned by his sister Augusta in Santa Rosa township in Sonoma County.  At that time in his life he was recorded as having no occupation.  It was almost eleven months later that Frederick William Collett died at Santa Rosa on 28th February 1931.

 

 

 

18Q10

Grace A Collett

Born in 1887 at New Haven, Connecticut

 

18Q11

Hazel M Collett

Born in 1894 at New Haven, Connecticut

 

 

 

 

18P25

Leonora Julia Collett was born at Hawstead in 1871, the eldest of the two children of the Reverend William Collett, Rector of Hawstead, and his second wife Charlotte Stowiczek.  And it was at The Rectory in Hawstead that she was living with her widowed father at the time of the census in 1881 when she was nine years old.  Ten months later her father died on the first day of February 1882, although it has not been determined exactly what happened to her following his death.

 

 

 

Ten years later, at the time of the census in 1891, Leonora J Collett of Hawstead was 19 and was living in the Brentford area of north London.  She later returned to Bury St Edmunds to live with her older half-sister Ellen Mary Collett, with whom she was living in March 1901 when she was recorded as Leonora Julia Collett, who was unmarried at the age of 29, and who was working as a daily governess.

 

 

 

It can be deduced from the next census in 1911, when she was still unmarried and living at Bury St Edmunds at the age of 39, and from the Will, and the obituary for her half-sister Augusta Cecil Collett (above) published in a Santa Rosa newspaper on 3rd November 1935, that Leonora never married and would appear to have lived the remainder of her life at Bury St Edmunds with her other half-sister Ellen Mary Collett (above).  She was one of the main beneficiaries under the terms of her half-sister’s Will of 1934, together with her brother John Anthony (below) and the Church of the Incarnation in Santa Rosa.  See Legal Documents for precise details.

 

 

 

New details discovered in 2014 reveal that spinster Leonora J Collett died at Bury St Edmunds where her death was recorded (Ref. 4b 1205) during the second quarter of 1967 when she was 95 years of age.

 

 

 

 

18P26

John Anthony Collett, who was born at Hawstead near the end of 1873, was the younger of the two children of the Reverend William Collett, Rector of Hawstead and his second wife Charlotte Stowiczek.  Tragically his mother died shortly after he was born.  Subsequently he was recorded as John A Collit, who was seven years old, at the time of the census in 1881, when he was living at The Rectory in Hawstead with his widowed father, his sister Leonora (above), and his four much older half-sisters.

 

 

 

At the age of 17, and according to the census in 1891, John A Collett from Hawstead was living in the Wimbledon area of south London with his older half-brother William Charles Collett (above), having been taken there by his half-sister Mary Louisa when he was only eight years old, following the death of their father in February 1882.  During the years after 1891, it would appear that John emigrated to North America, where he was known later to be living in Washington State.  He was still alive and living at Vashon in Washington in November 1935 when his older half-sister Augusta Cecil Collett (above) died, since he was referred to in her obituary as John Collett of Seattle, and was one of the main beneficiaries under the terms of her Will, which revealed he was living in Vashon at that time.  See Legal Documents for precise details.

 

 

 

 

18P27

Alfred Master Collett was born at Melcombe Regis at the end of 1858, the only child of Daniel Collett and his first wife Elizabeth Lizzie Pollard, and was baptised in Weymouth on 9th February 1859.  By the time of the census in 1861 Alfred M Collett was two years old and was living with his parents at Radipole near Melcombe Regis.  Ten years later, in 1871, the family was still living at Radipole, at 7 Grosvenor Road, when Alfred M Collett was 12.  His mother Lizzie P Collett was only 40 years old on that occasion, but during the years following the census that year she died.  It was also after that sad event, and during the 1870s, that his father remarried.

 

 

 

During that same decade Alfred was educated at Keble Collage in Oxford where he matriculated on 15th October 1877 aged 18.  He later gained a BA in 1880 and an MA in 1884.  By the time of the census 1881 he was at home with his stepmother Mary Sherwood Collett at 7 Grosvenor Road in Radipole in Weymouth, his father being a civil engineer who was working in London at that time.

 

 

 

Alfred later went on to become the Reverend Alfred Master Collett, and apparently he was never married.  His absence from the country at the time of the census in 1891 might indicate that he was working abroad.  By 1901 he was living in Cheltenham, where his stepmother was also living at that time.  The census confirmed that his place of birth was Weymouth, that his age was 42, and the fact that, like his stepmother, he was living on his own means.  And it was the same situation ten years later, it that he was still living in Cheltenham, except that for the first time in any census return, he was recorded as Alfred Master Collett age 52.  At that time in 1911 his stepmother was living at Lambeth in London.

 

 

 

Alfred survived for a further twenty-six years and was a patient at Cheltenham Infirmary when he died on 4th May 1937, with his Will being proved at Gloucester on 27th May that same year.  During the probate process it was confirmed that Alfred Master Collett died in hospital in Cheltenham on 4th May and that his personal effects worth £641 19 Shillings 2d were handled by Henry Edwin Daniel, a retired bank official.

 

 

 

 

18P28

Emily Collett was born at Beverley in 1861, where her recently married parents were living at that time.  She was however, baptised at Brightwell Church in Brightwell-cum-Foxhall near Ipswich on 18th August 1861 where her grandfather was the Reverend Woodthorpe Collett, the father of Emily’s mother Elizabeth.

 

The baptism record for Brightwell-cum-Foxhall confirmed that Emily was the daughter of Trusson and Elizabeth Charlotte Collett.

 

Emily and her parents continued to live in Beverley for a few more years before they moved into London where they were living in 1881, although their whereabouts ten years earlier has not been determined.

 

 

 

The census in 1881 confirmed that Emily and her parents were living at 178 Goldhawk Road in Hammersmith, where her father Trusson’s occupation was that of a clerk.  Emily’s place of birth was Beverley and, although she was 19 years old, she was listed as a scholar which would indicate that she was participating in higher education.

 

 

 

Whilst Emily was a spinster at twenty-nine and was still living with her parents on the fifth of April 1891, shortly after and during that same year she married Leopold Hansburg Norton.  Leopold was born in 1865 and sadly the marriage only lasted for three years when he died in 1894, but not before the marriage had produced a daughter for Emily.

 

 

 

The couple’s daughter Dorothy Annis Norton was born at Chiswick in 1892.  Tragically when she was only two years old her father, who had epilepsy, died of tubercular meningitis when the family was living at Chiswick in London.  Up until that time Leopold had worked as an insurance clerk.

 

 

 

Such was the grief that Emily felt following the loss of her young husband that she never recovered, and just over six years after his death, she too passed away while staying with relatives in Suffolk.  That apparently happened just prior to the March census in 1901 in which Emily’s orphaned daughter Dorothy A Norton aged eight years and from London was recorded as still visiting the Rope family at Blaxhall in Suffolk.

 

 

 

Following the death of her mother, Dorothy was looked after by her elderly grandparents Trusson and Elizabeth Collett at their home in London.  That was confirmed in the census return for 1911, when eighteen years old Dorothy Annis Norton of Chiswick was living at 21 Cavendish Road just of the A5 Edgware Road between Brondesbury and Kilburn.

 

Also living in the house was Trusson Collett and his wife Elizabeth Charlotte Collett, together with two domestic servants.  Dorothy was described as a scholar since, at that time, she was attending a boarding school in Richmond.

 

The photograph on the right was taken midway between the 1901 and 1911 Census years when Dorothy Annis Norton was around thirteen years of age.

 

 

 

Nine years after the census day in 1911, Dorothy Annis Norton, age 27, married widower Frederic Paul Marcel Tallet, age 48, at Brondesbury on 2nd June 1920.  Frederic was of French parents and was born in 1872, and was therefore twenty years older than Dorothy.  Once married the couple settled in Maida Vale to the south of Brondesbury and were living at 23 Bloomfield Court at the time of the birth of their two children.  It was also there that Dorothy and her family were living at the end of 1922 when her widowed grandfather Trusson Collett passed away and Dorothy Annis Talet was named as one of the joint executors of his Will.

 

 

 

It was during the previous year that her first child, Gerald Paul Marcel Tallet, was born in 1921 while his sister Margaret Pauline Tallet was born four years later in 1925.  The children’s father Frederic died in 1954 at the age of 82, while their mother Dorothy, who lived to be 97 when she died in 1989, continued to manage her own affairs right up to the end of her life.  Her son Gerald died two years later in 1991, while her daughter Margaret is married with a daughter of her own, who was born at Aylesbury in 1971.  This is Katerina Antalopoulos, and it is Katerina who kindly provided the information that has enabled the story of her mother and her grandparents to be told.

 

 

 

 

18P29

Frances Mary Collett was born at Gillingham in Dorset during 1844, the eldest child of William Lloyd Collett of Little Ilford in Essex and Frances Harriet Smith of Charlton in Kent.  Possibly because of the birth of the family’s fifth child in 1850, Frances and her two younger sisters Anna and Mary were staying with their grandparents at Charlton in 1851, where they were six, five, and three years old respectively.  Frances M Collett of Gillingham was 16 in 1861 when she was living with her family at St Stephen’s Parsonage in Hammersmith, although it is not known where she was at the time of the census in 1871 at the age of 26.  She has also not been located in 1881, even though it is established that she never married.

 

 

 

By the time of the census in 1891 Frances M Collett, age 47, was once again living with her parents in Hammersmith and, following the death of her father in 1896, Frances and her mother left London and retired to Brighton to live at 10 Charlotte Street, the home of her uncle John James Collett.  That was confirmed by the Brighton census in March 1901 when Frances was 56.  In addition to her mother, Frances’ unmarried sister Catherine (below) was also living there with them, as was Frances’ uncle John Collett of Westerham, her father’s youngest brother.  Upon his death early in 1902 Frances Mary Collett was named as one of the executors of his Will with her sister Helen Clara Collett (below).

 

 

 

With the death of her mother some time during the following decade, Frances Mary Collett, age 66, was still living in Brighton in April 1911, and living with her at that time were her two unmarried sisters Helen Clara Collett and Catherine Hester Collett. 

 

 

 

It was just over eleven years later that Frances Mary Collett passed away on 2nd August 1922.  Her address by that time was The Hoo at Aspley Guise near Woburn in Bedfordshire.  It took eighteen for her Will to pass through probate, when it was proved at Northampton on 19th January 1924.  By that time the value of her estate had been published at £8,832 7 Shilling and 2 Pence, while it was her unmarried sister Catherine Hester who was named within the Will, together with spinster Eva Margaret Williams and her brother Edward Taunton Williams [solicitor].

 

 

 

 

18P30

Anna Sophia Collett was born at Gillingham in Dorset in 1845, where she was also baptised on 2nd November 1845, the daughter of William Lloyd Collett and his wife Frances.  At the age of five she was staying with her grandmother Susette Smith and her grandfather Henry Smith at Morden College, and with her were her two sisters Frances (above) and Mary (below).  In 1861 Anna S Collett was 15 and was attending school in Hammersmith, while she was living with her family at St Stephen’s Parsonage.  By the time of the next census in 1871, Anna would have been 25, and with no record of an Anna Sophia Collett in that census or any thereafter, it must be assumed that she had become a married lady by then.

 

 

 

 

18P31

Mary Collett was born at Gillingham in Dorset in 1847 and was baptised there on 1st August 1847, the daughter of William Lloyd and Frances Harriet Collett.  At the time of the census in 1851 Mary Collett, age three years and from Gillingham, was staying with her grandparents Henry and Susette Smith at Morden College, where Henry was the college treasurer.  No further record of Mary has been found after that time, so it is assumed that she very likely suffered a childhood death.

 

 

 

 

18P32

Helen Clara Collett was born at Dover in 1848 where she was baptised on 11th April 1849, the daughter of William Lloyd Collett and his wife Frances Harriet Smith.  She was two years old at the time of the St Pancras & Kentish Town census of 1851, but was absent from the family in 1861 when they were living at St Stephen’s Parsonage in Hammersmith, when she would have been 12.

 

 

 

At the age of 22 she was once again living with her family in Hammersmith, but with no listed occupation, which probably suggests that she was supporting her mother.  By 1881 Helen was still a spinster at 32, and was still living with her parents in the vicarage on Coverdale Road in Hammersmith.  It is unsure where Helen was during the next three decades, but in 1911 she was living on her own means in Brighton with her sisters Frances (above) and Catherine (below), when she was described as unmarried Helen Clara Collett, age 62.  Nine years prior to that Helen Clara Collett was named as one of the executors of the Will of her uncle John James Collett on 10 Charlotte Street in Brighton.

 

 

 

The death of Helen Clara Collett of the Hoo at Aspley Guise in Bedfordshire, the home she shared with her sister Catherine (below) was recorded at Leighton Buzzard register office (Ref. 3b 394) during the last quarter of 1927 at the age of 79.  It was on 19th November 1927 that she died at the Carlton Medical Home in Leighton Buzzard, Beds, following which probate of her personal effects of £10,034 5 Shillings 7d, save and except settled land, was granted in London on 1st February 1928 to Wilfred Godden, a solicitor.

 

 

 

 

18P33

Catherine Hester Collett was born at Winkfield in Berkshire in 1850, the fourth daughter of William and Harriet Collett and was under one year old in the St Pancras & Kentish Town census of 1851.  Over the following years her family settled in Hammersmith where she was 10 in 1861 and 20 in 1871.  According to the next census in 1881 Catherine H Collett from Winkfield in Berkshire was a certified schoolteacher.  On that occasion she was unmarried at the age of 30, and was a lodger at 7 Church Street in Farnworth, Lancashire, the home of coal agent William Farnworth and his wife Ellen.

 

 

 

In 1891 Catherine Collett, age 40, was again living with her elderly parents at Hammersmith, where her sister Frances (above) was also living at that time.  With the passing of her father five years later, Catherine and her mother, together with her sister Frances Mary (above), moved to Brighton where all three were living on their own means in 1901 at 10 Charlotte Street the home of John James Collett.  Catherine E Collett was 50 and shortly after that Catherine’s mother passed away, at which time a third unmarried sister Helen joined Catherine and Frances at Brighton.  That was confirmed in the census of 1911 when Catherine Hester Collett was 60.

 

 

 

It was just over eleven years later that Catherine’s eldest sister Frances Mary Collett died at Aspley Guise near Woburn on 2nd August 1922.  Her sister’s Will was eighteen months going through probate, and was eventually proved at Northampton on 19th January 1924, in which spinster Catherine Hester Collett was named as receiving some part of her sister’s estate of just over £8,832.  It was a similar situation in 1929 upon the death of her brother Robert William Collett (below), when his estate was inherited by Catherine Hester Collett.

 

 

 

Following the death of her older sister Helen Clara Collett (above) it seems likely that Catherine continued to live at the Hoo in Aspley Guise, Bedfordshire, the home that she had very likely shared with her sister until she passed away.  It was also at the Hoo in Aspley Guise that Catherine Hester Collett was living in 1940 when she died.  Her death on 24th June 1940 was recorded at Ampthill register office (Ref. 3b 878) at the age of 89.  Upon her death she left a considerable fortune amounting to £23,452 17 Shillings 8d, probate for which was handed to William Deacons Bank Ltd and Edgar Laurence Newall Tuck, a solicitor.

 

 

 

 

18P34

Robert William Collett was born at Shepherd’s Bush in the Hammersmith area of London during 1852, the eldest of the three sons of William and Harriet Collett.  It was on 8th July 1852 that he was baptised with his full name at St Stephen’s Church in Shepherds Bush when his parents were named as William Lloyd Collett and Frances Harriett Collett, while it was as Robert W Collett, aged eight years, that he was listed living with his family in the Hammersmith census return for 1861.  He was still there ten years later when he was still attending school (medical college) at the age of 18.  He eventually qualified from medical college, when he became a physician and a surgeon with the following initials after his name M R C S L R C P.  After an initial spell working in London, Robert spent a short while at Wick near Bristol, before securing a position at Yarmouth Hospital in Deneside, Great Yarmouth, where he was working in 1881.  By that time, as Robert William Collett, he was described as being aged 28, from Hammersmith, unmarried, and employed as a House Surgeon.

 

 

 

Five years earlier there is a record in London of a Robert William Collett who married Christina Louisa Grove at Fulham where the event was registered (Ref. 1a 366) during the last quarter of 1876.  However, that Robert Wm Collett was a plumber and the son of publican Edwin Collett, both of whom are detailed in Part 62 – The Trowbridge to New Zealand Line 1725 to 1880 (Ref. 62N14).

 

 

 

It was three years later when bachelor Robert William Collett married Emily Maria Saunders at Bradford-on-Avon in Wiltshire during 1884.  Emily was born during 1860 at Brompton in London the daughter of Thomas B Saunders with whom she was living at the time of the census in 1891.  It seems rather strange that Emily remained in Wiltshire after she married Robert, perhaps to look after her elderly widowed father.  The census in 1891 recorded her in error as Emily M Collitt who was 31 and from Middlesex, a married lady living at Market Street in Bradford-on-Avon, the home of her father head of the household Thomas B Saunders who was 83.  The pair of them was supported by two servants Elizabeth Lye aged 27 and Adelaide King who was 17.  Staying with them on that day was their relative Beatrice C Riley who was 18.

 

 

 

According to the census in 1891 Robert Collett, age 38 and from Shepherd’s Bush, was married and a Doctor of Medicine (London), but on that occasion he was lodging in a boarding house at 7 Lower Rock Gardens in the Kemp Town district of Brighton, not far from Brighton Pier.  Living with Robert’s family at Hammersmith in 1881 was Robert’s aunt France Collett and her brother, uncle John Collett.  They were an older sister and a younger brother of Robert’s father, and by 1891 they too were living in the Kemp Town area of Brighton, so it is possible Robert was visiting them for health reasons.

 

 

 

Why he and his wife continued to live apart from one another remains a mystery, while it has been confirmed that Emily Collett aged 41 and from Brompton was still living in Bradford in 1901 and again in 1911 when she was recorded as Emily Maria Collett aged 51 and from Brompton.  The only other known fact about her is that she died in Wiltshire during 1916 when Emily Maria Collett was named as the wife of Robert William Collett.  It is now understood that shortly after 1891 Robert may have been become mentally ill and was possibly admitted into a home, hence the reason he has not been identified within the census conducted in 1901.

 

 

 

Certainly that was the case ten years later, when R W Collett was a patient at St Andrew's Hospital for Mental Diseases on Billing Road in Northampton.  At the age of 59 he was described as being married and a former medical practitioner who had been a lunatic for many years.  His place of birth was incorrectly stated as Sheffield, a mistake for Shepherds Bush one assumes.  It was also while he was still a patient at St Andrew’s Hospital that he died in 1929, when his estate passed to his unmarried sister Catherine Hester Collett (above).  All previous reference to Robert possibly having fathered a son prior to his marriage to Emily has now been removed as incorrect.

 

 

 

 

18P35

Alfred Collett was born at Shepherds Bush in 1854 and was a twin with his brother Arthur.  In the Hammersmith census of 1861 Alfred and Arthur were both six years old when living with their family at St Stephen’s Parsonage.  Ten years later they were both still living with their family when they was 16, at a time when the family was then living in St Stephen’s Vicarage in Hammersmith.  By the time of the next census in 1881 Alfred Collett, age 26, was listed as a civil engineer who was still living at the home of his father the Reverend William Lloyd Collett at the vicarage in Coverdale Road in Hammersmith.  It is not known at this time, as to the whereabouts of his twin brother Arthur Collett, of whom no records have been found in any of the British census records after 1871.

 

 

 

Alfred Collett was a Member of the Institute of Civil Engineers (M.I.C.E.) and it may have been his work that resulted in him sailing to South America in the early 1880s, where he was later joined by his sister Jessie Susette Collett (below).  And it was in Argentina at St John’s Anglican Cathedral in Buenos Aires on 29th April 1886, that Alfred married Ida May Wilkinson, following the publishing of banns at that church.  Ida was the daughter of James Wilkinson.  The witnesses at the wedding did not include Alfred’s sister Jessie, suggesting that she had travelled to South America after that time.

 

 

 

The cathedral record confirmed that Alfred and Ida were both from England, that they were both residents of Buenos Aires at the time of their marriage, and that the witnesses were W. Tudor, John Joseph Bithell, Mary Tudor, Agnes Woodhouse, Catherine Tudor, Augusta Lennox Robertson, Henry Dickinson, and Chas. B. Wilkinson, with the service being conducted by the officiating minister Arthur George Lennox Robertson, assistant chaplain.

 

 

 

18Q12

Reginald Collett

Born after 1886 in Argentina

 

 

 

 

18P37

Isabel Augusta Collett was born at Shepherd’s Bush in 1856 and was four years old in the Hammersmith census of 1861, when she was living at St Stephen’s Parsonage with her family.  On that occasion she was listed as Isabella A Collett.  It was ten years later that she was recorded as Isabel Augusta Collett, age 14, who was living with her family at St Stephen’s Vicarage in Hammersmith.  By 1881 Isabel A Collett, age 24 and unmarried with no stated occupation, was still living with her parents at the vicarage in Coverdale Road in Hammersmith.  However, sometime after that she headed north to Oxford where, in 1891, she was listed as Isabel A Collett, age 34 and from Shepherd’s Bush, living within the St Clement & Headington census registration district.

 

 

 

It would appear that, like three of her sisters, she never married and by 1901 she was still living in Oxford St Giles when, as Isabel A Collett, she was 44 and from Shepherd’s Bush with no stated occupation.  During the first decade of the new century Isabel left Oxford and retired to Devon, where she was living in 1911.  The census that year recorded Isabel Augusta Collett, age 54 and from Shepherd’s Bush, living alone in Newton Abbot on the south coast of the county.

 

 

 

It was over twenty-five years later that Isabel Augusta Collett, spinster of East Wyke, South Zeal near Okehampton in Devon died on 24th August 1935 when administration of her personal effects of £14,367 14 Shillings 3d was granted to her sister, the widow Jessie Suzette Collett- Mason, on 23rd October that same year.

 

 

 

 

18P38

Jessie Susette Collett was born at Shepherds Bush on 18th June 1860, and was ten months old in the Hammersmith census of 1861.  She was the tenth child and youngest daughter of William Lloyd Collett of Little Ilford in Essex, the Vicar of St Stephen’s Church in Shepherd’s Bush, and his wife Frances Harriet Smith of Charlton in Kent.  Ten years later, in the census of 1871, when she would have been 10 years old, she was missing from the family home at St Stephen’s Vicarage in Hammersmith.  However, ten years after that in 1881 she was one of four children still living with her parents at the vicarage on Coverdale Road in Hammersmith, when she was 20 years of age.

 

 

 

It would appear that, before the next census in 1891, Jessie may have been persuaded to leave England for South America by her brother Alfred (above), who had already travelled to that distant continent sometime before 1886.  However, she was not a witness at Alfred’s wedding in April that year, perhaps indicating that she had arrived in the country after 1886. 

 

 

 

What is known though is that she married James Collett Mason by the publishing of banns at St John’s Anglican Cathedral in Buenos Aires on 20th August 1887, and that her married brother Alfred Collett (above) was a witness at the ceremony.  James was born on 27th October 1853 at Chorlton in Manchester, the youngest child of William Wallis Mason (born in 1806) and his wife Mary Anne Poole and the great grandson of William Wallis Mason and his first wife Mary Collett of Eyke (Ref. 18M7).  Jessie’s great grandfather was Robert Collett of Eyke (Ref. 18M9), the brother of Mary Collett, thus confirming that Jessie and James were in fact distant cousins. 

 

 

 

The cathedral record confirmed that Jessie Susette Collett from England was a resident in the Belgrano district of the city, while James Collett Mason, who was also from England, was living in Santa Fe Province.  The witnesses at the service were recorded as J. Palmer Smythies, Alfred Collett, John Joseph Bithell, O. P. S. Nancy, J. G. Russell, and T. W. Hubbard.  The officiating minister at the ceremony was Waite Hockin Stirling, the Bishop of the Falkland Islands.

 

 

 

Jessie’s and James’ first child, their daughter Margaret Marion Collett-Mason, was born while the couple was living in Buenos Aires, while their next four children were born at Rosario in Argentina.  It was the couple’s youngest child, William Collett Mason, who inherited everything from his father to the detriment of his siblings.

 

 

 

It was sometime after the birth of the couple’s last child that James Collett Mason and his family returned to England where her became a Justice of the Peace.  Burkes Landed Gentry [2001] states that he lived at Nieuport Hall in Eardisley in the County of Herefordshire, whereas the 1963 version of Debrett when listing his daughter Asceline Frances Collett Mason, referred to him as the late James Collett Mason JP of Ashurst Place, Langton Green in Kent.  It was also at the time of the marriage of his eldest daughter in 1918 that his address was given as Nieuport Hall, Eardisley.

 

 

 

In early 1911, prior to the census that year, James sought official approval to incorporate Collett as part of the family’s surname.  This was grant and was in evidence by the end of March 1911 when the census was conducted that year.  From the date of approval the name was hyphenated as Collett-Mason, so James became James Collett Collett-Mason and Jessie became Jessie Susette Collett-Mason.

 

 

 

Certainly at the time of the census in Great Britain in 1911, Jessie was recorded as Jessie Suseth (sic) Collett-Mason, head of the household at The Hoo in Aspley Guise in Bedfordshire.  She was 50 and had been born at St Stephens, Uxbridge Road in London.  Living there with her were her two daughters ‘Aseclin Francis’ and Kathleen Lucy who were both listed as being 19 and born in Argentina.  At that same time Jessie’s youngest son William, age 15, was attending a school in Kent.  Where James was on that day has not been determined.

 

 

 

It was on Saturday 14th December 1929 that Jessie’s husband died while the couple were living at Ashurst Place, Langton Green to the west of Tunbridge Wells.  The following announcement of his passing was printed in The Times newspaper on Tuesday 17th December 1929.  “On December 14, 1929 at Ashurst Place, near Tunbridge Wells, of pneumonia, James Collett Mason, loved husband of Jessie Collett-Mason, aged 76.  Funeral service today (Tuesday) at Langton Green Church, Kent at 2.30 p.m.” 

 

 

 

His widow Jessie was still alive in 1935 when she was given the estate of Isabel Augusta Collett, her older sister (above), to administer.  However, it was towards the end of the following year that Jessie S Collett-Mason died on 15th December 1936 when she was 76.  Her death was recorded at Upton-on-Severn in Worcestershire (Ref. 6c 183) during the last quarter of that year.  The Will of Jessie Susette Mason-Collett was proved in London on 29th April 1937 and this confirmed that she had been living at Melton Lodge in Malvern at the time of her death and that probate was granted to her son William Wallace Collett Collett-Mason, of no occupation, and Paul Braddon a solicitor.  Her personal effects amounted to £8,823 14 Shillings 6d.

 

 

 

While James’ second daughter was Ascelein, his uncle Henry Ward Mason (born at Beverley in 1812) had a son Asline Collett Mason who was born at East Barnet in 1858 who later died in Australia during 1921.  Details about him can be found under James’ daughter Ascelein Frances Collett Mason (Ref. 18Q14), after whom she was presumably named.

 

 

 

18Q13

Margaret Marion Collett Mason

Born on 16.06.1888 in Argentina

 

18Q14

Ascelein Frances Collett Mason

Born on 08.04.1890 in Argentina

 

18Q15

Kathlees Lucy Collett Mason

Born on 23.03.1892 in Argentina

 

18Q16

Augusta F Collett Mason

Born circa 1893/4 in Argentina

 

18Q17

Guillermo Wallis Collett Mason

Born on 25.08.1895 in Argentina

 

 

 

 

18P39

Bernard Stockwell Collett was born at Shepherd’s Bush in 1866 and was baptised on 3rd March 1866 at St Stephen’s Church where his father William Lloyd Collett was the vicar.  He was five years old in the census of 1871 when he and his family were still residing at The Vicarage in Shepherd’s Bush, and ten years later in 1881 he was 15 years of age when he was a boarder at The Priory School, High Street in Marlborough, Wiltshire.  It was around two and a half years later that his death was recorded at Fulham (Ref. 1a 124) during the third quarter of 1883 when he was 17.

 

 

 

 

18P40

Phillis Carthew Collett was born at St Mary Abbot in Kensington, London in 1873, the eldest child of Charles Preston Collett and Lucy Ellen Daniels.  Around 1875 her family left London and moved to Devon where in 1881, they were living at Highclere House on the Warberry Road in Tor-Moham, a parish of Torquay, where Phillis Carthew Collett was seven years old.  Following the death of her family during the 1880s, it would appear that Phillis may have been educated at Cheltenham, since that was where she was recorded in the census of 1891 when she was 17 years old.  It is curious that in the next census of 1901 Phillis C Collett, aged 26, and her brother Arthur P Collett, age 20, were staying with the Borthwick family at 35 Palmerston Place in Edinburgh, while it was twenty-one years after that when their brother Charles Morden Collett (below) married the eldest daughter of Alexander and Katherine Borthwick.

 

 

 

After a ten years Phillis Carthew Collett from London was described as being 37 and a spinster living on private means in the census of 1911, when she was recorded as a boarder at 3 The Grove in Westward Ho In North Devon.  Staying at the same address was her sister Margaret Morden Collett who was 36.  The boarding house was being managed by widow Susan Pennington who was 55 and her two adult children.  Following the death of her aunt Ellen Anna Collett of Swanton Morley Street, off Valerie Road in Bournemouth on 12th June 1921 probate of her estate worth £16,337 14 Shillings 9d was granted to Phillis Carthew Collett, a spinster, and Charles Alfred Morton Lightly, a solicitor.

 

 

 

It was also as Phillis Carthew Collett that she died at the Forbes Fraser Hospital in Bath on 20th April 1938, when her home address was recorded as Heatherlands in Ilsington near Newton Abbot in Devon.  Her Will was proved in London on 23rd June 1938 when her brothers Charles Morden Collett and Arthur Preston Collett, both retired Indian Civil Servants were granted administration of her personal estate of £7,891 8 Shillings 9d.

 

 

 

 

18P42

Charles Morden Collett was born in 1876 at Torquay, just after his parents arrived there from London.  At the age of four years, Charles M Collett was living with his family at Highclere House, Warberry Road in Tor-Moham.  His father died when Charles was around ten or eleven years of age, and by the time of the census in 1891 he was being educated at Upton-on-Severn in Gloucestershire when he was 14.  It is unclear what happened to Charles after 1891, with no record of him located within either of the census returns from 1901 and 1911.  However, it was while he was in Bombay on 21st October 1922 that he married Evelyn Grace Stanhope Borthwick who was born at Winchester on 27th October 1878.  Evelyn S Borthwick was 22 at the time of the census in 1901 when she was living with her parents at 35 Palmerston Place in Edinburgh.  Her father Alexander Borthwick was 62 and the Chief Constable of Police, his wife being the much young Katherine Borthwick who was 45.  Coincidentally on that occasion, staying with the family that day, were two of Charles’ siblings, Phillis C Collett (above) and Arthur P Collett (below), so the two families were known to each other well before Charles married the Borthwick’s eldest daughter.

 

 

 

Charles and Evelyn remained in India after they were married, but just for the next nine months.  After that they then sailed back to England on board the ship Matiana which sailed out Calcutta and into the Port of London, arriving on 26th August 1923.  The passenger list confirmed that Charles was 47 and that the couple’s temporary address in England was the East India United Services Club at 16 St James Square in Seething Wells, Surbiton.  In 1934 and following the death of his mother during the previous year, Charles Morden Collett of no occupation was named with his brother Arthur Preston Collett (below) as the joint executors of her estate.  The same pair was also named in their sister’s Will of 1938, following the death of Phillis Carthew Collett (above) in April that year.

 

 

 

Charles Morden Collett was residing at 15 Wellswood Park in Wellswood, Torquay when he passed away on 31st January 1946 and five months later his Will was proved in London.  Probate of his personal effects amounting to £10,489 11 Shillings 10d was granted jointly to his widow Evelyn Stanhope Grace Collett, his unmarried sister Laura Lesley Collett (below) and William Stanley Richards, a solicitor.  His wife survived him by thirteen years and at the time of the death of Evelyn Stanhope Grace Collett on 15th April 1959 she was living in Flat 3 at Bourne House, 189 Sloane Street in London SW1.  Following her passing her considerable estate of £91,397 13 Shillings 7d was proved in London on 26th June 1959 and placed in the hands of Martins Bank Limited and David Henry Fitzroy Somerset, a private secretary.

 

 

 

 

18P43

Laura Lesley Collett was born at Torquay on 11th October 1878 and was two years old at the time of the census in 1881 when she was living with her family at Warberry Road in Tor-Moham in Torquay.  Almost ten years later her father Charles Preston Collett died and so by April 1891 Laura was 12 and was living with her widowed mother and younger brother Arthur (below) at Highclere in Tor-Moham, Torquay.  No trace has been found of her mother, but by April 1911 Laura Lesley Collett was 32 and was living at Lewisham in London when her occupation was that of a teacher of Swedish gymnastics.  By 1935, when Laura was 56 and still a spinster, she was living in Mozambique but returned to England on board the Union Castle mail steamship Dunbar Castle which sailed from Beira in Mozambique via Durban and Cape Town, arriving at Southampton on 12th August 1935. 

 

 

 

 

18P44

Arthur Preston Collett was born at Torquay on 10th September 1880, the son of Charles Preston Collett and his wife Lucy Ellen Daniels.  He was seven months old on 3rd April 1881 when he was living with his family in Warberry Road at Tor-Moham in Torquay.  Ten years later, and following the death of his father, Arthur was recorded as being 10 years old when he was still living with his widowed mother and sister Laura (above) at Highclere in Tor-Moham, Torquay.

 

 

 

Around the time he was 19 Arthur Preston Collett was admitted as a scholar into Queens College in Cambridge, when he was confirmed as the son of high court judge Charles Collett of Madras.  Prior to going to Cambridge, Arthur had attended Malvern College, from where he matriculated. 
In March 1901 he and his sister Phillis C Collett (above) were recorded in the census that month with the Borthwick family at 35 Palmerston Place in Edinburgh, their eldest daughter Evelyn becoming Evelyn Collett through her married to Charles Morden Collett (above) in 1922.  Arthur entered the I.C.S. during 1903 and served in the United Provinces as Magistrate and Collector. By 1911 he was Deputy Commissioner, and in 1914 was Joint Magistrate.  Arthur was appointed Private Secretary to the Lieutenant-Governor in 1915, and was on military service during the Great War from 1916 to 1919. On leaving the army he continued to work as Magistrate and Collector in 1920, a post he held until 1827.  During the years from 1928 to 1932 he was the Opium Agent and Commissioner of Income Tax in the United Provinces, after which he retired and resided at The Lodge in Hollesley, near Woodbridge in Suffolk.

 

 

 

Following the death of his mother in 1933 Arthur Preston Collett was named with his brother Charles Morden Collett (above) as the joint executors of her estate.  It addition to all of this, it is known that Arthur Preston Collett married Sheila MacKinnon, with whom he had three children who were born in India.  After the birth of their third and apparently last child, the family sailed from Bombay to London on 1st April 1926.  The passenger list named the family as Arthur P Collett, age 45, Sheila Collett, age 28, Phillis Anne Collett who was three, Anthony F Collett who was one and Sheila C Collett who was just three months old.  Arthur and Sheila were living at Felixstowe in 1945 when they receive the sad news that their daughter, Petty Officer Wren Phillis Anne Collett of the Royal Navy, had been killed during the Second World War.

 

 

 

Arthur Preston Collett of Brackenbury Lodge on Cliff Road in Felixstowe died on 25th March 1954 at the age of 73, his death recorded at Samford register office (Ref. 4b 1064).  Probate of his personal effects of £5,719 1 Shilling 11d was granted to Sheila Collett, his widow, to Geoffrey Barham Sankey and James Gutch Swift, solicitors.

 

 

 

18Q18

Phillis Anne Collett

Born during 1922 in India

 

18Q19

Anthony Farquar Charles MacKinnon Collett

Born during 1924 in India

 

18Q20

Sheila Candace Collett

Born during 1926 in India

 

 

 

 

18P45

Edward Pyemont Collett was born in Leicestershire in 1862, the eldest of three sons of Henry Pyemont Collett of Suffolk and Isabella Lamb Frazer of Wolverhampton.  Shortly after he was born his parents moved to Norfolk, and in 1871 they were living within the Wisbech & Terrington St Clement district of the county when Edward was eight years old, but was listed in the census as Edward Pyewood Collett.  Ten years later, at the age of 18, Edward from Leicester, was a medical student studying dentistry at Hastings, where he was living with his family at 12 Springfield Road.  On that occasion his mother and youngest brother were both absent, so it was just his father and his brother Henry (below) who were there at that time.

 

 

 

It was five years later that Edward Pyemont Collett married Aurora Beatrice Landi from London at St Ann’s Church in Westminster during 1886.  Once married the couple settled in the Chorlton-cum-Hardy district of Manchester where Edward took up work as a dentist.  It was while they were living there that Aurora presented Edward with two children, while the couple was living at Keppell Road in Chorlton-cum-Hardy.  In 1891 the family of four living at Chorlton-cum-Hardy was recorded in the census return as follows.  Edward P Collett was 28, his wife Aurora B Collett was 27, and their two children were Nora Collett who was three, although she was incorrectly noted as Flora, and Henry R P Collett who was under one year old.

 

 

 

Both of the children were sent to private schools, so in March 1901, it was only Edward and Aurora that were recorded as living at Chorlton-cum-Hardy.  Edward P Collett, age 38, from Hinckley in Leicestershire, was a dentist, while his wife Aurora B Collett from London was 37.  Their daughter Nora Collett, age 13, was attending a school in Sussex, with her brother Robert at a school in Harrogate at the age of ten.  Both children were confirmed as having been born at Chorlton-cum-Hardy.

 

 

 

By the time of the next census in April 1911, the family had moved to Bucklow near Knutsford in Cheshire, and also by that time, Edward’s daughter Nora was married to John Cooke and they were living at Tynemouth in Northumberland.  Living at Bucklow were Edward Pyemont Collett 48, Aurora Beatrice Collett 47, and their son Henry Robert Pyemont Collett who was 20.

 

 

 

18Q21

Nora Collett

Born in 1887 at Chorlton-cum-Hardy

 

18Q22

Henry Robert Pyemont Collett

Born in 1890 at Chorlton-cum-Hardy

 

 

 

 

18P46

Henry Francis Collett was born in 1864 after his parents, Henry Pyemont Collett and Isabella Lamb Frazer had moved to Norfolk.  In the census of 1871 the family was recorded as living within the Wisbech & Terrington St Clement registration district, where Henry Francis Collett was six years old.  However, during the next few years the family moved to Hastings on the south coast.  By 1881 Henry F Collett from Norfolk was still attending school at the age of 16, while he was living at the family home at 12 Springfield Road in Hastings St Leonards.  What happened to Henry after that time has not yet been discovered, but no record of him has been found in the census returns for 1891, 1901, and 1911.

 

 

 

His absence may be a result of the fact that he spent some time in his life living in America and may have been a frequent traveller across the Atlantic Ocean.  Certainly there is a record of Henry F Collett aged 27 sailing on the ship Etruria from New York which arrived at Liverpool during February 1892.  On the passenger list his occupation was stated as being involved in mining.

 

 

 

 

18P47

John Anthony Collett was born in 1866, the youngest of the three sons of Henry Pyemont Collett and Isabella Lamb Frazer.  There is some confusion concerning his place of birth.  The favoured option is Norfolk, since it is known that his father was attached to the Church of St Mary in Tilney-cum-Islington near King’s Lynn in 1867, where the family was living in 1871 when, as John Anthony Collett, he was four years old.  The confusion arises from the next census in 1881 when John A Collett, age 13, was attending Norton House College at Luton in Bedfordshire, and the census return gave his place of birth as Leicester.  That may have been an error on the part of the college, although it is established that his older brother Edward (above) was born in Leicestershire.

 

 

 

Perhaps for reasons of military service, no record of John has been located within the census of 1891, but in March 1901 he was still a bachelor at 34, when living at Dawlish in Devon.  Following the death of his father sometime during the previous few years, John was living with his widowed mother Isabella, who was described as living on her own means, while John had no stated occupation.  With his mother passing away just after 1901, John moved from Dawlish to Bristol, where he was recorded in April 1911 as John Anthony Collett from Norfolk who was unmarried at the age of 44.

 

 

 

 

18P48

Charles Hubert Edgar Collett was born at Brightwell-cum-Foxhall in Suffolk on 30th December 1862, and was baptised there on 12th July 1863, the son of Charles and Eliza Collett.  According to the census in 1881 Charles Hubert Edgar Collett was born at Paddington in London in 1862.  The census return also indicated that he had followed his father into the world of finance and at the age of 18 years he was a stockbroker’s clerk working in London while living at the family home in 13 Windsor Road in Ealing.

 

 

 

 

18P49

Anthony Keeling Collett was born at Cromhall near Wootton-under-Edge on 22nd August 1877, the eldest son of the Reverend William Michael Collett.  He was three years old in the census of 1881 when he was living with his family at The Rectory in Cromhall.  Ten years later, following the death of his father and at the age of 13, Anthony was living with his widowed mother at Axbridge in Somerset.  He was educated at Bradfield College in Berkshire and on 26th January 1896 was an elected scholar at Oriel College in Oxford on payment of £10.  It was at Oriel College where he matriculated on 22nd October 1896.  Two years later in 1898 he obtained a Third Class in Classical Moderations and, after a further two years, a Second Class in Final Classical School in 1900.  1900 was also the year he was made Bishop Fraser’s Scholar.  During that period in his life he also attended the University of Berlin.

 

 

 

The following year Anthony was 23 and was living at Theale in Berkshire where he was working as a journalist.  Following that he worked for The Globe and four years later in 1905 he was on the staff of the St James’ Gazette.  He was later employed by the magazine County Gentleman and that was followed by over twenty years writing for The Times.  He was initially a writer on nature, but held the position of leader writer from 1908 to 1922.

 

 

 

He lived most of his adult life in London, but travelled to Italy, Wales and Scotland.  During the First World War he enlisted as a private with the Post Office Rifles.  After gaining a commission, Anthony saw active service in France where he was involved in the battle at Vimy Ridge.  Following an injury, he was invalided back to England and spent the last part of the war in the Historical Section of the War Office.  His love of nature lead to him writing a number of books on the subject. 

 

 

 

In May 1920 Anthony Keeling Collett, a journalist, was granted permission through the probate service to settle the Will of his aunt Bertha Emily Wright near Collett, the older sister of his father, who died in hospital in Felixstowe earlier that year.

 

 

 

He never married and it was on 22nd August 1929 that Anthony Keeling Collett died of a wasting illness while attending a London nursing home.  The official notice of the proving of his Will contained the following details.  He was described as Anthony Keeling Collett of The Oxford & Cambridge Club in Pall Mall, London, while his place of residence was 5 Collingham Gardens in Earls Court, London.  Probate was granted in London on 3rd October 1929, when Christopher Edward Nicholl, a schoolmaster, and George Sidney Freeman, a journalist, were named as the executors of his estate of £3,074 10 Shillings 9d.

 

 

 

 

18P50

John Colet Collett was born at Cromhall on 30th August 1880, the youngest of the two sons of the Reverend William Michael Collett and his wife Alice.  From 1893 to 1897 he was educated at Rossall School in Fleetwood, following which he became a Civil Engineering Student studying at Heysham in Lancashire, as confirmed by the Census of 1901 in which he was listed as being aged 20 years and of Cromhall.  He was known within the family as Jack Collett and worked as a railway engineer, his work taking him to Russia and China in the early years of the twentieth century.  He eventually married Ardie O’Brien although they never had any children.

 

 

 

Curiously though on one of his overseas outings the passenger list named his travelling companion as Ellen Collett.  On that occasion in 1931 John Collett, an engineer of 51, and Ellen Collett who was 46, arrived in the Port of London on the ship Highland Chief which had sailed from River Plate in South America.  Their intended address was given as 49 Grosvenor Street in London W1, while their last country of permanent residence was given as Uruguay.  Their long sea voyage had been in a First Class cabin.

 

 

 

So was Ardie O’Brien the second wife of Jack Collett since in their later years together Jack and Ardie spent time in a villa that they owned at Rapallo in Italy which was still part of Jack’s estate when he passed away.  John Colet Collett died on 24th July 1960 at Via Privata Ghizolfo, 22 Rapallo in Italy, his wife having already died by then.  Probate of his personal effects amounting to £46,958 4 Shillings 8d was handled by the National Provincial Bank Limited at their Lincolns Inn Branch in Carey Street, London WC2.  His Will was proved at Bristol on 10th October at which time the executors of his estate were named as Francis Stephen Perry, a medical practitioner, and Margaret Clare Monk, the wife of Christopher William Monk.

 

 

 

Under the terms of his Will his estate was divided between just three individuals, one of them being his nephew, the aforementioned Francis Stephen Perry.  As a result, many of the antiques and personal possessions of John Colet Collett were passed to his nephew, one of which was an embroidered silk wallet containing his passport and the visiting card of the Viceroy of Canton.  The passport was issued by the Foreign Office in London on 25th January 1912, at which time John Colet Collett was 31 and a civil engineer travelling to Russia.  The many different hand stamps clearly demonstrate that he travelled a great deal during 1912 and 1913.

 

 

 

 

18P51

Ada Wright was born on 8th August 1884 at 2 Craven’s Terrace off Albert Street in Kingston-upon-Hull.  She married Walter Benson on 27th July 1907 at the Newport Registration Office in Monmouthshire.  Walter was the son of Thomas Boulton Benson and Selina Stanton Mumby and was born on 29th November 1885.  Once they were married Ada and Walter moved to Scotland and it was while they were in Glasgow that their first child was born.  Shortly after the family of three moved to the Manchester area and while they were living at 11 Walton Road in Blackley their second child was born.

 

 

 

A final move took the family just one mile from Blackley to Harpurhey where Ada’s and Walter’s remaining children were born.  During his life Walter was a musician and it was his work that eventually was the cause of his death.  Tragically on 6th October 1926, while working as a musical director for the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC), he was killed in a motorcycle accident in Aberdeen where he was buried.  Ada remained living at Harpurhey after her husband’s death and, twenty-five years later, it was there that she passed away on 18th May 1951 aged 66.

 

 

 

18Q23

Selina Benson

Born on 03.06.1908

 

18Q24

Ernest Walter Benson

Born on 09.05.1910

 

18Q25

Francis William Benson           twin

Born on 19.07.1912

 

18Q26

Edna Benson                           twin

Born on 19.07.1912

 

18Q27

Hector Benson

Born on 21.10.1913

 

18Q28

Myra Benson

Born on 18.03.1917

 

 

 

 

18P54

Florence Mary Collett was born at Edmondsley near Chester-le-Street in County Durham 1874, the eldest child of Charles Collett and Elizabeth Alice Field who were married in Suffolk during the first three months of that same year.  Not long after she was born her parents moved to Sunderland, but by 1881 the family was living at 4 Johnsons Place in the Holy Trinity district of Hull, where Florence was recorded as being six years old.  They were only at Hull for a short while, as the family finally settled in Ipswich where they were living at the time of the census in 1891.  However, by that time Florence had already left the family home and was living at 53 Lordship Park in Stoke Newington, where she was employed as a general servant to Otto Schallert, a journalist editor who was born in Germany, and his wife Barbara from Essex.

 

 

 

Five years later, in 1896, she married James Johnson at Billericay in Essex with whom she had six children up to 1910.  They were all born while the couple was living at Chelmsford in Essex, and they were Charles Thomas Johnson (born 1898), Frederick Edward Johnson (born 1899), Annie May Johnson (born 1901), William Henry Johnson (born 1904), Elizabeth Mabel Johnson (born 1907), and Florence Lydia Johnson who was born in 1910.

 

 

 

By the time of the census in 1901 Florence and her husband James were living at Friars Place in New London within the Moulsham area of Chelmsford with four children; Albert Ernest Johnson, age 14 who was James’ son from his first wife Annie Sophie Jacobs who died in 1893, Charles Johnson who was three, Frederick Johnson who was two, and Annie Johnson who was just five months old.  Both James and his eldest son were coach painters.

 

 

 

It would appear that, after the birth of their sixth child, the family moved the very short distance to 4 Spains Croft, The Chase in Widford, just outside Chelmsford, where they were living in April 1911.  With Florence and James on that occasion were five of their six.  They were Charles 13, Frederick 12, William who was seven, Elizabeth Mabel who was four, and Florence Lydia who was one year old. James Johnson was still a coach painter, but by that time, he was working on his own account.  Their missing eldest daughter Annie May was staying at her grandparents' house in Ipswich, where she was recorded simply as May Johnson, who was ten years old.  It is thought that Florence Mary Johnson nee Collett died at Chelmsford in 1933, when she was 59.

 

 

 

 

18P55

Elizabeth Honor Collett was born at Sunderland in 1876 and moved with her family, first to Hull and then to Ipswich where they were living in 1890.  It was nine years later that she married William Hallows at Islington in London in 1899, William having been born at Romford in Essex in 1877.  In March 1901 Elizabeth and her husband were living in Romford with their first child, William Henry Hallows, who was only two months old.  Over the next decade Elizabeth presented William with three more children, but sadly only one of their four children survived.  The aforementioned William Henry Hallows was born at Romford in January 1901, but he died at Camberwell in 1906.

 

 

 

By March 1911 Elizabeth, age 34, and her husband William, age 33, were living in the Camberwell area of London.  They were described as having been married for twelve years, during which time they had had four children although only one of them was still alive.  That was Walter Hallows who was two years old, who had been born at Camberwell.  It is very likely that the couple’s missing two children were Cyril Joseph Hallows, who was born at Romford in 1903, the same year that he died there, and Charles Frederick Hallows, who was born at Camberwell in 1904, and who died there in 1906, during the same quarter of that year as their first child William Henry Hallows. 

 

 

 

It was on 7th December 1937 in his home at Maple View, 25 Beech Street, Romford in Essex, that William Hallows died at the age of 60, following which probate was granted in favour of his widow Elizabeth Honor Hallows for his personal effects valued at £913 17 Shillings 3d.  Five years earlier their only surviving child Walter Hallows had married Ann C Stanton at Romford in 1932 with whom he had three children who were all born at Romford.  They were Brian D Hallows (born 1933), Ann Hallows (born 1935) and Patrick Hallows (born 1939).  Elizabeth Honor Hallows nee Collett outlived her husband by twenty-seven years, when she passed away on 24th August 1964.  At the time of her death Elizabeth’s home was at 11 Vine Street in Romford, although it was at Hainault Lodge in Hainault, Essex where she died.  Administration of her personal effects of £3,360 was granted to her son Walter Hallows, a sign writer.

 

 

 

 

18P56

Charles Frederick W Collett was born at Sunderland in 1879 and two years later his family were living in the Holy Trinity district of Hull at 4 Johnsons Place.  In 1890 the family had returned to their Suffolk roots and was living at Vine Cottage in St George’s Ipswich.  Ten years later Charles, at the age of 21, was still living with his family in the St Margaret’s area of Ipswich where he was working as a coach painter.  It was just two years after that when Charles became a married man at Ipswich.

 

 

 

His wife Emma was born at Sproughton to the west of Ipswich in 1878 and after they were married the couple living at 316 Foxhall Road in Ipswich where their only known child was born, and where the family of three was residing in April 1911.  By that time in his life Charles from Sunderland was 31 and a coach builder and a blacksmith.  His wife of seven years Emma was 32, while their daughter Elizabeth Collett was only seven months old, described as the only child of the couple.

 

 

 

The death of Charles F Collett was recorded at Ipswich register office (Ref. 4b 827) during the third quarter of 1966, when his age was incorrectly recorded as 89.

 

 

 

18Q29

Elizabeth Collett

Born in August 1910 at Ipswich

 

 

 

 

18P57

Maria Collett was born at 4 Johnsons Place in Kingston-upon-Hull in 1881, although the birth took place after 3rd April, the day of the census that year.  She was the youngest of the four children of Charles Collett of Halesworth and his wife Elizabeth Field from Ipswich.  Not long after she was born her parents left Hull and returned to Suffolk, and by 1891 the family was residing at Vine Cottage within the St George’s district of Ipswich, where Maria Collett was nine years old.  Tragically Maria Collett was just 19 years old when she died at Britannia Road in Ipswich on 15th November 1900, following which she was buried at St Margaret’s Church in Ipswich on 20th November 1900.

 

 

 

 

18P60

William Collett was born during the latter months of 1846 and within six month of the marriage of his parents.  No baptism has been found but tragically he died when he was two years old and was buried at Mettingham on 24th December 1848, the eldest child of William Collett and his wife Mary Ann Bradnum.

 

 

 

 

18P61

Maud Matilda Collett was born at Mettingham at the end of 1847, her birth being recorded at Wangford during the first quarter of the following year.  She was the eldest surviving child of William Collett of Mettingham and Mary Ann Bradnum of Kirby Cane.  She was three years old in the census of 1851 when she was one of only two children living at Mettingham with her parents.  The second child was her sister Harriet (below), and not her brother Benjamin who was older than Harriet.

 

 

 

Upon leaving the village school in Mettingham it would appear that it was arranged for Matilda to enter domestic service with the Boggis family at Home Farm in Gorleston.  That was confirmed by the census in 1861 which placed Matilda Collett, age 13 and from Mettingham, as a servant to James and Charlotte Boggis. 

 

 

 

Home Farm was 200 acres and James Boggis employed eight men and two boys to help him manage the land.  It would also appear that the Boggis family had only moved to Gorleston three or four years earlier, since the two eldest children had been born at Kirby Cane, where Matilda’s mother was born.  So it is likely it was through that connection that Matilda was taken on by the family.

 

 

 

Within the next ten years Matilda made her way to London and by 1871 she was working in domestic service at the home of ‘factor of paper hangings’ Charles Weedon and his wife Maria at 323 Caledonian Road in Islington.  It also seems very likely that she secured work for her two younger sisters, since they were both working together in Islington by 1881.  In July 1876 a certain Maud Matilda Collett was one of the witnesses at the Burgh Castle wedding of Matilda’s younger brother Joseph Collett (below) and she was more than likely this Matilda Collett.

 

 

 

According to the census of 1881 Matilda was still a spinster at the age of 34, when she was still working as a domestic servant for Charles Weedon, but at 13 Thornhill Square in Islington.  Her place of birth was confirmed as Mettingham.  It was also around that time in her life that Matilda became pregnant by a so far unknown gentleman, the child being born at Gorleston later that same year.

 

 

 

Following the birth of her son Matilda returned to live with her parents who, in 1891, were living in Porter’s Lane in Burgh Castle.  Matilda Collett from Mettingham was 44 and was working as a charwoman.  The only other occupant at her parents’ home was George J Collett, age nine years and from Gorleston, who was described as the grandson to head of the household William Collett. 

 

 

 

However, just a few months prior to the next census in 1901 Matilda’s son, aged around 19, must have died by some means, since his death was recorded at Yarmouth during the last quarter of 1900.  So the census in the following March listed just unmarried Matilda Collett, age 54 and from Mettingham, as continuing to work as a charwoman, while a servant at the home of farmer John H Chapman and his wife Susan at St Johns Road in Belton Entire in the parish of All Saints, just one dwelling from the Kings Head Inn.

 

 

 

By the time of the census of 1911, Matilda Collett from Mettingham was still living and working at the home of the Chapman family in Belton.  At that time Matilda was 65, while Susan Chapman, age 69, was a widow and had living with her, her daughter Beatrice Chapman who was 35.  It was during the first three months of 1925 that Matilda Collett died at the age of 77, her death being recorded at Stow register office (Ref. 4a 1070) near Bury St Edmunds.

 

 

 

18Q30

George James Collett

Born in 1881 at Gorleston

 

 

 

 

18P62

Emma Collett was born at Mettingham on 14th September 1848, where she was buried three days later on 17th September 1848.  It is understood that she was the daughter of William Collett and Mary Ann Bradnum.

 

 

 

 

18P63

Charlotte Collett may have been a twin sister to Emma (above) and was most likely born in 1848, the daughter of William Collett and Mary Ann Bradnum, who registered the birth at Mutford during first three months of the following year.  Curiously though, and the same as her brother Benjamin (below), she was not recorded living with her family in the Mettingham census of 1851.  By 1861, at the age of 12, Charlotte Collett from Mettingham was already working as a servant at the Burgh Castle home of her uncle and aunt James (24) and Mary Bradnum (25).

 

 

 

She was still living in that same area ten years later, as confirmed by the Mutford & Gorleston census of 1871, when she was recorded as Charlotte Collet (sic), age 22.  Just over three weeks after the census day, Charlotte married John William Jackson at Burgh Castle on 25th April 1871.  He had been born at Reedham in 1842, the son of agricultural labourer James Jackson and his wife Mary Ann Sales.  Four year later Charlotte’s brother William Collet (below) married John’s sister Elizabeth Jackson.

 

 

 

During the following decade Charlotte presented John with six children.  The first three were born while they were living at Somerleyton in Suffolk, while the second three were born after the family had settled in the village of Cantley in Norfolk, where they were living at the time of the census in 1881.  John Jackson, age 39, was a plate layer working on the railway which passed through Cantley, his wife Charlotte was 33 and from Mettingham, and their six children were Louisa 9, Matilda 7, Sarah 6, James 4, Dinah 3, and Kate who was one year old.

 

 

 

Two further children were added to the family during the following five years, but by 1891 two of the couple’s older children had left home by then.  So the family recorded in the census of 1891 comprised John 50, Charlotte 43, Matilda 17, James 14, Dinah 13, Kate 11, Alice 8, and Violet who was four years old. 

 

 

 

It is of some significance that Charlotte’s daughter Sarah Anna Jackson married Thomas William Collett (Ref. 18Q43) at Yarmouth in 1898, he being the son of Charlotte’s brother William Collett (below).  John William Jackson died during 1925, while his widow Charlotte Jackson nee Collett survived him by ten years, when she died in 1935 at the age of 85.

 

 

 

 

18P64

Benjamin Collett was born at Mettingham in early 1850, the second surviving child and eldest son of William Collett and Mary Ann Bradnum.  The birth was registered at the Wangford Registrar’s Office during the second quarter of 1850.  Curiously though, he was not listed with his family at the time of the census a year later in 1851, whereas he was 11 years old ten years later in 1861. 

 

 

 

By the time of the census in 1871, he had already moved out of his parent’s home, which by then was at Burgh Castle near Great Yarmouth.  At that time in his life he was a seaman on board the fishing boat ‘Royal Oak’.  Two years later Benjamin married Emily Turvey Pearson at Burgh Castle on 30th April 1873, the event being recorded at Mutford Registration District during the second quarter of 1873.  Emily was born at Burgh Castle, the daughter of agricultural labourer James Pearson and his wife Mary Ann, and her birth had also been registered at Mutford R D during the second quarter of 1852.  Benjamin Collett was also a witness at the marriage of his younger brother Joseph (below) who was married at Burgh Castle in 1876.

 

 

 

During the following years Emily presented Benjamin with six children, four of them born before the next census in 1881, although the youngest of the three died just two weeks before the census day.  According to the census that year, Benjamin Collett, age 30 and a fisherman from Mettingham, was living with his family at 12 Manor House in Burgh Castle.  On that occasion he was the third hand on board the fishing boat ‘Allah’.  His wife Emily was 28, and their three surviving children were Selina Collett, who was six, George Collett, who was three, and Jessie Collett who was two years old, all three of them having been born at Burgh Castle.  Also living with the family was Emily’s widowed mother Mary Ann Pearson aged 63 of Norwich.

 

 

 

On the day of the census Emily was expecting the imminent birth of her fifth child, which was born towards the end of June 1881.  However, further tragedy hit the family just two weeks later when the baby died.  It was also during the next decade that it would appear Benjamin Collett died, since he was not listed in the census of 1891 or 1901.  Curiously no burial record has been found for him at Burgh Castle, so it is possible that he died while at work at sea.  However, just a few months later there was recorded at Pancras (Ref. 1b 99) during the third quarter of 1881 the death of Benjamin Collett who was 31 years of age.

 

 

 

In 1891 the widow of Benjamin Collett was still living in a dwelling in the High Road (High Street) at Burgh Castle, when the family was recorded as Emily J Collett, age 38, the head of the household and a laundress, her son George W Collett 13, Jessie Collett 12 and Louis Collett who nine years old.  Ten years later it was only Emily, age 48, who was living at Holly Cottage in the High Street at Burgh Castle, with just her youngest child.  Louis Collett was 18, and was not credited with an occupation, whereas his mother was described as a washer and laundress on that occasion.

 

 

 

After a few more years Emily’s son Louis was married and started a family of his own.  However, by April 1911, Louis and his wife and their two daughters were still living in the High Street at Burgh Castle, and still living there with them was his mother Emily who was 58.

 

 

 

18Q31

Selina Margaret Collett

Born in 1874 at Burgh Castle

 

18Q32

George William Collett

Born in 1877 at Burgh Castle

 

18Q33

Jesse Benjamin Collett

Born in 1878 at Burgh Castle

 

18Q34

Arthur Herbert Collett

Born in 1880 at Burgh Castle

 

18Q35

Eliza Collett

Born in 1881 at Burgh Castle

 

18Q36

Louis Arthur Collett

Born in 1882 at Burgh Castle

 

 

 

 

18P65

Harriet Collett was born at Mettingham in early 1851 and her birth was recorded at Wangford during the first quarter of that year.  Furthermore she was only a few weeks old by the time of the census at the end of March in 1851 when she was living at Mettingham with her parents and her older sister Matilda (above).  In the next census of 1861 Harriet, age 10, was still living at Mettingham with her large family.  However, sometime between 1866 and 1870 Harriet and her family left Mettingham, when they moved nearer to Great Yarmouth, to settle at Burgh Castle.  With the family having twelve children, there may well have been an over-crowding issue in the new Collett household which prompted the older members to leave.

 

 

 

Certainly by the time of the census in 1871, Harriet, age 19, and her younger sister Sarah (below) were living within the Yarmouth Southern district of the town.  By that time both girls had entered into world of domestic service.  Ten years later Harriet was still unmarried at the age of 29, but by then she was a domestic servant at the north London home of George Pavely and his wife Mary.  George was a wholesale bookbinder employing 100 hands, while living at 132 Queens Road in Hornsey, Middlesex.  It is possible that Harriet never married because in the census of 1901, at the age of 50, she was still working for the George Pavely at his home in the St Pancras area of London.

 

 

 

How long she worked for the Pavely family is not known, but in April 1911 she was employed as a domestic cook at the home of elderly Thomas Edmund Oldacre and his even older wife Jane.  Unmarried Harriet Collett was 56 and was one of eight people listed at the dwelling at 7 Hillmarton Road in Islington, North London, while her place of birth was incorrectly recorded as Bungay in Suffolk.  It was just over seven years later that Harriet Collett died at Islington where her death was recorded during the third quarter of 1918 (Ref.  1b 232).

 

 

 

 

18P66

Joseph Collett was born at Mettingham at the start of 1852, with his birth being registered at Wangford between January and March that year.  He was nine years old in the Mettingham census of 1861 when he was still living there with his family.  During the last years of that decade his parents, William and Mary Ann Collett, took the family to live at Burgh Castle where Joseph, age 18, was living and working in 1871.  However, on that occasion he was a fisherman living at Bull Way in Burgh Castle, at the home of journeyman tile-maker Thomas Stannard and his wife Eliza.

 

 

 

It was just over five years later that he married the widow Elizabeth Penrose at Burgh Castle on 26th July 1876.  Elizabeth, who had been made a widow at the age of 21, was born at Burgh Castle during the third quarter of 1857, the daughter of Thomas Lock or Lack.  The witnesses at their wedding were Benjamin Collett and Maud Matilda Collett.  Benjamin was most likely Joseph’s brother (above), while Maud may have been his older unmarried sister Maud Matilda (above).  The marriage of Joseph and Elizabeth produced six children, the first born at Burgh Castle prior to the family settling in Gorleston from where Joseph continued his occupation as a fisherman. 

 

 

 

It was his work at sea that was the reason why he was missing from the census in 1881 and 1891 when, in the first of these, his wife and their first two children were living at 5 Manby Road in Gorleston.  Elizabeth Collett from Burgh Castle was 25 and was working as a charwoman, Susan Collett also from Burgh Castle was two years old, and Mary Ann Collett from Gorleston was only a few weeks old.  The birth of the first child had been registered at Mutford during the second quarter of 1879, while the younger child’s birth had been registered there during the first quarter of 1881.

 

 

 

Four more children were added to the family over the next eight years, and by the time of the census in 1891 Elizabeth and her young family were residing at 2 Back Wall Reach in Gorleston.  Once again Elizabeth’s husband was confirmed as being away at sea, so the family comprised Elizabeth, age 35, Susan, who was 12, Maryann, who was 10, Alice, who was seven, Georgina Kate, who was four, Joseph Thom, who was three, and George Hy who was one year old.  The births of all four younger children were registered at Mutford; Alice in the third quarter of 1883, Georgina in the third quarter of 1886, Joseph in the first quarter of 1888, and George during the third quarter of 1889.

 

 

 

What happened to the family after 1891 is not known, but it was only Joseph Collett who has been positively identified within the census of 1901, and he was described as a being 48 and the master of a fishing boat working out of Durness, Loch Eriboll in Sutherland, at the most northerly tip of Scotland.

 

 

 

18Q37

Susan Collett

Born in 1879 at Burgh Castle

 

18Q38

Mary Ann Collett

Born in 1881 at Gorleston

 

18Q39

Alice Collett

Born in 1883 at Gorleston

 

18Q40

Georgina Kate Collett

Born in 1886 at Gorleston

 

18Q41

Joseph Thomas Collett

Born in 1888 at Gorleston

 

18Q42

George Henry Collett

Born in 1889 at Gorleston

 

 

 

 

18P67

William Collett was born at Mettingham in 1854, and was baptised there on 2nd September 1854, the son of William and Mary Ann Collett.  He was eight years old in 1861 when living at Mettingham with his family.  By 1871 the family was living at Burgh Castle where William was 17 years old.

 

 

 

It was during the first quarter of 1875 that he married Elizabeth Jackson at Loddon in Norfolk, where the marriage was registered.  Elizabeth was born at Reedham in Norfolk during 1853, and was the daughter of agricultural labourer James Jackson and Mary Ann Sales.  She was also the sister of John William Jackson who married William’s sister Charlotte Collett (above).  Once married, the couple spent the first few years of their life together living at Wheatacre, between Beccles and Lowestoft.  And it was there that their first two children were born, although it was only the second child who was baptised at All Saints Church in Wheatacre when the baptism record revealed that William’s occupation was that of a fisherman.

 

 

 

The young family later moved to Lowestoft where two further children were born before 1881.  By the time of the census that year William, age 28, was employed as a fisherman and was living with his family at 2 Hervey Street in Lowestoft.  His wife was 27 and their four children at that time were their two sons Thomas who was five and Frank who was three, both born at Wheatacre in Norfolk, and their daughters Frances Beatrice Collett who was one year old, and Dinah Daisy Collett who was just three months old.  Both girls had been born after the family had moved to Lowestoft.  Tragically it would appear that Frances Beatrice died shortly after 1881, since the very next child born into the family was also named Beatrice Collett.

 

 

 

A total of five children were born into the family during the 1880s, so by the time of the census in 1891 Elizabeth Collett was 38 and was then living at 26 Trafalgar Road in West Gorleston with her eight surviving children.  They were Thomas W Collett 14, Frank Collett 13, Daisy Collett who was nine, Beatrice Collett who was eight, Ethel Collett who six, George Collett who was five, Louis Collett who was four, and Albert Collett who was one year old.  No record has been found of her husband William in 1891 so, as a fisherman, he may well have been at sea on the day of the census in 1891, since he was back with his wife and family at Gorleston for the census in March 1901.

 

 

 

At the age of 47, William Collett of Mettingham was working as a skipper at the local seaman’s mission in Gorleston, while he and his family were residing at 150 Bells Road in Gorleston.  His wife Elizabeth was 47 and from Reedham, and the children still living with their parents were Ethel 16, George 15, Lewis 13, all three of them born at Lowestoft, and Albert 11, and Jessie who was nine, both of them born at Gorleston.  Ten years later in 1911 the family was still living in Gorleston where William and Elizabeth were both 57, and the only children still living with them on that occasion were Lewis 23, Albert 21, and daughter Jessie who was 19.

 

 

 

18Q43

Thomas William Collett

Born in 1876 at Wheatacre

 

18Q44

Frank Ernest Collett

Born in 1877 at Wheatacre

 

18Q45

Frances Beatrice Collett

Born in 1879 at Lowestoft

 

18Q46

Dinah Daisy Collett

Born in 1880 at Lowestoft

 

18Q47

Beatrice Frances Collett

Born in 1882 at Lowestoft

 

18Q48

Ethel Mary Collett

Born in 1884 at Lowestoft

 

18Q49

George Collett

Born in 1885 at Lowestoft

 

18Q50

Louis James Collett

Born in 1887 at Lowestoft

 

18Q51

Albert Collett

Born in 1889 at Gorleston

 

18Q52

Jessie Collett

Born in 1891 at Gorleston

 

 

 

 

18P68

Sarah Collett was born at Mettingham in 1855 and was recorded as being six years old in the Mettingham census of 1861 where it is known she and her family were living up to 1866.  Unlike her siblings, no registration of her birth has been found to date.  In the years after 1866 the family moved to Burgh Castle, but perhaps because of the cramped conditions, Sarah and her older sister Harriet left home to enter domestic service in Great Yarmouth.  The 1871 census for the Yarmouth southern district listed Sarah Collett, age 15 and from Mettingham, as a servant living and working at the King Street home in Yarmouth of house builder James Howard and his wife Bessie.  Her obvious absence from the next census in 1881 as Sarah Collett very likely indicates that she was married during the second half of the 1870s.

 

 

 

 

18P69

Henry Collett was born at Mettingham during mid-February in 1856, where he was baptised one month later on 21st March 1856, the son of William and Mary Ann Collett.  Tragically it was exactly two weeks later that he was buried there on 4th April 1856 at just seven weeks old.

 

 

 

 

18P70

Dinah Collett was born at Mettingham in 1857 and was baptised there on 8th November 1857, the daughter of William and Mary Ann Collett.  Dinah was five years old in the Mettingham census of 1861, following which her family moved to Burgh Castle in the late 1860s, where Dinah was 13 at the time of the Burgh Castle census of 1871.  Dinah later joined up with her sister Jemima (below) and the two of them headed for London to find work, where their older sister Matilda was already gainfully employed.

 

 

 

Matilda was working in the Islington area of London and it may have been Matilda who arranged for her two younger sisters to enter into domestic service in that area.  By 1881 Dinah Collett, age 23 and of Mettingham, was working as a nurse to four years old Cecil J Benson at the home of his parents Joseph and Rebecca Benson at 57 Hilldrop Road, where he sister also worked.  Joseph Benson was a Baptist Minister, while both he and his wife were credited as being the managers of a firm of coal merchants.  Dinah was still being employed by the Benson family ten years later in 1891, but thereafter may have been married.

 

 

 

 

18P71

George Collett was born at Mettingham in 1858, and it was there also that he was baptised on 14th November 1858, the son of William and Mary Ann Collett.  George was two years old in the 1861 Census for that village and was living there with his parents.  He was still with his parents ten years later when he was 12, by which time the family was living at Burgh Castle.  Burgh Castle overlooks Breydon Water on the eastern edge of the Norfolk Broads and close to the North Sea, so it made sense that George’s occupation was that of a fisherman.

 

 

 

It was at Burgh Castle on 29th August 1880 that he married Eliza Kerrison who was born at Belton, where she was baptised on 21st May 1858, the daughter of George and Eliza Sarah Kerrison.  According to the 1881 Census, fisherman George Collett and his wife Eliza were both 22 and were living less than two miles north of Belton in Burgh Castle at 3 High Road.  Also living in Burgh Castle at that time were George’s parents William and Mary Ann Collett, and his brothers Benjamin and Joseph (above).  During the following decade Eliza presented George with two children, although sadly when the youngest of them was just two years old George Collett died, his death being recorded at Mutford during the second quarter of 1888.

 

 

 

The death of her husband prompted Eliza to return to her own family home in Belton, and it was there at St Johns Road that she and her two children were living with her parents in 1891.  The census that year confirmed that Eliza Collect (sic) was a widow at 31, when she was living with Margaret M Collect, who was six, and George Collect, who was three, at the home of her father and mother, George and Sarah Kerrison who were 68 and 69 respectively.

 

 

 

Eliza’ mother died during the 1890s and by March 1901 she and her son were still living with her widowed father and her brother George Kerrison at St Johns Road in Belton   Eliza Collett was 42 and from Belton, and was with described as a laundress and a washer with her own account at home.  Her son George Collett, who was 13, was listed as having been born at nearby Gorleston.  Later that same year Eliza’s father, who had been a gardener, passed away and was buried at Belton on 6th August 1901. 

 

 

 

Following the death of her father Eliza was perhaps forced to leave the dwelling at St Johns Road, and by April 1911 she and her son were residing at 68 Suffield Road in Gorleston, where Eliza Collett of Belton was 52 and George B Collett of Gorleston was 23.

 

 

 

18Q53

Margaret Matilda Collett

Born in 1884 at Belton

 

18Q54

George B Collett

Born in 1886 at Gorleston

 

 

 

 

18P72

James Collett was born at Mettingham in 1860, where he was baptised on 14th October 1860, the son of William and Mary Ann Collett.  He was listed as being under one year old in 1861 and was 10 years old in 1871 when, for the later census, he was living with his family at Burgh Castle.  No record of him has been found in 1881 when, like some of his siblings, he may have been a fisherman out at sea on the day of the census that year.

 

 

 

Despite his absence in 1881, it was just over two years later that he married Hannah Priscilla Adams at Burgh Castle on 17th May 1883.  Hannah was born either late in 1862 or very early in 1863, since her birth was registered in Yarmouth during the first quarter of 1863, when she was recorded as the daughter of John and Harriet Adams.  The witnesses at the wedding were Hannah’s father John Adams and Jemima Collett, James’ younger sister (below).

 

 

 

The first five years of their married life together was spent in Gorleston, but thereafter the family lived for a few years in West Hartlepool where the couple’s fourth and fifth children were born.  Around the middle of the decade the Hannah temporarily returned to Gorleston for the birth of her sixth and last child, shortly after which she rejoined her family in the north of England.  The birth of their first child was registered at Mutford in the second quarter of 1884, the second child’s birth was registered there in the third quarter of 1887, the next child during the third quarter of 1889, and the sixth child at the same office in the third quarter of 1895.  The births of the other two children were registered at Hartlepool in the third quarter of 1890 and during the fourth quarter of 1892.

 

 

 

So it was in the April census of 1891 that the family was living at 1 Belgrave Terrace in the Stranton district of West Hartlepool not far from James’ two younger brothers, the unmarried Cornelius Collett and the married Henry Collett (both below).  James Collett was 30 and a labourer at a cement works, his wife Hannah P Collett from Yarmouth was 27, and their four children on that occasion were James E Collett, who was seven, Edward J Collett, who was three, Maude M Collett who was one year old, and Cecil H Collett was just a few months old.

 

 

 

After the birth of their last two children the family was living in South Shields by 1901, as confirmed by the census that year.  However, whether James had returned to life as a fisherman is not known for sure, as he was absent from the family home at 12 Beethoven Street, nor has he or any member of his family been found within the census of 1911.  So it is feasible that the whole family had left Britain by then.  The census in 1901 listed the family as Priscilla Collett, who was 38 and from Yarmouth, James Ed Collett age 17 who was a steward on a trawler, John Ed Collett age 13 who was a draper’s errand boy, Maud M Collett who was 11, Cecil H Collett who was 10, Arthur B Collett who was eight, and Alice B Collett who was five years of age.  The census also confirmed that four of the children had been born at Gorleston, with the other two born at West Hartlepool.

 

 

 

18Q55

James Edward Collett

Born in 1884 at Gorleston

 

18Q56

John Edward Collett

Born in 1887 at Gorleston

 

18Q57

Maud May Collett

Born in 1889 at Gorleston

 

18Q58

Cecil Henry Collett

Born in 1890 at West Hartlepool

 

18Q59

Arthur B Collett

Born in 1892 at West Hartlepool

 

18Q60

Alice Beulah Collett

Born in 1895 at Gorleston

 

 

 

 

18P73

Jemima Collett was born at Mettingham in 1862, and was baptised there on 12th October 1862, the youngest daughter of William and Mary Ann Collett.  Her parents moved to Burgh Castle in the late 1860s and it was there she living with her family in 1871 aged eight years.  Sometime during the 1870s Jemima and her sister Dinah (above) followed their older sister Matilda into London for the purpose of seeking work.  Both girls were lucky enough to be taken on by coal merchant and baptist minister Joseph Benson and his wife at their home at 57 Hilldrop Road in Islington.  Jemima was listed as being aged 18 in 1881 and from Mettingham when she was employed as a domestic servant.  Two years after that she returned to Burgh Castle for the wedding of her older brother James Collett (above) who was married there in May 1883 when Jemima Collett was named as one of the two witnesses. 

 

 

 

It would appear that Jemima never married since, at the age of 48, Jemima Collett of Mettingham had returned to work for the Benson family at 57 Hilldrop Road (Holloway) in Islington where she was the cook.  Jemima Collett of 1 Bryanstone Road in Hornsey, London, was 80 when she died on 24th February 1943 as a patient at Hornsey Hospital.  Administration of her personal effects of £818 11 Shillings 10d was grant to her unmarried niece Matilda Mary Collett, the eldest daughter of Jemima’s youngest brother Henry Collett (below).

 

 

 

 

18P74

Cornelius Bradnum Collett was born at Mettingham in 1863, the son of William Collett and Mary Ann Bradnum.  It was also at Mettingham that he was baptised on 10th April 1864.  During the late 1860s the family moved to Burgh Castle near Great Yarmouth where he was listed as being seven years old in 1871.  On leaving school he joined the crew of the ‘Joseph & Henry’ a fishing boat sailing out of Great Yarmouth, as recorded in the 1881 Census when he was 16 years old.

 

 

 

A little while later he gave up being a fisherman and made the long journey north to Durham with his brother Henry (below) and was recorded as living with him and his wife Mary and their first child at 21 Wards Terrace in the Stranton area of West Hartlepool in 1891.  Cornelius was 27 and described as a boarder.  Also living nearby in West Hartlepool in 1891 was his other brother James Collett (above) with his wife and their first four children.  It was also after he had moved to the north of England that he met his future wife.

 

 

 

A short while after that, during the third quarter of 1892, Henry married Elizabeth Taylor at South Shields.  Elizabeth was born at Crook in County Durham in 1872 and was the daughter of coalminer John Taylor and his wife Elizabeth.  Their marriage produced three children, the first of which was born at Gorleston but was baptised seventeen months later at Kirkley near Lowestoft.  Just after the middle of the 1890s the family of three made the journey north back to Hartlepool, as confirmed by the census in 1901 when Cornelius Bradnum Collett, age 37 and from Mettingham, was recorded as being a man-in-charge of a wheeling steel works in West Hartlepool, while he and his family were living at 38 Winter Street.

 

 

 

His wife was confirmed as Elizabeth, age 28 and from Crook in County Durham, and their children were Elizabeth who was seven and who had been born at Gorleston, Grace who was three, and Mary who was two years old, the two younger children having been born after the family had settled in West Hartlepool.  Working with Cornelius at the steel works was his nephew George William Collett (Ref. 18Q30), who was a steel millwright and the son of Benjamin Collett (above).  It was as George Collett, age 23 and from Burgh Castle, that he was lodging with Cornelius’ brother Henry Collett (below).

 

 

 

During the next decade the family left West Hartlepool and moved to Tynemouth registration district where Cornelius resumed his former occupation as a fisherman.  And it was at 25 Princes Street in North Shields that Cornelius and his family were residing in April 1911.  Cornelius B Collett of Mettingham was 47, his wife Elizabeth of Crook was 39, and just two of their daughters were recorded with them.  They were Grace and Mary who were 13 and 12 and both of them confirmed as born at West Hartlepool.  The couple’s eldest daughter had already started work by then and was listed in the census across the River Tyne in South Shields, where she was noted as being 17 and from Gorleston.

 

 

 

Cornelius Bradnum Collett was still living in the Tynemouth area when he died in 1934, his death being recorded with the Tynemouth registrar during the third quarter of that year.  His wife survived him by just over seventeen years when Elizabeth Collett nee Taylor died at Tynemouth during the first three months of 1952.

 

 

 

18Q61

Elizabeth Julia Collett

Born in 1893 at Gorleston

 

18Q62

Grace Hilda Collett

Born in 1897 at West Hartlepool

 

18Q63

Mary Ann Collett

Born in 1898 at West Hartlepool

 

 

 

 

18P75

Henry Collett was born at Mettingham on 24th November 1865 and was baptised there on 11th February 1866, the youngest son and last of the twelve surviving children of William and Mary Ann Collett.  Sometime after he was born his family moved to Burgh Castle where he was recorded as five years old in the 1871 Census.  In 1881 Henry was the only child still living with his parents at 14 Butt Way in Burgh Castle.  At the age 15, he was working as a general labourer and the place of his birth was confirmed as having been at Mettingham.  Towards the end of the 1880s Henry travelled north to Durham with his brother Cornelius (above) and they both settled down to live at West Hartlepool.

 

 

 

It was there that Henry met Mary Timms Mitchell, whom he married during the second quarter of 1890 and, by the time of the census in 1891, their marriage had produced their first child.  Mary was born at West Hartlepool in 1870 and was the daughter of block and mast maker Thomas Mitchell and his wife Eliza.  The census return for West Hartlepool in 1891 placed the family living at 21 Wards Terrace in the Stranton area of West Hartlepool.  General labourer Henry Collett was 25, his wife Mary T Collett was 20, and their baby daughter was Matilda M Collett who was just three weeks old.  Living with the young family as a boarder was Henry’s brother Cornelius Collett (above) and living nearby in the same registration district was Henry’s older brother James Collett (above).  Over the next eight years a further four children were added to the family, although sadly one of them, the couple’s second daughter, Maud Mary, did not survive and died towards the end of 1896.

 

 

 

Ten years later, according to the March census of 1901, the family of six was still living at West Hartlepool, but at 26 Bentley Street.  Henry Collett, age 35, was employed as a jobbing bricklayer, and his place of birth was confirmed as Mettingham.  The age of his wife Mary was given as 30 and her place of birth as West Hartlepool in Durham.  All four of their children were recorded as having been born at West Hartlepool and they were Matilda Collett, age 10, William Collett who was eight, John Collett who was five, and Charles Collett who was two years old.  They were added to over the following decade when three more children were born into the family.  However, at that time in 1901 there was room in the house for Henry to have lodging with them his nephew George William Collett (Ref. 18Q30), the son of his older brother Benjamin (above).

 

 

 

Around the middle of that decade the family moved from West Hartlepool to Hartlepool, where the couple’s last two children were born, all as confirmed in the Durham census of 1911 when they were residing at 194 Hart Road in Hartlepool.  Henry was recorded as Harry Collett from Mettingham and was 45 and was working as a labourer for a cement manufacturer.  Living there with him was his wife Mary Timms Collett who was 41 and from West Hartlepool.

 

 

 

Of their oldest four children only William, who would have been 18, was missing.  He has not been found anywhere in Great Britain at that time, so there is a chance that he was in the army and possibly undertaking military service abroad.  The couple’s other three older children, who were all born at West Hartlepool, were recorded as, Matilda Mary Collett, age 20, John Arthur Collett who was 15, and Charles Albert Collett who was 12 years old.  Of the three youngest children, only the first of these, eight years old Albert was born while the family was still living in West Hartlepool.  The two latest arrivals, George, who was three, and Cecil who was one year old, were both confirmed as having been born after the family had moved to Hartlepool.

 

 

 

The family later moved to Stockton-on-Tees in County Durham where all of their children were married.  It was also there that Henry (Harry) Collett was living in 1936 when he died at the age of 71, his death being registered at Stockton during the final three months of that year.  Four years later his son George Richard Collett was killed in 1940 while serving with the Royal Engineers during the Second World War.  His parents and his wife were all named within his military records, which confirmed that Harry and Mary lived at Stockton-on-Tees.  After a further seven year Mary Timms Collett nee Mitchell passed away in 1947 aged 77, the event being registered at Durham South-East Registration District during the second quarter of that year.

 

 

 

In January 2011 new information about this family, and their youngest son Cecil Benjamin Collett, was received from Sue Hammler nee Collett, Cecil’s daughter.  The source of the information was the Family Bible which she holds, together with a conductor’s baton inscribed with the name of her grandfather Henry Collett.

 

 

 

The baton, decorated in silver and inscribed with the words "Presented to Mr H Collett in 1889" was handed down to Sue from her father, who indicated that it had been given to his father by an orchestra from either Philadelphia or Pittsburg.  So in addition to being a bricklayer, Henry Collett may have also been an accomplished musician.  However, it seems unlikely that he was presented with the baton in America during the year prior to his marriage to Mary Timms Mitchell, so it is more likely that the orchestra was visiting England at that time.

 

 

 

18Q64

Matilda Mary Collett

Born in 1891 at West Hartlepool

 

18Q65

William Henry Collett

Born in 1893 at West Hartlepool

 

18Q66

Maud May Collett

Born in 1894 at West Hartlepool

 

18Q67

John Arthur Collett

Born in 1896 at West Hartlepool

 

18Q68

Charles Albert Collett

Born in 1899 at West Hartlepool

 

18Q69

Albert Edward Collett

Born in 1902 at West Hartlepool

 

18Q70

George Richard Collett

Born in 1907 at Hartlepool

 

18Q71

Cecil Benjamin Collett

Born in 1909 at Hartlepool

 

 

 

 

18P76

Mary Ann Collett was born at Mettingham in 1843 just seven months after her parents were married there.  She was baptised at Mettingham on 14th April 1843, the eldest child of Henry Collett and Maria Myall, and was eight years old in 1851 when she was living with her family at Low Road in Mettingham.

 

 

 

 

18P77

Maria Collett was born at Mettingham in late December 1844, and was baptised there on 29th December 1844, the second daughter of Henry and Maria Collett.  Sadly Maria did not reach her first birthday, when she died on 3rd October 1845 and was buried at Mettingham two days after, at the age of 10 months.

 

 

 

 

18P78

Eleanor Collett was born at Mettingham in late 1846 or early 1847, and was baptised there on 7th February 1847, the only surviving daughter of Henry and Maria Collett.  In 1851 Eleanor was listed with her parents and her sister Mary Ann (above) and her brother James (below) at Low Road in Mettingham as Ellen Collett aged four years.

 

 

 

Following the death of her mother in February 1854, Eleanor continued to live with her father, who married for a second time four months later.  By the time of the census of 1861 she was living with her father and her stepmother and her brother James (below) at Great Road in Mettingham where she was recorded as Eleanor Collett at 13 years of age, when she had already started work as a silk weaver.  Also living with the family in 1861 was Maria Collett who was seven.  She was Eleanor’s cousin, the base-born daughter of her aunt Susan Collett, the younger sister of her father Henry Collett.  It seems likely that Eleanor was married by the time of the census in 1871, since no record of her as Eleanor or Ellen Collett has been located.

 

 

 

 

18P79

James Collett was born at Mettingham in 1849, the only surviving son of Henry and Maria Collett, and was baptised at Mettingham on 10th March 1850.  In the following year, and at the time of the census in 1851, James Collett was one year old while living at Low Road in Mettingham with his family.  Upon the death of his mother, when James was four years old, his father remarried and in the census of 1861 James was 12 and was living at Great Road in Mettingham with his father, his stepmother, his sister Eleanor, and his cousin Maria.  It is not known at this time what happened to James after 1861, but no record of him has been located in any of the census returns after that date.

 

 

 

 

18P80

Walter Collett was born at Mettingham during May in 1851, the son of Henry and Maria Collett.  Walter was baptised there on 9th June 1851, but tragically lost his life only six months later, following which he was buried at Mettingham on 4th January 1852 when he was only seven months old.

 

 

 

 

18P81

George Collett was born at Mettingham around the end of July 1853, the last child born to Henry Collett and Maria Myall.  Sadly he died at Mettingham during the first week of October that same year, and was buried there on 9th October 1853 at the age of 10 weeks.

 

 

 

 

18P82

Emma Porter was born at Ilketshall St Andrew in 1857 and was baptised there on 9th August 1857, the daughter of James Porter and Mary Ann Collett.  It was her cousin Henry (Harry) Collett (Ref. 18P85) who Emma married at St Margaret’s Church in Toft Monks on 27th September 1881.  Harry was the oldest son of Mary Ann’s brother Robert Collett and his wife Eliza Barber.  The village of Toft Monks, just north of Beccles, was where Emma parents were living at that time.

 

 

 

During the year before she was married Emma, at the age of 23, was working as a cook at the Parsonage House in Hellesdon, the home of the Curate of Hellesdon and Drayton, thirty-eight years old Charles A Hope from Tasmania and his Suffolk wife Louisa Hope.

 

 

 

The photograph below was taken on the occasion of her 90th birthday during the summer of 1947.  In the picture directly behind Emma is her eldest son Robert James Collett (Ref. 18Q70), next to him to the right is his only son also Robert Collett (Ref. 18R29) who was always known as 'Bobs' like his father.  In front of him, seated, is his mother Bessie [Elizabeth Teresa Collett nee Hamblin], while next to him is Emma’s second son William Walter Collett (Ref. 18Q71) – the grandfather of Mary Ann Dunn who kindly provided the photograph.  Standing next to William on the far right is Mary Ann’s father Philip Robert Walter Collett (Ref. 18R30) with his wife Babs [May Lillian Collett nee Read] seated in front of him.  Next to Babs, and seated in front of William, is his wife Florence Maud Collett nee Death.

 

 

 

On Emma's right is her daughter Dorothy Alice Collett (Ref. 18Q74), sitting in front of her husband Walter Ramsay, and standing next to him their son Harry.  Seated on the far left is Gladys Collett nee Finney, who was married to William Geoffrey (Ref. 18R31), who took the photograph.  In the front are Geoffrey’s and Gladys' daughter Simone Hilary Collett (Ref. 18S23), and Mary Ann Collett, age nine, the aforementioned Mary Ann Dunn (Ref. 18S22).

 

The picture was taken in William’s and Flo's garden in Ipswich.

 

 

 

Missing from the family gathering was Emma's daughter Mabel May Collett (Ref. 18Q73), who had already emigrated to Australia by then, and her third daughter Beattie [Beatrice Emma Collett] (Ref. 18Q72) who had died during the previous year at the age of 60.

 

 

 

See Henry Collett (below) for more details of the family of Emma Collett nee Porter.

 

 

 

 

18P83

William Charles Porter was at Ilketshall St Andrew during 1860, and it was there also that he was baptised on 8th July 1860, the fourth child and second son of James Porter of Ellough and Mary Ann Collett of Mettingham.

 

In the census conducted during the following year, nine month old William Porter was living with his family at Tooks Common in Ilketshall St Andrew.  Around five years later his family moved to Ringsfield near Beccles where two more children were added to the family, before moving to 16 High Road in nearby Worlingham, where they were recorded as living at the time of the census in 1871 when William was ten years of age.

 

 

 

Between 1873 and 1880 William’s parents moved the three miles north of Beccles to the village of Toft Monks, where they finally settled and where they were recorded as living at 7 Bull’s Green in 1881 when agricultural labourer William Porter was 20 years old.  And it was at Toft Monks later the following year that William Charles Porter married (1) Georgiana Sutton on 17th October 1882, the daughter of Charles Sutton and Mary Ann Snowling.  The witnesses were Charles Grimmer and Alice Sutton

 

 

 

Eighteen months earlier, Charles L Grimmer of Burnt House Farm in Haddiscoe, one mile north of Toft Monks, was recorded in the census of 1881 as a veterinary surgeon and a farmer of 171 acres employing six men and two boys.  Supporting his family was domestic servant Georgiana Sutton, age 18, from Gillingham in Norfolk.

 

 

 

Georgiana was born at Gillingham near Beccles during the last quarter of 1863, the birth being recorded at the Loddon registration office.  According to the census in 1891, the family was living at Rant Score in East Lowestoft, and by then the couple’s nine year marriage had already produced four children.  So at that time the family comprised general labourer William Porter 30, his wife Georgiana Porter 28, William C Porter who was 9, Ethel Porter who was six, Beatrice Porter who was three, and John Porter who was one year old.  Rant Score is still a thoroughfare in Lowestoft today.

 

 

 

Later that same year Georgiana presented William with a third daughter, Alice Jane Porter who was born in October, and exactly two years after that the couple’s final child and their third son, Charles James Porter was born in October 1893, both children being born while the family was living in Lowestoft.

 

 

 

Sadly, it was during the birth of their last child, that Georgiana Porter died in Lowestoft, and it was on 9th October 1893 at Toft Monks, that William buried his wife.  It was nearly eight years later that widower William Charles Porter married (2) Richanda Duffield of 4 Eastern Square in Lowestoft.  She was the widow of James Thomas Duffield, and was formerly Richanda Blowers, the illegitimate daughter of Emma Blowers and John Mobbs, who was born at Oulton on 2nd April 1866.  The wedding ceremony took place at the Sailors & Fishermen Bethel in Lowestoft on 20th July 1901.

 

 

 

Four months earlier, widower William Porter, age 40, was a watchman serving on board the fishing boat Emblem, sailing out of Lowestoft Harbour.  Historical note:  The ‘Emblem’ from Lowestoft was captured by a German submarine on 25th July 1915 and was destroyed.

 

 

 

Only four of his five children have been identified in the 1901 Census, and the absence of son John may indicate he had already died by then.  William (Charles) Porter of Toft Monks was 20 and an agricultural labourer at Carlton Colville, Ethel (Elvina) Porter was 16 and a general domestic servant at the home of Samuel Read at 112 London Road in Kirkley, near Carlton Colville, while Beatrice (Georgiana) Porter was 13 and was still attending school in Toft Monks, while living there with her uncle Harry Porter. 

 

 

 

Of the two youngest children, Alice Porter of Lowestoft was nine years old and may have been suffering with poor health, since she was living as a boarder with sick nurse Jemima Allen at her home at 8 Wesley Street in Lowestoft, while her brother Charles J Porter, age 7 and from Lowestoft, was living at Toft Monks with his late mother’s parents, that is his Sutton grandparents.

 

 

 

Following his marriage to Richanda Duffield, the couple initially lived at Kirkley near Carlton Colville, where Richanda presented William with the first of their two children.  Edith Laura Porter was born at Kirkley on 17th February 1902, was baptised at St Peter’s Church in Kirkley on 23rd May 1902, but died before the end of June that same year.  By the time of the birth of their second child, William and Richanda were living at 6 Fir Terrace in Fir Lane in Lowestoft, where Herbert William Porter was born on 20th January 1905.  It was also at that same address that the family was living in April 1911.

 

 

 

The record of the family in that year’s census return was curious to say the least.  William Porter was a boat owner’s labourer, but he gave his age as 53, instead of 50, and his place of birth as Toft rather than Ilketshall.  His wife was listed as ‘Richander’ Porter who said she was 45 and not married, and living with them was Charles Porter aged 16, William’s youngest son from his first marriage and Bertie Duffield, age 6, who was actually Herbert William Porter, together with Maud Duffield, age 15, a child from Richanda’s first marriage, who was described as William’s niece, rather than his stepdaughter.

 

 

 

William Charles Porter was still living at 6 Fir Terrace in Fir Lane, Lowestoft when he died on 15th December 1914 at the age of 54.  His eldest son, William Charles Porter, is of particular interest.  Firstly, he married Frances Matilda Duffield at St Margaret’s Church in Lowestoft on 14th January 1908, Frances being the daughter of the aforementioned James Thomas Duffield and Richanda Blowers the latter, by then, being married to William’s father.

 

 

 

William was born at Toft Monks on 31st January 1884, where he was baptised on 23rd March 1884 at Lowestoft Primitive Methodist Church, which raises the question as to why his parents recorded him as being nine years old in 1891, and why he said he was 20 in 1901.  His wife Frances was born at Pakefield on 5th December 1889.  Frances died at Lowestoft on 31st May 1959, and was following by William who died in 1972.

 

 

 

The marriage produced issue for William and Frances, and from one of these there came a grandson for the couple, Robert Porter who, in 2010 was a tour guide at Adnam’s Brewery in Southwold where he met Brian Collett, to whom he generously provided all of the details regarding the Porter family and their earlier connection with the Collett family.

 

 

 

 

18P84

Harry Porter was born at Ringsfield in 1867, where he was baptised on 17th March 1867, the youngest surviving son, and eighth of the nine children of James Porter and Mary Ann Collett.  By the time of the census in 1871 Harry was four years old and was living with his family at 16 High Road in Worlingham, near Beccles.  During the next decade his family moved to 7 Bull’s Green in Toft Monks where he was 14 in 1881 and was living there with his parents and his older brother William Porter.  Harry, and his brother, and his father, were all employed as agricultural labourers at that time.

 

 

 

It would appear that he followed the example set by his sister Emma (above) by marrying one of his cousins.  It was at Toft Monks on 4th April 1896 that Harry Porter married Alice Edith Collett (below).  In addition to being his cousin, Alice Edith Collett was also his sister-in-law, she being the sister of Henry Collett who married Harry Porter’s sister Emma porter (above).  The wedding was recorded at Loddon in Norfolk (Ref. 4b 433) when the witnesses were named as Stephen James Grimson and Jane Blake.

 

 

 

Once married Harry and Alice Porter settled in the village of Toft Monks, where a total of eight children were born to the couple although only five of them survived.  And it was there that the family was living at the time of the census in March 1901, when Harry Porter was a dealer in fowls.  According to that year’s census return, Harry was 34 and from Ringsfield, while his wife Alice was 33 and from Mettingham.  By then only two children were living with them, the first born child Charles having already died.  The two surviving children were Mary Ann Porter who was three and James Porter who was only one year old, both of them confirmed as having been born at Toft Monks.

 

 

 

During the next decade five more children were added to the family but only three of them survived.  So by the time of the next census in April 1911 the family at Toft Monks near Beccles was made up of Harry Porter, age 44, Alice Porter, age 43, Mary Ann Porter who was 13, James Porter who was 11, John Porter who was nine, Robert porter who was five and William Porter who was two years old.  In addition to this, the same census return stated that the couple had been married for fifteen years and included the names of the three children who had died even though they were ruled through. They were Charles, Harold and George who were the couple’s fifth and sixth children.  Harry Porter died at Toft Monks, where he was buried on 5th December 1941, while his wife survived him by fifteen years, when she was buried at Toft Monks on 10th October 1956.

 

 

 

 

18P85

Maria Elizabeth Collett was the base-born daughter of Susan Collett and was born at Mettingham around 1853.  In order avoid the shame brought of her family, the child was taken from Susan and placed in the care of the family of her older brother Henry Collett (above), he having lost a baby daughter called Maria some years earlier, and a baby son in the previous year.  It was while in his care that Maria Elizabeth Collett was baptised at Mettingham on 16th April 1854.  By the time of the census in 1861, Maria Collett was seven years old and was living at Great Road in Mettingham with her uncle Henry Collett, his second wife Catherine, and her two cousins Eleanor and James (above).

 

 

 

She was not actually living at Mettingham with the couple ten years later in 1871, but instead she was living nearby at Shipmeadow, where she was living and working at the home of elderly sisters Mary Ann Draper and Hannah Draper.  The sisters were unmarried and described as retired farmers and money lenders from Mettingham.  Their housekeeper was 21 years old Rosa Roe from Bungay, while Maria Collett from Mettingham was 18, and was employed as the domestic indoor servant.  During the following years it is anticipated that she was married, as no record of her as Maria Elizabeth Collett has been found in 1881.

 

 

 

 

18P86

Albert Collett was born at Mettingham in 1857, the first child born to Robert Collett and his first wife Eliza Barber.  Sadly Albert died shortly after he was born and was buried at Mettingham on 11th November 1857.

 

 

 

 

18P87

Henry Collett was born at Mettingham in 1859, where he was baptised on 20th June 1859, the eldest surviving son of Robert and Eliza Collett.  Henry was one year old by the time of the census in 1861, although he was better known as Harry.  And it was as Harry Collett that he was listed in the census returns for 1871, 1881 1891, and 1901, although he was Henry Collett in the April census of 1911.

 

 

 

Harry Collett was 11 in 1871 and ten years later, at the age of 21, his occupation was that of a railway porter.  At that time he was a lodger at the Mutford Bridge home in Oulton, Suffolk, of coal porter George Ratcliffe and his wife Elizabeth.  Six months later on 27th September 1881, Harry married his cousin Emma Porter (above) at Toft Monks, just two miles north of Beccles.  Emma was born in 1857 and was baptised at Ilketshall St Andrew on 9th August 1857, the daughter of James Porter and Mary Ann Collett.  Harry gave his occupation on that occasion as being a railway signalman.

 

 

 

The witnesses to the marriage were Emma’s father James Porter, who made his mark, and Alice Porter.  It seems very unlikely that Alice was in fact Harry’s sister Alice Collett, who was married to Emma’s brother, as she would have been only fourteen years of age in 1882.  Following their wedding the couple spent a short time living south of the Stour estuary at Mistley in Essex, but later moved north to Ipswich with their children, where they appear to have spent the rest of their lives together.

 

 

 

By the time of the Ipswich census of 1891 the family comprised Harry Collett, age 31, his wife Emma Collett, who was 32, and their four children, who at that time were Robert Collett, who was seven, William W Collett, who was six, Beatrice E Collett, who was four, and Mabel M Collett who was one year old.

 

 

 

According to the next census in 1901, the family was living in the St Mary Stoke area of Ipswich.  Harry was confirmed as being 41 and born at Mettingham, while he was employed as a ticket collector.  His wife Emma was 42 and from Ilketshall St Andrew, and their eldest son Robert, age 17, had been born while the couple were living at Mistley.  All of the couple’s younger children had been born after the family moved to Ipswich, and they were William W Collett, age 16, Beatrice E Collett, age 14, Mabel M Collett, who was 11, and Dorothy A Collett who was five years old.

 

 

 

By April 1911 the family was still living within the Ipswich area, where Henry Collett of Mettingham was 51 and his wife Emma was 53.  Three of their children had left home by that time and they were Robert James, who was living nearby in Ipswich, although recorded in error as Robert James Collett from Mistley, William Walter who was married by then, and Beatrice Emma who was living and working in the Sudbury area of Suffolk.  The two children still living at Ipswich with their parents were the two youngest girls, Mabel May Collett, who was 21, and Dorothy Alice Collett who was 15.

 

 

 

Henry (Harry) Collett survived for another six years after the census day, when he died during 1917 at the age of 58.  His widow Emma lived on for a further thirty-three years, until her death in 1950 when she was aged 93.  See photograph (above) of Emma surrounded by her family at her 90th birthday party in the garden of her son William in Ipswich in 1947.

 

 

 

18Q72

Robert James Collett

Born in 1883 at Mistley, Essex

 

18Q73

William Walter Collett

Born in 1884 at Ipswich

 

18Q74

Beatrice Emma Collett

Born in 1886 at Ipswich

 

18Q75

Mabel May Collett

Born in 1889 at Ipswich

 

18Q76

Dorothy Alice Collett

Born in 1895 at Ipswich

 

 

 

 

18P88

Alice Edith Collett was born at Mettingham in 1867, the year before her mother died.  By the time of the census of 1871 Alice and her family were living at Broome.  Alice was listed as being three years old and was living with her father Robert Collett, her stepmother Ellen, her brother Harry (above), and her half-sisters Clara and Ellen (below).

 

 

 

Ten years later, at the time of the census of 1881, the Alice and her family were living at the Black Horse Inn at Ditchingham, to where the family had moved from Broome in 1872.  Alice was listed as being 13 and born at Mettingham in Suffolk, and by that time she had left school and was working as a silk winder.  In 1891 Alice was 23 and was unmarried, while living within the Beccles & Wangford census registration district of Suffolk.

 

 

 

Just over five years later at Toft Monks near Beccles that Alice Edith Collett married her cousin Harry Porter on 4th April 1896.  Harry was the younger brother of Emma Porter who married Alice’s brother Henry Collett (above), Harry being the son of Mary Ann Collett and James Porter.  For more details of their family see Harry Porter (above).

 

 

 

 

18P89

Clara Elizabeth Collett was born at Broome near Bungay in 1869, the first child of Robert Collett with his second wife Ellen Beckett who were married at Mettingham on 16th December 1868.  Clara and her family were still living in Broome at the time of the census in 1871, when she was two years old, but during the following year the family moved to Ditchingham near Bungay.  Clara’s father took over the running of the Black Horse Inn at Ditchingham, and it was there that the family was living in 1881, by which time Clara was twelve and was still attending school although she was also described as a silk winder, like her older sister Alice (above).

 

 

 

Just under ten years later Clara married Alfred Elden with whom she is reputed to have had around thirteen children, even though only nine of them are listed below.  Alfred was a bricklayer, the son of bricklayer George and Rachel Elden of Broome where Alfred was also born in 1869.  Around the time that Alfred was ten years old his mother died, possibly during childbirth.  Alfred was twelve years old in 1881 and was living with his widowed father and his three brothers and younger sister at Broome.  Two older sisters had already left the family home by then, or had not survived.

 

 

 

In 1871 the Elden family of Broome comprised George, age 34, Rachel, age 31, Caroline Elden, who was eight, Edward Elden, who was six, Susannah Elden, who was five, and Alfred who was one year old.  Ten years later George was 43, Edward was 17, Alfred was 12, Eleanor was 10, Jeffrey George was five, and Bertie Joseph was four years old.  Alfred and Clara were still living in Broome in 1891 where, over the next seven years three of their surviving children were born.  Alfred Elden was 21 in 1891, while his wife Clara E Elden was 22.  It was after the birth of son Alfred in 1897 that the family left Norfolk and moved south to Ipswich where the couple’s remaining children were born, and where they were living in 1901 and 1911.

 

 

 

The census of 1901 recorded the family was Alfred and Clara who were both 31, and their six children Donald who was nine, Margaret who was eight, Alfred who was four, Bertie who was three, Reginald who was one year old, and baby Horace who was under one year old.  Over the next decade a further three children were added to the family.  So by April 1911 the family comprised Alfred and Clara Elizabeth who were 42, and their nine children.  They were Donald Edward Elden, age 19, Margaret Kate Elden, age 18, Alfred George Elden, age 14, Bertie Arthur Elden, age 13, Reginald James Elden, age 12, Horace Redvere (?) Elden, age 10, Arthur Sydney Elden, who was seven, and Frank Ernest Elden who was six years old.

 

 

 

Just immediately prior to the census day in 1911, Clara had given birth to the couple’s latest child, and the baby boy, who was presumably only a few hours old, was unnamed on the day of the census, being recorded as ‘not yet named’.  The names of three of Clara’s and Alfred’s other ‘missing’ children may have been Harold Robert Elden, Clara Eleanor Elden, and Sidney Albert Elden, although no records have been so far found to support this.  It is therefore possible that they did not survive beyond childhood.  Clara’s husband Alfred Elden died in 1947, while Clara Elizabeth Elden nee Collett lived a very long life before her passing in 1963 when she was around 93 years of age.

 

 

 

 

18P90

Ellen Elizabeth Collett was born at Broome in 1870 and was baptised at Ditchingham on 28th August 1870, the daughter of Robert and Ellen Collett.  By 2nd April 1871 she was less than one year old and in the census return she was referred to as Elizabeth, while living with her father Robert, her mother Ellen and her three siblings Harry, Alice, and Clara (above).  At the age of ten years, and as Elizabeth, she was living with her family at the Black Horse Inn at Ditchingham where her father was the beer retailer.  By 1891 she was listed as Ellen E Collett aged 20 and born at Broome where she was living with her parents at that time.

 

 

 

It was originally believed that she had married Henry Bird shortly after the 1891 Census, but it is now established that Ellen Elizabeth Collett died at Broome on 2nd August 1893 at the age of 23, and that it was her younger sister Florence (below) who married Henry Bird.