PART EIGHTEEN

 

The Main Suffolk Line - 1870 to 2010

 

This is the fifth of five sections of Part 18 of the Collett family

 

Updated June 2016

 

The contributors for a previous update were Gillian Hawley, Liz Whittaker,

Gordon Collett, cousins Alan Collett and Sue Hammler, and Robert Porter

 

The new information in May 2011 was provide by John Davies,

great grandson of Edith Florence Davies nee Collett (Ref. 18Q132), and

Sue Hammler, the daughter of Cecil Benjamin Collett (Ref. 18Q69)

 

The information for the previous update was generously provide by

Katerina Antalopoulos, the granddaughter of Emily Collett (Ref. 18P28).

The Jan ‘10 update related to Mabel May Collett (Ref. 18Q73), the information for which

was kindly provided by Mary-Ann Dunn nee Collett (Ref. 18S22),

and Kate Collett (Ref. 18P91) the great grandmother of Steve Keeble

The Dec ‘09 update was thanks to Jane Reuben nee Collett (Ref. 18S34) of Surrey

Gordon Alan Collett (Ref. 18S37) kindly provided some of his family details

The information for the April 09 update related to Lionel C G Collett (Ref. 18Q125)

which was kindly provided by his great grandson Mark Norman

The information for the February 2009 update was kindly provided by Judith Jones

and relates to the family of John Christian George Collett (Ref. 18P138)

The previous update to the file provided details of the family line of siblings Rachael

and Andrew Collett down to Andrew’s son Sean Francis Collett (Ref. 18T13) who was

born in 2002 from Henry Colet in 1360, the line being identified by the names in italic print.

 

 

18P91

Horace Collett was born at Broome in 1872 and was nine years old in April 1881 when living with his family at The Black Horse Inn in Ditchingham.  By 1891 Horace Collett of Broome was 18 and had left the family home and was living and working within the Hartney Wintney & Farnborough registration area.  That may indicate he had joined the army and that could also be the reason he was not listed in the UK in 1901.

 

 

 

Curiously there was one other Collett living in the same area in 1891.  That was Owen Collett, who was 19, of whom no other record has been found either before or after 1891, and including the census of 1911.  According to the census of 1911, unmarried Horace was thirty-nine and was once again living at the home of his mother Ellen who had since moved to Ipswich with her two youngest sons Arthur and Sidney (below).

 

 

 

The aforementioned connection to the army may be very relevant, since Horace Collett a pioneer with the Royal Engineers was killed in East Africa on 22nd February 1918.  Probate of his Will valued at £515 14 Shillings 6d was granted in London on 7th June 1918 to his widow Mary Ethel Collett, when the home address was recorded as Rodbridge Corner, near Long Melford to the west of Ipswich.  The military record for Horace Collett confirmed his service number was 288317 and that he was buried at the Dar Es Salaam War Cemetery.  Curiously though, in addition to this, his name was included on a brass plate in St Hildeburgh’s Church at Hoylake in Cheshire, having originally been in Holy Trinity Church in Hoylake until it was demolished in the 1970s.  This therefore raises the question as to whether he was the Horace Collett from Broome, which now seems unlikely – see below.

 

 

 

The death record of one Horace Collett has been discovered during 2015 which contains the following details.  He was 82 at the time of his passing, which was recorded at Ipswich register office (Ref. 4b 754) during the second quarter of 1954 and which provides a date of birth of around 1872.

 

 

 

 

18P92

Florence Collett may have been born at Broome like her brother Horace (above), although she was baptised at Ditchingham on 26th September 1873, the daughter of Robert and Ellen Collett.  By the time of the 1881 Census Florence was aged 8 and was living with her parents at the Black Horse Inn at Ditchingham.  She was also still living with her parents ten years later at their home in Broome at the age of 18, but fifteen days after the census day in 1891 she was married.

 

 

 

Florence married Henry Bird at the parish church in Broome on 20th April 1891.  The parish register confirmed that Henry Bird of Ditchingham was 21 and a labourer, while Florence was 19 (?) and a domestic servant from Broome whose father was labourer Robert Collett.  The witnesses at the church were Robert Collett and Rose Saws.

 

 

 

Over the next seven years Florence presented her husband with three children while they were living in Broome.  They were William Bird, Marion Bird and Ellen Bird.  In March 1901 the census for the village of Broome recorded the Bird family as Henry aged 31 of Ilketshall St Lawrence (?) and just his two oldest children, William who was eight and Marion who was five.  It may have been the absence of Henry’s wife Florence that resulted in the couple’s youngest child, three-year old Ellen Bird, staying nearby in Broome with her grandmother Ellen Collett.

 

 

 

According to the 1901 Census for the London Borough of West Ham Florence Bird, age 29 and from Broome, was recorded there with her new husband George Bird of Ditchingham, the brother of her previous husband Henry.  George was 30 and was a carpenter’s labourer, while living with the couple was their daughter Alice M Bird who was one year old and born at Islington.  That situation would appear to indicate that her marriage to Henry Bird had only lasted for about seven years, following which she had ‘runaway’ to London with his brother. 

 

 

 

Four further children were added to the family over the next ten years, and by April 1911 the larger family was living at 25 Poplar Walk in Lambeth.  George Bird was a gardener aged 39 from Norfolk, his wife Florence from Norfolk was 38, and their five children were Alice, age 11, George who was nine, Gladys who was six, Ivy who was three, and Grace who was one year old.  The first three children had been born at Islington, the next at Dulwich, and the last at Norwood.

 

 

 

 

18P93

Kate Collett was born at Ditchingham in 1874 and was baptised there on 6th March 1874, the daughter of Robert Collett and his second wife Ellen.  At the time of the census in 1881 Kate was seven years old and living with her family at the Black Horse Inn at Ditchingham.  During the next decade her family left Ditchingham and moved to Broome where they were living in 1891, but with Kate absent at that time.

 

Kate was around 24 years of age when she married Charles Bloomfield, the wedding taking place at Loddon in Norfolk in 1898.  The couple initially lived at Broome where their first child was born, before moving to 5 Small Lea Cottages in Cheshunt.  The move to Hertfordshire was very likely the result of Charles taking up employment as a carman with the London & North Eastern Railway.

 

 

 

The photograph above was kindly supplied by Steve Keeble and is believed to have been taken around 1924, possibly even on the occasion of Kate’s fiftieth birthday.

 

 

 

The Cheshunt census in March 1901 recorded Charles Bloomfield of Suffolk as 29, Kate Bloomfield of Broome (sic) as 27, and their son as Arthur Bloomfield who was just one year old.  Living with the family was boarder Arthur Cranfield who was 22 and a stockman from Suffolk.  Sometime during the next year or so the family left Cheshunt and moved to 11 Kings Road in nearby Waltham Cross to be closer to the railway station.  And it was while the family was living there that Kate presented Charles with their second child Percy Bloomfield in 1903.

 

 

 

According to the census of 1911, the family was still living at 11 Kings Road, from where Charles was still working as a carman.  The census return recorded that Charles Bloomfield of Wingfield in Suffolk was 39, and that his wife of twelve years Kate, was 37 and from Ditchingham in Norfolk, while their two sons were eleven and seven respectively.  Living with the family as boarders on that occasion were two bachelors, carpenter Charles Miller, 37 from Notting Hill, and 28 years old John Clark from Watford, a worker at the Royal Gunpowder Factory.

 

 

 

Tragically it was just three years later that Kate was made a widow when Charles died as a result of an accident while working on the railway.  That happened in 1914 when he suffered a fatal head injury caused by a collision with an overhead beam.  Of their two children very little is known about Percy, except that he died in 1936.  As regards Arthur Bloomfield, he volunteered for the army in 1915 but, being below the minimum age, he said he was older in order to be accepted.  He joined a Norfolk Regiment and gained the crossed guns emblem of a marksman. 

 

 

 

In 1916 he was sent to France and was given the role of a Lewis Gunner in trenches.  During the Battle of the Somme in August that same year, Arthur sustained a serious shrapnel injury to the head which resulted in his return to England for recuperation and his ultimate retirement from the army.  It was a few years late in 1922 that Arthur Bloomfield married Winifred Jackson with whom he had two children.  Their first child was Audrey, who was born in 1923 and who died in 1979.  It was around the birth of the second child that sadly Winifred died.  Dorine was born in 1928 just prior to the death of her mother, following which Arthur returned to live in Suffolk with his two daughters.

 

 

 

Majuba Cottage in Beccles, where Arthur and the girls settled, had previously been owned by the late Henry Keable, Arthur’s uncle through marriage to his aunt Maria Bloomfield.  Upon the death of Henry Keable in 1924, the property was purchased by Mr H Theobald for £580 and was eventually rented by Arthur Bloomfield from 1928.

 

 

 

At the time of the sale in 1924, Majuba Cottage, at Swines Green, off Ingate Place in Beccles was described as being ‘A well built freehold dwelling house containing 2 sitting rooms, kitchen and 3 bedrooms, with offices in rear, stable, cart shed, piggeries, granary, fowl houses, and other outbuildings AND valuable enclosure of productive land, the whole containing 3 roods and 35 perches, well adapted for a Poultry Farm, Market Garden or Building Purposes, having a frontage of 252 feet upon the High Road’.  It was built in 1901 of bricks made from clay from the Beccles brick kilns.

 

 

 

Arthur’s mother Kate also lived with the family at Majuba Cottage, where she acted as mother to her two granddaughters.  That arrangement continued for a further five years, until the passing of Kate Bloomfield nee Collett while she lay in her bed at Majuba Cottage in 1933 at nearly 60 years of age.  Her son Arthur Bloomfield was 75 years old when he died in 1974. 

 

 

 

All of this information has been kindly provided by Steve Keeble who was born in 1960, the son of Dorine Bloomfield and Stanley Charles Keeble who were married in 1959.  Sadly Dorine Keeble nee Bloomfield passed away in hospital, following a very brief illness, on Saturday 30th June 2012 at the age of 84.

 

 

 

 

18P94

Robert Collett was born at Ditchingham on 17th March 1876 and very likely at the Black Horse Inn in Ditchingham where his family was living in 1881 when Robert was six years old.  His birth was recorded at Ditchingham (Ref. 26 103) when his parents were named as Robert and Ellen Collett.  By the time he was 16 he and his family were living at Woodton, just north-west of Bungay.  No trace of Robert Collett has been found so far in the 1901 Census, nor have any details been unearthed about him at anytime thereafter.  So what became of him is not known at this time if, in fact, he did survive beyond his teenage years.

 

 

 

 

18P95

Jessie L Collett was born at Ditchingham in 1878 and was three years old in 1881 when living with her family at the Black Horse Inn in Ditchingham.  Upon leaving school she entered into domestic service and by 1901 she was living and working in the St Margaret’s district of Ipswich where at 23 she was employed as a parlour maid, at which time she was referred to as Jessie.  Two years later Jessie Collett married Edwin Abbott during the final quarter of 1903, the event recorded at Ipswich (Ref. 4a 1966), and by April 1911 she had given birth to three children. 

 

 

 

The census that year placed the family at 28 Upland Road in the St John's district of Ipswich.  Jessie Abbott from Ditchingham was 33 and had been married to Edwin, also 33, for seven years.  Their three children were named as Florence Abbott who was six, Olive Abbott who was four and Monica Abbott who was two.  It was as Jessie L Abbott aged 61, that her death was recorded at Ipswich register office (Re. 4a 1504) during the first three months of 1939.

 

 

 

 

18P96

Arthur Collett was born at Ditchingham in 1883.  Sometime before 1889 his family left Ditchingham and moved to Broome where they were living in 1891 when Arthur was seven years old.  Ten years later at the age of 17 Arthur was working as a railway porter while living with his mother, and widow, Ellen Collett and his youngest brother Sidney (below) at her home in Broome.  In April 1911 Arthur was still not married at the age of 27, when he was still living with his mother Ellen Collett who had settled in Ipswich by that time.

 

 

 

 

18P97

Sidney W Collett was born at Broome in 1888 where he was living with his widowed mother Ellen in 1901 at the age of 12.  Also still living in the family home at Broome was Sidney’s older brother Arthur (above).  By the time of the census of 1911 Sidney was 22 and he and his mother had moved to the Ipswich area.  Also living there with them was Sidney’s two unmarried brothers Horace and Arthur (above).

 

 

 

 

18P98

George Collett was born at Mettingham in 1859 and was baptised there on 29th May 1859, the eldest child of Christopher Collett of Mettingham and his wife Lucy Jones.  George was one year old in the Mettingham census in 1861 when he was living there with his parents.  He was still with his parents ten years later when the family was living at Wrentham, north of Southwold, when he was 11 years old.

 

 

 

When George was in his early to middle teenage years his younger brother Walter Henry Collett died when he was around three or four years old and that tragic event may have been the reason why his family moved north to Lancashire shortly thereafter.  So by the time of the census in 1881, George Collett, age 22 and from Mettingham, was living at 65 Rowbotham Street in Manchester.  He was a boarder at the home of Henry Cooper who was a railway porter, while George himself was a railway ticket collector.

 

 

 

It was at Barton-upon-Irwell during the first quarter of 1884 that George married Matilda (Martha) Jane Higginbottom.  She was born at Morton Green in Patricroft (Eccles) in 1857, and was the daughter of labourer Joseph Higginbottom and his wife Mary Ann.  The marriage produced three children prior to the next census in 1891, when the family was living at 24 New York Street in the Pendleton area of Salford and comprised George Collett from Mettingham, who was 32 and a ticket collector, his wife Matilda J Collett, who was 34, and their children ‘Florance M Collett’ who was six, George Collett who was two, and Walter Collett who was under one year old.

 

 

 

Within a couple of years of the census George’s wife presented him with their fourth and last child while they were still living at Pendleton.  However, during the next few years the family moved to 86 Church Street in Pendleton, as confirmed in the census of 1901 which contained a number of spelling errors.  Firstly the family was recorded incorrectly under the name of Collitt, while George’s place of birth was listed as Meltingham in Suffolk.  George Collitt was 42 and was a bus man for a railway company, and his wife Martha J Collitt from Morton Green Lanes (?) was 45 and a hardware dealer.  All four children were living with them at that time, and they were Florence Collitt, age 16, George Collitt, age 12, Walter Collitt, age 10, and Ernest Collitt who was seven.  All three boys were still attending the local school.

 

 

 

Another family move seems to have taken place during the first decade of the new century, since in April 1911 the family was living within the Fylde registration district of Lancashire.  George of Mettingham was 53, his wife Martha Jane was 55, and their children were ‘Florance Mary’ 26, George 22, Walter 20, and Ernest Victor who was 17.  All three of George’s sons were confirmed as having been born at Pendleton.  Also listed with the family was six months old Gertrude Lucy Collett, the first grandchild for George and Martha.  With no apparent wife for sons George and Walter, it is possible that the baby was the base-born child of their daughter Florence, so for completeness, and in the absence of any more detailed information, it is with Florence that the child has been placed.

 

 

 

18Q77

Florence Mary Collett

Born in 1884 at Patricroft, Salford

 

18Q78

George Collett

Born in 1888 at Pendleton, Salford

 

18Q79

Walter Collett

Born in 1890 at Pendleton, Salford

 

18Q80

Ernest Victor Collett

Born in 1893 at Pendleton, Salford

 

 

 

 

18P99

Ann Catherine Collett was born at Chediston in 1862, the second child and eldest daughter of Christopher Collett and Lucy Jones, but was not baptised there.  Her mother was born at Chediston and it is therefore highly likely that Ann was born at the home of her maternal grandparents, since she was the only child of Christopher and Lucy to be born there.  Not long after she was born her family was living at Cuckholds Green in Wrentham near Southwold, and around the time of the death of her brother Walter Henry Collett (below) in 1873, Ann and her family moved to Lancashire. 

 

 

 

The move was confirmed in the census of 1881 when the family was living at 33 King Street in Barton-upon-Irwell.  Ann was recorded as Catherine Collett, age 18, who by that time had entered into domestic service upon leaving school.  However, whilst her occupation was stated as being that of a general domestic servant, she was also described as being unemployed at that time.  Her father died at the end of 1882 and six years after that her mother remarried to become Lucy Bower, and with no trace of her in 1891 it is assumed that she was married by then.

 

 

 

 

18P100

Frederick Christopher Collett was born at Wrentham near Southwold on 24th July 1866, and was baptised there on 29th July 1866, the son of Christopher and Lucy Collett.  And it was at Cuckholds Green in Wrentham that Frederick C Collett, age four years, was living with his family in 1871, and was already attending the village school.  Around 1874 the family travelled to Lancashire where they were living in 1881.  By then Fred C Collett, age 14, had left school and had begun work as a domestic groom, while still living with his family at 33 King Street in Barton-upon-Irwell.

 

 

 

His father died towards the end of 1882 and six years later his mother remarried to become Lucy Bower.  So by the time of the next census in 1891 the only Colletts still living in the Barton-upon-Irwell area was Frederick, together with his two brothers Henry and Walter William (below).  For whatever reason, at that time in their lives, both Frederick and brother Walter took up using their second names, so in the census return Frederick was recorded as Christopher Collett from Wrentham who was 24.

 

 

 

It was just over four years later at Barton-upon-Irwell, during the last three months of 1895 that Frederick Collett married Margaret Jane Challoner from St Asaph in Flintshire, near Denbigh in North Wales, where she was born around 1870 to bricklayer Joseph Challoner and his wife Elizabeth.  Shortly after they were married the couple settled in Wigan where their children were born.  By the time of the census in 1901 the marriage had produced their first children.  The census returned confirmed that Frederick C Collett, age 33, was a green grocer living at 39 Darlington Street in Wigan. 

 

 

 

At that time his wife Margaret J Collett was 30, and their daughter Fanny Collett was four years old.  During the following year the family was expanded by the birth of a second daughter while the family was still living in Wigan, and before they moved to the Ormskirk area of Lancashire.  And it was at Hoscar Lathom, three miles north-east of Ormskirk, that the family was living at the time of the April census in 1911.  Frederick Collett was 44, Margaret Collett was 40, Fanny Collett was 14, and Clara Collett was eight years old, both confirmed as born at Wigan.

 

 

 

It would appear that Margaret died prior to the passing of her husband, since Frederick Christopher Collett was living at West View in Hoscar Lathom when he died on 6th February 1939, his death being recorded with the registrar at Ormskirk that same quarter.  Probate was completed less than a month later at Liverpool on 1st March, when his unmarried daughter Fanny Collett was named together with canal toll clerk Thomas Barrow.  His estate was valued at £448 14 Shillings 6d.  The reference to the canal is very interesting since Hoscar Lathom sits of the Leeds and Liverpool Canal.

 

 

 

18Q81

Fanny Collett

Born in 1896 at Wigan

 

18Q82

Clara Collett

Born in 1902 at Wigan

 

 

 

 

18P101

Walter Harry Collett was born at Wrentham in 1868, but was not baptised until he was around two years old when he was baptised in a joint ceremony with his baby brother Alfred (below) on 10th July 1870, the son of Christopher and Lucy Collett.  That was confirmed in the Wrentham census of 1871, when Walter H Collett was two years old.  His delayed baptism may have had something to do with Walter being a poorly child because, two years after his family had move north to Lancashire, Walter Harry Collett died at Winton in Eccles, his death being recorded at Barton-upon-Irwell during the second quarter of 1876.

 

 

 

 

18P102

Alfred Collett was born at Wrentham in 1870 where he was baptised in a joint ceremony with his older brother Walter (above) on 10th July 1870, the son of Christopher and Lucy Collett.  Alfred was one year old in the Wrentham census of 1871 when he was living at Cuckholds Green with his family.  Towards the middle of the 1870s his family moved north to Manchester, and in 1881 they were living at 33 King Street in Barton-upon-Irwell where schoolboy Alfred was 11.  His father died at the end of the following year, and it is also possible that Alfred Collett was another victim of whatever had killed his father and his older brother Walter (above), since no record of him has been found after 1881.

 

 

 

 

18P103

Henry Collett was born at Wrentham in 1872, the son of Christopher and Lucy Collett, whose birth was registered at Blything during the third quarter of that year.  No baptism record for him has been found at Wrentham, although it is known that he was born just prior to the death of his brother Walter (above) at Wrentham.  Henry was one year old when his brother died, and at that time his parents had swapped living in Suffolk for a new life in Lancashire.

 

 

 

It was at 33 King Street in Barton-upon-Irwell that Henry Collett was eight years old in the census of 1881, when he was living there with his family and attending the local school.  Following the death of his father in 1882, his mother married Samuel Bower in 1888 and in 1891 Henry Collett of Wrentham was 18 when he was working as a carter while he was a lodger at the home of labourer Richard Atkinson and his wife Sarah at 5 Dudley Street in Barton-upon-Irwell.  Also a member of the Atkinson family was their daughter Catherine who was 19 in 1891, and it was with her the Henry began a friendship that resulted in them being married.

 

 

 

It was around eighteen months later at Barton-upon-Irwell that Henry Collett married Catherine Atkinson during the third quarter of 1893.  Catherine was born at Bolton in 1871.  Over the next eight years Catherine presented Henry with four children and, according to the census in 1901, three of them were born at Patricroft in Eccles, within the Barton-upon-Irwell registration district.  The census return that year listed the family as living at 12 Hampton Groves in Eccles.

 

 

 

Henry and Catherine were both 28, and at that time in his life Henry from Wrentham was a house painter and decorator.  Their children were recorded as Bertha Collett who was six, Christopher Collett who was five, and Elsie Collett who were two years old.  During the next year the couple’s last child was born at Winton, whereas on the occasion of the census in 1911 the place of birth of all four of the children was stated as being Winton in Eccles, which was where Henry’s parents had originally settled after their move from Suffolk, and where his youngest brother Walter (below) was born, together with his two children.

 

 

 

The census return in April 1911 placed the family living at 54 Liverpool Road in Eccles, within the Barton-upon-Irwell registration district where it comprised Henry and Catherine, who were both 39, and their five children.  Bertha Collett was 16, Christopher Collett was 15, Elsie Collett was 12, while Dora Collett was eight years old.  At that time in his life Henry was continuing to work as a house painter.  Staying with the family on the day of the census was Alfred Collett, age 12 and from Winton, who was Henry’s nephew, being the son of his brother Walter William Collett (below).  Nothing is known about the family after 1911, except that Catherine Collett nee Atkinson died during the first three months of 1953, and that her death was recorded at the Barton-upon-Irwell registration office.

 

 

 

18Q83

Bertha Collett

Born in 1894 at Patricroft in Eccles

 

18Q84

Christopher Henry Collett

Born in 1896 at Patricroft in Eccles

 

18Q85

Elsie Collett

Born in 1898 at Patricroft in Eccles

 

18Q86

Dora Collett

Born in 1903 at Winton in Eccles

 

 

 

 

18P104

Walter William Collett was born at Winton in Eccles in 1874, the youngest son of Suffolk couple Christopher Collett of Mettingham and Lucy Jones of Chediston.  His parents had only just moved to Lancashire when he was born, and that move also happened following the death of his older brother Walter Henry Collett, after whom he was named.  Following a short period living in Winton the family moved from there to 33 King Street in Barton-upon-Irwell before 1881, since it was there that they were living at the time of the census that year.  Walter Collett was six years old by then, and was attending the local school.

 

 

 

That reference to him in the census of 1881 appears to be the last occasion in his life when he was noted in public records as Walter Collett.  From the subsequent records thereafter, it looks as though, as an adult, that he opted to use his second name of William instead.  His father died at Barton-upon-Irwell towards the end of 1882, and in 1888 his mother married Samuel Bower.  By the time of the census in 1891 ‘William Collett’, age 16, was working as a labourer at a timber merchant while he was living with his mother Lucy Bower at the home of Samuel Bower at 9 Elizabeth Street in Barton-upon-Irwell.

 

 

 

It was less than four years later that William Collett married Eda Jones who was born at Salford in 1870, the daughter of Francis Jones, a clerk at a paint works, and his wife Sarah.  The marriage was registered at Barton-upon-Irwell during the first quarter of 1895.  Once they were married William and Eda lived much of their early life together in Winton in Eccles.  The marriage produced just two children for the couple at Winton, and the four members of the family were living at 22 Worsley Road in Eccles by March 1901.  ‘William Collett’ of Winton was 26 and a salesman at a timber yard, his wife Eda from nearby Salford was 31, their daughter Lillian Collett was four, and their son Alfred Collett was two years old.

 

 

 

Things were slightly different ten years later, perhaps because William’s mother, Lucy Bower, had died at Barton-upon-Irwell just a few weeks prior to the census and, following her death, his stepfather Samuel Bower, age 66, was staying with the Collett family in early April 1911.  In order to accommodate Samuel, William’s son Alfred was staying with his brother Henry (above).  In when the family was living at 5 Byron Street in the Patricroft area of Eccles, where ‘William Collett’ was 36, Eda Collett was 40, and Lillian Collett was 14.  However on that occasion their son was.

 

 

 

18Q87

Lillian Collett

Born in 1896 at Winton, Eccles

 

18Q88

Alfred Collett

Born in 1898 at Winton, Eccles

 

 

 

 

18P105

Alfred Ernest Collett was born at Brooke, near Loddon in Norfolk during 1854, the eldest child of Charles and Ellen Collett, who was baptised there on 23rd October 1854.  Not long after he was born his father’s work as a domestic servant took the young family to Hampstead in London, where they lived until around 1862, as confirmed by the Hampstead census in 1861 when Alfred A A Collett (sic) was six years old.  Following the birth of his second brother at Hampstead the family returned to Brooke where another brother was added to his family.

 

 

 

Two more children were born into the family after it had moved into Norwich around 1865, but tragically after that Alfred’s mother died and for a short while the young children were looked after by their father within the Parish of St Margaret in the West Wymer district of Norwich.  It was there that they were living in 1871 when Alfred Collett from Brooke was 17.  Ultimately though, it would appear that the family was eventually split up, and by 1881 Alfred from Broke (sic) was 26 and was working as a brewer’s servant while residing at Bartholomew Street within the Holy Sepulchre area of Norwich.

 

 

 

During 1888 or 1889 Alfred married the much older Sophia, whose age varied from census to census.  In 1891 the childless couple was living in the West Wymer district of Norwich when Alfred was 37 and Sophia was 45.  Being that much older than Alfred there never was any chance of children, and in 1901 it was just the two of them still living in Norwich, where Alfred Collett from Brooke was 46 and a gardener, while Sophia Collett from Knodishall in Suffolk was 56. 

 

 

 

After a further decade they were still living in the West Wymer area of Norwich, at 38 Exeter Street, where Alfred from Brooke was 56 and a gardener who had been married to Sophia, aged 69, for twenty-two years.  The couple was still residing in Norwich when first Sophia passed away, followed eleven years after by her husband.  Sophia Collett of 12 Ashbourne Street in Norwich and the wife of Alfred Ernest Collett died on 23rd March 1927, her death recorded at Norwich register office (Ref. 4b 190) when she was 85.  Curiously administration of her personal effects valued at £122 11 Shillings 5d was granted to Horatio William Nobbs, a corporation labourer, which raises the question, why was it not her husband?  The death of Alfred E Collett aged 83 was recorded at Norwich register office (Ref. 4b 141) during the second quarter of 1938.

 

 

 

 

18P106

Charles C Collett was born at Hampstead in London during 1857 and was the second child of Charles and Ellen Collett.  In the Hampstead census of 1861 Charles C Collett was three years old.  After the death of his mother around 1868 when the family was living in Norwich, Charles and his five siblings were living in West Wymer, Norwich in 1871, when he was 14 and his place of birth was confirmed as London.  Charles was only one of two children still living with his father in 1881, when he was 21 (sic) and they were living at the Jolly Butchers Inn on Ber Street in Norwich.

 

 

 

A little while later Charles married Jessie who was born at Devonport in Plymouth around 1860.  Curiously in the Norwich & Conisford census of 1891 the childless couple gave the census enumerator incorrect ages when they said they were 29 and 28 respectively, when in fact they were nearer 32 and 30.  More accurate ages were offered at the time of the next census in 1901.  On that occasion Charles Collett from Brooke was 42 and was employed as a bricklayer’s labourer, while his wife Jessie was 40 and was described as a charwoman.  No obvious record for the couple has been found in 1911, so there is a chance that they were reunited with other missing members of Charles’ family.

 

 

 

 

18P109

George Collett was born at Norwich in 1866, the fifth child of Charles and Ellen Collett.  He was only a couple of years old when his mother died and for a few years he was raised by his father, with whom he was living in Norwich in 1871 when he was four years old.  However, by the time of census in 1881, George was 15 and a servant at the home of gardener Jonathan Hall and his wife at Eaton Park in Eaton St Andrew in Norwich.  On that occasion his place of birth was recorded as Earsham (near Bungay) where his father was born, so it seems likely that it was his father who arranged for him to be with the elderly couple.

 

 

 

Nothing more is known about George after that time, except that in 1901 there was recorded in that year’s census a George Collet from Norwich who was 33 and living within the West Ham area of London.  Whether he was this George Collett still needs to be determined.

 

 

 

 

18P110

Eliza Collett was born at Norwich in 1868, the last of the six children born to Charles and Ellen Collett.  Tragically her mother died, either during the birth or shortly thereafter, and by 1871 Eliza aged two years was living with her father and her five brothers in Norwich.  During the years that followed her father appears not to have been able to care for his child, resulting in the family being broken up.  By 1881 Eliza Collett from Norwich was 12 years old and was living with John and Susan Waites, and their daughter Rosina, at their home in Russell Street in Norwich Higham.  No record of her has been found after that time, so it is likely that she was married by 1891.

 

 

 

 

18P111

Sarah Ann Collett was born at Fressingfield in 1843.  While the Suffolk Marriage Records show that her parents Benjamin Collett of Fressingfield and Sarah Ann Spalding of Earl Soham were married at Fressingfield on 26th December 1843, Sarah Ann Collett was baptised there on 9th July 1843.  Therefore there is a strong possibility that Sarah Ann Spalding, the base-born child of Sarah Ann Spalding who was born or baptised at Fressingfield on 23rd December 1842, was the same child as Sarah Ann Collett, since only one of them has been identified in the census of 1851.  On that occasion, Sarah Ann Collett was eight years old and was living with her parents at their home in New Street in Fressingfield, although she was not living there ten years later in 1861 when she would have been 18.

 

 

 

One year later in 1862, Sarah Ann’s father died and during the following year she married William Brundish of Fressingfield.  William was born on 14th December 1844, the son of Charles Brundish and Cecilia Celia Mayhew.  The couple’s first four children were born while they were still living at Fressingfield as confirmed by the census in 1871 which listed the family as William 29, Sarah Ann 28, Mary seven, William five, George four, and Jane Brundish who was two years old.

 

 

 

Shortly after 1871 the Brundish family left Suffolk when they moved to the south of England and settled in Erith in Kent where the couple’s next two children were born.  By the time of the next census in 1881 the family was living at 25 Bottle Road in Erith.  Also by that time Sarah Ann’ mother, sixty-two years of Sarah Collett was living with the family.  William Brundish, at 39, was head of the house and a general labourer, while Sarah Collett of Fressingfield was referred to as his mother-in-law.  According to the census in March 1901 Sarah A Brundish was 58, William Brundish was 59, and at that time the couple from Fressingfield were still living in Erith, where William was working as a general labourer.

 

 

 

 

18P112

Samuel Collett was born at Fressingfield during September 1844, the first son of Benjamin Collett and Sarah Ann Spalding.  Tragically he only survived for a few months, when he died and was buried at Fressingfield on 17th May 1845 as Sam Collett aged eight months.

 

 

 

 

18P113

Jane Collett was born at Fressingfield in 1845 where she was baptised at St Peter’s & St Paul’s Church on 30th November 1845, the daughter of Benjamin and Sarah Collett.  Unlike her brother Samuel (above) who suffered an infant death before she was born, Jane survived for a few years when she died at Fressingfield during November in 1848, where she was buried on 19th November 1848, aged three years.

 

 

 

 

18P114

Sam Collett was born at Fressingfield in 1846 and was baptised as Sam Collett the son of Benjamin and Sarah Collett on 15th March 1846.  His absence from the census of 1851, coupled with the absence of his three immediately adjacent siblings perhaps indicates that all four of them suffered infant deaths.

 

 

 

 

18P115

Matilda Collett was born at Fressingfield during August 1847, where she was baptised on 31st October 1847.  The baptism record at St Peter’s and St Paul’s Church confirmed she was the daughter of Benjamin and Sarah Ann Collett.  Matilda was the couple’s third known child to suffer an infant death, when she died at Fressingfield and was buried there on 25th February 1849 at the age of one year and six months.

 

 

 

 

18P116

Edward Collett was born at Fressingfield in 1849 and it was there that he was baptised on 13th March 1849, the son of Benjamin and Sarah Collett.  Sadly he only survived for less than a week after he was baptised, when he died and was buried at Fressingfield on 19th March 1849.

 

 

 

 

18P117

Harry James Collett was born at Fressingfield on 14th October 1850, and was baptised there on 20th July 1851, the son of Benjamin and Sarah Collett.  According to the census in 1851 Harry Collett, who was four months old, was living with his parents and his sister Sarah at New Street in Fressingfield.  Sadly, it later that same year that Harry James Collett died at Fressingfield, where he was buried on 21st December 1851 aged just one year.

 

 

 

 

18P118

Jane Collett was born at Fressingfield in 1852, where she was baptised on 14th August 1853, the daughter of Benjamin and Sarah Collett.  Jane was seven years old by the time of the census in 1861 when she was living there with her parents.  Her father died at Fressingfield during 1862 so by 1871, and at the age of 19, she was still living there with her widowed mother and her brother Anthony (below).  Jane continued to live at Fressingfield until the mid 1870s when she became a married woman.  Jane Collett was the great great grandmother of Glen Dersley who kindly provided some of the details regarding Jane’s father and her grandfather.

 

 

 

In the census of 1901 there were just two Janes who were born at Fressingfield around 1852 and both were living in Norfolk at that time.  The first, and most likely, was Jane Day who was 29 and living at Barnham Broom near Wymondham, while the other was Jane Doggett who was 28 and living in Norwich who was a charwoman, perhaps indicating an unmarried status.  Living with Jane Day, was her husband Henry Day 51, who was an ordinary agricultural labourer from Stratton St Michael, and their two sons Edward John Day 11, and Frederick Leonard Day who was seven.

 

 

 

 

18P119

Keziah Collett was born at Fressingfield in 1856 and was baptised there on 10th August 1856, the youngest daughter of Benjamin and Sarah Collett.  According to the census in 1861, Keziah was four years old while living with his parents in Fressingfield.  During the following year her father died, but before that and just after Christmas in 1861 Keziah Collett died at Fressingfield, where she was buried on 29th December 1861.

 

 

 

 

18P120

Anthony Harry Collett was born at Fressingfield on 18th February 1858 but was not baptised there until 14th September 1862 in a joint ceremony with his brother William (below).  In the Fressingfield census of 1861, Anthony was two years old when living there with his family.  It was during the following year that his father Benjamin Collett died, so in the census of 1871 when Anthony was 12 years of age, he was still living at Fressingfield with his widowed mother Sarah and his older sister Jane (above).  No further record of Anthony or Harry Collett has been found after that time.

 

 

 

 

18P121

William Collett was born at Fressingfield on 3rd June 1862, and it was during that same year that his father died.  He was baptised there in a joint ceremony with his brother Anthony (above) at the church of St Peter’s and St Paul’s on 14th September 1862, the last of eleven children of Benjamin and Sarah Collett.  However, like five of his siblings before him, William Collett died on 21st March 1863 and was buried at Fressingfield during the following day, when he was described as being nine months old.

 

 

 

 

18P122

Henry Collett was born at Westport, County Mayo in Ireland in 1848, the first of five children of William and Ann Collett.  His father was a private with the Dragoon Guards and when Henry was around one year old he was transferred from Ireland to Wales and was based at Brecon Barracks in 1851.  Henry was two years old by that time and was living with his mother and baby sister Bethiah in the St Mary district of Brecon.  Within the next ten years his father was retired from the guards and during that decade the family moved from Brecon to Dartmoor, from Dartmoor to Fressingfield, and finally to Whitehaven.

 

 

 

It was at St Bees in Whitehaven that Henry, age 12, was living with his family in 1861.  Following the death of his father during the 1860s, Henry eventually left his family to take up the occupation of a joiner, and by 1871 he was living and working in Kendal where he appears to have spent the rest of his life.  It was also during the first quarter of the previous year that Henry married (1) Isabella Bousfield.  The marriage was conducted at Kendal, where Isabella was baptised on 16th February 1851, the daughter of Robert and Ann Bousfield.

 

 

 

The newly married couple were recorded in the Kendal census of 1871 when Henry Collett and his wife Isabella Collett were both 22.  By the time Isabella was very likely pregnant with their first child.  During the next two decades Isabella presented Henry with at least six children, although there was a gap of ten years between the fifth and the sixth child.  Within that time period, other children may have been added to the family, but did not survive.

 

 

 

In 1881 the family was confirmed in that year’s census as living at 10 Serpentine Road in Kendal.  Henry Collett from Ireland was 32 and a house carpenter, his wife Isabella from Kendal was also 32, and by that time they had five of their children with them, and all of them born at Kendal.  They were Ann Collett who was nine, Mary E Collett who was seven, Maggie Collett who was five, William H Collett who was four, and Robert Collett who was one year old.  Also living with the family as a boarder, was unmarried Sarah Armstrong, age 24, a woollen weaver from Kendal.

 

 

 

Henry’s and Isabella’s last known child was born during the year before the next census in 1891, but it would appear from the later family records, that the child did not survive beyond a few years, and his death may have coincided with that of his mother.  However, in 1891 the family living in Kendal comprised Henry and Isabella, aged 42, and their six children Ann Collett, age 19, Mary E Collett, age 18, Margaret Collett, age 16, William H Collett, age 14, Robert B Collett, who was 11, and John F Collett who was one year old.

 

 

 

Just less than three years later Isabella Collett died during the first quarter of 1894, and it was exactly one year later, in the first quarter of 1895, that Henry Collett married (2) Mary Alice Foster at Leeds.  Mary was born at Scarborough in 1859 and was a widow.  That second marriage for Henry produced a further son for him, who was born during the following year.

 

 

 

Just after the start of the new century, Henry and Mary were still living in Kendal when the only members of their family still living with them were their three youngest surviving sons.  Henry Collett from Ireland was 62, and a joiner and a carpenter, his wife Mary A Collett from Seaton in Yorkshire was 42, and the three sons were William Hy Collett, age 24, Robert B Collett, age 21, and Harold Collett who was four years old.  William and Robert were joiners, probably working with their father.  By April 1911 only Henry’s son from his marriage with his second wife was still living with the couple.  The Kendal census that year listed the three of them as Henry Collett, who was 63, Mary Alice Collett, who was 53, and Harold Collett who was 14.

 

 

 

18Q89

Ann Collett

Born in 1871 at Kendal

 

18Q90

Mary E Collett

Born in 1873 at Kendal

 

18Q91

Margaret Collett

Born in 1875 at Kendal

 

18Q92

William Henry Collett

Born in 1877 at Kendal

 

18Q93

Robert B Collett

Born in 1879 at Kendal

 

18Q94

John F Collett

Born in 1890 at Kendal

 

The following is the child of Henry Collett and his second wife Mary Alice Foster:

 

18Q95

Harold Collett

Born in 1896 at Kendal

 

 

 

 

18P123

Bethia Ann Collett was born at Mullingar, the county town of Westmeath in Ireland, during 1850.  She was the eldest daughter of William and Ann Collett, and it was originally believed that she may have been named after her paternal grandmother Bertha Philpot.  However, it is now known that her name was Bethia.  At one year old she was living with her mother and brother Henry (above) at St Mary Brecon, while her father was billeted with the Dragoon Guards in the Brecon Barracks, when her name was recorded as Bethiah Collett on that occasion.

 

 

 

Over the next few years the family moved around England as a result of her father’s service with the army.  In 1861 the family had settled in St Bees in Whitehaven when, as Bethia Ann Collett, she was ten years old.  And it was also as Bethia Ann Collett that she was recorded in the census of 1871 when she was living at 103 Scotch Street in St Bees with her widowed mother and three of her younger siblings.  At that time she was 21 and was working as an assistant stationer.

 

 

 

It was on 25th December 1872 at the Church of St John the Baptist in the Parish of Skelsmergh in Westmorland that Bethia Ann Collett married John William Tanner who was born at Kendal in Westmorland on 10th December 1849.  John was 23 and was a cloth finisher of Skelsmergh, the son of Thomas Tanner who was a bobbin turner.  Bethia was also 23 and of St Thomas, Kendal, the daughter of William Collett deceased.  The witnesses were Joseph Smallwood Tanner and Isabella Wilkinson and the marriage was registered at Kendall.  It was also in Kendal that Bethia’s brother Henry Collett had been married two years earlier and where he living with his wife from that day forward. 

 

 

 

By the time of the census in 1881 railway porter John Tanner, aged 31, and his wife Bethia, who was also 31, were residing at West Gate Cottage in Barrow-in-Furness with their children Albert V Tanner who was eight, Walker K Tanner who was six, Edith A Tanner who was four, John W Tanner who was two and Francis H Tanner who was just ten weeks old.  John’s occupation as a railway porter was again confirmed two years later at the birth of the couples’ seventh child Beatrice Tanner in 1883.  However, it was only four years later, and after the birth of her eighth child, that the death of Bethia Ann Tanner nee Collett was recorded in 1887 at the age of only 37.  It seems likely that she died in childbirth, since it was at that same time when her ninth child, her son Edwin Tanner, was born who also did not survive the ordeal.

 

 

 

According to the next census in 1891 railway porter John Tanner was a widower living at 28 Settle Street in Barrow-in-Furness with his five surviving children.  They were Albert V tanner who was 18 and a billiards marker, Edith A Tanner who was 14 and a nurse/domestic servant, John W Tanner who was 12 and a milk boy, Beatrice E tanner who was seven and Fredrick J Tanner who was six years of age.  To help John look after his family was servant Agnes E Clarke who was 23, and it was she who John married later that same year.  Agnes Ellende Clarke was born at Ulverston in Lancashire in 1868.  On the occasion of the marriage of his daughter Beatrice in 1914 John Tanner was employed as a shipyard storekeeper.  And it was twelve years after that when John William Tanner passed away in 1926 at the age of 77

 

 

 

18Q96

Albert Vernon Tanner

Born in 1873 at Kendall

 

18Q97

Walter Kitchen Tanner

Born in 1874 at Barrow-in-Furness

 

18Q98

Edith Ann Tanner

Born in 1876 at Kendall

 

18Q99

John William Tanner

Born in 1878 at Barrow-in-Furness

 

18Q100

Francis Henry Tanner

Born in 1880 at Barrow-in-Furness

 

18Q101

Arthur Henry Tanner

Born in 1881 at Barrow-in-Furness

 

18Q102

Beatrice Eleanor Tanner

Born in 1883 at Barrow-in-Furness

 

18Q103

Frederick James Tanner

Born in 1884 at Barrow-in-Furness

 

18Q104

Edwin Smallwood Tanner

Born in 1887 at Barrow-in-Furness

 

 

 

 

18P124

John Collett was born at Dartmoor in Devon during 1851, the son of William and Ann Collett.  By the time of the census in 1861 John’s father had retired from serving with the Dragoon Guards and the family was then living in St Bees in Whitehaven, where John was nine years old.  After a further ten years, and following the death of his father prior to 1871, John was living at 103 Scotch Street in St Bees with his widowed mother and three of his siblings, where he was 19 and an unemployed grocer. 

 

 

 

Where nothing was previously known about John Collett after 1871, it is thanks to Brian Eddleston that, it is now established that John married Isabella Landell, their wedding recorded at Berwick (Ref. 10b 695) during the last three months of 1874.  One year later Isabella presented John with a son whose birth was also recorded at Berwick (Ref. 10b 410) during the last quarter of 1875, with the child baptised at Berwick-on-Tweed in Northumberland on 5th December 1875, father John Collett, mother Isabella.  Within the next three months John Collett suffered a premature death, his death recorded at Berwick (Ref. 10b 262) during the first three months of 1876, when he was only around twenty-five years of age.

 

 

 

According to the census in 1881 John’s widow Isabella Collet (sic) from Hawick in Northumberland was 30 and a servant at the home of worsted spinner Walter Walker and his wife Margaret E Walker at 22 Highfield Terrace in Halifax.  On that same day her son William Collett from Berwick-on-Tweed was five years old when he was living with his paternal grandmother, the widow Ann Collett, at her home at 41 Hawke Street in Barrow-in-Furness.  William was described as her grandson, while also recorded at that address was William’s uncle, William Collett, his late father’s younger unmarried brother.

 

 

 

Within the next six months the widow Isabella Collett married Job Barker, the event recorded at Halifax (Ref. 9a 552) during the third quarter of the year and a year later she gave birth to a daughter, Martha E Barker who was born at Halifax in 1882.  That situation was confirmed in the next census of 1891, by which time Isabella’s son William had returned to live with his mother and stepfather in Halifax.  Job Barker was 39 and worsted mill worker, Isabella was 40, their daughter Martha was nine, and job’s stepson was William Collett who was 15.  During the second half of that decade Isabella’s son left home to be married, and he was replaced by the arrival of two of her nieces, the daughters of her first husband’s sister Elizabeth.  So on the day of the census in 1901 Job and Isabella were residing within the Queensbury-Halifax registration district where their daughter Martha E Barker aged 19 was a worsted spinner, as was niece Elizabeth Creber who was 15 and from Barrow, while her sister Annie Creber also from Barrow was 11 who was still attending school.  On that occasion Isabella from Berwick was 49, as was Job Barker who was a warehouseman at a local worsted mill.

 

 

 

18Q105

William Collett

Born in 1875 at Berwick-on-Tweed

 

 

 

 

18P125

William Collett was born at Fressingfield in 1855, the son of William Collett of Fressingfield and his wife Ann.  In 1861 William was five years old when he was living with his family at St Bees in Whitehaven.  Ten years later according to the census in 1871, and following the death of his father, William was 15 and was living with his widowed mother and his family at 103 Scotch Street in Whitehaven.  During the following decade his mother moved to live at Barrow-in-Furness and it was with her at 41 Hawke Street in Barrow that William was living in 1881 when he was 25 and a labourer at a local foundry.  In addition to his mother Ann, aged 52, four other people were staying at that address, the first of which was William’s nephew William Collett from Berwick-on-Tweed, the five-year old son of William’s late brother John Collett.  The other three were all married boarders, and they were Charles Littlewood, Job Roberts and Agnes Irving.

 

 

 

It was eighteen months later, during the third quarter of 1882, when William Collett married Frances Nelson at Barrow-in-Furness, Frances having been born at Whitehaven in 1861.  During the following year Frances gave birth to a daughter who sadly died when she was only three years old, by which time she also had a son.

 

 

 

Over the following four years Frances presented her husband with two more sons, all of the children born while the couple continued to live in Barrow-in-Furness.  So by the time of the census in 1891, when William Collett said he was 33, although he was actually 35, he was employed as a railway porter while living at Barrow-in-Furness with his wife Frances who was 29.  Living there with them were their two sons, John W Collett who was four and Thomas H Collett who was two years old.  Not long after the census day that year Frances gave birth to her last child.

 

 

 

The complete family of five was recorded in the Barrow census of 1901 as William Collett, age 44 and from Fressingfield, who was a railway checker, his wife Frances who was 38, and the three children who were John W Collett aged 14, Thomas H Collett aged 12 and Robert Collett who was nine years old.  Their eldest son John had already left school by then and was working as a railway clerk.

 

 

 

The same five members of the family were still living together in Barrow ten years later in April 1911.  William Collett was 53, his wife Frances Collett was 49, and their three sons were recorded as John William Collett, age 24, Thomas Henry Collett, age 22, and Robert Collett who was 19.  What is interesting is the William from Suffolk and Frances from Whitehaven were described as being married for twenty-six years, during which time Frances had given birth to four children, with only three surviving, a reference to their late daughter Elizabeth.

 

 

 

18Q106

Elizabeth Ann Collett

Born in 1883 at Barrow-in-Furness

 

18Q107

John William Collett

Born in 1886 at Barrow-in-Furness

 

18Q108

Thomas Henry Collett

Born in 1888 at Barrow-in-Furness

 

18Q109

Robert Collett

Born in 1891 at Barrow-in-Furness

 

 

 

 

18P126

Elizabeth Collett was born at St Bees in Whitehaven in 1857, the youngest child of William Collett of Fressingfield and Ann from Ravenglass in Cumberland.  She was three years old in 1861 and sometime in the following few years her father died, so by 1871 she was 13 and living at 103 Scotch Street in St Bees with her widowed mother and three older siblings.  It was in late 1876 at Barrow-in-Furness that Elizabeth Collett married Elijah Creber who was born at Dudley in Worcestershire in 1856.  Shortly after they were married Elizabeth gave birth to the first of their children, while the couple were still living in Barrow.

 

 

 

It was also in Barrow, at 30 Cook Street, that the family was living at the time of the census in 1881, not far from where Elizabeth’s mother Ann was living at that time.  Elijah Creber was 24 and a labourer at the local ironworks, his wife Elizabeth was 23, and by then they had two children, Sarah Ann Creber who was four, and William Creber who was one year old and born at Dudley.

 

 

 

Five more children were added to the family during the next decade, so by 1891 the family living at Barrow was made up of Elijah Creber 34, Elizabeth Creber 33, Sarah Ann Creber 14, William Creber 11, James who was nine, Elijah who was seven, Elizabeth who was five, John who was three, and Annie B Creber who was just one year old.  Just under eight years later Elizabeth Creber nee Collett died during the first three months of 1899, her death recorded at Barrow-in-Furness (Ref. 8e 636) when she was 41.  Two years after that sad event widower Elijah Creber was still living in Barrow according to the census in March 1901 but the only two of his children still living there with him were his son Elijah junior, who was 17 and a brass dresser at the nearby shipyard, and daughter Hannah Creber who was six years old.

 

 

 

On that same day two of Elizabeth’s daughters were staying with Elizabeth’s sister-in-law Isabella Barker whose first husband John Collett – Elizabeth’s eldest brother (above) - had died in 1876.   The census in 1901 placed the two girls, Elizabeth Creber aged 15 and a worsted spinner and her sister Annie Creber, who was 11, living in the Halifax home of Job and Isabella Barker, where they were described as their nieces.

 

 

 

From the website www.cumbriabmd.org.uk it is now known that Elizabeth Creber Collett had a total of ten children, two more than those named in the census returns for 1881 and 1891, the full list being as follows.  Sarah Ann Creber (born in1876), Elizabeth Creber (born in 1880, who died in 1880), William Creber (born in 1880), James Creber (born in 1881), Elijah Creber (born in 1883), Elizabeth Creber (born in 1886), John Henry Creber (born in 1887), Annie B Creber (born in 1889), Levi Creber (born in 1891, who died in 1891) and Hannah S Creber (born in 1894; who died in 1905 age 10 years).

 

 

 

 

18P127

Henry Collett was born at Fressingfield in 1862, where he was baptised on 26th July 1863, the eldest child of George Collett and Harriet Cracknell.  It was in the census of 1871 that he was referred to as Harry Collett aged eight years.  By the time of the 1881 Census he had left the family home in Fressingfield and, at the age of 19, Henry Collett was living and working at Weybread, between Fressingfield and Harleston.  He was described as an industrial farm servant, employed at the home of John and Emily Anness.  The farm holding was one hundred acres for which John Anness employed eight men and one boy, the latter presumably referring to Henry Collett.  There was only one other person living at the farmhouse and that was 18 years old Emily Youell of Pulham Market.

 

 

 

It was at Cratfield on 17th April 1883 that Henry married Elizabeth Randall, the daughter of labourer William Randall of Laxfield and his wife Mary Ann from Bungay.  Elizabeth was born at Cratfield around 1854 and was therefore some years older than her husband.  Two years before they were married, Elizabeth Randall from Cratfield was 26 and was living there with her parents at the time of the census in 1881.  Over the twelve years after they were married, Elizabeth presented Henry with five sons and a daughter.  The first three boys, and her daughter, were all born while the couple were still living at Cratfield.

 

 

 

Around 1890 the family left Cratfield when they moved to Redenhall just outside Harleston where the couple’s last two sons were born.  The census of 1891 causes some confusion and some concern, since it would appear that Elizabeth Collett, age 36, was listed with her husband and three of their children, while also being recorded visiting her father with two of her children.

 

 

 

Married agricultural labourer Henry Collett of Fressingfield, age 28, was living at Bungay Road in Redenhall with Harleston.  Included on the census return with him was his wife Elizabeth Collett who was 36 and from Laxfield (sic), and three of their children, Henry Collett who was six, Maria Collett who was four, and George Collett who was two years old.  All three children confirmed as born at Cratfield.

 

 

 

Still living at Cratfield, from where the Collett family had only recently moved, was Elizabeth’s father sixty years old agricultural labourer William Randall of Laxfield.  He was living in Bell Lane in Cratfield and with him, according to the census return, was his married daughter Elizabeth aged 36, and two grandchildren William Collett who was seven, and Maria Collett who was four.

 

 

 

It therefore seems likely, although it can never be proved, that Henry’s and Elizabeth’s eldest son William had stayed with Elizabeth’s father when the family moved to Redenhall, probably because Elizabeth was with-child and was expecting to give birth at any time around the day of the census.  However, there is no simple explanation as to why Elizabeth and her daughter Maria were listed in two places at the same time.  Not long after the census day in 1891 Elizabeth gave birth to another son, the first of two boys to be born while the family was living at Redenhall.

 

 

 

By March 1901 the family had been rejoined by the eldest son William, perhaps following the death of Elizabeth’s father who has not been identified in the same census.  Henry and Elizabeth and their family were living at Cloutergate Cottage in Redenhall, but by that time their daughter Maria had already left the family home, and was the only child missing on that occasion.  The full census details revealed that Henry, who was referred to as Harry Collett, was from Fressingfield and working with horses as a teamster of a farm at the age of 38.  On that occasion his ‘older’ wife Elizabeth gave her age as being 42 and confirmed that she had been born at Laxfield.

 

 

 

Living with the couple were their five sons, the oldest three possibly working on the same farm as their father, since each of them was described as being an ordinary farm labourer.  The five boys were William 17, Harry 15, George 12, Charles 9, and Ernest who was seven years old, the first born at Cratfield and the last two at Redenhall.

 

 

 

Ten years later Henry was still calling himself Harry, the name he very likely used for the rest of his life.  The April census of 1911 confirmed that he and his family were still living at Redenhall.  Harry Collett of Fressingfield was 49, and his wife Elizabeth Collett of Laxfield was 52.  The only children still living with them were the two youngest Charles Collett 19, and Ernest Collett who was 18.  Sons William, Harry and George were all married by then but were still living nearby, William in Redenhall, with Harry and George in Harleston.  Also married by then with a family of her own was Harry’s daughter Maria and she and her family were also living at Redenhall at that time.

 

 

 

18Q110

William Collett

Born in 1883 at Cratfield

 

18Q111

Harry Collett

Born in 1885 at Cratfield

 

18Q112

Maria Collett

Born in 1886 at Cratfield

 

18Q113

George Collett

Born in 1888 at Cratfield

 

18Q114

Charles Collett

Born in 1891 at Redenhall, Harleston

 

18Q115

Ernest Collett

Born in 1893 at Redenhall, Harleston

 

 

 

 

18P128

Mary Ann Collett was born at Fressingfield on 21st June 1864, the eldest daughter of George and Harriet Collett.  She was also baptised there on 29th April 1866, all of which was confirmed by the census in 1871 in which she listed as Mary Ann Collett aged six years.  However, within a year of the census day she died at Fressingfield, where she was buried on 4th February 1872 aged seven years.

 

 

 

 

18P129

Benjamin Collett was born at Fressingfield in 1866 and was baptised there on 29th April 1866 in a joint ceremony with his sister Mary Ann (above).  He was five years old in 1871 and was 15 by the time of the 1881 Census when he was living with his family at Catchpool Gardens in Fressingfield.  It was on 7th October 1890 at Metfield that he married Emily Emma Poppy, the daughter of farmer Robert Poppy and his wife Emily.  Emily Emma Poppy was born on 18th October 1869 and was baptised at Metfield on 1st May 1870, and her marriage to Benjamin was recorded at Hoxne (Ref. 4a 1465) during the last quarter of 1890.

 

 

 

By the time of the next census in 1891 Benjamin Collett, age 24, and his wife Emily Emma Collett, age 22, were living at St James South Elham where their only child was born during the weeks and months after the census day that year.  And it was at St James South Elham that their daughter, Emma Emily Collett was baptised on 6th September 1891.  Sometime after the birth, the family of three moved to Thetford and in 1901 they were living in the village of Barnham near the River Little Ouse.

 

 

 

The census that year recorded that Benjamin Collett, age 35 and from Fressingfield, was a teamster on a local farm, just like his older brother Harry (above), his wife Emily Emma Collett from Metfield was 30, while their daughter Emma Conby (sic) Collett was 10 years old.  It was very likely Benjamin’s work with horses that took the family to the Loddon area of Norfolk over the next few years.  Since it was there that the family was living in 1911.  Benjamin Collett was 43, his wife Emily Emma was 41, and on that occasion their daughter was correctly recorded as Emma Emily Collett age 19.

 

 

 

18Q116

Emma Emily Collett

Born in 1891 at St James South Elham

 

 

 

 

18P131

George Collett was born at Fressingfield in 1870 and it was there that he was baptised on 27th November 1870, the son of George and Harriet Collett.  He was living at Catchpool Gardens in Fressingfield with his family in 1881 when he was ten years old.  Although his family then moved to Stradbroke, George was not living with them in 1891.  It was on 14th October 1892 at Fressingfield that George Collett married Eliza Pearce, the daughter of horseman Frederick Pearce.  Their marriage produced just one son for Eliza and George who was born in the village of Metfield to the north-east of Fressingfield.  However, it was around the time of the birth of the child that George may have died, with the death of George Collett at Metfield recorded at Hoxne register office in Suffolk (Ref. 4a 441) during the second quarter of 1898 when he was only 27 years of age. 

 

 

 

Following the premature death of her husband, the young widow Eliza Collett married the much older bachelor Thomas Woolnough, an agricultural labourer from Metfield, at Metfield on 20th July 1899.  By the time of the Metfield census in 1901 Thomas was 43 years of age, Eliza from Fressingfield was 29, while living with the couple was Thomas’ stepson and Eliza’s son George Collett from Metfield who was two years old.  Not long after the census day that year Eliza gave birth to the first of her two known children with Thomas Woolnough, with the second child born two years after the first one.  That situation was confirmed in the next census in 1911 when the family was still living in Metfield, but without Eliza’s first born child Frederick George Collett who had left the family by then.  Thomas was 53, Eliza was 38, Ruth Woolnough was nine and Charles Woolnough was seven years of age.

 

 

 

18Q117

Frederick George Collett

Born in 1898 at Metfield

 

 

 

 

18P132

William Collett was born at Fressingfield during May 1872, where he was baptised on 27th October 1872.  It was barely sixteen months later when he died and was buried at Fressingfield on 2nd March 1874, where the burial register recorded that he was one year and nine months old.

 

 

 

 

18P133

Esau Collett was born at Fressingfield in 1874 and was baptised there on 28th March 1874, just twenty-six days after his brother William (above) had been buried there.  Esau, the son of George Collett and Harriet Cracknell, was six years old in 1881 when he was living there with his family at Catchpool Gardens.  Upon leaving school, Esau also left the family home to seek work, and by 1891, at the age of 17, he was living and working at Redlingfield as an agricultural labourer.  Ten years later Esau Collett from Fressingfield was 26 and a boarder at the home of Harry and Fanny Frampton and their family within the Hackney parish of St Matthew in London.  Unmarried Esau was described as a horse-keeper when he was still a bachelor, who was presumably preparing for the day he would be married.  Also at the same address were brothers George and William Cracknell, who may well have been Esau’s cousins through his mother’s family and whose sister was most probably his future wife.

 

 

 

Just four months after that census day Esau Collett, aged 27 and the son of George Collett, married Mary Ann Cracknell, aged 25 and the daughter of William Cracknell, on 5th August 1901 at the Church of St Michael & All Angels in Stoke Newington within the London Borough of Hackney.  It seems highly likely that Mary Ann was somehow related to Esau’s mother.  Their married resulted in the birth of six children, all born at Stoke Newington during the following decade, where the family was still living on the day of the next census in April 1911.  According to the Hackney census Esau Collett was 36, his wife Mary Ann Collett was 35, and their six children were Mary Collett who was eight, George Collett who was seven, Edith Collett who was five, Charles Collett who was four, John Collett who was one year old, and baby Frank who was just two months old.

 

 

 

Esau Collett was 84 years old when he passed away in 1958, his death recorded at Hackney register office (Ref. 5c 725) during the final three months of that year.

 

 

 

18Q118

Mary Collett

Born in 1902 at Stoke Newington

 

18Q119

George William Collett

Born in 1903 at Stoke Newington

 

18Q120

Edith Collett

Born in 1905 at Stoke Newington

 

18Q121

Charles Collett

Born in 1906 at Stoke Newington

 

18Q122

John Collett

Born in 1909 at Stoke Newington

 

18Q123

Frank Collett

Born in Jan 1910 at Stoke Newington

 

 

 

 

18P134

William Collett was born at Fressingfield in 1876 and was named after his late brother.  He was the son of George and Harriet Collett and was baptised at Fressingfield on 27th February 1876.  He was four years old and living with his family at Catchpool Gardens in Fressingfield in 1881.  He was still living with his parents ten years later in 1891 when he was 15, but by then the family was recorded at St Cross South Elmham.  After the turn of the century, when William Collett was 25, he was still a bachelor living with his parents, but at Stradbroke, where his occupation was that of a non-domestic groom.  Not long after the census day William Collett married Lydia Frances Jarvis from Corpusty near Aylsham in Norfolk at Haveringland in Norfolk on 1st November 1901, when the groom’s father was confirmed as George Collett.

 

 

 

Once they were married the couple headed for Hackney area of London where they were living when their first four children were born.  By the time of the census conducted at the start of April in 1911 the family of six was residing at 7 Detmold Road in Clapton just a few yards from Clapton Railway Station.  The three-roomed accommodation was occupied by William Collett from Fressingfield in Suffolk, who was 34 and a general labourer employed by London City Council Tramways, his wife of nine years Lydia Frances Collett who was also 34, Mabel Lydia Collett who was nine, Walter James Collett who was six, Grace Maria Collett who was four and Annie May Collett who was one year old.  Living with the young family was their cousin Bertha Crackwell, aged 24, a domestic cook from Stradbroke, and a work colleague of William’s, Thomas Wilding who was 43 and another general labourer working for L C C Tramways.

 

 

 

 

18P135

Sarah Collett was born at Fressingfield in 1878 and was two years old in April 1881 when she was living with her family at Catchpool Gardens in Fressingfield.  Ten year later in 1891 she 12 years old.  When her parents moved to Stradbroke after 1891 Sarah moved with them, and at the age of 22 she was living with them at Stradbroke, from where she was employed as a domestic housemaid.

 

 

 

 

18P136

James Collett was born at Cratfield after his parents moved there from Fressingfield.  He was born in 1881 but after 3rd April.  Their time spent at Cratfield lasted only around five years, since by 1891, his family was living within the Wangford & Bungay registration district, where James was nine.  A further family move took place after that, with the family living at Stradbroke in 1901, when James was 19 and an ordinary farm labourer.

 

 

 

 

18P137

May Collett was born at Cratfield in 1885, the youngest child of George Collett and Harriet Cracknell, and she was five years old in the Wangford & Bungay census of 1891.  Ten years later she had left the family home, which by then was a Stradbroke.  Instead May Collett, age 15 and from Cratfield, was a general domestic servant at Fressingfield-cum-Withersdale.  An error was made at the time of the next census in 1911.  The census return that year listed May Coblett from Cratfield as 25, and living and working in the Brentford area of Middlesex.

 

 

 

 

18P138

Elizabeth Collett was born at Cawnpore in India on 8th June 1861.  Elizabeth and her sister Sarah (below) were the daughters of Private John Collett of Ilketshall St Andrew who was serving in India with the 54th Regiment at the time of their birth.  In May 1873 the family returned to England and to Ilketshall St Andrew where, in 1874, Elizabeth’s mother died followed in the next year by her father who had only just remarried.  Upon the death of her mother Elizabeth and her two siblings were taken into the family of their father’s brother William Collett, but by April 1881 Elizabeth was living and working in the Streatham area of South London.

 

 

 

By then she was 20 and her place of birth was confirmed as Cawnpore.  She was employed as a parlour maid at Matlock Lodge in Streatham which was the home of John and Ann Saunders.  What is of particular interest is the fact that working as a cook at the same address was 37 years old spinster Elizabeth Collett of Kennington in Surrey.  And as yet it has not been determined if she was an aunt of the younger Elizabeth or some more distant relative.

 

 

 

Almost exactly ten years later, when Elizabeth was thirty, she married Charles Henry Howard at Camden Town in London on 28th March 1891 with whom she had five daughters and one son.  According to the census of 1901 Elizabeth Howard of India was 39 when she was living at St Pancras with her family.  Shortly after that the family moved out of London and settled in Walton near Felixstowe in Suffolk, and it was there, at 53 Kings Street, that they were living in March 1903 when the couple’s only son was born.

 

 

 

Sadly the marriage only survived for twelve years when Elizabeth died of exhaustion around September 1903, leaving Charles with a young family to raise.  The tragic event happened while the family was still living at 53 Kings Street in Walton, and occurred around six month after she gave birth to her only son Richard Howard who was born on 10th March 1903.  However, having five daughters to look after, son Richard was taken by Elizabeth’s married sister, Sarah Smith nee Collett (below) to live in London with her and husband William Saunders Smith.

 

 

 

The birth certificate for Richard Howard confirmed the following details.  That he was born on 10th March 1903 at 53 Kings Street in Walton, and that it was registered at Woodbridge under the sub-district of Colneis.  His father was Charles Henry Howard, a general labourer, and his mother was Elizabeth Howard formerly Collett, and that it was she who registered the birth on 18th April 1903.

 

 

 

A further tragedy struck the family six years later when Charles’ daughter Annie Amelia Sarah Howard died from diphtheria on 15th January 1909 at nine years of age.  On that occasion widower Charles and his daughters were still living at 53 Kings Street in Walton, and the same house was still there in 2008.  Charles Howard died in 1932, after four years of bitter exchanges with William Saunders Smith over his adoption of Charles’ son Richard Howard.

 

 

 

 

18P139

Sarah Collett was born at Maradabad in India on 19th December 1862.  She returned to England with her family in May 1873 and settled in Ilketshall St Andrew where she was orphaned by the deaths of her mother in 1874 and her father in 1875.  Initially Sarah and her sister Elizabeth (above) and brother John (below) lived with their uncle William Collett at Ilketshall St John, but it was at Hornsey in North London that she was living and working by the time of the census in April 1881.

 

 

 

Sarah was confirmed as being 18 and born in India.  The address where she was working as a general servant was 23 Upper Tollington Park which runs from Finsbury Park to the Hornsey Road (A103) which is still there today.  That was the home of Charles W Leach of Wakefield, who was described as a mantle warehouseman.  Five years later, on 3rd April 1886 Sarah married William Saunders Smith at St Lukes Marylebone in London and by March 1901 Sarah, who was recorded as being born at Maradabad, Calcutta in India, was living in the St Pancras area of London at the age of 39.

 

 

 

Just over two years later, and upon the death of her married sister, Elizabeth Howard nee Collett (above), Sarah and William took over the care of her youngest child and only son Richard Howard who was only six months old in the autumn of 1903.  As a result of this, to all intent and purposes he was raised as Richard Howard Smith, the son of Sarah and William, and sadly it was not until he was in his mid-twenties that he discovered the identity of his real parents, and that he had five sisters, although only four of them survived beyond childhood.

 

 

 

By April 1911, the Smith family was living at 172 Sirdar Road, Noel Park within the Wood Green area of London.  The census that month recorded the occupants of the four-room dwelling as William Smith, age 53 and from South Moulton in Devon, who was a railway inspector, his British wife of 27 years Sarah Smith, who 49 and was born at Maradabad in India, their niece Alice Collett, age 16, who was born at Raydon in Suffolk, and their nephew Richard Howard who was eight years old and from Walton in Suffolk.  Alice Mary Collett was the eldest daughter of Sarah’s brother John Christian George Collett (below) and, although she knew who her parents and her siblings in Westleton, she too referred to Sarah and William as Mum and Dad.

 

 

 

It was at that same address that Sarah and William continued to live until the day they died, at which time Richard Howard Smith took over the property and lived there with his wife and their son.   Richard was the grandfather of Louisa Rickett, and it was his son who was her father.  Richard Howard Smith died in 1968 while still living at 172 Sirdar Street.  Many years before his passing Richard had made contact with his sister Elizabeth Jane Howard, with whom he became very close, and who sent flowers and a card on the day of his funeral.

 

 

 

However, between 1928 and 1932 there were some very bitter exchanges between Charles Howard and William Saunders Smith, as details in letters held by Louisa Rickett.  Charles Howards had written his letter himself, while William Saunders Smith had instructed a solicitor to reply.  From the exchange of correspondence it seems that Sarah and William were allowed to take Richard to live with them in 1903 on the understanding that he should be brought up to know he had a father and siblings still living.  But it seems that the Smiths did not fulfil that promise.  In addition to which the Howard family was furious that William Smith had signed himself as Richard’s father on his marriage certificate.  When challenged on this, the Smiths claimed they had Richard’s surname changed by a Justice of Peace and that everything was above board.

 

 

 

 

18P140

John Christian George Collett was born at Port William, Calcutta in India on 21st December 1864 and was possibly the only son of John Collett and Mary Penney.  John Collett senior was a private with 54th Regiment serving in India during the 1860s and 1870s.  Like his sisters Elizabeth and Sarah (above) John had returned to England in May 1873 but had tragically lost both parents by 1875, first his mother in 1874, then his father in 1875.  As a result of the first death, the three children of John Collett were taken into the care of their uncle William Collett (Ref. 18O91) and initially lived with him at his home at Ilketshall St John.

 

 

 

Five years later the census in 1881 confirmed that John was 16 and that he was living with his uncle William Collett at Ilketshall St John.  His occupation then was that of an agricultural labourer.  It seems very likely he was working alongside his younger cousin John Collett (below) who was also listed as an agricultural labourer.  It was when John was in his late twenties that he met Anna (Annie) Meadows who was born in 1872 at Earl Soham near Framlingham and the couple were later married at Wangford Parish Church on 8th February 1893.  The marriage produced thirteen children for John and Annie made up of eight daughters and five sons. 

 

 

 

The couple initially lived at Wrentham, near Southwold, where their first child was born before the family settled at Willow Marsh in Yoxford where the next four children were born.  It may have also been at Willow Marsh where all of the remaining children were born.

 

 

 

According to the 1901 Census John C G Collett, age 37, had been born at Port William in Calcutta.  He was employed as a yardman working on a farm at Yoxford midway between Blythburgh and Saxmundham with his wife Annie aged 26 of Earl Soham and their five children.  The children at that time were John W G Collett who was seven and from Wrentham, Alice aged five who was born at Yoxford but was at St Pancras in London on the day of the census, Annie E Collett who was four 4, William S Collett who was two, and Elizabeth C Collett who was not yet one year old.

 

 

 

Also living with the family in March 1901 was a cook and domestic servant by the name of Kate Collett who was aged 26 and born at Great Malvern in Worcestershire.  At some time in his later life John Christian George Collett moved the three miles east to Westleton where he died on 14th June 1941.

 

 

 

18Q124

John William George Collett

Born on 04.10.1893 Willow Marsh, Yox.

 

18Q125

Alice Mary Collett

Born on 09.07.1895 Willow Marsh, Yox.

 

18Q126

Annie Elizabeth Collett

Born on 04.04.1896 Willow Marsh, Yox.

 

18Q127

William Saunders Collett

Born on 22.10.1898 Willow Marsh, Yox.

 

18Q128

Elizabeth Cissie May Collett

Born on 31.05.1900 Willow Marsh, Yox.

 

18Q129

Francis Ernest James Collett

Born on 16.10.1901 at Yoxford

 

18Q130

Violet Hazel Collett

Born on 01.06.1903 at Yoxford

 

18Q131

Ivy Sarah Collett

Born on 11.09.1906 at Yoxford

 

18Q132

Robert Charles Collett

Born on 10.04.1908 at Yoxford

 

18Q133

Lillian Emma Collett

Born on 19.05.1910 at Yoxford

 

18Q134

Claude Victor Collett

Born on 26.03.1912 at Yoxford

 

18Q135

Louisa May Collett

Born on 16.03.1913 at Yoxford

 

18Q136

Dorothy Vera Collett

Born on 08.10.1914 at Yoxford

 

 

 

 

18P141

Harriet Collett was born at Ilketshall St Andrew in 1877, nearly two years after the death of her mother’s late husband John Collett.  Harriet Collett was baptised there on 12th August 1877, when the parish register described her as the illegitimate daughter of Charlotte Collett nee Carver.  Therefore it is not known for sure who the father was.

 

 

 

From the time of the death of Charlotte’s husband’s first wife in 1874, the three children of John Collett from his previous marriage had been cared for by the family of John’s younger brother William Collett.  It therefore probably made sense for Harriet to be placed in the care of another family to enable her mother Charlotte to leave Ilketshall, perhaps in disgrace, to seek work elsewhere.

 

 

 

Because Harriet was not the child of John Collett she was placed with an apparently unrelated family, as confirmed by the census in 1881 when, at the age of just three years, Harriet Collett was described as a boarder and lodger at the home of farm labourer William Howlett at Black Common in Ilketshall St Andrew.  Ten years later in 1891 Harriet Collett, age 13, was still living with William Howlett, who by then was a widower, and Harriet was working as his housekeeper.  No record of her has been found in March 1901, by which time she was very likely married.

 

 

 

 

18P142

George Collett was born at Reedham on 21st April 1858, where he was baptised on 9th May 1858, the eldest of the two sons of Charles Collett and Mary Ann Ellis.  Shortly after that his family left Reedham when they moved to Oulton near Lowestoft where he was baptised on 9th May 1858.  It was also there that he was living with his parents in 1861 when George Collett was three years old.  Three years later, and following the birth of his brother Charles (below), George Collett, age six years, was once again baptised, that time in a joint ceremony with his baby brother which took place at Oulton on 28th August 1864.  The boys’ parents were confirmed as Charles and Mary Collett.

 

 

 

George was 13 at the time of the census in 1871, when he and his family were living at 4 Common Lane, Southtown in Gorleston, to the south of Great Yarmouth.  Ten years later, according to the census in 1881, George Collett, age 23, had left his east coast home and was a seaman with the vessel ‘Robert & Mary’ sailing out of Littlehampton in Sussex on the south coast of England.  On that occasion he gave his place of birth as Oulton where he was living just after he was born and where his brother Charles (below) had been born.  Not obvious record for George Collett of Reedham has been found in any census after that time, and it is possible that he may have been the victim of an accident at sea. 

 

 

 

 

18P143

Charles George Collett was born at Oulton near Lowestoft in 1864, the second of two sons of Charles Collett and Mary Ann Ellis.  He was only a few months old when he was baptised at Oulton in a joint ceremony with his older brother George (above) on 28th August 1864.  It was also simply as Charles Collett, age seven, that he was listed in the census of 1871, by which time he and his family were living at 4 Common Lane, Southtown in Gorleston, and it was at that same address that he and his parents were living in 1881, when Charles was a general labourer at the age of 16.

 

 

 

Three years later, when he was 20, Charles married the much older Lavinia Anna Howlett during the first quarter of 1884 as recorded at Mutford R D.  Lavinia was a dressmaker who was born at Bungay, the birth being recorded at Wangford R D during the second quarter of 1852, the daughter of gardener William and Sarah Howlett.  It may have been out of embarrassment of their 12-year age difference that Lavinia only admitted to being six years older than Charles in the subsequent census returns.  Certainly in 1861, as the eldest child in her family, Lavinia Howlett was confirmed as being nine years old.  It was appear that the first child of Charles and Lavinia may have been a honeymoon baby, as its birth was recorded at Mutford R D during the last quarter of the same year in which they were married.  A further three children were added to the family before the next census in 1891, two of which were born at Southtown to the north of Gorleston.  However, on the day of the census the family was once again living in Gorleston where dairyman Chas Collett, age 26, was living at 8 Common Lane in Gorleston (the same road in which his parents were living in 1901).  Living there with him was his wife and just three of their four children.

 

 

 

The census return that year confirmed Charles’ family as Lavina Collett, who said she was 32 rather than her actual age of 38, Sara Mary Collett, who was six years old, Bertie H V Collett, who was three, and Alb Ed Sidney Collett who was not yet one year old.  The couple’s missing son Leonard was living with Charles’ parents at East Marsh Road in Burgh Castle, where he was recorded incorrectly as George L Collett who was five years old.  It was around two years later that the couple’s fifth and final child was born at Gorleston.

 

 

 

Eight years later in March 1901 Charles Collett from Oulton was working at Barking in Essex, while his wife and five children were still living at Gorleston, near Great Yarmouth.  Charles was 36 years of age and was employed as a general labourer at a chemical works in Barking.  His wife Lavinia Collett, a dressmaker, said she was 42 instead of 48, and was confirm she had been born at Bungay.  Her eldest child was named as Lavinia instead of Laurina, who was 16, Lionel was 15, Bertie was 13, Albert was listed as Sidney, who was 10, and Grace was eight years old. 

 

 

 

By April 1911 the family was residing at 21 Burnt Lane in Southtown and comprised Charles Collett, age 47 who was a riverside labourer, his wife Lavinia, age 56, together with just two of their children, they being Albert Edward Sidney Collett, who was 20, and Grace Nellie Kate Collett who was 18. 

 

 

 

Charles George Collett died at Southtown sometime between 1911 and 1915, and was followed by his wife Lavinia Ann Collett nee Howlett whose death was recorded at Yarmouth R D during the first three months of 1915.

 

 

 

18Q137

Laurina Sarah Mary Collett

Born in 1884 at Gorleston-on-Sea

 

18Q138

Lionel Charles George Collett

Born in 1886 at Gorleston-on-Sea

 

18Q139

Herbert V Collett

Born in 1887 at Southtown, nr Gorleston

 

18Q140

Albert Edward Sydney Collett

Born in 1890 at Southtown, nr Gorleston

 

18Q141

Grace Nellie Kate Collett

Born in 1893 at Gorleston-on-Sea

 

 

 

 

18P144

Sarah Collett was born in 1865 at Ilketshall and was baptised at Ilketshall St Andrew on 18th March 1866, the daughter of William and Emma Collett.  Upon leaving school she entered into domestic service and at the age of 15 she was a housemaid at The Rectory of St John the Baptist Church in Ilketshall St Andrew.  Sarah’s employer was the Rector John Beatty, age 70 and from Londonderry, and his Irish wife Maria.

 

 

 

Towards the end of that decade Sarah from Ilketshall St Andrew married Charles Minister.  He was the son of agricultural labourer Joseph Minister of Thurlton in Norfolk and his wife Sarah Ann from nearby Thorpe, and was born at Thurlton near Loddon during 1864.  By the time of the census in 1891, Sarah had presented Charles with the first of their four known children.  On that occasion the family of three was living in the village of Thurlton, where they were also recorded in 1901 and 1911.  Charles Minister was 26, his wife Sarah was 25, and their son Sidney C Minister was not yet one year old.  During the following year Charles and Sarah Minister were the witnesses at the 1892 wedding of Sarah’s brother John Collett (below) at Reydon parish church near Southwold.

 

 

 

The Minister family was complete nine years later, when the Thurlton census of 1901 recorded them as farm labourer Charles of Thurlton who was 36, Sarah from Suffolk St Andrews (Ilketshall St Andrew) who was 35, and their four children, Sidney who was 10, Ernest who was eight, Mabel who was six, and Oscar who was three years old.  Ten years later the Thurlton census of 1911 provided the full names of each member of the family.  Charles and Sarah were 46 and 45 respectively, while their children were listed as Sidney Charles Minister, who was 20, Ernest Arthur Minister who was 18, Mabel Emma Minister, who was 16, and Oscar William Minister who was 13 years of age.  Sarah’s place of birth was recorded as St Andrews, with the other members of her family all having been born at Thurlton.

 

 

 

 

18P145

John Collett was born at Ilketshall St Andrew on 26th October 1867, where he was also baptised two months later on 28th December 1867.  The baptism record confirmed that he was the son of William Collett and Emma Rackham.

 

According to the census of 1881, John was 13 and an agricultural labourer when he was living with his parents at Ilketshall St John.  Also living with the family was John’s older cousin, the orphaned John Collett (above) who was born in India.

 

This picture of John Collett was provided by his great great grandson John Davies, and is an extract from a larger photograph which included the two sons of his daughter Edith Florence Davies, together with one of their sons.

 

 

 

John Collett married Louisa Clara Haward on 2nd January 1892 at the parish church in Reydon, within the Blything registration district where the event was recorded during the March quarter of 1892.    Louisa Haward was born at Reydon, the birth being recorded within the Blything registration district in the March quarter of 1869, and was the daughter of George Haward of Wrentham and Matilda Marjoram of Mutford.  The witnesses at the wedding were Charles and Sarah Minister, Sarah very likely being John’s married sister (above).

 

 

 

By the turn of the century Louisa had presented John with the first four of their eight children.  The 1901 Census placed the family as living at 42 Church Street in Southwold.  John was 33 and his occupation was that of a corporation carter, presumably meaning that he was employed by the local council.  Louisa his wife was listed as being 32 and born at Reydon one mile north of Southwold.  The four children living with the couple in April 1901 were Lily aged 8, Ellen aged 7, John aged 6, and Edith who was five years old.  The first three children had been born while the family was living at Easton Bavents, while the fourth was born after they had moved into Southwold.

 

 

 

The parish of Easton Bavents was located just immediately north of Southwold, but today it does not exist, as the whole area was subject to coastal erosion and has since fallen into the sea.

 

 

 

Of the four children born after April 1901, one is known to have been Daisy who was born during September 1907.  The census of 1911 revealed that the family was still living in Southwold, in the Blything registration district, where John was 44, his wife Louisa was 43, and the children still living with the couple were Edith who was 14, Agnes who was seven, Dorothy who was six, Daisy who was three and Roland who was two years of age.

 

 

 

18Q142

Lillian (Lily) Emma Collett

Born in Dec. 1892 at Easton Bavents

 

18Q143

Ellen Collett

Born in Dec. 1893 at Easton Bavents

 

18Q144

William John Collett

Born in Mar. 1895 at Easton Bavents

 

18Q145

Edith Florence Collett

Born in 1896 at Southwold

 

18Q146

Agnes Bessie Collett

Born in 1903

 

18Q147

Dorothy Mary Collett

Born in 1905

 

18Q148

Daisy Evelyn Gertrude Collett

Born in September 1907

 

18Q149

Roland Sidney George Collett

Born in 1909

 

 

 

 

18P146

William Collett was born in the village of Ilketshall St Andrew in 1869 and was baptised at the Church of St John the Baptist on 24th September 1869, the son of William Collett and his wife Emma Rackham.  Sadly he died there at the age of three weeks and was buried at St John the Baptist Church on 7th October 1869.

 

 

 

 

18P147

William Collett was born at Ilketshall St Andrew during the month of January in 1871, and was baptised at the Church of St John the Baptist on 5th February 1871, the second son of that name born to William and Emma Collett.  The census in 1871 recorded William as being two months old, although tragically he suffered the same fate as his namesake brother two years earlier, when he was buried there on 14th December 1872 at the age of 23 months.

 

 

 

 

18P148

Robert Collett was born at Ilketshall St Andrew in early 1864, the only surviving child of Robert Collett and Lydia Ann Brighton.  Tragically his father and his baby sister died while he was still very young, so by 1871, and at the age of only seven years, he was living at Ilketshall St Andrew with his widowed mother Lydia Ann Collett, and his widowed grandmother Mary Brighton.  It may be of interest that, in his later years, Robert gave his place of birth as Shipmeadow, a village approximately two miles north of Ilketshall St Andrew.  Upon leaving school he became a fisherman like his father, and in early 1881 it would appear that he set sail out of Pakefield near Lowestoft on board the fishing boat ‘Au Revoir’.  

 

 

 

By the third of April in 1881 the boat was moored at Falmouth in Cornwall.  According to the census return that day, fisherman Robert Collett of Ilketshall St Andrew was 17, and was one of eight fishermen employed by master fisherman Daniel Colby Adams of Pakefield.  Upon giving up his occupation as a fisherman Robert became a groom employed at Carlton Colville, where it is very likely that he met his future wife.

 

 

 

Also by that time Robert’s widowed mother Lydia was living at Carlton Colville and had married widower William Artis, following the death of his first wife Amy Girling.  It is therefore significant that Robert Collett married Lois Girling at Carlton Colville on 5th February 1889, the marriage being registered at Mutford R D during the first quarter of that year.  Lois was born at Ilketshall St Lawrence where she was baptised as Louisa Girling on 16th April 1865, the daughter of agricultural labourer Henry and Eliza Girling, Henry being the brother of the late Amy Artis nee Girling.  It was prior to her wedding day that Lois Girling had given birth to a base-born son who continued to carry his mother’s maiden name, although nothing more is known about the child at this time, except that he was the grandfather of Brian Girling.

 

 

 

Lois Girling was the fifth child of agricultural labourer Henry Girling and his wife Eliza Barber.  Henry was born at Westhall, near Halesworth in 1824, while his wife was from Ilketshall St Margaret, where she was born in 1831.  The couple’s first two children, William and Robert Henry, were born at Ilketshall St Andrew, while the remainder of their children were all born at Ilketshall St Lawrence.  In the Ilketshall St Lawrence census of 1871, Lois Girling was six years old when she was living there with her parents and her six siblings.  An eighth child was added to the family during the following few months, but by 1881 three of the child had left the family home in Ilketshall St Lawrence to make their own way in the world.

 

 

 

They were the eldest son William Girling, who was 25 and married to Eliza with whom he already had four children while living at Mutford Bridge in Oulton, from where William was employed as a railway carman; Charlotte Girling, age 18, who was a kitchen maid at Bramford Hall near Ipswich, the home of Lieutenant Colonel Frank Scott; and Lois (Louisa) Girling, age 17, from Ilketshall St Lawrence who was a domestic servant at Lorne Villa in Carlton Colville, the home of farmer Elijah Lee and his wife.

 

 

 

It was around six years after that, when Lois found she was with-child, and in 1888 she gave birth to a son out of wedlock, who was baptised as Henry Robert Girling at Ilketshall St Lawrence on 13th May 1888.  By the time Lois married Robert Collett at Carlton Colville her base-born son had been taken into the care of her older brother Robert Henry Girling, gamekeeper, and his wife Susan, at Ilketshall St Margaret, with whom he was the only child living there with the couple in both 1891 and 1901, when he was three years of age and 13 years old respectively.  It was while Robert Collett and his wife Lois were still living at Carlton Colville that their first child was born there during the month of August in 1890.  Following the birth of Francis their son, Robert and Lois, moved to Lancashire, very likely for work purposes, since it has been established that the couple were living at 15 Carno Street in the Wavertree district of Liverpool West Derby by the time of the census in 1891.

 

 

 

The census return confirmed that Robert Collett from Shipmeadow in Suffolk was 27 and that, at that time in his life, he was employed as a railway porter.  His wife Lois Collett from St Lawrence, Suffolk was 26, and their eight month old son Francis W C Collett had been born at Carlton Colville in Suffolk.  Lodging with the family were two other men who were also employed on the railway, and both of them came from Suffolk.  In addition to the Collett household, it is interesting that all of the occupants of the two adjoining houses in Carno Street had also been born within the North Suffolk area, perhaps indicating a mass exodus to the north of England for the promise of work.

 

 

 

It was while Robert and his family were still living at 15 Carno Street in Wavertree that Lois presented her husband with the couple’s second child, who was born during the following year.  During the next year or two, the family left Wavertree when they moved the four miles south to Garston on the east bank of the Mersey River between Liverpool and Widnes.  That move may have coincided with a change of occupation for Robert.  It was also at Garston that a further three children were added to the family. 

 

 

 

So by 1901 Robert Collett, age 37 and from Shipmeadow, was living at 68 King Street in Garston, very close to the docks where he was employed as a dock labourer.  Living at the house with him was his 36 years old wife Lois Collett of Ilketshall St Lawrence, together with four of their five known children.  They were William Collett who was 10 years old and born at Carlton Colville near Lowestoft, Ethel Collett who was five, Albert Collett who was two, and Florence Collett who was 11 months old.  Where their daughter Norah was at that time, remains a mystery.  The only possibility might be Nora K Collett, at Bootle-cum-Linacre but, although she was born within the Liverpool area, she was 11 years old in 1901, rather than eight years of age.

 

 

 

Despite a thorough search of the 1911 Census, no record of Robert, his wife Lois, or their children Francis William, Ethel Maude, or Albert has been found.  However, for whatever reason, the two sisters Norah and Florence had returned to Suffolk and were living at the home of their grandmother Lydia Ann Artis, formerly Lydia Ann Collett nee Brighton.

 

 

 

It is therefore possible that the remainder of the family had sailed out of Liverpool for a new life in one of the colonies.  There is also an unsubstantiated claim that suggests a further child, Robert Collett, was born to Robert and Lois sometime shortly after 1901, and he has been included here in the hope that evidence may come to light in the future to prove or to disprove this.

 

 

 

18Q150

Francis William Charles Collett

Born in 1890 at Carlton Colville

 

18Q151

Norah Collett

Born in 1892 at Wavertree, Merseyside

 

18Q152

Ethel Maude Collett

Born in 1895 at Garston, Merseyside

 

18Q153

Albert Collett

Born in 1897 at Garston, Merseyside

 

18Q154

Florence May Collett

Born in 1900 at Garston, Merseyside

 

18Q155

Robert Collett - unconfirmed

Born in 1903

 

 

 

 

18P149

Mary Anne Collett was born at Ilketshall St Andrew in 1866, the only known daughter of Robert Collett and his wife Lydia Ann Brighton.  Tragically Mary Anne died at Ilketshall St Andrew when she was only eight months old, and it was there that she was buried on 29th June 1867.  It was also around that time that her father also passed away, although no burial record for has so far been found.

 

 

 

 

18P150

Ruth Collett was born at Norwich in 1883.  She was the oldest of the three children of George Collett and his wife Amy, who sadly died around the time that Ruth was four years old, just after the birth of her brother Philip (below).  That following that tragic event George and his children were living at 43 Mill Street in the Lakenham district of Norwich, where Ruth’s grandmother Lucy Collett was the housekeeper.  Ruth was recorded as a scholar at seven years of age.

 

 

 

Ruth and her family were still living in Norwich ten years later when she was 17.  Her grandmother had passed away by then, and so the housekeeping duties had been taken over by Ruth, who was then caring for the needs of her father and two younger brothers.  When Ruth’s father married for a second time during the first decade of the new century Ruth left Norwich and moved to London, and in April 1911 she was living in the Hackney area of the city at the age of 27, when her place of birth was confirmed as Norwich.

 

 

 

 

18P151

David Collett was born at Norwich in 1885.  Upon the birth of his younger brother Philip (below), when David who only two years old, his mother Amy died.  According to the next census in 1891 David Collett, aged six years, was living at 43 Mill Street in Lakenham, Norwich, with his father and his two siblings, where his grandmother Lucy Collett was the housekeeper for the family.  Following the death of David’s grandmother, David’s father George, together with his three children, were still living in Norwich in 1901, when David was 16 and was working as a labourer at a starch factory.  During the early years of the new century David’s father remarried so by 1911 David who was twenty-six and his brother Philip were recorded as living at Norwich with their father and step-mother Hannah.

 

 

 

With the war starting in Europe, David joined the 1st Battalion Norfolk Regiment in which he was Private Collett 6531.  Sadly, not long after the start of the Great War, David was killed in action during the Battle of Loos.  He died on 18th October 1914 and his name is one of the 13,000 listed on the Le Touret Memorial which commemorates those soldiers killed at the Battle of Loos who have no known grave.  The name of David Collett can be found in Panel 8.  David’s army record confirmed that his father and next-of-kin was George Collett of 40 Harford Street, in Lakenham, Norwich, and that his mother had been Amy Collett.

 

 

 

 

18P152

Philip Collett was born at Norwich in 1887 but tragically, either at the time or just after the birth, his mother Amy passed away, leaving Philip and his two older siblings (above) in the care of their father George and his widowed mother, the elderly Lucy Collett.  According to the census in 1891, the family was residing at 43 Mill Street in Lakenham, Norwich, when Philip was three years old.  Over the next few years his grandmother died in her late seventies and by March 1901 Philip and his family were still living in Norwich, where Philip was 13 and Norwich was confirmed as his place of birth, like his two older siblings.  It was during the next few years that Philip’s father was married for a second time and, by April 1901, when Philip was 23, he was still living at Norwich with his father George and stepmother Hannah.

 

 

 

 

18P153

Annie Collett was born between April and June in 1866 and that may have happened at Brentford where her parents, Hammond and Mary Collett, had been married during the spring of 1865.  However, her absence from the census from the Chiswick census in 1871 probably indicates that she had suffered an infant death.

 

 

 

 

18P154

Hammond Isaac Collett was born at Chiswick in 1868, the eldest surviving child of Hammond Collett and his wife Mary Bradford.  As Hammond I Collett, he was two years old in 1871, and was 12 in the Chiswick census of 1881 when he was living with his family at Back Lane.  He was 21 when he was married by banns to Jessie Elizabeth Draper, aged 18, on 22nd June 1890 at the parish church for Turnham Green with Gunnersbury.  Jessie was born in 1873 at Brisbane in Australia and the marriage certificate named her father as William Draper, an engineer, and the daughter of Eliza Baker who, as a witness, made her marked with a cross.  The male witness was H Collett, presumably Hammond’s father, both father and son described as labourers.  The same address was given for both Hammond and Jessie, that being Turnham Green.  

 

 

 

The couple lived the early days of their married life in Brentford, where their first two children were born.  It was after they were born, and around the middle of the 1890s, that Hammond and his family settled in the Chiswick area, near to where his parents were still living, and where the couple’s next five children were born.  Towards the end of the century Hammond entered the service of the British Army, initially with the 2nd Battalion Middlesex Regiment, although he later transferred to the Queens Mounted Infantry.  It was during his time with the latter regiment that he saw action in the Second Boer War at Cape Colony from October to December 1899 and the following year in February at Tugela and the Relief of Ladysmith.  He was also involved in the final battle of the War at Transvaal in April 1902.

 

 

 

However, he may have been on leave at the end of March in 1901 as the census recorded the family living at Chiswick as Hammond Collett, age 32 who was working as a labourer navvy, his wife Jessie from Brisbane who was 27, and their four sons Hammond Collett (junior) who was nine, William Collett who was eight, John J Collett who was four and Harry Collett who was two years old. 

 

 

 

It seems highly likely that Jesse was with-child at the time of the census since latter that same year she gave birth to the couple’s fifth child, and their first of the couple’s three daughters, and all of them born while the family was still living at Chiswick.  And it was at 3 Bond Street in Chiswick that the whole family was living in April 1911.  Hammond was 41, his wife Jessie Elizabeth was 38, and their children were Hammond Alexander who was 19, William Alfred who was18, John Isaac who was 14, Jessie Elizabeth who was nine, Rosetta who was six, Rene Rebecca who was four and Albert who was one year old.  Five years later, at the time of the wedding of his eldest son, Hammond Isaac Collett was described as an engineer.

 

 

 

Jessie Elizabeth Collett nee Draper was living in the Brentford area when she passed away in 1938, her death recorded at Brentford register office (Ref. 3a 357) at the age of 65 during the first quarter of that year.  She was survived by her husband who continued to live in London for a further thirteen years, the death of Hammond I Collett recorded at Wandsworth register office (Ref. 5d 726) during the second quarter of 1951 when he was 82.

 

 

 

18Q156

Hammond Alexander Collett

Born in 1891 at Brentford

 

18Q157

William Alfred Collett

Born in 1893 at Brentford

 

18Q158

John Isaac Collett

Born in 1897 at Chiswick

 

18Q159

Harry Collett

Born in 1899 at Chiswick

 

18Q160

Jessie Elizabeth Collett

Born in 1901 at Chiswick

 

18Q161

Rosetta Collett

Born in 1904 at Chiswick

 

18Q162

Irene Rebecca Collett

Born in 1906 at Chiswick

 

18Q163

Albert Collett

Born in 1910 at Chiswick

 

 

 

 

18P155

Mary A Collett was born at Chiswick in 1870 and was one year old at the time of the Chiswick census on 1871.  She was still living with her parents at Back Lane in Chiswick in 1881, when she was 11, and again ten years after that, when Mary A Collett was 21.  Her absence from the census in 1901 as Mary Collett very likely indicates that she was married by then.

 

 

 

 

18P156

Alfred Lewis Collett was born at Chiswick around 1871 and was nine years old when living with his family at Back Lane in Chiswick in 1881.  He was still living there in 1891 when he was 19 and was working as a bargeman’s mate on the River Thames at Brentford.  Like his two brothers Hammond Isaac (above) and Robert (below), Alfred served as a professional soldier from June 1891 with the 2nd Battalion Middlesex Regiment.  On 22nd February 1892 he sailed from Waterford in Ireland to India on board HMS Crocodile.  It was while he was serving at Ahmednagar in India that he was hospitalised on five occasions, suffering with malaria, between 1892 and 1894.  It was many years later, on 2nd December 1899, that he sailed with the regiment from Southampton on board the SS Avondale Castle for South Africa where they arrived at Cape Town on Boxing Day.  During the period from December 1899 to 31st May 1901, while fighting in the Second Boer War, Private Alfred managed to write a diary of his experiences and this can be found on the website:  www.muralartist.co.uk/diary/diary.htm 

 

 

 

Once he was back at home in England, Alfred married spinster Rose Punter on 25th December 1902 in Christ Church at Turnham Green in Chiswick.  Rose was born on 17th December 1880 and was the daughter of James Punter and Mary Ann Huggins.  Their marriage produced a total of five children and all of them were born at Richmond even though the family was certainly living at 21 Cambridge Cottages in Kew Green from 1911 onwards.  According to the census in April 1911, Alfred and Rose and their first two children were living there, just a short distance from 15 Cambridge Cottages, the home of Alfred’s brother Robert Collett (below).  Alfred Lewis Collett from Chiswick was 39, his wife Rose was 30, and their two children were Alfred Lewis Collett who was four and Freda Collett who was three years old, both of them born at Richmond. 

 

 

 

Three more children were added to their family during the next six years, and all of them also born at Richmond, at a time when it is also known that the family’s home address was still 21 Cambridge Cottages in Kew Green.  Just after the start of the First World War Alfred Lewis Collett of that address was 43 years 6 months when he enlisted with the army on 28th April 1915 at Hornsey.  He was described as being five feet six inches with a tattoo of a ship on his chest.  His wife was confirmed as Rose Punter, while the full names for their five children were also included on the enlistment form.  It was on 24th June 1915 that he was made a private 38186 and assigned to 19th Battalion of the Middlesex Regiment, the Pioneers and on 16th July 1917 he was transferred to the Suffolk Regiment, while it was on 29th March 1918 that he was discharged from duty, being no longer physically fit for war service.  His military service record therefore stated that, by that time, he had completed two years and three hundred and thirty-six days service.  Most of that time was spent ‘in the field’, but for a few days at the end of March and the beginning of April in 1917 he was sick and had returned to England.

 

 

 

Alfred and his wife Rose continued to live at 21 Cambridge Cottages in Kew Green after the war and it was there that Alfred Lewis Collett senior eventually passed away.

 

 

 

18Q164

Alfred Lewis Collett

Born in 1903 at Richmond

 

18Q165

Freda Rose Collett

Born on 02.10.1907 at Richmond

 

18Q166

John Collett

Born on 03.08.1912 at Richmond

 

18Q167

Marjorie Collett

Born on 13.06.1915 at Richmond

 

18Q168

Arthur Collett

Born on 04.11.1916 at Richmond

 

 

 

 

18P157

ROBERT COLLETT was born at Chiswick on 14th August 1875 and was five and 15 in the Chiswick census returns for 1881 and 1891.  He married Edith Martha Sykes on 26th December 1903 at Brentford.  Edith was born on 14th October 1884 the daughter of John Sykes and Maria Harper.  In 1891 Robert was a labourer, an occupation that he continued with for those parts of his life when he was not in military service.

 

As with his two older brothers Hammond and Alfred, Robert was a member of the 2nd Battalion Middlesex Regiment and saw active service during the Second Boer War.  At some point during his military career he transferred to the Queens Mounted Infantry of the Middlesex Regiment, as did his brother Hammond Collett (above). 

 

 

 

It is generally known within the family that he fought at Klerksdorp in 1901 and was awarded the Victoria South Africa Medal 1901 with clasps for the campaigns at Transvaal, Orange Free State, Relief of Ladysmith, Tugela Heights and Cape Colony.  He also received the King Edward VII South Africa Medal with 1901 and 1902 clasps (far right).  Robert also served with the British Army during the First World War. 

 

Both medals carry the inscription “Private 4998 H Collett” which would appear that they were given to Hammond Collett.  However, the present day family are convinced that they were presented to Robert Collett who curiously also had the service number 4998.

 

 

 

An independent investigation by an expert in military history has been undertaken to try to resolve this matter, and these are his findings.  I found an H Collett, number 4998, in both the King's and the Queen's medal rolls being listed with 2nd Battalion Middlesex in the Queen's, but no battalions were given in the King's.  There was also in the Queen's an R Collett, but his number was also given as 4998.  He was with the Mounted Infantry Company of the Middlesex.  The numbers for Robert Collett in the WWI medal rolls are 3429 (Middlesex Regiment) and 21367 (Labour Corp).  I also found in the WWI medal rolls, Hammond Collett no 42708 (Royal Field Artillery) as a Gunner and a Bombardier.”

 

 

 

According to the census of 1911 the family was still living in Chiswick where Robert was 35, Edith Martha was 27, and their two children at that time were Robert John Collett who was six, and William Hammond Collett who was one year old.  Also living with the family on that occasion was Robert’s elderly widowed mother Mary Collett who was seventy years old.

 

 

 

Between the wars Robert resumed his job as a labourer securing a job with the Port of London Authority.  It was originally thought that the family left Chiswick in 1906 to move to 15 Cambridge Cottages at Kew, but it would seem that only applied to Robert’s brother Alfred (above), although Robert and his family did move there a little while after 1911.

 

 

 

It was certainly at 15 Cambridge Cottages where Robert lived for the remainder of his life.  Living close by at 21 Cambridge Cottages was his brother Alfred Collett who had moved there in 1906.  It is also understood within the family that Robert took up arms again during the First World War, but so far no military records have been found to confirm this.  Robert Collett died during July 1954 and Edith his wife died at Richmond in Surrey sixteen years later on 25th December 1970.

 

 

 

18Q169

ROBERT JOHN COLLETT

Born in 1904 at Chiswick

 

18Q170

William Hammond Collett

Born in 1910 at Chiswick

 

18Q171

Winifred Rose Collett

Born in 1915 at Kew

 

18Q172

Alice Collett

Date of birth unknown

 

 

 

 

18P158

Ada E Collett was born at Chiswick in 1878 and was three years old and 12 years old in the next two Chiswick census returns.  Ten years later in March 1901 Ada was 23, when she was still living with her parents and younger sister Rosella (below) at Chiswick.

 

 

 

 

18P159

John Collett was born at Chiswick in September 1880 and was six months old on the day of the census in 1881, when he was living at Back Lane with his family, where he was very likely born.  By 1891 he was 10 years old and still living with his parents in Chiswick, but by 1901 at the age of 20, he was a private with the 3rd Battalion of the Middlesex Regiment.  Although not listed on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website, it is understood that John Collett of the Middlesex regiment died during the Battle of the Somme.

 

 

 

 

18P160

Rosella Collett was born at Chiswick in 1882, the last child of Hammond Collett and his wife Mary Bradford.  She was eight years old in 1891 and was 18 at the time of the 1901 Census when she was living with her mother and father at Chiswick.  Her occupation was that of a domestic servant.

 

 

 

 

18P161

John Collett was born at Chelsea in 1867, the eldest child of John Collett of Wilby, Suffolk and Sarah Mallett of Pimlico.  Not long after the birth of his brother Ephraim (below), his parents moved out of London when they settled in Wilby, where all of the remaining siblings were born.  That was confirmed in the census of 1871 when John was three years old.

 

 

 

By 1881 he was 13 and he and his family were living on the Framlingham Road in Wilby, and ten years after that he was 23 and still living there with his family.  It was towards the end of the following year that John married Ellen Muttock at Wilby on 3rd November 1892.  Ellen was born in the nearby town of Eye, and before the end of the century she had presented John with three children.  The first two children were born at Wilby, with the third born after the family had moved to Shotley near Harwich.

 

 

 

At the time of the 1901 Census the family was living at Shotley across the River Stour from Harwich.  John 33 was an ordinary agricultural labourer, Ellen was 32 and their children were Ernest Collett who was six, Emily Collett who was four, and John Collett who was one year old.

 

 

 

During the following year another son was added to the family while they were still living at Shotley.  However, shortly after the family left Shotley and moved in land to Bury St Edmunds where they were living in 1911.  John was 43 and his wife Ellen was 44, and both of them said that they were from Wilby like their oldest son.  Only three of their four children were listed with them, and they were Ernest Collett 16, John William Collett 11, and Herbert George Collett who was eight years old.

 

 

 

By that time the couple’s daughter Emily had left school and was recorded working at another house in Bury St Edmunds, where she was incorrectly listed as Emily Collet, although her age and her place of birth were both correctly noted as being 14 and Wilby.

 

 

 

18Q173

Ernest Collett

Born in 1894 at Wilby

 

18Q174

Emily Collett

Born in 1896 at Wilby

 

18Q175

John William Collett

Born in 1899 at Shotley

 

18Q176

Herbert George Collett

Born in 1902 at Shotley

 

 

 

 

18P162

Ephraim George Collett was born at Chelsea in 1869, just prior to his family’s move to Wilby.  It was at Wilby that he was baptised on 28th May 1870 and there at Framlingham Road in 1871 and 1881 that he was living with his family at the age of one year and eleven years respectively.  Ten years later in 1891, Ephraim Collett was 21 when he was a bachelor living and working at Walsham-le-Willows to the north of Stowmarket.  It was during the following year that Ephraim married Alice from Elmswell, just five miles south of Walsham-le-Willows, and midway between Bury St Edmunds and Stowmarket.  And it was at Elmswell that the couple settled and where all of their children were born, although sadly their second son only survived for three weeks.

 

 

 

By March 1901 Ephraim G Collett, age 31 and from Chelsea, was a bricklayer at Elmswell.  His wife was Alice L Collett, age 25, and their three surviving children at that time were Edith May Collett who was seven, Ephraim Geo Collett who was five, and Bessie A Collett who was only one year old.  Three more children were added to the family during the next decade, so by April 1911 the family still living at Elmswell comprised Ephraim George Collett 43, Alice Louisa Collett 35, and their six children.  Edith May Collett was 17, Ephraim George Collett was 15, Bessie Amelia Collett was 11, Walter Herbert Collett was eight, Cyril Charles Collett was seven, and Gladys Dorothy Collett was two years old.  All occupants of the house, except Ephraim, were confirmed as having been born at Elmswell.

 

 

 

18Q177

Edith May Collett

Born in 1893 at Elmswell

 

18Q178

Ephraim George Collett

Born in 1895 at Elmswell

 

18Q179

Henry James Collett

Born in 1897 at Elmswell

 

18Q180

Bessie Amelia Collett

Born in 1899 at Elmswell

 

18Q181

Walter Herbert Collett

Born in 1902 at Elmswell

 

18Q182

Cyril Charles Collett

Born in 1903 at Elmswell

 

18Q183

Gladys Dorothy Collett

Born in 1908 at Elmswell

 

 

 

 

18P163

Robert Collett was born at Wilby in 1871 where he was baptised on 17th November 1871, the third son of John and Sarah Collett.  He was nine years old and 19 years old respectively in the Wilby census returns for 1881 and 1891, when he was living with his family at Framlingham Road.  Tragically Robert Collett died four years later and was buried at Wilby on 30th June 1895 aged 23.

 

 

 

 

18P164

Alfred Lewis Collett, sometimes written as Alfred Louis, was born at Wilby and was baptised there on 13th April 1873, the fourth son of John and Sarah Collett.  He was eight years old at the time of the 1881 Census when he was living with his family at Framlingham Road in Wilby.  Ten years later he was still living there with his family at the age of 18.  Alfred was still a bachelor in March 1901 when he was 28 and working as an agricultural labourer while still living at Wilby with his parents.

 

 

 

Very shortly after that Alfred married Elizabeth Anna and the couple were blessed with a daughter who was born during the following year.  By April 1911 the family of three was living at Hartismere near Eye, some seven miles west of Wilby, and staying with them was Alfred’s younger brother Charles (below) and their widowed father John Collett.  The full census return listed the occupants of the house as Alfred Louis Collett of Wilby who was 38, his wife Elizabeth Anna 43, their daughter Emily Emiliea who was eight, Alfred’s brother Charles Collett of Wilby who was 32, and his father John Collett also of Wilby who was 67.

 

 

 

18Q184

Emily Emiliea Collett

Born in 1902

 

 

 

 

18P165

Harry Collett was born at Wilby and it was there that he was baptised 27th September 1874.  It was also at Wilby where he died a year later and was buried there on 29th August 1875, the fifth son of John Collett and Sarah Mallett.  He was listed as being one year old in the burial record at Wilby.

 

 

 

 

18P166

James Collett was born at Wilby where he spent his short life.  He was baptised there on 30th May 1875, was five years old in 1881 and was 16 years old in the Wilby census return for 1891 when he was still living there with his large family.  It was just over two years later that he died there and was buried at Wilby on 12th April 1893 aged 17.

 

 

 

 

18P167

Charles Collett was born at Wilby where he was baptised on 20th August 1876.  Charles was four years old and 15 years old while living at the family home in Framlingham Road in Wilby in 1881 and 1891.  Sometime later he travelled to London to seek work and in 1901 was living in Chelsea where his two oldest brothers had been born and where at 25 years of age he was employed as a labourer in a distillery.  Ten years later Charles was still a bachelor at 32 and by April in 1911 he had returned to Suffolk where he was living at Hartismere with his married brother Alfred Louis Collett (above).  Also living there with them was Charles’ and Alfred’s widowed father John Collett.

 

 

 

 

18P168

Sarah Ann Collett was born at Wilby in 1878 and she was baptised there on 21st April 1878.  Sarah was three and 13 in the next two Wilby census returns, but by the time of the March census in 1901 she had left the family home and was working as a general domestic servant at Mellis, south of Diss, where she was 23.

 

 

 

 

18P169

Amelia Betsy Collett was born at Wilby and baptised there on 1st June 1879.  Sadly she died a week later and was buried there on 8th June 1879.

 

 

 

 

18P170

Emily Collett was born at Wilby during September 1880 and was six months old at the time of the 1881 Census.  She was living with her family at Framlingham Road and had been baptised at Wilby at three months old on 12th December 1880.  Following the premature deaths of her three younger siblings (below), Emily was the youngest child of John and Sarah Collett still living with them at Wilby in 1891 when she was 10 years old.  It seems likely that she moved to London with her older brother Charles (above), since in 1901 she was a domestic servant aged 20, who was working and living in the Kensington district of the city.

 

 

 

 

18P171

Mary Ann Collett was born at Wilby during August 1882.  She was baptised there on 21st January 1883, but died six weeks later and was buried at Wilby on 7th March 1883, aged seven months.

 

 

 

 

18P172

Ernest Collett was born at Wilby during March 1884, was baptised there on 21st May 1884, the twelfth child of John Collett and his wife Sarah Mallett.  Tragically it was there also that he died and was buried on 30th January 1885 at the age of just ten months.

 

 

 

 

18P173

Arthur Collett was born at Wilby during October 1885 and was the last child of John and Sarah Collett, and their seventh child to die while still an infant.  He was baptised at Wilby on 25th October 1885 but died when under a year old and was buried there on 12th September 1886 at the age of only eleven months.

 

 

 

 

18P174

Cornelius Collett was born at Wilby in 1874 where he was baptised on 1st November 1874, the son of Alfred Collett of Wilby and his wife Caroline from Brundish.  At the time of the census in 1881, Cornelius Collett was six years old and the eldest child of the family living with his parents at Framlingham Road in Wilby.  In 1891 Cornelius was 17, when he was still living at the family home with his parents in Wilby.  Some years later his work took him north to Yorkshire.  According to the census in 1901, Cornelius Collett from Wilby in Suffolk, was a bachelor aged 27, and was living at Pocklington in the East Riding of Yorkshire where he was employed as an ostler.

 

 

 

It was only a few months after that, that Cornelius married Elizabeth, with whom he had three children by 1905.  Initially the couple lived at Pocklington, where their first child was born, before moving to the Doncaster area where they were living in April 1911.  It is interesting that the first two children were named after Cornelius’ mother and father.  The census at that time listed the family as Cornelius Collett and his wife Elizabeth as both being 40, when Cornelius was actually 36, and their three children as Caroline Collett who was eight, Alfred Collett who was seven, and Florence Collett who was five years old.

 

 

 

18Q185

Caroline Collett

Born in 1902 at Pocklington

 

18Q186

Alfred Collett

Born in 1903 at Doncaster

 

18Q187

Florence Collett

Born in 1905 at Doncaster

 

 

 

 

18P178

Dinah Collett was born at Stradbroke during July 1882 and was baptised there on 21st January 1883 the daughter of Alfred and Caroline Collett.  Sadly she died there and was buried at Stradbroke on 24th April 1883 at the age of only nine months.

 

 

 

 

18P179

Kate Collett was born at Stradbroke in 1883, the youngest surviving child Alfred Collet of Wilby and his wife Caroline Smith of Brundish.  During the next few years the family returned to Wilby where Katey Collett, age seven years, was living with her parents at the time of the census in 1891.  Ten years later, in 1901, she was the only child still living with her married mother and head of the household at Wootten Green near Stradbroke, while her father was working away in Ipswich.  Kate Collett, age 18 and from Stradbroke, was working as a general domestic servant at that time.

 

 

 

The only other person living at the address was the granddaughter of Kate’s mother.  That was Ethel Minnie Collett who was three years old and also from Stradbroke.  It is considered that the child was too old to be the base-born daughter of Kate Collett, who would have had to have been 14 at the time of conception, which seems unlikely, although not impossible.  It is therefore more reasonable to assume that Ethel Minnie was the base-born daughter of one of Kate’s older sisters, Elizabeth or Anna.

 

 

 

 

18P180

Ethel Minnie Collett was born at Stradbroke on 26th December 1897 and her birth was recorded at the Hoxne register office (Ref. 4a 871) during the first three months of 1898.  She was the granddaughter of Alfred Collett and Caroline Smith and therefore the daughter of one of their four oldest children, they being Cornelius, David, Elizabeth or Anna.  It was as Ethel Minnie Collett aged three years that she was listed with her grandmother Caroline Collett at Wootten Green in Stradbroke in March 1901, and it was with both of her grandparents that she was still living there in 1911 when Ethel Collett was 13.

 

 

 

Twelve years later Ethel M Collett married Edwin A Eustace, the event being recorded at Steyning register office in Sussex (Ref. 2b 625) during the third quarter of 1923.  Edwin Arthur Eustace was born on 7th December 1900 and died in Sussex at the age of 74 (sic), his death being recorded at Cuckfield register office (Ref. 5h 750) during the first three months of 1974.  It was around four and a half years later that Ethel Minnie Eustace nee Collett passed away at the age of 80, with her death recorded at Brighton register office (Ref. 18 0181) in East Sussex during the third quarter of 1978.  The marriage of Ethel and Edwin produced a total of four children and they were: Kathleen A Eustace who was born later in the year they were married, that is 1923, and she married Albert J Cull; Patricia M Eustace who was born in 1925 and married Albert M Tiffany; while the names of the other two are not revealed, perhaps because they are both living in 2014.

 

 

 

 

18Q1

Thomas Collett was born at Upper Clapton within the London Borough of Hackney in 1867, the eldest child of Thomas Trusson Collett and his cousin Georgiana Collett.  While still a young child Thomas’ parents left London to set up home at Woodnesborough in Kent.  However, according to the 1881 Census Thomas was the only member of his family living in the United Kingdom at that time.

 

 

 

What the census does reveal was that Thomas Collett from London, Middlesex, age 13, was attending The Lines Private School at Sutton Valence in Kent as a boarder.  Sadly it was just over four months later that Thomas’ father died in August 1881.  Five years later on 9th October 1886 Thomas entered Clare College at Cambridge, but for some reason he must have been withdrawn after a few years, because the university records indicate that he was re-admitted on 17th January 1891.  Just over two months later Thomas Collett, age 23, was living at Woodnesborough in Kent with his widowed mother Georgiana and his three younger siblings, William, Charles, and Katharine (below), as recorded in the census of 1891.

 

 

 

The Clare College re-entry record for 1891 confirmed that Thomas was the son and heir of Thomas Trusson Collett of Ringleton in Kent, and that he was born in 1867.  The record also stated that he had matriculated in 1886, gained his BA in 1892, and been awarded an MA in 1896.  Between the latter two dates, he was ordained as a deacon in 1894, and became a priest at Exeter in Devon during 1895.  He was the Curate at St Jude’s Church in Plymouth from 1894 to 1899, when he took up the post of Vicar of St Mary’s Church in Doncaster which he held for ten years until 1909.

 

 

 

It was while Thomas was living in Devon that he met and married Agnes Maude Bewes.  Agnes was born at Plymouth in 1867 and was the daughter of Charles Theodore Bewes of Mannamead in Plymouth.  It was while Thomas and Agnes were living at Plymouth that their first two children were born.  Shortly after the birth of their second child Thomas and Agnes moved north to the West Riding of Yorkshire and to the village of Wheatley, where the two youngest girls were born.  The 1901 Census stated that Thomas Collett, age 33 and from Upper Clapton, was a Church of England clergyman living at Wheatley with his wife Agnes, who was also 33, and their first two children Thomas who was four, and Kathleen who was one year old.

 

 

 

It was two years earlier that Thomas had became the Vicar of St Mary’s Church, Doncaster, so after a further eight years there, Thomas made his final move to Scotby, to the east of Carlisle in 1909, where he was living at the time of the census in 1911.  However, by that time his wife Agnes was not living there with him, instead she and the couple’s two youngest children were living (or visiting) Agnes’ hometown of Plymouth.

 

 

 

The census in April 1911 recorded Thomas Collett, age 43 and from London, living in Carlisle where he was referred to as the Reverend Thomas Collett, Vicar of Scotby.  His wife Agnes Maude Collett, age 43 and born at Plymouth, was living there with her daughters Florence Mary Collett, aged eight years, and Evelyn Margaret Collett, who was five, both of them born in Yorkshire.

 

 

 

Of their other two children, only their son Thomas has been identified in the census of 1911.  He was recorded as Thomas Collett, age 14 from Plymouth, who was attending a boarding school at Whitehaven in Cumberland, so he was approximately thirty miles away from his father in Scotby, Carlisle.  No record at all has been found for their daughter Kathleen, so it seems likely she did not survive to reach her eleventh birthday. 

 

 

 

Thomas Collet died while he was visiting Eastbourne near Darlington on 3rd December 1913 at the age of 46, following which he was buried at Scotby.  Four years later, at the time of the death of his son Thomas Theodore Collett in 1917, his military record described him as the son of the late Reverend Thomas Collett of Scotby and his wife Maude Collett.  Also by that time Thomas’ widow Agnes Maude Collett had left Plymouth and was living in Sussex, as confirmed by her son’s military records, which gave her address on the occasion of his death as 12 Garden Road in Tunbridge Wells.

 

 

 

Agnes Maude Collett nee Bewes was residing at Heather Patch in Groombridge in Kent when she died on 23rd June 1940.  Her Will was proved at Llandudno on 2nd November 1940 when her two surviving daughters were confirmed as the executors of her estate of £5,759 2 Shilling 4d.  They were Florence Mary Warren, the wife of the Reverend Max Alexander Cunningham Warren, a clerk, and Evelyn Margaret Collett, a spinster.

 

 

 

18R1

Thomas Theodore Collett

Born in 1897

 

18R2

Kathleen Maud Collett

Born in 1899

 

18R3

Florence Mary Collett

Born in 1902

 

18R4

Evelyn Margaret Collett

Born in 1905

 

 

 

 

18Q2

William George Collett was born at Upper Clapton in Hackney on 2nd June 1869.  No record of William or his parents has been found within the census of 1881, but it is known that during August that same year his father Thomas Trusson Collett died.  William was educated at Sutton Valence School in Kent and, following his matriculation, he was accepted for a place at Corpus Christi College in Cambridge on 1st October 1888.  William Collett of Middlesex, the third son of Thomas Trusson Collett of Ringleton in Kent obtained his BA in 1891 and his MA in 1895.  He was an assistant master at Oxford Military College from 1892 to 1897, after which he was appointed as a master at Wellington College at Crowthorne in Berkshire, where he worked from 1897 to 1929.

 

 

 

In the census of 1891, William G Collett was 21, when he was living with his widowed mother Georgiana and his two brothers and one sister at Woodnesborough in Kent.  Ten years later, at the time of the 1901 Census, William was listed as being aged 31 and an assistant master clergyman at Wellington College in Crowthorne.

 

 

 

It was while working at Wellington College that he met and married Ruth Lillian Kempthorne, the daughter of the Reverend P H Kempthorne of Wellington College.  Ruth was born at Crowthorne in 1882 and was thirteen years younger than William.  In 1901 Ruth was still single at the age of only 18 years, so her marriage to William probably took place when she was around twenty in 1903.  William lived a long life and died in 1956 and was buried at Crowthorne.

 

 

 

It seems very likely that all of the children of William and Ruth were born at Crowthorne, since certainly the first three were, as confirmed by the census of 1911.  At that time William George Collett, age 41 and from Upper Clapton, and was described as an ‘Assistant Master at a public school’ that was Wellington College.  The actual home address for William, his family, and their four servants, on that occasion was given as Quatre Bras, Wellington College Station, Berkshire in the district of Easthampstead, sub-district Sandhurst, and the parish of Crowthorne.

 

 

 

William’s wife of seven years was recorded as being Ruth Lillian Collett from Crowthorne who was 28.  The couple’s three children living with them on that occasion were Charles Trusson Collett, who was six years old, George Kempthorne Collett who was five, and Helen Elizabeth Collett who was two years old.  Visiting the family on the day of the census was Mrs Florence Mary Tyler who was 40 and born at Tabulpor in India.  The four servants were single ladies, the oldest being Fanny Loader at 41, the others being Fanny Hunt who was 30, Winifred Annie Martin 19, and Alice May Fowler who was just 15 years old.

 

 

 

It is interesting to note that in the Easthampstead census of 1911 another Collett was also living there, and he was George Collett of Alvescot in Oxfordshire, with his wife Mary from Wantage, who are listed in Part 28 – The Faringdon Line (Ref. 28O54).

 

 

 

During the First World War, William George Collett served as a major with the Rifle Brigade.  The fact that he ceased to be a master at Wellington College in 1929, might be an indication that it was around that time when he died, or simply retired.  No precise details are known at this time.

 

 

 

18R5

Charles Trusson Collett

Born in 1904 at Crowthorne

 

18R6

George Kempthorne Collett

Born in 1906 at Crowthorne

 

18R7

Helen Elizabeth Collett

Born in 1908 at Crowthorne

 

18R8

Frank Ainslie Collett

Born in 1911 at Crowthorne

 

18R9

John William Collett     twin

Born in 1915 at Crowthorne

 

18R10

Gillian Ruth Collett       twin

Born in 1915 at Crowthorne

 

18R11

Ann Kathleen Collett

Born in 1923 at Crowthorne

 

 

 

 

18Q3

Charles Collett was born at Ringleton Manor in Kent on 20th October 1875, but was baptised at nearby Woodnesborough on 25th November 1875.  No record of him or his parents has been located in the census of 1881, but later that same year his father died during the month of August.

 

 

 

In 1891 Charles Collett was 15 years old when he was living at Woodnesborough with his widowed mother Georgiana Collett, his brothers Thomas and William (above), and his sister Katharine (below).  Three years later, on 1st October 1894, Charles Collett of Kent entered Corpus Christi College in Cambridge, as had his two older brothers; Thomas in 1886 and William in 1888.  The admission papers confirmed his date of birth, and that he was the son of Thomas Trusson Collett, gentleman of Ringleton in Kent.  The college records also refer to the fact that his two older brothers Thomas and William also attended Corpus Christi.  His earlier education had been completed at Sutton Valence Grammar School, from where he matriculated in 1894.  Whilst at Cambridge he was awarded his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1897.

 

 

 

Four years later, at the time of the census in 1901, Charles Collett was 25 and was living at Suffield Park, near North Walsham in Norfolk, where he was working as a schoolmaster.  Two years later in 1903, he was tragically killed in a bicycling accident.

 

 

 

 

18Q4

Katharine Collett was born at Woodnesborough on 28th December 1878, the youngest of the four children of Thomas Trusson Collett of Ringleton and his wife Georgiana Collett of Monkton who was also his cousin.  It was at Woodnesborough where Katherine lived for all of her short life, and it was there also that she died as a spinster in 1911, but after the second of April, since the census return for Woodnesborough listed her as living there at the age of 32.  Also living with Katharine on that occasion was her widowed mother Georgiana Collett, who was recorded as Georgina Collett, age 64, from nearby Monkton.

 

 

 

 

18Q5

George Clemson Collett was born at Monkton in Kent in 1882, the eldest child of George Alfred Collett and Georgina Ching Clemson.  In 1891 he was eight years old and ten years later he was working on the land at Monkton with his father, both of them being described as farmers.  By April 1911 George’s father had died, following which George and his sister Dorothy left Monkton when they moved into the Kensington area of London, where George Clemson Collett was 28.  His living companion was recorded as unmarried Dorothy Collett of Ramsgate who was 25. 

 

 

 

Within the next couple of years George met and married Elizabeth Mary Arkcoll with whom it is established he had at least two children.  George was 31 when he married Elizabeth, age 32, on 24th February 1914 at Holy Trinity Church in Paddington.  The register there confirmed the groom’s father was George Alfred Collett, while the father of the bride was William James Arkcoll.  It was on 2nd May 1918 that George, aged 36, entered into military service with the Rifle Brigade, service number 50186, when he and his young family were living at 1 Bassett Road in North Kensington.  At that time in his life George had been working as an insurance agent, while his next-of-kin was named as Elizabeth Mary Collett of 1 Bassett Road in Notting Hill.  (Bassett Road actually lies midway between North Kensington and Notting Hill).  In the end George was discharged on 2nd September 1918 after just 122 days.  During a medical he was stated to be in good general health but unable to keep still for any length of time.  He was also shown to have had jaundice and since then had been unable to handle any hard work without the fear of a nervous breakdown.

 

 

 

Less than one year into the Second World War George and Elizabeth were living in Luton when they received the tragic news that their son George had been killed in action.  George Clemson Collett died at Peterborough on 21st July 1954, while his Will was proved in London on 13th October 1954.  The probate process confirmed that George Clemson Collett was residing at 37 Grange Road in Peterborough when he died, and that his estate of £3,565 7 Shillings 1d was placed in the hands of Barclays Bank.

 

 

 

18R12

Rita Eileen Collett

Born in 1914

 

18R13

George Richard Collett

Born in 1916

 

 

 

 

18Q6

Alfred Collett was born at Ramsgate in 1883 and was seven years old and 17 years old in the censuses of 1891 and 1901.  For the first of these he was living with his family at Monkton, but for the second he was recorded in Margate where his two younger brothers were attending boarding school.  It was around the middle of the first decade of the new century that Alfred married the slightly older Annie, as confirmed in the census of 1911, by which time they had four children.  Alfread (sic) Collett from Kent was 25 and working as a sawyer at the local timber saw mill in the Peckham area of London.  Living with him at 40 Bridson Street off the Old Kent Road in Peckham was his wife Annie Collett who was 30, together with their four children.  They were Daisy who was six, Violet who was three, Gladys who was one and Alfread (sic) who was only two months old.  The census return also confirmed the couple had been married for six years.

 

 

 

 

18Q7

Dorothy Collett was born at Ramsgate in 1885 and very soon after she was born her parents moved to nearby Monkton where her father was a farmer.  The family was still living at Monkton in 1901 when Dorothy was 15.  Following the death of her father in 1907, Dorothy and her older brother George (above) left Kent and moved to Kensington in London where they were still living in April 1911.  Dorothy was 25 and was unmarried, her place of birth confirmed as Ramsgate.

 

 

 

 

18Q8

Harold Willis Collett was born at Monkton in 1887, where he was still living with his family in 1907 when his father passed away.  That sad event led to the family leaving Monkton and going their separate ways.  Six years earlier Harold was 13 when he was attending the same boarding in Margate with his younger brother Percy (below).  Four years after the death of his father Harold Willis Collett of Monkton in Kent was living in Wokingham in April 1911, where he was still a bachelor at the age of 24.

 

 

 

Tragically it was less than three years later that Harold Willis Collett died on 8th January 1914 at the age of 26, his death recorded at Paddington register office (Ref. 1a 43).  Probate of his estate of £536 18 Shillings 4d was granted in London to George Clemson Collett (his eldest brother above) on 27th January 1914.  At that time in his young life Harold was residing at 26 Westmorland Road in Bayswater and following his death he was buried at Kensal Green Cemetery in London, where Isambard Kingdom Brunel was also laid to rest.

 

 

 

 

18Q9

Percy Stapleton Collett was born at Monkton in 1888, the son of George Alfred Collett and his wife Georgina Ching Clemson.  His birth was recorded at Thanet register office (Ref. 2a 893) during the last three months of that year.  It was at Monkton that he was living in 1891 when he was two years old.  When he was old enough he was sent away to a boarding school in Margate with his brother Harold (above), where he was listed simply as Percy Collett from Monkton in the census return of 1901 when he was 12.  No further record of him has been found following the death of his father in 1904, so where he was in 1911 still needs to be determined.  Perhaps he had already emigrated to Canada by then.

 

 

 

It has since been revealed that, during the First World War, Percy Stapleton Collett served as Private 817913 with the Eastern Ontario Regiment of Princess Patricia’s Light Infantry and that he was killed in action on 30th October 1917 at the age of 29.  His military record confirms that he was the son of the late George Alfred Collett and that his name appears on Panel 10 of the Menin Gate Memorial at Ypres in West Flanders, Belgium.

 

 

 

Twenty years after his death the Will of Percy Stapleton Collett of New Brunswick in Canada was proved in London on 19th June 1937.  The full account states that Percy Stapleton Collett of Maple View, Lorne in Victoria County, province of New Brunswick died in France with administration of his Will being granted to George Clemson Collett (his eldest brother above), an insurance official and the attorney of Alfred Collett (his second oldest brother).  His personal effects were valued at £272 19 Shillings 9d.

 

 

 

 

18Q13

Margaret Marion Collett Mason was born in Buenos Aires in Argentina on 16th June 1888 where she was baptised on 13th July 1888 at St John’s Cathedral. She married Philip Adams Opie on Saturday 26th January 1918, which was advertised the previous day in The Times newspaper.  The notice under ‘Marriages’ read as follows:

Captain P. Opie and Miss Collett-Mason

 

A marriage is arranged and will take place tomorrow (Saturday) between Captain Philip Opie D.A.D.M.S, Cairo, eldest son of Mr Ernest Opie J.P. of Willand, Cullompton in Devon and Margaret Collett, eldest daughter of Mr J.C. Collett Mason J.P. and Mrs Collett-Mason of Nieuport Hall, Eardisley in Herefordshire.

 

 

 

The wedding ceremony was conducted by the Reverend Baghot de la Bere, T.C.F. at the Citadel Garrison Chapel in Cairo, Egypt, where Philip Adams Opie was a Captain with the Royal Army Medical Corps.  This information was extracted from the Supplement to the British Medical Journal published on Saturday 23rd March 1918.

 

 

 

The marriage of Margaret and Philip produced one son for the couple, he being Peter Mason Opie.  Margaret accompanied her husband Philip on a trip across the Himalaya Mountains and, by so doing wrote herself into the history books as the first white women to cross the range.

 

 

 

In addition to all of this, Margaret Opie was the grandmother of Avryll Sixtus nee Opie of New Zealand who provided valuable information relating to this family line.  Avryll’s father was the aforementioned Peter Mason Opie, the son of Margaret Marion Collett Mason, who was named in the probate process for the considerable estate of William Wallis Collett Mason (below) when he was described as an author.

 

 

 

 

18Q14

Asceline (or Ascelein) Frances Collett Mason was born in Argentina on 8th April 1890 and was baptised on 27th April 1890 at St Bartholomew’s Church in Rosario, the daughter of James Collett Mason and Jessie Susette Collett.  When Asceline was around three and a half years old she was given a present by her aunt Sarah Mason, possibly her father’s sister.  It was a copy of the book Aesop’s Fables, inside which was written “to Asceline Frances Collett Mason with the love of her affection Aunt Sarah Mason, October 3rd 1893".  Today, in 2011, this book is the property of William (Bill) Ebden who received it from his father.

 

 

 

Some years later the Collett Mason family returned to live in England and, according to the census in 1911, Aseclin Francis Collett Mason (sic) from Argentina was 19, when she was living with her mother and sister Kathleen Lucy Collett Mason (below) at The Hoo in Aspley Guise, Bedfordshire.

 

 

 

It was around the time that the gift was presented to Asceline that Sarah Ann Mason married into the Stag family, which owned and ran the Stag Garage Company in Ipswich.  Some years later it is established that Asceline Frances Collet Mason married Captain Edward George Hay of the Devonshire Regiment on 13th November 1917.  Edward was born on 21st October 1879, the fifth son of William Hay of Duns Castle in Berwickshire, J.P, Colonel of Militia and Convenor of Berwickshire.

 

 

 

Many years after the war, the marriage produced a daughter for Asceline and her husband, Nora Margaret Hay, who was born on 24th July 1922, and she married John Robertson Campbell on 15th August 1942 with whom she had seven children.  Sadly, Asceline did not live long enough to see the last three grandchildren, when she died on 8th October 1945.  These details about her and her family have been taken from page 1194 of the 1963 version of Debrett, and page 1138 of the 1976 version.

 

 

 

Curiously there was an Asline Collett Mason listed in the Service Records of the National Archives of Australia as someone who supported the effort during the Great War of 1914 to 1918 by serving at a depot in Australia.  However the entry would also indicate that Asline was a male since the next-of-kin was listed as his wife Mrs Mason.  It is also interesting that within the Victorian Law Reports of 1884 there is the mention of a probate case in Australia involving Asline Collett Mason.

 

 

 

It now transpires that he was the son Henry Ward Mason who was born at Beverley in 1812 (see Ref. 18M7) and his wife Anne Lightfoot.  Asline Collett Mason was born at East Barnet in Hertfordshire on 29th January 1858, where he was baptised on 10th March 1858.  It was after his arrival in Victoria, and during 1889, that Asline Collett Mason married Annie Rae Nesbitt Welshman who was born at St Kilda in Victoria during 1865.  Their marriage produced three children at Shepparton, they being Asline Claude Mason who was born in 1890, Dorothy A Mason who was born in 1892, and Clive Collett Mason who was born in 1901.  It was also at Shepparton in Victoria that he died during 1921 at the age of 63.

 

 

 

 

18Q15

Kathlees Lucy Collett Mason, who was known as Kay, was born in Argentina on 23rd March 1892 and was baptised at St Bartholomew’s Church in Rosario on 30th June 1892.  By the time of the census in April 1911, and as Kathleen Lucy Collett Mason, she and her sister Asceline (above) were living at The Hoo in Aspley Guise in Bedfordshire, England, with their mother, when both girls were confirmed as having been born in Argentine, although both of them were recorded as being 19 years old.  Following her marriage she became Kay Minchin.  She was known to have had two sons, both of which married the same woman in Kenya.  In her old age, Kay was cared for in a nursing home that was previous Malvern Priory.

 

 

 

 

18Q17

Guillermo Wallis Collett Mason, who used the name William, was born in Argentina on 25th August 1895 and was baptised at St Bartholomew’s Church in Rosario on 10th December 1895.  He was the youngest child of James Collett Mason and Jessie Susette Collett and he inherited everything from his father to the detriment of his siblings.  At the time of the census in 1911, he and his family had returned to England, and on that occasion, when his mother and two of his sisters were living at Aspley Guise, William Wallis Collett-Mason, age 15 and from Argentina, was attending a school in the Thanet area of Kent.  It was only during the first three months of 1911 that the family surname was changed to Collett-Mason.

 

 

 

It was later that he staked his fortune on a game of cards and lost the entire inheritance including the family home.  Very shortly after that disaster William set sail for North America.  He left Liverpool on 8th November 1929 on the Steam Ship Samaria bound for New York.  On the ship’s passenger list he was stated as being aged 34 and an artist.

 

 

 

However, whatever it was that he subsequently did in America, he was worth a small fortune when he died on 28th August 1957.  Also by that time he was once again living in England and his Will was proved in London on 29th October 1957.  The probate report revealed that William Wallis Collett otherwise William Wallis of 71a Mount Ephraim in Tonbridge Wells died on 28th August 1957 at the Calverley Hotel in Tonbridge Wells.  Probate was granted to David Drummond, a solicitor, Kenneth Forbes Davison, a farmer, and Peter Opie, an author, when his personal estate was valued at £72,795 7 Shillings 8d.

 

 

 

 

18Q18

Phillis Anne Collett was born in India during 1922, the eldest daughter of Arthur Preston and Sheila Collett, who returned to England in April 1926.  At the outbreak of World War Two Phillis joined the Women’s Royal Naval Service and became a Wren with the land-based HMS St Angelo.  Their headquarters were in London and that was the main administration centre for the Royal Navy activities in the Mediterranean Sea.  The wrens that worked there where billeted at Whitehall Mansions.  Towards the end of the war Phillis reached the rank of Petty Officer Wren 11235 and it may have been her elevation to that level of responsibility which took her from the relative safety of London into action in the Mediterranean arena.

 

 

 

With the war over and peace declared, Phillis’ parents received the tragic news at Felixstowe that she had died on 30th August 1945 at the age of 23.  Sadly Phillis never made it home and was buried at the Mazargues War Cemetery in Marseilles – Grave 31, Row A, Plot 11.

 

 

 

 

18Q19

Anthony Farquar Charles MacKinnon Collett was born in Bengal, India on 18th October 1924, the son of Arthur Preston Collett and his wife Sheila MacKinnon.  During the Second World War the home address for Anthony and his parents was Brackenbury Lodge on Cliff Road in Felixstowe and it was there in 1945 that they received the tragic news of the death of Anthony’s sister Phyllis (above).  It was also that address which was used in 1947 when Anthony sailed back to India, when his occupation at the age of 23 was given as a tea planter.  Under his full name Anthony Farquar Charles Mackinnon Collett he sailed out of Southampton on 21st November 1947 on board the Strathmore bound for Bombay.

 

 

 

 

18Q20

Sheila Candace Collett was born in India on 18th January 1926, the third child and second of the two daughters of Arthur Preston Collett and his wife Sheila MacKinnon.  It was as Sheila C Collett aged three months that she returned to England from Bombay on 1st April 1926.  On leaving school Sheila became a physiotherapist and travelled the world.  On 11th November 1950 she sailed to Canada when her home address was stated as being 80 St John’s Road in Oxford, while four years later she was living with her parents at Brackenbury Lodge on Cliff Road in Felixstowe when her father died in 1954.  Later that same year she travelled to Bombay on 21st December when her address was Brackenbury Lodge and her occupation that of a physiotherapist.  It is assumed that she was reunited with her brother Anthony in India on that occasion, he having sailed there just after the war.

 

 

 

Sheila was still a single lady when she travelled to Singapore from India on 25th November 1955.  It is assumed, although not confirmed, that it was later that she returned to India where she married tea planter Peter Austin from Southwold.

 

 

 

 

18Q22

Henry Robert Pyemont Collett was born at Chorlton-cum-Hardy in Manchester during 1890, the only son of Edward Pyemont Collett of Leicester and his wife Aurora Beatrice Collett from London, formerly Aurora Beatrice Landi.  He was baptised there at the Church of St Clement on 5th April 1891, the very same day of the national census that year.  In the census he was recorded with his family as Henry R P Collett and was under one year old.  His parents were still living in Chorlton-cum-Hardy in 1901, when Robert Collett, age 10 and from there, was attending a private school in Harrogate.  During the next decade, and on completing his education, Henry Robert Pyemont Collett, age 20, was once again living with his family which, by April 1911 was residing in Bucklow, near Knutsford, in Cheshire

 

 

 

Two years prior to the census in 1911 Henry Robert Pyemont Collett was a member of The Lancashire Fusiliers with whom he was promoted to Second Lieutenant with the 8th Battalion on 20th March 1909.  However, despite his time in the army, at the outbreak of the Great War, Henry joined the Royal Flying Corp, where he eventually became a lieutenant with the 21st Balloon Company, having initially enlisted as a student office with the 49th Balloon Section of the RFC.  As a flight-lieutenant with 49th he was twice mentioned in despatches.  There is a story written about him under the title “A Balloonatic in Palestine: being the Travels of 49 Balloon Section in the Wilderness and Judea" a tale of Lieutenant H R P Collett RAF.  It was during the war years that the RFC became the RAF.

 

 

 

The 21st Balloon Company, in which Collett was an observer officer and whose two sections, 49 and 50, included many men who were past middle-age and had an Army medical category of C2 or C3, arrived in Egypt in July 1917.  Collett, who was serving with 49 Section, explains their routine and how the balloon was operated and emphasises the difference between the temperature on the ground in the desert and in the balloon at some 3000 feet.  The Section's principal responsibility was to spot for the artillery batteries in the vicinity: Collett notes that from their "letting up" position at Sheikh Shabasi he could see every house in Gaza 12000 yards away.  Many Royal Artillery officers, however, were prejudiced against balloons and believed that their own observation posts were quite adequate for spotting.  The Section remained at Sheikh Shabasi until the time of the final successful attack on Gaza and they then moved forward to a camp at Saris, just off the road leading north towards Jerusalem. The balloons had already been fired at by Turkish aircraft and artillery and shortly before the surrender of Jerusalem one was shot down.  After Jerusalem had fallen, writes Collett, "things were very quiet in the Section... and it was hard to kill time" and the narrative dwells on the good living conditions and amenities which the officers and men were able to enjoy.  Their next excitement came in February 1918, at a new "letting-up" position at Attara, when a German aircraft was shot down after attacking the balloon in which Collett was observing.  The following month the Section moved to a camp near the coast at Hadrah which, as it was well in the rear area, was only very occasionally shelled.  From here, on 13 April, Collett did his first night ballooning and on 9 May he had to parachute to safety after his balloon had been shot down by an aircraft flown by a Bulgarian NCO, but Collett only sustained a few minor injuries.  After a quiet summer, all three of the balloons were aloft when the major Allied offensive began on 17 September, but, records Collett, "... before long, the tide of battle had swept away beyond our vision" to the north.  The Section advanced with the armies for a short time, but they then withdrew to Kantara and Collett was posted back to Home Establishment just before the Armistice. His narrative is a pleasant, but somewhat episodic, record of an unusual aspect of the Palestine campaign.

 

 

 

All that is so far known about him after the war is that Henry Robert Pyemont Collett, BA, became the Vicar of Islington in Norfolk and that at the time of his death in 1958 he was married and was living at 26 Newton Road in Failsworth, Lancashire.  He died at the Monsall Hospital in Manchester on 13th June 1958 when administration of his personal effects amounting to £2,668 7 Shillings 5d was granted to his widow Winifred Collett.  It was also in Manchester that his death was recorded (Ref. 10e 371) at the age of 67.

 

 

 

 

18Q23

Selina Benson was born at Glasgow on 3rd June 1908 and she married William Gibson.

 

 

 

 

18Q24

Ernest Walter Benson was born at Blackley near Manchester on 9th May 1910 and he married Winifred Barnett.

 

 

 

 

18Q25

Francis William Benson, who was known as Billy, and his twin sister Edna (below) were born at Harpurhey in Greater Manchester on 19th July 1912.  Just prior to the Second World War Billy married Mary Cockett at St Anne’s Church in Manchester on 21st June 1939.  Mary was born on 20th September 1911 and prior to the wedding she managed a shop at Hale in Cheshire.  Once married Billy joined Mary and they lived over the shop in Hale.  The couple’s first child was born in North Manchester Hospital near to the home of Billy’s mother where Mary was staying at that time due to the fact her husband was away with the British Army.  It was also thought that the shop at Hale was not the most convenient or suitable place for Mary to give birth.

 

 

 

The family continued to live at the shop in Hale until 1954 when they moved to Hale Barns, followed in 1960 by a further moved to Bowdon near Altrincham.  The couple’s two sons were born in a Maternity Home in Bowden.  Later moves saw the family living at Cuddington in Cheshire and at Manchester with just their son Phil.  A final move took place during the 1970s when the couple retired to Gloucestershire.  And it was at Woolstrop House in Quedgeley, just south of the city of Gloucester, where Billy died on 1st February 2003 aged 90.  He was cremated at the Gloucester Crematorium and his ashes scattered elsewhere.  Mary died four years later on 27th May 2007 and her ashes were scattered at the same place as her husband.

 

 

 

18R14

Elizabeth Mary Benson

Born on 05.01.1941

 

18R15

David William Benson

Born on 19.09.1942

 

18R16

Philip Martin Benson

Born on 27.06.1953

 

 

 

 

18Q26

Edna Benson was a twin with her brother Francis (above) who was born at Harpurhey on 19th July 1912.  She later married Thomas Murphy.

 

 

 

 

18Q27

Hector Benson was born at Harpurhey on 21st October 1913 and he later married Eva Willis.

 

 

 

 

18Q28

Myra Benson was born at Harpurhey on 18th March 1917 and she married Frank Betney.

 

 

 

 

18Q30

George James Collett was born at Gorleston towards the end of 1881, his birth being registered by his unmarried mother Matilda Collett, age 34, at Mutford during the last quarter of that year.  Following the birth George and his mother went to live with his grandparents at Porter’s Lane in Burgh Castle, where George was nine years old in the census of 1891.  Sadly for whatever reason, George died at Burgh Castle, where he was buried on 7th August 1900 at the age of 18, perhaps as a result of a work related accident.  His death was later registered at Yarmouth R D.

 

 

 

 

18Q31

Selina Margaret Collett was born at Burgh Castle, possibly at the end of 1874 or the beginning of 1875, with the birth being registered at Mutford during the first three months of 1875.  She was the eldest of the six children of Benjamin Collett and his wife Emily Turvey Pearson, and was six years old at the time of the census in 1881 when she was living with her family at 12 Manor House in Burgh Castle.  Upon leaving school, Selina entered domestic service, and in 1891 she was a servant at the Burgh Castle home of farmer William Jackson and his wife Lucy.

 

 

 

It was six years later when Selina was living and working in London that she married Frederick George Cattermole at St Thomas’ Church in Finsbury Park on 14th August 1897.  Frederick was 21 and a milk carrier, the son of pensioner Isaac Cattermole, while Selina was 22 and her address at that time was given as 143 Green Lanes in Finsbury Park.  Once married the couple initially settled in the Hampstead area of London where Selina Cattermole from Burgh Castle was 26, and her husband Frederick Cattermole, age 25 and from Middlesex, was a domestic coachman in March 1901.  Ten years later Frederick Cattermole was 35 when he was living in the Hackney area of London, although no trace has been found of his wife Selina.

 

 

 

 

18Q32

George William Collett was born at Burgh Castle in 1877, the birth being registered at Mutford Registration District during the final quarter of that year.  He was baptised on 18th October 1877, the son of Benjamin Collett and his wife Emily Turvey Pearson, and was three years old in April 1881 when he was living with his parents at 12 Manor House in Burgh Castle.  Ten years later, and following the death of his father, George at 13 was living in the High Street at Burgh Castle with his mother and his two younger siblings Jessie and Louis (below).

 

 

 

Sometime after leaving school in the mid-1890s George moved north to seek work with his uncle Cornelius Bradnum Collett (Ref. 18P72) at West Hartlepool.  By the time he was 23 years old in 1901 his occupation was that of a millwright at the local steel works, where his uncle was a manager.  However, at that time in his life he was lodging with another uncle, that being Henry Collett (Ref. 18P73), at his home at 26 Bentley Street in West Hartlepool.

 

 

 

It was in Hartlepool during the second quarter of 1910 that George married Sarah Margaret Elder who was born at West Hartlepool around 1883, the eldest child of sailor Joseph Elder and his wife Harriet J Elder.  Ten years later in April 1911, George William Collett of Burgh Castle was living at 10 Hurworth Street in West Hartlepool when he was 33 and a bricklayer’s labourer.  He wife was recorded as Sarah Margaret Collett who was 27, and by that time their marriage had already produced a daughter for the couple, Vera Margaret Collett who was under one year old.

 

 

 

It is not known if further children were added to their family in the years after 1911, but it is known that George William Collett died living still living in the Durham area during 1963, his death being recorded at the Durham Eastern Registration District Office.

 

 

 

18R17

Vera Margaret Collett

Born in 1910 at West Hartlepool

 

 

 

 

18Q33

Jesse Benjamin Collett, who was known as Jessie, was born at Burgh Castle in 1878.  The birth was registered at Mutford R D during the fourth quarter of the same year.  He was therefore around three months old when he was baptised at Burgh Castle on 2nd March 1879.  It was also at Burgh Castle where he was living with his family at 12 Manor House in 1881, when he was two years old.  The family was still at Burgh Castle ten years later when they were residing in a property in the High Street, where Jessie was 12.

 

 

 

In 1901 it would appear that Jessie was not listed anywhere in the UK, so perhaps he was a soldier with the British Army in South Africa involved in the Boer War as many young men were at that time.  However, it was around eighteen months later that he was once again back in England, and had settled in County Durham where other members of the Colletts had previously migrated.  It was there at South Shields, during the third quarter of 1902, that he met married Mary A Seales.  Mary had been born at South Shields around 1882 and was the fourth child of fish salesman Matthew Seales and his wife Harriet.  Over the next few years Mary presented Jessie with two children, although it is possible that further children were born to the couple in the years after 1911.

 

 

 

According to the South Shields census of 1911, the young Collett family was lodging with Mary’s Seales family at the home at 69 Imeary Street in the village of Westoe.  Jesse Collett, age 32 and from Burgh Castle, was a skipper of a fishing boat most likely working for his father-in-law.  His wife Mary from South Shields was 28 and their two sons were Benjamin, who was four and born at Woodstock, and Clifford who had been born at South Shields just six months earlier.  Head of the household was Matthew Seales, age 54, and the rest of his family was Harriet Seales, who was 52, Susan Seales, who was 23, Annie Seales, age 20, and Robert Seales who was 18.

 

 

 

Upon the death of Jesse Benjamin Collett at North Shields on 28th September 1930 it was his widow Mary Ann Collett who was granted administration of his personal effects of £404 4 Shillings 6d by the Newcastle register office on 6th January 1931.  At the time of his passing Jesse and Mary were residing at 47 Kitchener Terrace in North Shields.

 

 

 

18R18

Benjamin Collett

Born in 1906 at Woodstock

 

18R19

Clifford Collett

Born in October 1910 at South Shields

 

 

 

 

18Q34

Arthur Herbert Collett was born at Burgh Castle in 1880, the son of Benjamin Collett and Emily Turvey Pearson, although it was there also that he was buried on 21st March 1881.

 

 

 

 

18Q35

Eliza Collett was born at Burgh Castle during June in 1881, the daughter of Benjamin and Emily Collett.  Like her brother Arthur (above), Eliza died and was buried at Burgh Castle on 9th July 1881 at just two weeks old, her death being recorded at the Mutford register office (Ref. 4a 459).

 

 

 

 

18Q36

Louis Arthur Collett was born at Burgh Castle in 1882, the youngest child of Benjamin Collett and his wife Emily Turvey Pearson.  The birth was registered at Mutford R C during the final quarter of 1882 and, by the time of the Burgh Castle census of 1891 Louis was eight years old, when he was living at High Street with his widowed mother, following the death of his father shortly after he was born.  Ten years later in March 1901, he was still living with his widowed mother Emily at Holly Cottage on the High Street in Burgh Castle, from where he was working as a milkman on a local farm at the age of 18.

 

 

 

During the fourth quarter of 1906 Louis Arthur Collett, age 24, married Elizabeth Artherton at Walsingham in Norfolk, where the marriage was registered.  Walsingham lies five miles north of Hempton near Fakenham, where Elizabeth was born in 1878.  By April 1911 the marriage had produced two children for the couple, at which time the family was still residing at a dwelling on the High Street in Burgh Castle.  Louis was 28, his wife Elizabeth was 33, and their two daughters were Queenie who was three, and Mabel who was two years old.  Also still living with Louis and his family was his mother Emily Collett who was 58.  The census return confirmed that Louis was employed as a cowman, and that he and his mother and his two daughters were all born at Burgh Castle.  At the outbreak of war, Louis Arthur Collett joined the 1st Norfolk Regiment as Private Collett 16810.  Tragically he was killed in action on 4th June 1916 while at Arras in France and the Arras Memorial bears his name on Bay 3.

 

 

 

18R20

Queenie Blanche Collett

Born in 1907 at Burgh Castle

 

18R21

Mabel Jessie Collett

Born in 1908 at Burgh Castle

 

 

 

 

18Q41

Joseph Thomas Collett was born at Gorleston in 1888, the son of Joseph Collett and Elizabeth Penrose nee Lack.  It may have been at 2 Back Wall Reach in Gorleston that he was born as it was there that he and his family were living in 1891 when  Joseph Thom was three years of age.  His father was a fisherman and was away at sea on the day of the census in 1891and in 1901 he was fishing off the north coast of Scotland.  For whatever reason the whereabouts of Joseph, his mother and the rest of his family has been identified from the census in 1901.  However, ten years later Joseph Thomas Collett age 23 and from Yarmouth was working as the third hand on a fishing boat at Grimsby.  It was also at Grimsby that Joseph Thomas Collett died at the age of 61, his death being recorded at Grimsby (Ref. 3b 209) during the second quarter of 1949.

 

 

 

Shortly after 1911 Joseph Thomas Collett married Mary Jane Bruce, most likely at Grimsby.  However, it may have been his work as a fisherman which resulted in Joseph and Mary being in Aberdeen when their only known son was born in 1914. 

 

 

 

18R22

Frederick Betmead Collett

Born in 1914 at Aberdeen

 

 

 

 

18Q43

Thomas William Collett was born at Wheatacre All Saints in Norfolk in 1876, the eldest child of William Collett of Mettingham and his wife Elizabeth from Reedham.  His birth was recorded as Loddon in the third quarter of that year but, as yet, no baptism record for him has been found.  He was five years old in 1881 when living at 2 Hervey Street in Lowestoft with his parents.  He was still living with his family ten years later in 1891 when he was 14, although by then, they had moved the seven miles north to Gorleston, where he was already working as a greengrocer’s assistant.

 

 

 

During the final quarter of 1898 when Thomas married Sarah Anna Jackson of Somerleyton, where she was born in 1874, the daughter of platelayer John William Jackson and his wife Charlotte Collett (Ref. 18P61) the sister of Thomas’ father, thus making them first cousins.  The marriage, which was registered at Yarmouth, produced four children for the couple, the first two being born prior to the census in 1901.  According to the March census that year Thomas, age 24, was living 2 Station Terrace in Gorleston, when his occupation was that of a fishermen’s store keeper.

 

 

 

Living with him was his wife Sarah from Somerleyton, not far from Wheateacre where Thomas was born, and their two children Gladys who was one year old and another baby daughter who had only just been born and was unnamed.  Both children were recorded as having been born at Southtown.

 

 

 

Two further children were added to the family during the first decade of the new century and by April 1911 the family was still living at Southtown near Gorleston.  The full family was described as Thomas who was 34, Sarah who was 35, their three daughters Gladys, age 11, Mary, age 10, Isa, who was seven, and their son William who was four years of age.

 

 

 

18R23

Gladys Collett

Born in 1899 at Southtown, Gorleston

 

18R24

Mary Collett

Born in Mar. 1901 at Southtown, Gorleston

 

18R25

Isa Collett

Born in 1903 at Southtown, Gorleston

 

18R26

William Collett

Born in 1906 at Southtown, Gorleston

 

 

 

 

18Q44

Frank Ernest Collett was born at Wheatacre All Saints where he was baptised on 22nd November 1877, the second child of William and Elizabeth Collett.  Not long after he was born his family moved to Lowestoft where they were living at 2 Hervey Street in 1881 when Frank was three years old.  He was still living with his family in 1891, by which time they had moved to Gorleston, and were residing at 26 Trafalgar Road in West Gorleston, where Frank was 13.  By March 1901 Frank E Collett was 23 and was living at Church Road in Brightlingsea, Kent, where he was working as a Primitive Methodist Missionary, although no positive record for him has been found in the next census in 1911.

 

 

 

 

18Q45

Frances Beatrice Collett was born at Lowestoft and her birth was recorded at Mutford registration district during the last three months of 1879, shortly after her parents moved there from Wheatacre.  She was the eldest daughter of William and Elizabeth Collett, and her birth was registered at Mutford.  She was one year old in the census of 1881 when she was living with her family at 2 Hervey Street in Lowestoft.  Within six weeks of the census day she had died and, simply as Beatrice Collett, she was buried at St Margaret’s Church in Lowestoft on 16th May 1881 at the age of one year.

 

 

 

 

18Q46

Dinah Daisy Collett was born at Lowestoft in December 1880, and was baptised there on 1st January 1881, the daughter of William and Elizabeth Collett.  She was three months old in the census of 1881, when she was living with her family at 2 Hervey Street in Lowestoft.  It was as Daisy Collett aged nine years, that she was recorded with her family in 1891, by which time her parents had taken the family to live at 26 Trafalgar Road in West Gorleston.  Curiously no record of her after that time has been found even though it is established that she never married.  It was as Daisy Dinah Collett, a spinster, that she was joint executor of the estate of her sister Beatrice in 1950.  It was sixteen years later that the death of Dinah Daisy Collett was recorded at the register office in Acle, to the west of Great Yarmouth, during the third quarter of 1966.

 

 

 

 

18Q47

Beatrice Frances Collett was born at Lowestoft in 1882, the fifth child of William and Elizabeth Collett, her birth being recorded at Mutford during the third quarter of that year.  She was eight years old in the census of 1891, when she and her family were living at 26 Trafalgar Road in West Gorleston.  It is unclear where she was residing in 1901, but in the later census of 1911 she gave her name as Beatrice F Collett, and it has been assumed here that the F was a tribute to her older sister Frances who died just before Beatrice was born.

 

 

 

During the 1880s her family left Lowestoft and moved to Gorleston where they were living in 1891 when, as Beatrice Collett, she was eight years old and her place of birth was confirmed as Lowestoft.  Prior to reaching 19 years of age, Beatrice left Norfolk and moved south to Surrey where she entered domestic service, working as a housemaid for a family in Wallington by the time of the March census in 1901.  Ten years later she was still unmarried and by then she was living in the Croydon area of Surrey.  On that occasion she was recorded as Beatrice F Collett, age 28 and from Lowestoft, and was not living with any other member of the Collett family. 

 

 

 

Beatrice never married and was living at 123 Lowestoft Road in Gorleston when she died on 13th December 1949.  Probate of her estate of £526 11 Shillings 2d was granted at Norwich on 8th May 1950 to her two sisters Daisy Dinah Collett and Ethel May Collett, both spinsters themselves.

 

 

 

 

18Q48

Ethel Mary Collett was born at Lowestoft in 1884, the daughter of William and Elizabeth Collett, when it would appear the birth was registered at Mutford using the names Ethel Mary.  It was simply as Ethel Collett that she was listed in the census of 1891, when she was six years old and was living with her mother and her family at 26 Trafalgar Road in West Gorleston, her father being absent on that occasion because he was a fisherman and most likely away at sea on that day. 

 

 

 

Ten years later in March 1901, Ethel Collett, age 16, was still living with her parents, who were then residing at 150 Bells Road in Gorleston.  However, ten years after that, according to the census in April 1911 she was living and working in the Kingston-on-Thames area of south London, where she was recorded as Ethel Maude Collett from Lowestoft who was 27.  Like her two older sisters (above), Ethel Mary Collett never married and was named as one of the two executors for the estate of her sister Beatrice in 1950.

 

 

 

 

18Q49

George Collett was born at Lowestoft, perhaps at the end of 1885, since his birth was recorded at Mutford during the first three months of 1886.  He was five years old at the time of the 1891 Census and was living at 26 Trafalgar Road in West Gorleston with his mother and other members of his family.  Ten years later he had left school and at 15 years of age he was living at the family home which was at 150 Bells Road in Gorleston, from where he was working as a grocer’s apprentice.

 

 

 

By the time of the census of 1911, unmarried George Collett, age 24 and from Lowestoft, was living and working in the Grimsby area, while he was living apart from any other members of the Colletts family.  It is likely that he saw active service during the Great War, and towards the end of which he married Ethel M Shepherd at Grimsby, sometime between July and September 1918.  No further information regarding George and Ethel after that time is currently available.

 

 

 

 

18Q50

Louis James Collett was born at Lowestoft during the first six months of 1887, while his birth was registered at Mutford in the second quarter of that year.  Just after he was born his parents left Lowestoft when they moved the family to Gorleston.  By the time of the census in 1891, Louis Collett aged four years was living at 26 Trafalgar Road in West Gorleston with his family, and ten years after that, as Lewis Collett, age 13, he was living with his parents at 150 Bells Road in Gorleston.

 

 

 

After a further ten years, the census in April 1911, stated that bachelor Lewis Collett was 23 and that he was still living with his family at Gorleston, when his place of birth was once again confirmed as Lowestoft.  The only other known fact about Lewis, is that he married Ethel M Hicks in 1916, the marriage being registered at Mutford in the months from January to March that year.

 

 

 

 

18Q51

Albert Collett was born at Gorleston-on-Sea in 1889, just after his family had arrived there from Lowestoft.  He was the youngest son of William Collett of Mettingham and his wife Elizabeth Collett from Reedham.  Albert was one year old at the time of the Gorleston census of 1891, when he and his family was living at 26 Trafalgar Road in West Gorleston.  He was 11 years old in the Gorleston census of 1901 when he was still living there with his parents at 150 Bells Road in Gorleston, and was once again living with his parents after a further ten years, in 1911, when he was 21.

 

 

 

Within the birth records at the Mutford Registrar’s office there are two children with the name Albert Collett, so without obtaining the actual birth certificates it cannot be determined exactly at this time which one was this Albert Collett.  Only one of them would qualify as being one year old in the census of 1891.  However, for completeness, all the details are listed here, together with the death of another Albert Collett, in the hope that the identity of all three may be resolved at a later date.

 

 

 

The most likely candidate is Albert Charles Collett whose birth was registered on 26th June 1889, since he would be older than one year and younger than two years by April 1891.  He later married Eva A Sayer at Yarmouth during the first three months of 1918, and the records at Yarmouth also show that he died there during the second quarter of 1974. 

 

 

 

The other Albert, was Albert Edward S Collett whose birth was registered at Mutford during the third quarter of 1890, thus making him under one year old in April 1891.  He married Laura M Mills at Yarmouth during the first quarter of 1935.  And finally, the death of Albert C Collett was recorded at Yarmouth in the last three months of 1927, but with his age at that time not known, it cannot be stated when he was born or who he was.  There is however, a slight possibility that he was the young son of the aforementioned Albert Charles Collett.

 

 

 

 

18Q52

Jessie Collett was born at Gorleston-on-Sea in 1891, the youngest child of William Collett and his wife Elizabeth Jackson.  The birth was registered at Yarmouth during the final quarter of 1891, so Jessie was born after the census that year.  Jessie was nine years old by the time of the census in 1901, when she was living at 150 Bells Road in Gorleston with her parents, and she was still living at the family home in Gorleston ten years later in 1911 when she was 19.  It was just over five years later that she married Robert S Blake at Yarmouth during the last three months of 1916.

 

 

 

 

18Q53

Margaret Matilda Collett was born at Belton in 1884, possibly at the home of her maternal grandparents, as her parents had been living at Burgh Castle in 1881.  The birth was registered at Mutford during the third quarter of 1884, when her parents were named as George and Eliza Collett.  Margaret was just over three years of age when her father died, following which her mother took Margaret and her younger brother George (below) to live at Belton with her parents.

 

 

 

The Mutford & Gorleston district census of 1891 recorded the three members of the Collett family under the name of Collect, and they were Eliza, who was 31, Margaret M, who was six, and George who was three.  Eliza’s parents, with whom they were living at St Johns Road in Belton, were listed as George Kerrison, age 68, and Sarah Kerrison, who was 69.

 

 

 

After leaving school towards the end of the century Margaret may have left her grandparents home in Belton to secure work.  Certainly at the time of the census in 1901 Margaret M Collett, age 16 and from Belton, where visiting the Norfolk home of Charles and Edith M Holland at Turner’s Green in the village of Garvestone near East Dereham.  Charles was 34 and an ordinary agricultural labourer who was born at Garvestone, Edith was 27, and with then were their two children young Ernest and Ellen.

 

 

 

Whether the Holland family was in some way related to Margaret is not currently known, but ten years later she was living at 21 Albermarle Road in Gorleston, the home of Edith Bullock who was 27.  By that time in her life the unmarried daughter of George and Eliza Collett was listed as Margaret Matilda Collett, age 26, who had been born at Belton.

 

 

 

 

18Q54

George B Collett was born at Gorleston in early 1886, the birth being registered at Mutford during the first quarter of that year.  He was the only known son of George and Eliza Collett, and tragically his father died when he was just two years old.  In 1891 he was recorded with his widowed mother and his older sister Margaret (above) living at St Johns Road in Belton, the home of his maternal grandparents George and Sarah Kerrison.  George Collect (sic) was three years old at that time in his life.

 

 

 

By 1901 he was still living with his widowed mother at the home of her then widowed father at St Johns Road in Belton All Saints, Sarah Kerrison having passed away during the 1890s.  George Collett of Gorleston was 13 and was still attending school, while to provide an income for the family, his mother ran a laundry and wash business on her own account.  Also living at the address was George Kerrison junior, the uncle of George B Collett, which must have been confusing, having three Georges living together.  Four months after the census day, gardener George Kerrison senior died at Belton where he was buried on 6th August 1901.

 

 

 

Over the next few years George and his mother left Belton when they moved into Gorleston, where they were living at 68 Suffield Road in the town in 1911.  George was recorded in the census return that year as George B Collett, age 23, who was born there, while his widowed mother Eliza from Belton was 52.  On that occasion George was working as a railway clerk.  Whether George later became a married man is not known at this time.

 

 

 

 

18Q61

Elizabeth Julia Collett was born at Gorleston on 26th June 1893, the eldest of three daughters of Cornelius Bradnum Collett of Mettingham and his wife Elizabeth Taylor from Crook in County Durham.  It was during the following year that Elizabeth was baptised at the Church of St Peter & St John in Kirkley in Lowestoft on 23rd November 1894.  During the following years Elizabeth and her parents left East Anglia, when they moved north to West Hartlepool where the family was living at 38 Winter Street in 1901 when Elizabeth was seven years old. 

 

 

 

Another family move took place during the first decade of the new century, when Elizabeth’s family settled in the Tynemouth area, where they were living at 25 Princes Street in North Shields by 1911.  Elizabeth had already left the family home by then and was recorded in the census that year as Elizabeth Julia Corlett (sic) from Gorleston who was 17.  She was at an institution in South Shields, just across the River Tyne from North Shields, where she was possibly working as a nurse, rather than being there as a patient.  Sometime during the months of July, August or September in 1916, Elizabeth married James H Turner, the event being recorded at the Tynemouth registration district.

 

 

 

 

18Q62

Grace Hilda Collett was born at West Hartlepool in 1897, her birth being recorded during the second quarter of the year at Hartlepool.  She was three years of age at the time of the census in 1901 when she and her family were residing at 38 Winter Street in West Hartlepool.  By the time of the next census in 1911 Grace, age 13, was living at 25 Princes Street in North Shields with her family.  It was during the last three months of 1917 that Grace married George T Green while she was still living within in the Tynemouth registration district.

 

 

 

 

18Q63

Mary Ann Collett was born at West Hartlepool in 1898, the youngest of the three children of Cornelius Collett and his wife Elizabeth Taylor.  The birth was recorded at the Hartlepool registration office during the last three months of 1897.  By 1901 she was two years old and was living with her family at 38 Winter Street in West Hartlepool, where it is possible that she was born.  Not long after that the family moved to 25 Princes Street in North Shields where they were living in April 1911, when Mary was 12 years of age.  Nothing more is known about Mary after that time.

 

 

 

 

18Q64

Matilda Mary Collett was very likely born at 21 Wards Terrace in the Stranton area of West Hartlepool, where she was living with her parents on the day of the census in 1891.  She was born on 15th March 1891, the birth being registered at Hartlepool during the second quarter of that year.  She was the eldest child of Henry Collett and his wife Mary Timms Mitchell, and was just three weeks old on the day of the census.  Her enlarged family was living at 26 Bentley Street in the town ten years later when Matilda was 10, and by the time of the next census in 1911 Matilda Mary Collett, age 20, was still living with her family which was recorded as residing at 194 Hart Road in Hartlepool.

 

 

 

Matilda remained a spinster well into her later fifties, although she did eventually marry Frederick S Edwards in Durham during the third quarter of 1947, the marriage being registered at the Durham South-Eastern registration office.  Frederick Sykes Edwards of Stockton was the son of William and Jane Ann Edwards, and was an apprentice joiner in Stockton in March 1901 when he was 14 years old.

 

 

 

 

18Q65

William Henry Collett was born at West Hartlepool on 20th January 1893, the second child and eldest son of Henry and Mary Timms Collett.  It was also during the first quarter of that year when the birth was registered at the Hartlepool registrar’s office.  It is possible that he was born at 21 Wards Terrace in Stranton, West Hartlepool, where his parents had been living in 1891.  However, by the time of the census in 1901 William was eight years old and he and his family were living at 26 Bentley Street in West Hartlepool.  Ten years later, when he would have been 18, he was absent from the family home, which by then was at 194 Hart Road in Hartlepool, so may have been in military service at that time.  It was over eight years later that he married Eva Evans at Stockton-on-Tees during the last quarter of 1919, presumably after he had served his King and Country in the Great War.

 

 

 

 

18Q66

Maud May Collett was born at West Hartlepool on 9th May 1894, the third child of Henry Collett and Mary Timms Mitchell, her birth being registered at Hartlepool before the end of June that year.  Tragically she only survived for thirty months, when she died on 9th November 1896, her death being recorded at Hartlepool during that same month.

 

 

 

 

18Q67

John Arthur Collett was born at West Hartlepool on 25th November 1896, the son of Henry and Mary Collett.  He was five years old in March 1901 when he and his family were living at 26 Bentley Street in West Hartlepool, but by April 1911 the family had moved again and was living at 194 Hart Road in Hartlepool, where John Arthur Collett, age 15, had already left school and was working as a repairer of scales.  It was just over ten years after that when he married Emily Fulton at Stockton-on-Tees during the third quarter of 1921.  Emily was the daughter of Robert and Mary Jane Fulton of Stockton-on-Tees.

 

 

 

 

18Q68

Charles Albert Collett was born at West Hartlepool on 26th January 1899, the son of Henry and Mary Collett.  The birth may have taken place at 26 Bentley Street in West Hartlepool, where the family was certainly living in March 1901 when Charles was two years old.  It was as Charles Arthur Collett that he was recorded with his family at 194 Hart Road in Hartlepool in the census of 1911 when he was 12.  The only other known fact about Charles at this time, is that he died during the last three months of 1977 when his passing was reported to the Claro Registration District which was abolished in 1998 to become the North Yorkshire Registration District.

 

 

 

 

18Q69

Albert Edward Collett was born at West Hartlepool on 12th April 1902, the son of Henry and Mary Collett.  One year earlier his family was living at 26 Bentley Street in West Hartlepool, which is where he may have been born.  However, he was only a couple of years old when his parents left West Hartlepool and moved the family into Hartlepool, where they were living in 1911 at 194 Hart Road in the town, when Albert was eight years of age.  Fifteen years after that Albert married Edith Sudron at Stockton-on-Tees during the second quarter of 1926.

 

 

 

Although not a common name, within the Stockton-on-Tees census of 1911 there are two people with the name Edith Sudron.  One was 11 years old, the daughter of John Edward and Lauretta Isabella Sudron and so born around 1899, while the other was six years old, the daughter of Charles and Margaret Sudron, born around 1904.  With Albert Edward’s date of birth being virtually midway between their two respective dates of birth, it may have been either of them who became his wife, although the younger one might be the most likely.

 

 

 

 

18Q70

George Richard Collett was born at Hartlepool on 10th May 1907 and was three years old while living there with his family 194 Hart Road in April 1911.  It was at Stockton-on-Tees during the fourth quarter of 1934 that George married Aileen Anderson Fordy, with whom he had a son.  Aileen was from Stockton-on-Tees in County Durham and was born there on 16th August 1909, the daughter of George and Mary Elizabeth (Lillian) Fordy.

 

At the outbreak of the war George enlisted with Royal Engineers with whom he became Sapper Collett 1927515 with 107th Army Field Company.  Sadly on 29th May 1940 he was killed on board a destroyer having already been evacuated from Dunkirk beach.  He was 33 and his name is one of the 4,500 listed on the Dunkirk Memorial in Dunkirk Town Cemetery.

 

 

 

His military record confirmed that he was the son of Harry and Mary Timms Collett, and the husband of Aileen Anderson Collett of Stockton-on-Tees.  It was George’s son Alan who kindly provided this photo of his father.  The history books indicate there were three destroyers rescuing troops that fateful day and all three were sunk just off the beach at Dunkirk.  HMS Wakeful had already picked up 600 men when it was hit by a torpedo, and when HMS Grafton attempted to pick up the survivors, she too was torpedoed and sunk.

 

 

 

18R27

Alan F Collett

Born on 09.06.1936

 

 

 

 

18Q71

Cecil Benjamin Collett was born at Hartlepool on 6th December 1909, the youngest of the eight children of Henry Collett and Mary Timms Mitchell.  It is very likely that he was born at 194 Hart Road in Hartlepool, where he was one year old at the time of the census in 1911.  It was three months before his twenty-seventh birthday when Cecil married Grace Ness on 10th September 1936 at Stockton-on-Tees.  Grace was the third child of John William Ness and his wife Jane.  The marriage later produced two daughters for Cecil and Grace.

 

Prior to the outbreak of the war Cecil was a carter and carrier, delivering fireplaces and hearths.  For that work he was the proud owner of a wagon, which he affectionately called ‘Daisy’.  When Daisy was requisitioned by the British Army as part of the war effort, Cecil volunteered to join the army in order to remain the driver of the wagon.

 

 

 

Like his older brother George (above), Cecil also served with the Royal Engineers, and on that fateful day in 1940, both of them were together on the beach at Dunkirk.  Somehow in the chaos, George had lost his rifle, so Cecil gave him his rifle as a replacement, but to no avail, since George was tragically killed while on board a rescue destroyer which was struck by a torpedo.  Thankfully Cecil was one of the lucky ones who managed to reach England in ‘one of the small boats’ which helped in the evacuation from Dunkirk.

 

 

 

It was while Cecil and Grace were living at 13 Vicarage Street in Stockton that their first child was born, after which the family settled in Thornaby-on-Tees.  And it was there that their second child was born.  After leaving the army at the end of the war, Cecil became a bus driver with United Automobile Services, more simply known as United.  The North Yorkshire company had a fleet of red double-decker buses which were usually very reliable in those days.  However, on one occasion he was driving down the very steep road that is Lythe Bank, between Loftus and Whitby on the North Yorkshire coast, when his brakes failed.  There then followed a few scary moments with the vehicle careering to the foot of the hill where, thank goodness, it came safely to rest.

 

 

 

Cecil Benjamin Collett died on 18th June 1981 when he was 71, his death being recorded at Cleveland that same month.  It was Cecil’s daughter Sue Hammler nee Collett who kindly provided the details regarding her parents, and those of her aunts and uncles, all of which has been used in updating this family line.

 

 

 

18R28

Jean Collett

Born on 21.07.1946 at Stockton

 

18R29

Susan Collett

Born on 14.05.1953 at Thornaby-on-Tees

 

 

 

 

18Q72

Robert James Collett was born at Mistley in Essex in 1883, the eldest child of Harry Collett and his cousin Emma Porter.  Shortly after he was born his parents left Essex and moved to the St Mary Stoke area of Ipswich.  And that was where Robert was still living with his family in March 1901, when he was 17 and his occupation was that of a merchant’s clerk.

 

 

 

He was later employed at Paul’s of Ipswich where he worked alongside a very young John Mills who later became a legendary British film actor.  Robert, who was known as Bobs, married Elizabeth Teresa Hamblin with whom he had one son who was born at Ipswich.  Elizabeth was born at Ipswich in 1887 and was the daughter of retired book maker Robert Hamblin and his wife Matilda Blanche Hamblin.  Coincidentally in 1901 Elizabeth, age 13, was living with her family in the St Mary Stoke area of Ipswich, not far from where Robert’s family lived.

 

 

 

Ten years later Robert James Colleth (sic), age 27 and from Mistley, was recorded in April 1911 as residing and working within the Ipswich registration district, but not with any member of the Collett family or the Hamblin family.  In the same census his future wife Elizabeth Teresa Hamblin, age 23, was still living with her family in Ipswich.  From this information it is determined that Robert and Elizabeth were married after April 1911, and therefore their son Robert was probably born after 1912.

 

 

 

Robert James Collett, and his son Robert, were still alive in 1947, when they both attended the 90th birthday celebrations for Emma Collett nee Porter, the mother of Robert senior, at the Ipswich home of his brother William (below).  See photograph under Ref. 18P80.

 

 

 

18R30

Robert Collett

Date of birth after 1912 at Ipswich

 

 

 

 

18Q73

William Walter Collett, who was always referred to as Will, was born at Ipswich on 6th October 1884, the son of Henry (Harry) Collett and Emma Porter.

 

By March 1901, when he was 16 years old, he was working as a brewer’s clerk at the Tollemache Brewery, in the St Mary Stoke area of Ipswich.

 

Seven years later on his twenty-fourth birthday on 6th October 1908, Will married Florence Maud Death, formerly of Ipswich, at the parish church in Great Clacton in Essex. 

 

The marriage produced two sons for Will and Florence, and both of them were born at Ipswich just prior to the Great War of 1914-1918.

 

 

 

In 1911 the national census was conducted on the second of April, less than a week away from the birth of the couple’s first child.  The census therefore recorded just William Collett, age 26, and his wife Florence Collett, age 28, as living in Ipswich on that occasion.

 

 

 

At the outbreak of the war, Will joined up and served his King and Country and after, returned to working at the Tollemache Brewery, where he was employed for the rest of his working life.  The brewery eventually merged with the Cobbold Brewery to become Tolly Cobbold, but that happened three years after Will had passed away.

 

 

 

William Walter Collett died during 1954 at the age of 69.  The photograph of him (above), was taken in the garden of his Ipswich home during 1939, following the birth of Will’s first grandchild.  The full picture shows four generations of the Collett family, from baby-in-arms Mary Ann Collett, her father Philip Robert Walter Collett, Will (William) Collett, and to Will’s mother Emma Collett nee Porter.  A later photograph also taken in William’s own garden in Ipswich in 1947, capture the 90th birthday gathering of the family for his mother Emma Collett nee Porter.  See photograph at Ref. 18P80, in which Will and his wife Florence feature, together with other members of the family still living in England at that time.

 

 

 

18R31

Philip Robert Walter Collett

Born on 08.04.1911 at Ipswich

 

18R32

William Geoffrey Collett

Born in October 1912 at Ipswich

 

 

 

 

18Q74

Beatrice Emma Collett, who was known as Beattie, was born at Ipswich in 1886 and was 14 years of age and still attending school in March 1901 while living with her family at St Mary Stoke in Ipswich.  At the time of the census of 1911 Beatrice Emma Collett was 24 and was living and working in the Sudbury area of Suffolk.  Beattie never married and later returned to live with her parents, and with her widowed mother after the death of her father Harry in 1917.  Sadly in 1946 at the age of 60 Beattie Emma Collett died leaving her elderly mother Emma, who was approaching her ninetieth year, who survived for a further four years.

 

 

 

 

18Q75

Mabel May Collett, who was known as May, was born at Ipswich in 1889.  In 1901 she was 11 and was living with her parents at St Mary Stoke in Ipswich.  Ten years later, at the age of 21, she was still living at the family home in Ipswich with her parents and younger sister Dorothy (below).  It was in 1917 at Ipswich that Mabel married widower Howard Gant who already had two children from his first marriage.

 

 

 

Howard was the ninth child of gardener Samuel Gant of Boxted in Essex and his dressmaker wife Anna Gant of Nayland in Suffolk.  Like all of the Gant children, Howard was born at Boxted, in 1879, and on leaving school he worked as a tool turner.  In March 1901 at the age of 21 he was living with his parents who were living in Colchester by then.  Around five years later Howard Gant married Caroline and by April 1911 the marriage had produced two children for the couple, both born in Colchester, where the family was still living at that time.  Their son Harold Gant was born in 1907 and their daughter Violet Gant was born in 1909.  However, quite tragically their mother Caroline died during the next few years.

 

 

 

The subsequent marriage of Mabel Collett and Howard Gant produced two children for the couple: a son, Howard Henry Gant, who was born in 1918; and a daughter, Dorothy Lily Gant, who was born in 1922.  It was two years later on 19th June 1924 that Howard’s eldest son Harold Gant, aged just 16, sailed to Australia to seek a new life in Queensland.  The passenger list of the steamship S S Sophocles of the Aberdeen Line gave occupation as farming, while his address on that occasion as 26 Bradley Street in the Stoke district of Ipswich, where Mabel and Howard and the rest of the family was living at that time.  It was also at that same address where the family of Howard, Mabel, Violet, Howard junior, and Dorothy was still living five years later, when they left England for Australia in October 1927.

 

 

 

However, their sea voyage to Australia was not uneventful.  After sailing out of the Port of London for Brisbane on board the P & O Line steamship S S Bendigo on 13th October 1927, the vessel broke a drive shaft and was forced to dock at Falmouth in Cornwall.  The passenger list recorded the family as having two tickets.  The first 2279 covered Howard Gant, age 47, who was a turner, and his son Howard Henry Gant who was eight years old.  The second 2280 covered his wife Mabel May Gant, age 37, Violet May Gant, who was 17 and a domestic, and Dorothy Lily Gant who was five.  The same tickets were used again for their onward journey from Falmouth to Australia on board the P & O steamship SS Balranald which sailed out of Falmouth on 31st October 1927.  The S S Bendigo was subsequently taken out of service and was given a complete re-fit, following which is made its first voyage on 5th July 1929.

 

 

 

Mabel May Gant nee Collett died in Australia on 2nd April 1974 at the age of 85, and was followed in 1990 by her daughter Dorothy who was 68, and in 2001 by her son Howard who was 83.  All of this information has been kindly provided by Mary-Ann Dunn nee Collett (Ref. 18S22), and our thanks also go to Beverley Hill who kindly provided the information on the Gant family.

 

 

 

 

18Q76

Dorothy Alice Collett, who was referred to as Dorrie, was born at St Mary Stoke in Ipswich in 1895, the youngest of the five children of Harry Collett and Emma Porter.  She was five years old at the time of the March census in 1901, and by April 1911 she was still living with her parents in Ipswich, when she was recorded as Dorothy Alice Collett, age 15.  Later in her life she was still living at Ipswich, where she married Alfred Ramsey, with whom she had a son named Harry Ramsey.

 

 

 

In 1947 all three members of the Ramsey family attending the 90th birthday celebration for Dorothy’s mother Emma Collett nee Porter, at the Ipswich home of Dorothy’s brother Will (above).  See Ref. 18P80 for a photograph taken on that summer’s day.

 

 

 

 

18Q77

Florence Mary Collett was born at Patricroft in the Eccles area of Manchester in late 1884, the eldest child of George Collett of Mettingham and his wife Matilda J Collett.  The birth was recorded at Barton-upon-Irwell during the first three months of the following year.  In 1891 the family was living at 24 New York Street in the Pendleton area of Salford, where ‘Florance M Collett’ was six years old.  The family had not been identified previously in the census of 1901, and the reason for that was that they were listed in error as the Collitt family.  On that occasion Florence Collitt was 16 and a machinist at a baby linen factory, while living at the family home at 86 Church Street in Pendleton.

 

 

 

Ten years later in 1911 unmarried ‘Florance Mary Collett’, age 26, was living within the Fylde area of Lancashire with her complete family, but with the addition of the first grandchild for her parents.  At that time the age of her three unmarried brothers was 22, 20 and 17 respectively.  It is therefore more than likely that the named granddaughter, Gertrude Lucy Collett who was just six months old, was Florence’s base-born daughter, although no evidence has yet been found to confirm this.

 

 

 

18R33

Gertrude Lucy Collett

Born in October 1910 at Flyde

 

 

 

 

18Q78

George Collett was born at Pendleton in Salford in 1888, and his birth was recorded at Salford R D during the second quarter of that year.  He was two years old in the census of 1891 when he and his family were living at 24 New York Street in Pendleton.  By 1901 the family had moved to 86 Church Street in Pendleton where George Collitt (sic) was 12.  After a further ten years the family had left The Salford area and had settled within the Fylde district of Lancashire where George was then 22.  It was at Blackpool, during the second quarter of 1938, that George Collett died aged 50.

 

 

 

 

18Q79

Walter Collett was born at Pendleton in Salford during 1890, his birth being recorded at Salford in the second quarter of the year. He was just under one year old by the time of the census in 1891 when his family was living at 24 New York Street in Pendleton where he was very likely born. He was still living with his family in Pendleton in 1901 but at 86 Church Street where he was still attending school at the age of 10.  Shortly after that his family left Pendleton and moved to the Flyde area of Lancashire, although in 1911 Walter Collett, age 20 and a house painter, was a staying with his uncle and aunt James and Elizabeth Vickers at 48 Cannon Street in Eccles.  What happened to Walter after that time is not known, but he was 74 when he died at Blackpool during the first three months of 1958, twenty years after his older brother George (above) had died there, and only three years after his younger brother Ernest (below) died there.

 

 

 

 

18Q80

Ernest Victor Collett was born at Pendleton in Salford during 1893 where the birth was registered at Salford in the third quarter of that year.  In 1901 Ernest Collitt who was seven when he was a school boy living at 86 Church Street in Pendleton, but during the decade his family moved to the Fylde district of Lancashire where in 1911, as Ernest Victor Collett from Pendleton, he was 17 years of age.  Like his two older brothers George and Walter, Ernest Victor Collett died at Blackpool during the third quarter of 1955.

 

 

 

 

18Q81

Fanny Collett was born at Wigan in 1896, the elder of the two daughters of Frederick Christopher Collett and his wife Margaret Jane Challoner.  It is very likely that she was born at 39 Darlington Street in Wigan, where she was living with her parents in 1901 at the age of four years.  After the birth of her sister Clara during the following year the family of four settled in Hoscar Lathom where they were living in 1911 when Fanny was 14.  Fanny Collett was still a spinster when first her mother passed away, and then also at the time of the death of her father in February 1939.  It therefore seems highly likely that Fanny was looking after her father at their home at West View in Hoscar Lathom, just three miles from Ormskirk.

 

 

 

 

18Q83

Bertha Collett was born at Patricroft in Eccles on 4th June 1894, the eldest of the five children of Henry Collett and his wife Catherine Atkinson.  At the age of six years Bertha was living with her family at 12 Hampton Grove in Eccles, while ten years later in 1911, when she was 16, the family was residing at 54 Liverpool Road in Eccles.  It would appear that she never married and died while living in the Lancaster area during the second quarter of 1980.

 

 

 

 

18Q84

Christopher Henry Collett was born at Patricroft in Eccles in 1896, the son of Henry and Catherine Collett, with the birth being registered at Barton-upon-Irwell in the first three months of that year.  He was five years old in 1901 when living at 12 Hampton Grove in Eccles with his family.  By 1911 the family was living at 54 Liverpool Road in Eccles when Christopher was 15.  It was during the autumn of 1923 that he married Eleanor Thom at Barton-upon-Irwell, although it is not known at this time whether there were any children resulting from the marriage.  What is known is that Christopher Henry Collett died during the first three months of 1961 when his death was reported to the Barton-upon-Irwell registrar.

 

 

 

 

18Q85

Elsie Collett was born at Patricroft in Eccles 16th November 1898, the daughter of to Henry and Catherine Collett.  Elsie was two years old when she and her family were living at 12 Hampton Grove in Eccles, and was 12 years old ten years later, by which time her family was still living in Eccles but at 54 Liverpool Road.  Like her two sisters it is understood that she never married and that she died at Ulverston in the Lake District during the autumn of 1978.

 

 

 

 

18Q86

Dora Collett was born at Winton in Eccles in 1903, the last of the five children of Henry Collett and his wife Catherine Atkinson.  Her birth was recorded at Barton-upon-Irwell during the third quarter of that year.  She may have been born while her family was living at 12 Hampton Grove, although by 1911 they were living at 54 Liverpool Road in Eccles where Dora was recorded as being eight years of age.  It is possible that she followed the examples set by her two older sisters by staying unmarried all her life, because it was at Barrow-in-Furness that her death was recorded during the first three months of 1967.

 

 

 

 

18Q87

Lillian Collett was born at Winton in Eccles in 1896, the eldest of the two children of Walter William Collett and his wife Eda Jones, and her birth was registered at Barton-upon-Irwell R C during the third quarter of that year.  At the age of four years Lillian and her family were residing at 22 Worsley Road in Eccles in 1901, and by 1911 they were living at 5 Byron Street in Eccles, where Lillian was 14.

 

 

 

 

18Q88

Alfred Collett was born at Winton in Eccles in 1898 and his birth was recorded at Barton-upon-Irwell during the second quarter of that year, when his parents were confirmed as William and Eda Collett.  He and his family were living at 22 Worsley Road in Eccles in 1901 when he was two years of age.  Ten years after that Alfred Collett, age 12, was staying with his uncle Henry Collett and aunt Catherine at their home at 54 Liverpool Road in Eccles.  Perhaps that was a temporary arrangement to cover the period when his own family was living at 5 Byron Street in Eccles, where they had staying with them Samuel Bower the second husband of Alfred’s grandmother Lucy Collett nee Jones.

 

 

 

The only other detail known about the life of Alfred Collett is that his death was recorded in Blackpool during the third quarter of 1966.

 

 

 

 

18Q89

Ann Collett was born at Kendal in 1871, the eldest child of carpenter Henry Collett from Ireland and his wife Isabella Bousfield of Kendal.  In 1881, at the age of nine, Ann was attending school in Kendal where she was living at 10 Serpentine Road with her family.  Ten years later, when she was 19, she was working as a woollen warper while still living in Kendal with her family.  Sometime thereafter it would appear that she married, since no record of her as Ann Collett has been found in any later census return.

 

 

 

 

18Q91

Margaret Collett was born at Kendal in 1875 and was recorded as Maggie Collett aged five years in the 1881 Census, when she was living at 10 Serpentine Road in Kendal with her family.  It was as Margaret Collett, age 16, that she was listed living with her family in Kendal in 1891, by which time she was working as a woollen winder.  By the end of the century it is assumed that she was married.

 

 

 

 

18Q92

William Henry Collett was born at Kendal in 1877, the eldest son and fourth child of Henry Collett and Isabella Bousfield.  He was four years old in 1881 when he was living at 10 Serpentine Road in Kendal, the census including him with his family as William H Collett.  Before the end of the decade, and on leaving school, William started his working life alongside his father who was a house carpenter.  His early occupation was that of a joiner, as confirmed by the census returns in 1891, when he was 14, and again in 1901, when he was 24.

 

 

 

It was also just after the census day in 1901 that William married Isabel at Kendal, and it was there also that the couple settled, and where their two daughters were born.  In the census of 1911 William and his family were still living in Kendal, and were recorded as follows.  William Henry Collett was 33, his wife Isabel Collett was also 33, and their two daughters were Elsie Collett who was nine, and May Isabel Collett who was seven.  All four members of the family were noted as having been born at Kendal.

 

 

 

18R34

Elsie Collett

Born in 1902 at Kendal

 

18R35

May Isabel Collett

Born in 1904 at Kendal

 

 

 

 

18Q93

Robert B Collett was born at Kendal in 1879, the son of Henry and Isabella Collett.  He and his family were living at 10 Serpentine Road in Kendal in 1881 when, as simply Robert Collett, he was one year old.  It was as Robert B Collett, age 11, that he was still living in Kendal with his parents at the time of the census in 1891.  He was around 15 years old when his mother and his younger brother John (below) died, but by 1901 Robert was still living with his father, who had re-married by then.  Like his brother William (above, Robert also took up his father’s trade and in 1901 he was a joiner at the age of 21.

 

 

 

What happened to Robert after that time is not known, since there was no record of him in Great Britain in the census returns for 1911, by which time he would have been 31 and possibly married and living abroad.

 

 

 

 

18Q94

John F Collett was born at Kendal in 1890 and was one year old in the Kendal census of 1891.  On that occasion he was the youngest child of Henry and Isabella Collett, but his absence from the next census in 1901 suggests that he suffered an infant death.  It was also during that same time period that his mother Isabella died in the first three months of 1894.

 

 

 

 

18Q95

Harold Collett was born at Kendal in 1896, the only son of widower Henry Collett and his second wife, the widow Mary Alice Foster, who were married during the previous year.  Harold was living with his parents and his two half brothers in March 1901, when he was four years old, but by April 1911 he was the only child still living at Kendal with his parents at the age of 14.

 

 

 

 

18Q96

Albert Vernon Tanner was born at Kendall in Westmorland during 1873, the first of the nine children of John William Tanner and Bethia Ann Collett.  He married Mary Agnes Wilson in 1910 at Holy Trinity Church in Lancaster.  Tragically after only fourteen years together Mary died on 20th June 1924 aged 44.  From the Index of Wills & Administrations 1858 – 1966, the administration of the personal effects, valued at £108 8 Shillings 4d, of Mary Agnes Tanner of 7 Leyster Street in Morecambe, the wife of Albert Vernon Tanner, a ship’s steward, was granted in London on 17th July 1924 to the said Albert Vernon Tanner.  Albert survived for a further thirty-four years and died on 19th January 1959 at the age of 85.  From the Index of Wills & Administrations 1858 – 1966, the Will of Albert Vernon Tanner of 3 Ridge Lane in Lancaster valued at £262 was proved on 13th October 1964 and placed in the hands of executors John Taylor, a builder, and Joseph Albert Jones, a solicitor.  The probate notice also confirmed that Albert died at The Laurels, Cannon Hill in Lancaster.

 

 

 

 

18Q97

Walter Kitchen Tanner was born at Barrow-in-Furness in 1874 and sadly he was only seven years of age when he died there during 1882.

 

 

 

 

18Q98

Edith Ann Tanner was born at Kendall in 1876.  It was during 1896 when she married David Richard Hurley who was born at Workington on 11th January 1878, the son of Edwin and Elizabeth Hurley.  Five years later the census in 1901 recorded the couple at 14B Walney Road in Barrow-in-Furness with their three children.  David Hurley, an ironworks coke fitter, was 23, his wife Edith was 24 and their children were David Hurley junior who was three, George F Hurley who was one year old and Edith L Hurley who was just eight months old and died later that same year.  A fourth child had been born to the couple in 1896, Albert Edward Hurley, who died during the following year before his first birthday.

 

 

 

Further tragedy struck the family in 1902 when Edith Ann Hurley nee Tanner died at the age of 25.  Following the death of his wife and two of his children, David emigrated to America during 1903 and arrived in New York on 30th July aboard the ship Teutonic which had sailed out of Liverpool.  He married Agnes Simpson who was born in 1886 with whom he had another son John who was born in 1910.  David Richard Hurley became a naturalised American on 27th January 1912 when he was residing at 1338 Jenny Lind Street in McKeesport, Pennsylvania, where his brother Joseph Daniel Hurley also lived.  According to the US Census of 1940 David Hurley was 52 and his wife Agnes was 54 when they were living at 1604 Geaner Street in McKeesport, from where he was employed as a millwright.  During that decade he and Agnes were living at 604 Beaver Avenue in McKeesport, while it was on 21st June 1949 that David Richard Hurley died in McKeesport aged 71.

 

 

 

 

18Q99

John William Tanner was born at Barrow-in-Furness in 1878.  It was at St Mark’s Church in Barrow in 1905 that he married widow Sarah Ann Hetherington who was born in 1880 at Croydon in Surrey, England.  By 1911 John, age 31 (sic) and Sarah were living at 19 Hawcoat Lane, Hawcoat Park in Barrow-in-Furness.  The census return that year confirmed the property had six rooms and stated that John, a flour mill labourer, and Sarah had been married for six years.  They had no children from their marriage, although living there with them was Sarah’s daughter Eva Hetherington who was 10 years of age and born at Barrow-in-Furness.  The record of the death of a ‘Sarah Tanner’ was registered at Barrow-in-Furness in 1933 when she was 53, while it was fifteen years later that John William Tanner passed away in 1948 when he was 70.

 

 

 

 

18Q100

Francis Henry Tanner was born at Barrow-in-Furness in 1880 and died there the following year when he was one year old.

 

 

 

 

18Q101

Arthur Henry Tanner was born at Barrow-in-Furness in 1881 and was yet another childhood death in the family when he died during 1890 at the age of eight years.

 

 

 

 

18Q102

Beatrice Eleanor Tanner was born at Barrow-in-Furness on 13th August 1883, a daughter of John William Tanner and Bethia Ann Collett.  She later married William Eddleston in 1914 when she was 31.  Thanks must go to Brian Eddleston, the grandson of Beatrice and William, who generously provided lots of new information regarding Bethia Ann Collett and her family.

 

 

 

 

18Q103

Frederick James Tanner was born at Barrow-in-Furness in 1884.  He married Hilda Augusta Wise who was born in 1894 at Peckham in Surrey, one of the five children of Hubert and Jane Wise.  They married on 2nd December 1915 at the Church of St Mary in Balham, London when Frederick was 30 and a seafarer and Hilda was 21.  His address was the same as Hilda’s, that being 43 Balham Hill in Balham.  The groom’s father was confirmed as John William Tanner, a storekeeper, and the bride’s father was described as Herbert (sic) Lewington Wise, deceased, whose past occupation was that of a clerk.  The census in 1911 confirmed that Hilda was a laundry porter, while Hubert was a shipbrokers clerk.

 

 

 

 

18Q104

Edwin Smallwood Tanner was born at Barrow-in-Furness in 1887, the last of the nine children of John William Tanner and Bethia Ann Collett.  Sadly neither mother nor child survived.

 

 

 

 

18Q105

William Collett was born at Berwick-on-Tweed in 1875, the only child of John Collett and Isabella Landell, his birth recorded at Berwick (Ref. 10b 410) during the last quarter of 1875.  He was later baptised at Berwick-on-Tweed in Northumberland on 5th December 1875 when his parents were confirmed as John and Isabella.  Tragically William was still only a few months old when his father died.  However, on the day of the census in 1881, when his widowed mother was working as a servant in Halifax, William Collett aged five years and from Berwick was staying with his grandmother Ann Collett of Ravenglass at 41 Hawke Street in Barrow-in-Furness.  Just a few months later his mother married Job Barker in Halifax, and it was with his mother and stepfather that William was living in 1891.

 

 

 

The census in 1891 recorded William Collett, who was 15 and from Berwick-on-Tweed, living with Job and Isabella Barker and their daughter Martha within the Halifax & Northowram registration district.  It was possibly six years later, when he was still living in the Halifax area, that William married Elizabeth Ann who was born at nearby Queensbury in 1877.  The marriage is known to have produced just three children for the couple and, according to the census in March 1901, William and Elizabeth Ann were living in Queensbury, midway between Northowram and Halifax, with their first two children.  William’s mother Isabella and stepfather Job Barker were also living in the Queensbury area at that time.

 

 

 

By that time William Collett, age 25 and from Berwick, was working as a machine tool maker and turner, his wife Elizabeth A Collett was 23, and their two children were Annie Collett who was two, and Leonard Hy Collett who was not yet one year old.  On that occasion the place of birth of Elizabeth and her two children was given as Halifax.  Ten years later, and after the arrival of the couple’s third and last known child, the family was living in the Keighley area of Yorkshire, some seven miles north of Queensbury.  The census in April 1911 listed the family as William Collett from Berwick, who was 35, Elizabeth Ann Collett from Queensbury, who was 33, Annie Collett from Queensbury, who was 12, Leonard Harry Collett, who was 10, and Harold Collett who was nine years old.

 

 

 

18R36

Annie Collett

Born in 1898 at Queensbury

 

18R37

Leonard Harry Collett

Born in 1900 at Queensbury/Halifax

 

18R38

Harold Collett

Born in 1902

 

 

 

 

18Q106

Elizabeth Ann Collett was born at Barrow-in-Furness in 1883, the first child of William Collett and Frances Nelson, whose birth was recorded at Barrow (Ref. 8e 855) during the fourth quarter of 1883 when the mother’s maiden name was confirmed as Nelson.  Tragically Elizabeth Ann Collett was only three years old when she died at Barrow (Ref. 8e 543) during the third quarter of 1887.

 

 

 

 

18Q107

John William Collett was born at Barrow-in-Furness in 1886 and was recorded as John W Collett aged four years in the census of 1891 and was again named as John W Collett in the Barrow census of 1901 when he was 14.  It was only in the next census of 1911 that, as John William Collett aged 24, he was still living with his family at Barrow-in-Furness.  His occupation was that of an engineer, his work taking him to and from South America on a number of occasions.  However, it was during the last years of the Great War that he married Olga and their only know child Adolpha Collett was born in 1918.  Whether she was born in Brazil has not been confirmed, but on 9th July 1926 the family of three sailed into Liverpool on the steam ship Hildebrand, a vessel of the Booth Line, having sailed from the Port of Belem in Brazil.  John William Collett, an engineer aged 40, his wife Olga Collett who was 29, and their eight year-old daughter Ahualpa (sic) Collett, were travelling first class from their permanent residence in Brazil to a destination address of 65 Bishopsgate in London.

 

 

 

Sometime later the family returned to their home within the State of Para on the northern Atlantic coast of Brazil.  Then again in 1932 John and his wife set sail from the Port of Manaus in the State of Amazonas and sailed down the Amazon River, before crossing the Atlantic out of Belem, bound for Liverpool.  On that occasion John Wm Collett was 45 and his wife Olga Collett was 33, when they were named on the passenger list of the steam ship Hilary of the Booth Steamship Company, which arrived in Liverpool on 31st May 1932. 

 

 

 

After a further seventeen years the couple was once again crossing the Atlantic Ocean, that time from Liverpool, bound for the State of Para in Brazil, and again on the ship Hilary of the Booth Line.  The passenger list confirmed that engineer John Collett and his wife Olga had been staying at 2 Milford Road in North West London.  The vessel left Liverpool on 10th November 1949, stopping at Portugal and Tenerife on the way to North Brazil.  Less than three years later the same pair was named on the Hilary’s passenger list when they arrived at the Port of Liverpool in England on 8th June 1952.  That year John William Collett was 65 when the destination for him and his wife Olga was 30 Highgate in West Hill, London.

 

 

 

18R39

Adolpha Collett

Born in 1918

 

 

 

 

18Q108

Thomas Henry Collett was born at Barrow-in-Furness in 1888, the son of William and Frances Collett.  It was as Thomas H Collett aged two years and 12 years that he was listed with his family in the two Barrow censuses conducted in 1891 and 1901, and as Thomas Henry Collett that he was recorded again with his family in Barrow in 1911 when he was 22.  Very little else is known about except that he was 58 years of age when he died, his death recorded at Barrow-in-Furness register office (Ref. 10b 149) during the second quarter of 1947.

 

 

 

 

18Q110

William Collett was born at Cratfield in 1883.  When his parents moved to nearby Redenhall around 1890 William remained living in Cratfield with his grandfather William Randall.  That was confirmed by the Cratfield census of 1891 when William was seven years old and was living there in Bell Lane.  As the oldest child in the Collett family, that arrangement was probably made out of convenience for the family, since William’s mother Elizabeth Collett nee Randall was expecting the family’s fifth child.  A little while later William moved back in with his family at Redenhall, where he was recorded in 1901.

 

 

 

The census that year showed the family reunited and living in a house on the Bungay Road in Redenhall, with the exception of William’s sister Maria who was working in a neighbouring village.  By that time, when he was 17, William’s occupation was that of an ordinary farm labourer.  It is very likely that he was working alongside his two younger brothers Harry and George (below) who were also farm labourers, and it may have been on the same farm where their father worked as a teamster.

 

 

 

Around the middle of the first decade of the new century William married Laura and by April 1911 the marriage had produced a son for the couple.  The census return for that year listed the family living at Redenhall as William Collett, age 27, his wife Laura, and their son Harry Collett who was five years old.

 

 

 

18R40

Harry Collett

Born in 1905 at Redenhall

 

 

 

 

18Q111

Harry Collett was born at Cratfield in 1885 and when he was around four years old his family left Suffolk and moved to Redenhall cum Harleston in Norfolk.  By 1891 Harry was six years old and living at Bungay Road in Redenhall.  Ten years later at the age of 15, Harry was working as an ordinary farm labourer with his two brothers William (above) and George (below), while all three of them were still living in the family home at Redenhall. 

 

 

 

Around four year later, when Harry was approaching twenty, he married Lucy and the couple settled in nearby Harleston where their son was born.  According to the Harleston census in 1911, for the Depwade area of Norfolk, Harry Collett of Cratfield was 25, his wife Lucy Collett was 24, and their son Arthur was five years old.

 

 

 

18R41

Arthur Collett

Born in 1905 at Harleston

 

 

 

 

18Q112

Maria Collett was born at Cratfield in 1886, the only daughter of William Collett of Fressingfield and Elizabeth Randall of Cratfield.  Rather confusingly Maria seems to appear twice in the census of 1891.  In the first she was four years old and living at Redenhall cum Harleston with her parents and two siblings Harry (above) and George (below), her place of birth confirmed as Cratfield.  At the same time her grandfather William Randall said she and her older brother William Collett (above) were staying with him at Cratfield, together with her mother Elizabeth Collett nee Randall.  It is accepted that William Collett was there, but it is thought that Maria and her mother were just visiting.

 

 

 

On leaving school Maria entered into domestic service and by March 1901, at the age of 15, she had left the family home at Cloutergate Cottage in Redenhall and was employed as a general domestic servant at a house in Fressingfield cum Withersdale.  Around two or three years later Maria Collett married Frederick Ashfield of Wingfarthing in Norfolk with whom she had four children before 1911.  In the census that year the young Ashfield family was living at Redenhall and comprised Frederick 28, Maria of Cratfield who was 24, and their children George 6, Albert 4, Leonard 3, and Irene who was one year old; all of the children having been born at Redenhall.

 

 

 

 

18Q113

George Collett was born Cratfield in 1888.  Not longer after he was born his family left Cratfield and moved across the Suffolk county boundary into Norfolk where they settled in Redenhall cum Harleston; and it was there in 1891 that George was recorded aged two years.  The family lived in a house on the Bungay Road in Redenhall where there were also living in 1901 and 1911.  By March 1901 George Collett was twelve years old and was already employed on a local farm as an ordinary farm labourer like his two older brothers William and Harry (above) with whom he was probably working.

 

 

 

Just prior to the census of 1911 George married Edith, and by April that year George Collett of Cratfield was 22 and was living at Harleston with his wife Edith Collett who was 21.  The marriage had not produced any children for the couple by that time.

 

 

 

 

18Q117

Frederick George Collett was born at Metfield in 1898, the only son of Eliza and George Collett from Fressingfield, whose father died around the time that he was born.  The baptism of Frederick George Collett also took place in 1898 at the Church of St John the Baptist in Metfield.  During the next year his mother married Thomas Woolnough and it was with Thomas and Eliza that George Collett aged two years and from Metfield was living in March 1901.  When he left the home of stepfather is not known, except that it had taken place prior to the next census in 1911, by which time his mother had given birth at Metfield to two half-sisters.  It was as Fredrick (sic) George Collett aged 12 years that he was living with the Balls family at The Common on Harleston Road in Metfield not far away from his mother’s new family when he was still attending the village school.

 

 

 

 

18Q119

George William Collett was born at Stoke Newington, in the London Borough of Hackney in 1903 and was baptised at St Matthews Church in nearby Upper Clapton on 12th August 1904, the eldest son of Esau Collett and Mary Ann Cracknell.  In the census of 1911 he was simply recorded as George Collett aged seven years, but sixteen years later it was as George William Collett, aged 24 and the son of Esau Collett, that he was recorded on 23rd July 1927, the day he married Doris Griffin.  Doris was 22 and the daughter of Samuel Joseph Griffin, and they were married at St Stephen’s Church in Norbury near Croydon.

 

 

 

 

18Q124

John William George Collett was born at Wrentham near Southwold on 4th October 1893.  Shortly after he was born the family moved to Yoxford north of Saxmundham, where his brother and sisters were born.  At the time of the 1901 Census, John W G Collett was seven years old when living at Yoxford with his family.  By 1911 he had left the family home and was living and working in the Blything area of Suffolk, when he was 17 and his place of birth was confirmed as Wrentham.  He later married Laura Lily Burden with whom he had fourteen children, although only nine of whom are identified below.  Laura was born at Lowestoft on 22nd October 1892.

 

 

 

Laura Lily Collett nee Burden died at Lowestoft on 17th November 1970 and was followed by John William George Collett who also died there on 21st December 1975.

 

 

 

18R42

Jack Collett

Born in 1915; died 1915 at Lowestoft

 

18R43

Irene L B Collett

Born in 1915 at Lowestoft

 

18R44

Henry Collett

Born in 1916; died 1916 at Lowestoft

 

18R45

Edward Collett

Born in 1917; died 1981 at Lowestoft

 

18R46

Francis Robert Charles Collett

Born in 1919 at Lowestoft

 

18R47

Hazel Collett

Born in 1921; died 2004 at Lowestoft

 

18R48

John Collett

Born in 1923; died 1926 at Lowestoft

 

18R49

Harold G Collett

Born in 1925 at Lowestoft

 

18R50

Raymond Lewis Collett

Born in 1926 at Lowestoft

 

 

 

 

18Q125

Alice Mary Collett was born at Willow Marsh in Yoxford on 9th July 1895 and was five years old in the census of 1901, although at the time on 31st March she was staying with relatives in the St Pancras area of London.  By April 1911, and as Alice Collett, age 16 and from Raydon (sic) in Suffolk, she was living at 172 Sirdar Road in Noel Park, Wood Green, the home of her father’s older sister Sarah Smith nee Collett and her husband William Smith.  Alice retained her London connection when later in her life she married Lewis John Block with whom she had three children.  Lewis was born at Islington in London in 1900 and was the son of William Abraham and Emily Block of Tottenham.

 

 

 

 

18Q126

Annie Elizabeth Collett was born at Willow Marsh in Yoxford on 4th April 1896 and was four years old in the census of 1901 when living with her family at Yoxford.  She married William Alexander who was born at Ipswich in 1896 who was the son of William Alexander of Stonham Aspal and his wife Harriet.  The marriage never produced any children for Annie and William although they did raise the base-born daughter of Annie’s younger sister Elizabeth Collett (below).  Sadly Annie only lived a relatively short life when she died in 1933 aged 37.

 

 

 

 

18Q127

William Saunders Collett was born at Willow Marsh in Yoxford on 22nd October 1898.  He was two years old in the 1901 Census and was living with his family at Yoxford.  William married Laura Crisp sometime after the Great War and the marriage produced three children for the couple, the first born in the Blythburgh area of Suffolk, the next at Darsham to the south of Southwold, and the last at Ipswich.  Laura was born at Grundisburgh in 1897 and was the daughter of William Crisp of Grundisburgh and his wife Charlotte.  William Saunders Collett died in 1971 at the age of 72.

 

 

 

18R51

Roy William Collett

Born in 1932 at Blythburgh

 

18R52

Clive Rex Collett

Born in 1938 at Darsham

 

18R53

Gordon Daniel Collett

Born in 1944 at Ipswich

 

 

 

 

18Q128

Elizabeth Cissie May Collett was born at Willow Marsh in Yoxford on 31st May 1900 and was not one year old by 31st March 1901.  When she was in her mid-teenage years she conceived a child that was born when she was 17.  Once the family discovered she was with child she was sent away to Bulcamp Workhouse in Blythburgh six miles north of Yoxford.

 

 

 

The father of the child was never determined and once born the child was passed to Elizabeth’s older sister Annie to be brought up by her and her husband William Alexander as they had no children of their own.  Elizabeth later married Jack Reeve and they moved to live in Kent where the marriage produced four children for Elizabeth and Jack.  The story within the family is that Elizabeth and her base-born child were never reunited.  Elizabeth’s husband Jack was the son of Samuel Reeve and Matilda Moore.

 

 

 

 

18Q129

Francis Ernest James Collett was born on 16th October 1901 at Willow Marsh in Yoxford.  He later left Suffolk and moved north to live in Scotland where he worked as a marine engineer.  It was while at Rosehearty near Fraserburgh in Aberdeenshire that he married the widow Jemima Ritchie.  Jemima’s first husband had been a fisherman and died when he was lost at sea while working out of Rosehearty.  It was through Jemima’s work as a fish processor that she met Francis and by which time she had a child from her previous marriage.  The couple, with Francis’ stepdaughter, continued to live at Rosehearty after they were married, and it was there that their three children were born.

 

 

 

18R54

John Collett

Born in 1930 at Rosehearty, Scotland

 

18R55

Ivy Collett

Born in 1936 at Rosehearty, Scotland

 

18R56

Francis Ernest James Collett

Born in 1942 at Rosehearty, Scotland

 

 

 

 

18Q130

Violet Hazel Collett was born on 1st June 1903 at Willow Marsh in Yoxford.  It was much later in her life when she married Gerald Ronald William Earrye at Blythe in Suffolk during the third quarter of 1943.  His surname was originally Eary and it was Gerald’s father, William James Eary - who was born at Lavenham around 1883, who changed the name to Earrye prior to his marriage to Ethel Janet Moore from London.  They were married during the second quarter of 1805 at Wangford, Suffolk, where the birth of Gerald Earrye was recorded on 14th September 1910.  The census in 1911 placed the Earrye family as residing at Bungay in Suffolk when William was 26, Ethel was 23 and Gerald was six months old.

 

 

 

The marriage of Violet Hazel Collett and Gerald Ronald William Earrye produced a daughter, Gloria May Janet Earrye, who was born at Sudbury in Suffolk during the second quarter of 1947 when her mother’s maiden name was confirmed as Collett.  Sadly Violet Hazel Earrye nee Collett was only 49 when she died at Sudbury during the second quarter of 1952, the cause of death being cancer.  From that time onwards her daughter was cared for by Gerald’s sister.  By the time of the death of Gerald Earrye at Newmarket in 1987 his daughter Gloria had been married to John M Arbon for over fifteen years, their marriage recorded at Ipswich during the first three months of 1972.

 

 

 

Our thanks go to Pat Watson nee Earey who, in early 2016, made contact regarding Gerald and his father William, and it was the brief details that she kindly provided which enable a more detailed investigation into their lives to be undertaken and from which resulted in the insertion of the above information.  Pat has also generously extended an offer of help to anyone carrying out research into the Eary/Earrye/Earey family name.

 

 

 

 

18Q131

Ivy Sarah Collett was born on 11th September 1906 and possibly at Willow Marsh in Yoxford.  She married Herbert James Spindler who was from Westleton in Suffolk, it being less than three miles from Yoxford.  The marriage produced only one child for the couple, Herbert James Spindler who was born at Westleton in 1928.  However, following the birth, Ivy suffered badly with post-natal depression from which she never recovered.  From that time onwards she spent her life in St Audrey’s Hospital at Melton near Woodbridge where she died in 1982.  Prior to 1916 St Audrey’s Hospital was the former East Suffolk County Lunatic Asylum.

 

 

 

 

18Q132

Robert Charles Collett was born on 10th April 1908 at Willow Marsh in Yoxford.  He married Rachel Goodchild and their marriage produced three sons for the couple.

 

 

 

18R57

a Collett son

Date of birth unknown

 

18R58

a Collett son

Date of birth unknown

 

18R59

a Collett son

Date of birth unknown

 

 

 

 

18Q133

Lillian Emma Collett was born on 19th May 1910 at Willow Marsh in Yoxford.  She was a member of the Girl Guides and it was while with the guides that she picked up a spinster in her finger which turned septic.  The resulting blood poisoning was listed as the cause of her death on 2nd February 1922.

 

 

 

 

18Q134

Claude Victor Collett was born on 26th March 1912 at Willow Marsh in Yoxford.  He later married Betty Harmer and together they had two children who were both born while the couple were living at The Old Mill House in Westleton near Southwold.

 

 

 

18R60

Thelma Joan Collett

Born on 14.06.1935 at Westleton

 

18R61

John Victor Collett

Born on 28.08.1937 at Westleton

 

 

 

 

18Q135

Louisa May Collett was born on 16th March 1913 at Willow Marsh in Yoxford.  She married Leslie Harper by whom she had three children.  One of these was a daughter, Beryl May Harper who later married Christopher Scott.  Beryl and Christopher in turn had a daughter of their own, Jane Scott who, as Jane Clements, provided valuable details of her family that has enabled this update to be completed.  Louisa May Harper died in 1990.

 

 

 

 

18Q136

Dorothy Vera Collett was born on 8th October 1914 at Willow Marsh in Yoxford.  She married Jack Brabbin and their marriage produced two children for the couple.

 

 

 

 

18Q137

Laurina Sarah Mary Collett was born at Gorleston-on-Sea in 1884, her birth being recorded at Mutford during the fourth quarter of that year.  She was the eldest child of Charles George Collett and Lavinia Ann Howlett and in the census of 1891 she was listed with her family at 8 Common Lane in Gorleston as Sara Mary Collett who was six years old, while ten years later she was 16, when she was named in the 1901 census as Lavinia Collett.  With no record of her as a Collett found in the census of 1911, it must be assumed that she was married by then.

 

 

 

 

18Q138

Lionel Charles George Collett was born at Gorleston in either late 1885 or very early in 1886, as his birth was recorded at Mutford R D during the first three months of 1886.  He was the second child and the eldest son of Charles and Lavinia Collett.  Following the birth of his brother Albert early in 1891, it would appear that Lionel was sent to live with his grandparents for a while, to allow his mother to spend more time with the new arrival.  Certainly in the census that year he was staying them at East Marsh Road in Burgh Castle, when he was recorded in error as George L Collett, who was five years old. 

 

 

 

He was however, back living with his family at Gorleston at the time of the next census in 1901, when he was simply named as Lionel who was 15.