PART TWO

 

The Second Gloucestershire Line - 1830 to 1890

 

This is the second of three sections of Part Two of the Collett family line

 

Updated April 2016

 

The information for a previous update was kindly provided by James R Dainty

 

Some of the earlier details in this file were kindly provided by

Hilary A Collett (Ref. 2S43) of Basingstoke in Hampshire and

Reg and Patricia Harvey (Ref. 2Q132) of Somerset

 

 

 

2O1

Jane Elizabeth Collett was born at Freebridge Lynn in Norfolk during the third quarter of 1875 (Ref. 4b 301).  Not long after she was born her parents took the family to live in Bedford and it was there, when she was twenty-five, that she married Henry George Astbury during the second quarter of 1901 (Ref. 3b 698).  Henry was born at St Saviour Southwark in London in early 1870 (Ref. 1d 167).  The marriage produced a daughter, Catherine Olive Astbury, who was born at Wandsworth in London during the first quarter of 1909 (Ref. 1d 647) and she died at Shepway in Kent in 1994.  In 1935 she married Roy Worthington Latham at Croydon in Surrey, who was born at Bromley in Kent at the end of 1909 and who died at Chichester in Sussex in 2000.  Their daughter Gillian Latham was born at Croydon in 1940.  Henry George Astbury died at Chichester in Sussex in the first quarter of 1939 (Ref. 2b 710), while it was twenty-five years after his death that his widow Jane Elizabeth Astbury nee Collett also died at Chichester during the first three months of 1964 (Ref. 5h 721).

 

 

 

 

2O2

Mary Henrietta Collett was born at Bedford in 1877 and it was there that her birth was recorded during the first three months of the year (Ref. 3b 347).  She married Alfred George Board at Bedford during the third quarter of 1902 (Ref. 3b 603) and he was born at Weymouth in Dorset during the last three years of 1874 (Ref. 5a 316).  Over the remainder of that first decade of the new century Mary presented Alfred with two sons and a daughter, all of them born when the couple was living at Weymouth.  They were Miller Hall Board (born in 1905), Clifford Collett Board (born in 1908) and Ellen Doreen Board (born in 1910).  Alfred George Board died at Weymouth during the first three months of 1955 (Ref. 6a 1), while it was just over one year later that Mary Henrietta Board nee Collett passed away at Weymouth during the second quarter of 1956 (Ref. 6a 2).

 

 

 

 

2O4

Caroline Sarah Collett (previously Ref. 33O26) was born at Upper Slaughter in 1848 and it would appear that she never married.  In the churchyard of St Peter’s Church at Upper Slaughter a headstone marks her grave with the following inscription “In Loving Memory of Caroline Sarah Collett who departed this life 28th August 1926 aged 77 years”.  From the time she was born up until shortly 1871 Caroline lived with her family at upper Slaughter where she was two years old in 1851, 12 in 1861, and 22 in 1871.  She left Gloucestershire sometime after the census day in 1871 and by 1881 she was working in London as a parlour-maid.  She was recorded incorrectly as Caroline Collitt who was 32 and from Upper Slaughter living and working at 91 Lexham Gardens in Kensington, the home of solicitor and bachelor Francis Evelyn Linklater.  Also living and working there, as a lady’s maid, was Annie Courtenay who was 28 and also from Upper Slaughter.

 

 

 

Caroline was still living and working in London in 1891 when she was recorded in the census that year within the Paddington St John registration district as Caroline Collett who was 42 and from Upper Slaughter.  It was during the next decade that she eventually left London for Wales and in 1901 she was listed as Caroline S Collett, age 52 from Upper Slaughter, who was a draper and a shopkeeper in the parish of St Peter Cockett in Swansea.  She was still there in April 1911 when, as Caroline Sarah Collett, she was 62.

 

 

 

 

2O5

John Brain Collett (previously Ref. 33O27) was born at Upper Slaughter in 1851 and was listed in the Upper Slaughter census returns for 1861 and 1871 as being nine years old and 19 respectively.  Around five years later he married Annie who was born in 1853 at Chastleton in Oxfordshire, which is just four miles north-east of Stow-on-the-Wold.  By early April in 1881 John and Annie were living in the village of Upper Slaughter where John B Collett was 29 and a farmer of 90 acres employing one man and one boy, while Annie was described as being 28 and a farmer’s wife.  Living with them at Upper Slaughter was their daughter Mary A Collett, who was four and born at Bourton-on-the-Water, and their son John B Collett who was two years old who had been born at Bledington in Gloucestershire.

 

 

 

On the day of the census Annie may have been expecting the birth of the couple’s third child, since their second daughter was born later that same year.  Two further children were added to their family prior to the next census in 1891, by which time the family was living at Fulbrook to the north of Burford, where the couple’s most recent child had been born.  The census return on that occasion recorded the family as John B Collett, age 39 and the driver of a thrashing machine, Annie Collett, age 38 and from Castle Eaton (sic), and their five children.  They were named as Mary A Collett, who was 14 and from Bourton, John B Collett, who was 12 and a plough boy from Bledington, Margaret E Collett, who was nine and at school, Walter R Collett, who was eight and also at school, and Evelyn Collett who was two years old and born at Fulbrook.  Her two older siblings had been born at Upper Slaughter.

 

 

 

It would seem logical that the last child born to John and Annie two years later was also born while the family was still living at Fulbrook, as was confirmed in the census of 1911.  Rather curiously, no traced of John and his wife Annie has been found in the census 1901, even though their son John was recorded as living in Birmingham, while their daughter Margaret was living at Hambledon in Surrey, the Surrey connection being fairly significant.  However, both John and Annie featured in the census conducted in April 1911 when they were living in the Burford area of Oxfordshire.  John Brain Collett was 59, his wife Annie was 58, and living with the couple was their youngest son Arthur Frederick Collett who was 17.

 

 

 

2P1

Mary Ann Collett

Born in 1876 at Bourton-on-the-Water

 

2P2

John Brain Collett

Born in 1878 at Bledington

 

2P3

Margaret E Collett

Born in 1881 at Upper Slaughter

 

2P4

Walter Richard Collett

Born in 1883 at Upper Slaughter

 

2P5

Evelyn Collett

Born in 1888 at Fulbrook, Oxfordshire

 

2P6

Arthur Frederick Collett

Born in 1893 at Fulbrook, Oxfordshire

 

 

 

 

2O7

George Edward Collett (previously Ref. 33O29) was born at Upper Slaughter in 1859 and appeared with his family in the 1861 and 1871 Censuses for Upper Slaughter at the age of one year and 11 years respectively.  On reaching working age he left home to seek his fortune in London and by 1881 was he living as a boarder at 61 Pagnell Street in Deptford St Paul.  The family he was lodging with at 61 Pagnell Street was made up of Richard Cowdrey, age 62, a railway porter and his wife Charlotte from Swindon.  George Collett was 21 and a baker from Upper Slaughter.  Pagnell Street is still there in the twenty-first century running alongside the railway near New Cross Station.

 

 

 

It must have been later that same year or at the start of 1882 when George married Frances because their first child was born during 1882.  Where they were married is not known, but curiously their daughter was born in the Derbyshire village of Hilton, midway between Burton-on-Trent and Derby.  After she was born George and Frances returned to London and it was at Enfield in Middlesex that the couple’s second daughter was born and where the family of four was living in 1891.  George Edward Collett from Upper Slaughter was 31, his wife Frances Collett from Alderbury near Salisbury was 35, and their two girls were Ethel Collett, who was eight and born at Hilton, and Matilda Collett, who was six and born at Enfield.  Ten years after that the complete family was living at Twyford, just north of Wokingham in Berkshire, where George was 41, Frances was 45, Ethel E Collett was 18, and Matilda, who was referred to as Susanna Collett was 16.  The census did not provide details of any occupation for all four members of the family.

 

 

 

After 1901 the family seems to have broken up, perhaps with Matilda/Susanna becoming married, while no obvious record has been found in 1911 of her mother.  The only option for her father was a certain George Edmund Collett from Gloucestershire who was 50 and living alone in West Ham.  Ethel Elizabeth Collett, who was born at Hilton, was 29 and was living and working in the Northamptonshire village of Brixworth, the only person by the name of Collett living there in April 1911.

 

 

 

2P7

Ethel Elizabeth Collett

Born in 1882 at Hilton, Derbyshire

 

2P8

Matilda Susanna Collett

Born in 1884 at Enfield, Middlesex

 

 

 

 

2O9

Francis William Collett (previously Ref. 33O31) was born at Upper Slaughter on 14th March 1867 and it was there that he lived all his life.  He was the last child born to John Brain Collett and his wife Mary Ann with whom he was living in 1871 at the age of four.  During the next decade his father died, so by 1881 Francis, age 14, was an apprentice carpenter living with his widowed mother Mary Ann Collett.  Ten years later at the age of 24 he was still working as a carpenter and was still living with his mother, but not longer after 1891 Francis married Margaret Bell with whom he had five children, all of whom were born at Upper Slaughter.

 

 

 

The 1901 Census for Upper Slaughter revealed that the family was still living there and that Francis’ wife Margaret was 43 and a school mistress from Leamington Spa.  The census return also confirmed that all five of their children were born at Upper Slaughter, and they were Francis, who was six, Marjorie, who was four, Fred, who was two, and the twins Violet and Dorothy who were six months old.  Francis, who was 34, had progressed from simply being a carpenter to being a carpenter and a wheelwright by then.  Ten years later in April 1911 Francis and his family were still living at Upper Slaughter, by which time Francis William Collett was 44, and his wife Margaret Bell Collett was 53.  Their children were recorded as Francis George Brain Collett, age 16, Margorie (sic) Katharine Collett, age 14, Fred Holt Collett, age 12, and Violet Mary and Dorothy Elizabeth who were both ten.

 

 

 

Francis William Collett died on 13th February 1933 and was buried at St Peter’s Church in Upper Slaughter where he was joined sixteen years later by his wife Margaret Collett nee Bell who died on 24th July 1949.  The epitaph of the headstone that marks their grave reads “In Loving Memory of Francis William Collett 14th March 1867 – 13th February 1933 Also of his wife Margaret Bell died July 24th 1949 aged 82 years”.  Exactly two years to the day, prior to his own death, Francis William Collett, a carpenter, was named as the sole administrator for the estate of his son Frederick Holt Collett who died at the age of just 33.

 

 

 

Recently contact has been made with John Collett at Upper Slaughter, the great great grandson of Francis William Collett who founded the business of F W Collett & Son, General Builders of Upper Slaughter which was established in 1890.  The company in 2011 was being managed by John and his brother Peter, together with their father Tony Collett, in premises at Lower Farm Workshop, Upper Slaughter near Cheltenham, from where it is carries out property maintenance and repairs.

 

 

 

2P9

Francis George Brain Collett

Born in 1894 at Upper Slaughter

 

2P10

Marjorie Katherine Collett

Born in 1896 at Upper Slaughter

 

2P11

Frederick Holt Collett

Born in 1898 at Upper Slaughter

 

2P12

Violet Mary Collett                    twin

Born in 1900 at Upper Slaughter

 

2P13

Dorothy Elizabeth Collett         twin

Born in 1900 at Upper Slaughter

 

 

 

 

2O11

Jane Elizabeth Collett (previously Ref. 2o2 in Guiting Power appendix) was baptised at Guiting Power on 8th February 1852, the eldest child of George Collett and his second wife Ann.  She was nine years old in 1861 and, following the death of her father in 1868, no record of Jane has been found in 1871.  However, in the next census of 1881, she was 28 years of age, unmarried, and working as a domestic housemaid employed by Henry E Bayley and his family.  Jane E Collett from Guiting Power was living with the family at 17 Lansdown Place in Cheltenham, Henry Bayley MA being a clergyman and master at the college in the town.  It is now known that Jane Elizabeth Collett later married Tom Lanchbury, the eldest son of Job Lanchbury, to whom her mother was married in 1875 following the earlier death of Jane’s father.

 

 

 

 

2O12

Emily Collett (previously Ref. 2o3 in Guiting Power appendix) was baptised at Guiting Power on 4th September 1853, the daughter of George and Ann Collett.  She was seven years of age in the Guiting census of 1861 and was fourteen when her father passed away.  Like her older sister Jane (above) Emily has not been identified in the census of 1871, while after a further ten years Emily Collett from Guiting power was 26 and a domestic servant at 12 York Terrace in Cheltenham.  It is interesting that Helen M Collett, aged 24 and also from Guiting Power, was living not far away at 9 York Terrace, where she was employed as a domestic servant at the home of widow Christiana Hope, age 63 and from London.  Helen’s younger brother was Thomas Collett who was another at Guiting Power who was a non-domestic groom in 1881 when he was 23, unmarried, and lodging at 2 Northfield Terrace in Cheltenham, the home of 72 years old groom James Grant from London.

 

 

 

 

2O13

George Edward Collett (previously Ref. 2o4 in Guiting Power appendix) was baptised at Guiting Power on 6th May 1855, the third child and eldest son of George and Ann Collett.  George E Collett was six years old at the time of the Winchcombe & Guiting census of 1861 when he was living there with his family, while attending the village school.  Upon leaving school George moved out of the family home in Guiting Power and, in 1871 at the age of 16, he was a servant at the home of Mr Reeks, a butcher, on the High Street in nearby Winchcombe, not far from his widowed mother, following the death of his father, a butcher, in 1868.  It is not clear where George was at the time of the census in 1881, but it is established that he married Eliza Breakwell from Birmingham on 28th January 1877 at St Paul’s Church near Balsall Heath.  Eliza was the daughter of an iron bedstead manufacturer and lived within the same Balsall Heath area of Birmingham where George had his butcher’s shop at 291 Moseley Road.  The butcher’s shop was managed by George up until 1891 and also had Moorcroft Farm between the years of 1886 and 1891.

 

 

 

By 1881 Eliza had already given birth to the couple’s first child and over the following fifteen years a further eight children were added to the family, although two of them suffered infant deaths.  The first seven children were all born while the family was living at 291 Moseley Road in Balsall Heath, where Edward had a butchers shop, and it was there that the family was living in 1891.  It was also around that time when Edward became a tenant of Moorcroft Farm in Moseley.  The census that year confirmed the family as George E Collett who was 36, Eliza Collett who was 38, and their daughters Harriet M Collett who was 11, Eva R Collett who was 10, Una M Collett who was six, Jesse Collett who was five and Flora D Collett who was under one year old.

 

 

 

Later that same year, during the month of September, that the family moved to Parkfield House, a farm in Coughton, between Studley and Alcester, within the parish of Sambourne, when Edward became a tenant farmer of the Throckmorton family.  It was also at Coughton that the couple’s last two children were born and where the family was recorded in the census of 1901.  George Edward Collett was a farmer aged 47 from Guiting, his wife Eliza Collett was 49 and from Birmingham and their six surviving children were listed as Harriet May Collett who was 21, Eva R Collett who was 19, Una M Collett who was 16, Flora D Collett who was 10, Winifred Collett who was seven and Otto Collett who was six years old.  The family was again living at Coughton on the occasion of the next census in April 1911, when curiously the place of birth of the two youngest children was then recorded as having taken place at Sambourne.

 

 

 

Over the years that followed, George’s three eldest daughters left the family home, to be married.  According to the April census of 1911 George Edward Collett, age 56, had living with him, his wife Eliza, age 59, his daughters Flora Dorothy Collett, age 20, and Winifred Collett, age 17, and his son Otto Collett who was 16.  George Edward Collett of Coughton, a farmer, died on the 14th February 1920, after which his Will was proved at Birmingham on 26th March 1920 when the following gentlemen were named as executors of his estate amounting to £6,264 15 Shillings 6d.  They were his sons Jesse Collett and Otto Collett, and his sons-in-law Ernest Johnson and William Green.  All four were described as farmers.  At the time of the death of her husband Eliza Collett nee Breakwell was described as the tenant of Parkfield House.  George Edward Collett and his wife Eliza Collett nee Breakwell are both buried in the family vault at St Marys Church in Moseley, along with their two infant daughters and Eve Reletta Collett, the only grown up daughter not to marry.

 

 

 

2P14

Harriet May Collett

Born in 1879 at Balsall Heath, Birmingham

 

2P15

Eva Reletta Collett – died in 1968

Born in 1881 at Balsall Heath, Birmingham

 

2P16

Una Marie Collett

Born in 1884 at Balsall Heath, Birmingham

 

2P17

Jesse Collett

Born in 1885 at Balsall Heath, Birmingham

 

2P18

Ida Collett – infant death

Born in 1887 at Balsall Heath, Birmingham

 

2P19

Ivy Collett – infant death at 10 months

Born in 1888 at Balsall Heath, Birmingham

 

2P20

Flora Dorothy Collett

Born in 1890 at Balsall Heath, Birmingham

 

2P21

Winifred Collett

Born in 1893 at Coughton, Warws

 

2P22

Otto Collett

Born in 1894 at Coughton, Warws

 

 

 

 

2O14

John William Collett was baptised at Guiting Power on 15th February 1857, a son of George and Ann Collett.  It was a John W Collett that he was recorded in the census returns for both 1861 and 1871, when he was four years old and 14 years of age respectively.  He later married Agnes from Cardiff who was born in 1860 and with whom he had two daughters.  After the birth of their first child John and Agnes were living within the parish of Henbury in the Barton Regis area of Bristol in 1891.  For some reason, in the census that year, the head of the household referred to himself as William Collett who was 33, his wife Agnes was 32, and their daughter of the same name was five.  Ten years later the family of four was residing at Abbots Leigh in Somerset to the west of Bristol, where John W Collett was 44, Agnes L Collett was 31, Agnes E Collett was 15 and Helen G Collett was seven years old.  It would appear that during the next decade John William Collett, most likely after 1909, while his eldest daughter was married by 1911.  So in the census that year it was just John’s widow Agnes Collett, aged 51, and her daughter Helen Collett, aged 17, who were listed as living within the village of Chew Magna, Somerset, to the south of Bristol.

 

 

 

2P23

Agnes E Collett

Born in 1866 at Henbury, Bristol

 

2P24

Helen G Collett

Born in 1894 at Abbots Leigh, Somerset

 

 

 

 

2O17

James Frederick Collett was baptised at Guiting Power on 18th October 1863, the youngest son of George Collett and his second wife Ann Butler.  He was five years old when his father died, and was 12 years of age when his widowed mother re-married.  In between times James F Collett was seven years old in the Guiting Power census of 1871 when he was living there with his mother and four of his siblings.  Tragically James Frederick Collett was only 14 years of age when he died on 7th June 1877, suggesting that he was born around June 1863.

 

 

 

 

2O24

WILLIAM COLLETT was born at Bibury and was baptised at Arlington on 13th July 1834 and his age was confirmed as being six years in the Bibury census of 1841.  By 1851 the family had left Bibury and no record of William’s whereabouts has so far been found.  After a further ten years it is established that William was out of the country and that he was an Able Seaman with the Royal Navy and fought in the China Wars of 1861 on board HMS Chesapeake.  He was awarded the China Medal and later became a merchant sea captain.

 

 

 

He married Caroline Ruth Watts on 19th April 1866 at St Matthews Church in Coates near Cirencester.  The parish register described him as ‘William Collett seaman, son of William Collett labourer’.  Once married the couple headed for Swindon where there was the promise of work and accommodation.  William held the post of Chief Fireman with the Great Western Railway from 1869-1879 and all of the children of his marriage to Caroline Ruth were born in Swindon.

 

 

 

The Swindon census of 1871 placed William and Caroline as living at 22 Cromwell Street the home of GWR engine fitter William Hardiman 26 and his wife Louisa 25 and their daughter Georgina who was three.  William was described as being 34 and from Bibury, who was working as a labourer with the GWR.  Caroline was 22 and from Minchinhampton, and with the couple was their first born child William J Collett who was one year old and born at Swindon.  It is possible that shortly after that when William Hardiman and his family moved out of the house, since the GWR Staff Records indicate that the Collett occupied the premises up to 1875, following which William and his growing family moved to 16 Exeter Street.

 

 

 

Five years later in 1880 William’s poor health forced him to give up the Chief Fireman’s job, at which time he became Swimming Baths Manager and was listed as such in the North Wiltshire Kelly’s Directory for 1880.  His change of job also coincided with the family moving to 7 Bath Street in 1880, as confirmed in the Swindon census of 1881.  The census return listed William as 45 and a labourer at the G W R Works E & M.  Caroline his wife was eleven years younger and of Minchinhampton.  All of their children up to that date were listed with them, but tragically three-month old twin daughter Ella Collett died shortly after the census day on the third April that same year.

 

 

 

Included in the Great Western Railway records at Kew is a document dated 03.04.1881 that shows the rent for 7 Bath Street, which comprised just four rooms, was £13 a year or 5 shillings per week.  Despite the cramped living conditions the family still found space for a lodger.  He was unmarried iron works labourer William Pickett 37 of Hilmarton in Wiltshire who was listed in the 1881 census as a boarder.  And so it was that just over seven years later on 24th August 1888 William Collett died at his home at 7 Bath Street in Swindon.  He was 54 and the cause of death was recorded as pneumonia.  With the passing of her husband and some of the older children leaving the family home to make their own way in the world, it would appear that Caroline Ruth Collett was forced to accept another GWR family into her small home, as confirmed by the Swindon census of 1891.

 

 

 

Caroline was 42 and from Stroud and she was making ends meet by working for the GWR as a needle woman.  Living with her at 7 Bath Street were six of her eleven children, plus the new family of GWR general labourer William Harris 28, his wife Sarah 25 and their four months old son William.  Caroline’s children at that time were daughter Caroline R Collett, age 14, and sons Harry J Collett, age 12, Arthur S A Collett, who was eight, ‘Morris’ E Collett, who was six, Percy E Collett, who was four, and Mervyn F M Collett who was three years old.  So far no trace of her daughter Nellie has been found, even though she would have been 10 years of age, and was back living with the family in 1901.

 

 

 

Six different children were still living with Caroline ten years later in March 1901, Arthur having been replaced by Nellie.  By that time the widow Caroline Collett of Stroud was 52 and was no longer employed by the Great Western Railway.   However, she was permitted to continue to reside in the tied house due to the fact that three of her sons were then working for the company.  Of the six children still living at 7 Bath Street, only Caroline’s youngest Mervyn was not in employment, he being only 13 and still attending the GWR Institute School.  The other five children on that occasion were Caroline, age 24, Harry, age 22, Nellie, age 20, Maurice who was 16, and Percy who was 14.

 

 

 

Also living with the family was Caroline’s eldest daughter Elizabeth, who was 27, and her husband Frederick H Taylor and their eleven-months old baby William F H Taylor.  7 Bath Street was subsequently renamed 7 Bathampton Street shortly after the census day and the terraced house was eventually taken over in 1909 by William’s and Caroline’s son Harry James Collett and his wife Alice Louisa Collett (Ref. 1P37), ensuring that it stayed with the Collett family until 1959 when the widowed Alice finally moved out.

 

 

 

By April 1911 Bath Street in New Town Swindon, or the Railway Village as it was often called, was listed as Bathampton Street, while Caroline was no longer living at number seven.  Instead it was occupied by her son Harry, his wife, and their first child who was sixteen months old.  Caroline on the other hand had moved in with her married son Maurice and his young family at 14 Stanier Street in Swindon.  The census return simply listed her as Caroline Collett, mother of Maurice, age 63 and born at Minchinhampton.

 

 

 

Three years later, sometime during 1914, Maurice’s work took him to Lancashire, at which time Caroline went to live with her married daughter Elizabeth Taylor at 13 Morse Street in Swindon.  And it was there, six months before her eightieth birthday that Caroline Ruth Collett nee Watts died on 29th January 1929.  A photograph that was taken on the day of her funeral includes all of the nine children of her marriage to William Collett that were still alive on that day.

 

 

 

Caroline Ruth Watts (Ref. 10O3 Watts) was born on 9th August 1848 at Box near Minchinhampton in Gloucestershire.  She was the daughter of John Watts and Mary Ann Pitt.  She married 32-years old William Collett when she was only 17 years of age and against the wishes of her father, her mother having died in childbirth before Caroline had reached her second birthday.

 

Her father’s objection to Caroline’s marriage to William may not have been on the grounds of the age difference, since John Watt had been twenty years older than his wife.  It was more likely to do with the type of person that William Collett was.  William and Caroline must have lied about her age when they presented themselves to be married at Coates near Cirencester on 19th April 1866 in order for the ceremony to proceed.

 

 

 

On the marriage certificate Caroline’s age was given as 19 years, when in reality she was still only seventeen.  As a result of her marriage to William, her father subsequently disowned her.  The couple’s marriage certificate described Caroline’s father as a soldier, the witnesses to which were recorded as Henry Harvey, who made a mark, and Hannah Latham.  Hannah was very likely William’s sister Hannah Collett (below) who was known to be married by then.  It is also likely that the wedding would have been attended by William’s parents who were recorded as living in Coates at that time.

 

 

 

Caroline’s mother tragically died giving birth to her sister, Eliza Ann Watts (Ref. 10O4 Watts) on 24th June 1850.  Curiously in the Box census of 1851 Caroline was not listed as living with her father and her sister even though she would have only been three years old.  On 14th October 1851 John Watts was married for a second time when he wed Mrs Mary Burnell.  He died at Minchinhampton on 15th June 1866 aged 67, less than two months after disowning Caroline. 

 

 

 

John Watts’ second daughter Eliza Ann (Ref. 10O4 Watts) married Joseph Henry Gardiner on 22nd September 1873 and the couple emigrated to the United States of America.  As Eliza Ann Gardiner she died at Vernal in Utah on 6th August 1935, and it was Eliza and Joseph who created the family line of Jean Rogers (Ref. 10R2 Watts) of Salt Lake City in Utah.

 

 

 

Further details of the Watts family are provided in Part 10 – Other Branch Lines

 

 

 

A story told by Caroline Ruth Collett to her eldest granddaughter Ella Agnes (Nell) Collett (Ref. 1Q12) involved her late husband William Collett prior to their marriage when he was in China.  Apparently when he was in Shanghai, he went ashore with a group of ship mates and saw a mandarin with his daughter being paraded through the streets.  It was custom in those days for everyone to lower their heads and not look at the girl.  It was also the custom that the daughter's feet be tightly bound from birth to keep the feet very small and in consequence the daughter would be carried in a sedan-type chair.  Being the man he was, William’s friends dared him to race forward and take one of the shoes off the child, which he did causing a great commotion and angering the locals.  As a result of which the sailors were then chased back to the safety of their ship by Chinese men waving their swords.  To accompany the story, Caroline produced the said slipper shoe to show the young Ella, which was made of a white material and had many jewels attached to it.

 

 

 

2P25

William John Collett

Born in 1870 at Swindon

 

2P26

Albert Henry Collett

Born in 1872 at Swindon

 

2P27

Elizabeth Annie Collett

Born in 1874 at Swindon

 

2P28

Caroline Ruth Collett

Born in 1876 at Swindon

 

2P29

HARRY JAMES COLLETT

Born in 1879 at Swindon

 

2P30

Ella Agnes Collett                    (twin)

Born in 1881 at Swindon

 

2P31

Nellie Winifred Collett              (twin)

Born in 1881 at Swindon

 

2P32

Arthur Stephen Alan Collett

Born in 1882 at Swindon

 

2P33

Maurice Edward Collett

Born in 1885 at Swindon

 

2P34

Percy Ethelbert Collett

Born in 1886 at Swindon

 

2P35

Mervyn Fred Matthew Collett

Born in 1887 at Swindon

 

 

 

 

2O25

Hannah Collett was born at Bibury during January 1838.  Two records have been found that suggest she was baptised on 28th January 1838 and 4th February 1838.  It is therefore possible that the first of those two dates was the day that Hannah was born, the second being her christening date.  She later married Joseph Jervis, the marriage being recorded at Stow-on-the-Wold during the first three months of 1859 when Hannah was 21.

 

 

 

 

2O26

Ruth Collett was born at Bibury and was baptised there on 26th September 1841.  She married Elias Parslow of Newington Bagpath where their first child was born.  The married was registered at Malmesbury in June quarter of 1861.  Only two children’s details are provided below, but there may have been others.  In 1881 Ruth was visiting her mother Hannah Collett at her home in the High Street in Kemble.  With her was her son William Charles Parslow who was three years old and born at Sherston Magna to the west of Malmesbury.  Ruth’s general labourer husband Elias Parslow was at the family home at Back Street in Sherston Magna, and with him there was their eldest son George Edward Parslow, age 18, who was born at Newington Bagpath and who was also working as a general labourer.  Boarding with the family was Elias’ unmarried brother Thomas Parslow, age 38 and also of Newington Bagpath who was also a general labourer like his brother.

 

 

 

 

2O28

William Collett was born in 1842 at Arlington, his birth being recorded at Northleach during the third quarter of 1842.  He was eight years old in the census of 1851 when he was living with his parents, John and Mary Collett, at the Arlington Row home of his grandparents Thomas and Mary Collett.  He continued to live at Bibury where he was 18 in the census of 1861.  He left the family home in Bibury during the next few years and in 1864 he married Hester Mills, probably at nearby Poulton, where she was born in 1846, the marriage being recorded at Cirencester in the September quarter of that year. 

 

 

 

By 1871 the marriage had produced two children for the couple who were then living within the Cirencester area which included Poulton where their first child was born, and Arlington where the second child had been born.  The census return that year listed the family as William, age 28, his wife Esther, age 24, and their daughters Ann Collett, who was six, and Martha Ellen Collett who was three years old.

 

 

 

Three more children were added to the family during the next decade and they were born at Shorncote and Kemble, both just south of Cirencester, and at Rodborough near Stroud, where the family was living in April 1881.  William’s occupation as a carter seems to have resulted in the family moving many times, judging by the different places that his children were born.  According to the census of 1881, William was a 38 years old carter working with horses while living at Dark Mill in Stroud.  Curiously though, William’s place of birth was not stated as being Arlington, but was recorded as Arlingham which lies on the east side of the River Severn south of Gloucester.  The same census also gave Arlingham as the place that his daughter Martha was born.  It is therefore very likely that they were simple errors made by the census enumerator in translation or transcription.

 

 

 

It would appear shortly after the day of the census in 1881 that the family left Stroud and moved to Gloucester where the couple’s next child was born within the following nine months.  Sometime within the next couple of years the family moved again, on that occasion to Brimscombe near Minchinhampton, where their last child was born.  And it was at Brimscombe that the family was living in 1891.  William was 48 and Hester was 44, and by that time the two new members of the family were confirmed as Kate Collett, who was 10 and from Gloucester, and Arthur Collett who was five and of Brimscombe.

 

 

 

Ten years later, just after the start of the next century, the family was still living at Brimscombe and the unmarried children still living with William and Hester were James, age 29, Sarah, age 26, Rose, age 23, Kate, age 21, and Arthur who was 15.  At that time William was 58 and was confirmed as having been born at Bibury, while his wife was referred to as Esther, age 55, who had been born at Poulton.  William’s occupation was given as a factory yard horse keeper.  It was just eighteen months later, as Esther Collett, that William’s wife’s death was recorded at Stroud during the September quarter of 1902, when she was 56.  William Collett survived his wife by nearly six years when his death was registered at Stroud during the second quarter of 1908 when he was 66

 

 

 

2P36

Ann M E Collett

Born in 1865 at Poulton

 

2P37

Martha Ellen Collett

Born in 1868 at Bibury

 

2P38

James Collett

Born in 1872 at Shorncote

 

2P39

Sarah Collett

Born in 1875 at Kemble

 

2P40

Rose Anna Collett

Born in 1878 at Rodborough

 

2P41

Kate M Collett

Born in 1881 at Gloucester

 

2P42

Arthur Collett

Born in 1885 at Brimscombe

 

 

 

 

2O30

William Collett was born at Withington in 1864, the second son of Joseph Collett and his wife Eliza Porter, and his birth was recorded at Northleach register office (Ref. 6a 376) during the first quarter of that year.  It would appear that he lived for the majority of his life in the hamlet of Foxcote within the parish of Withington, not far from Dowdeswell and Kilkenny where he later lived.  In 1871 he was seven, and was 16 and a farmer’s boy in the Foxcote census of 1881, by which time his father had died.  William was twenty-two when he married Emma Eliza Messenger in 1886, the event being recorded at Northleach (Ref. 6a 683) during the June quarter of the year.  Emma, who was twenty years of age, had presented William with four children by 1891.

 

 

 

The census that year listed the family as William, who was 26, Emma Elizabeth, who was 24, Ellen Louisa Collett, who was six, Emily Jane Collett, who was four, Ernest William Collett, who was two, and Constance Beatrice who was not yet one year old.  Living with the family was William’s widowed mother Eliza Collett.  All members of the household were confirmed as having been born at Withington.

 

 

 

It was a similar situation ten years later, although by then William Collett was a farmer at Cranham village near Coopers Hill within the Stroud registration district.  The census of 1901 provided an indication that after 1891 William and his family first moved to Dowdeswell, to the east of Cheltenham, where the couple’s last child was born at Kilkenny, before they arrived at Cranham.  Also by 1901 the couple’s two eldest daughters were not living with the family which comprised William, age 37, Emma Elizabeth, age 35, Ernest William, age 12, Constance Beatrice, age 10, and Horace F C Collett who was four.  The two eldest daughters were absent from the family home on the day of the census in 1901, the elder daughter not being positively identified.  However, Emily Collett from Withington, was 14 and was a general servant at a home within the Brockworth area near Coopers Hill and so not very far away from her parents.

 

 

 

Three and a half years later, during the first ten days of October in 1904 Emma Elizabeth Collett of Eddles Mill (Cranham) aged 39, suffered a premature death, and it was at Cranham where she was buried on 11th October 1904.  As a result of his loss it would appear that William was unable to continue to look after his children, some of whom have not been located thereafter.  Instead widower William subsequently moved in with the family of his brother-in-law Charles Messenger at Withington, where he was recorded in the April census of 1911.  William Collett from Withington was 47 and a farmer labourer, staying with Charles and Florence Messenger and their baby daughter Annie Elizabeth Messenger aged one year.  Also staying at that same address with William’s mother Eliza Collett aged 77.  On that same day William’s eldest daughter Ellen was married and living in Charlton Kings, second daughter Emily unmarried and was living and working in Cardiff, while unmarried daughter Constance was working in a hospital in Cheltenham.

 

 

 

It was over twenty years later that William Collett died in 1931 at the age of 68, his death being recorded at Northleach (Ref. 6a 457) during the second quarter of that year.  His widow Emma had been born in Gloucestershire in 1867, her birth being recorded at Northleach during the June quarter of that year (Ref. 6a 376).  She survived William by just over eleven years, when she died during the last three months of 1942 at Bromley in Kent (Ref. 2a 929) at the age of 75.

 

 

 

2P43

Ellen Louisa Messenger Collett

Born in 1885 at Foxcote, nr Withington

 

2P44

Emily Jane Collett

Born in 1887 at Foxcote, nr Withington

 

2P45

Ernest William Collett

Born in 1889 at Foxcote, nr Withington

 

2P46

Constance Beatrice Collett

Born in 1891 at Foxcote, nr Withington

 

2P47

Horace Frank C Collett

Born in 1896 at Kilkenny, Dowdeswell

 

 

 

 

2O31

Henry Joseph Collett was born at Withington in 1870, the son of Joseph and Eliza Collett.  He was under one year old in 1871 and was 10 years old in the Withington census of 1881 when he and his family were residing in Foxcote.  Henry then is missing from the next two census records in 1891 and 1901.  However, by 1911 Henry Collett, age 40 and from Withington, was unmarried and was living alone at Foxcote in Withington.

 

 

 

 

2O32

Jesse Collett was born at Withington in 1873, the son of Joseph and Eliza Collett.  He was seven years old in the census of 1881 when he was living at Foxcote with his widowed mother and the rest of his family.  Tragically he died within a few months of the census when his death was registered at Northleach during the third quarter of 1881.

 

 

 

 

2O33

George H Collett was born at Withington in 1876, the youngest of the five sons of Joseph Collett and Eliza Porter.  Around the time he was born, or shortly thereafter, his father died and so by 1881 George was four years old and living at Foxcote in Withington with his widowed mother and three of his older brothers.  It was as George H Collett, age 14, that he was living and working within Northleach & Bibury registration district, not far from his mother at Withington within the Northleach & Chedworth area.  Like other members of his family, his whereabouts after that time has not been revealed.

 

 

 

 

2O34

Samuel George Collett was born at Guiting Power in 1844, the eldest known child of baker John Collett and his wife Elizabeth Smith, his birth being recorded at Winchcombe during the last three months of 1844 under the name of Samuel George Collett.  He was recorded simply as Samuel Collett age six years within the Winchcombe & Guiting census of 1851, and ten years later in the census of 1861 he was recorded as Samuel George Collett who was 16.  By 1871 Samuel and his parents had moved to Naunton and were living at The Mill.  Samuel was unmarried at the age of 26 and was still a bachelor ten years later in 1881.  By that time his mother had died and Samuel, at the age of 36, was still living at The Mill with his widowed father when his occupation was that of an assistant overseer working for the local municipal council.

 

 

 

Following the death of his father during the 1880s, Samuel was the only member of the family to remain living in Naunton, where he took over the family baker business.  In the census of 1891 Samuel G Collett of Guiting was 46, and ten years after that, in 1901 he was listed as Samuel George Collett age 56 of Guiting Power who was a bachelor and a baker by trade.  Samuel George Collett died at Dale House in Naunton on 13th August 1905 and on 22nd September 1905 his Will was proved at Gloucester.  That event described him as a baker and a flour dealer, while it was his son Otto John Collett, a miller, and Joseph Thomas Wilkins, a mealman, who were named as the executors of his estate valued at £2,182 17 Shillings 10d.  Otto’s wife was Mary Ann Wilkins, so Joseph was more than likely her brother.

 

 

 

 

2O35

Andrew Collett was born at Guiting Power in 1846, the son of John and Elizabeth Collett, whose birth was recorded at Winchcombe during the December quarter of that year.  By the time of the census in 1851 Andrew was four years old, but he suffered an infant death, when he died the following year, his death being registered at Winchcombe during the second quarter of 1852.

 

 

 

 

2O36

Mary Ann Collett was born at Guiting Power in 1848 and her birth was recorded at the Winchcombe register office (Ref. XI 500) during the third quarter of that year, when her parents were named as John and Elizabeth Collett.  She was three years old in 1851 and it was as Mary Ann Collett that she was recorded in the Guiting census of 1861 when she was living there with her family at the age of 12.  Within the next few months the family moved to Naunton where Mary was 22 in 1871.  It was just over four years later that she married John Fisher, the marriage being recorded at the register office in Stow-on-the-Wold (Ref. 6a 836) during the last three months of 1875.  John was an ironmonger and had been born on the Isle of Wight during the second quarter of 1842 and he may have been related to Walter Chesney Fisher who married Mary Ann’s youngest sister Ada Collett (below).

 

 

 

By the time of the census in 1881 Mary Ann had given birth to three children and all of them born after the couple had settled in Cheltenham.  Their address in the town on that occasion was 34 Winchcombe Street, when John Fisher was 39, Mary Ann Fisher from Lower Guiting was 32, and their three children were John C Fisher, who was four, Ethel A Fisher, who was two, and Frank L Fisher who was one year old.  Living with the family was a distant relative of Mary Ann Fisher, he being Thomas Collett, age 19 and from Lower Slaughter, who was working with her husband as an apprentice ironmonger.  In addition to a visitor, spinster Elizabeth Pullen aged 27 and from Bristol, the household was supported by two general domestic servants.  They were Mary Ann Smith from Corsham in Wiltshire who was 23, and Caroline Morris from Cheltenham who was 14.

 

 

 

In total Mary Ann presented John with seven children while they were living in Cheltenham, of which six of them were recorded with the couple in the Cheltenham census of 1891.  By that time the family comprised John Fisher, age 49, Mary A Fisher, age 42, John C Fisher, age 14, Ethel A Fisher, age 12, Frank L Fisher, age 11, Harold C Fisher, who was six, Bernard N Fisher, who was four, and Edgar Fisher who was two years old.  Tragically John senior died just twelve months later when Mary Ann was expecting their seventh child, which was born a few months later.  John Fisher was 50 and his death was recorded at the Cheltenham register office (Ref. 6a 370) during the first three months of 1892.

 

 

 

The Cheltenham census return for 1901 confirmed that Mary Ann Fisher was a widow of 52 from Naunton, and that she and her two eldest sons had taken over her late husband’s ironmonger business.  Her eldest daughter had no named occupation and was therefore most likely looking after the younger children.  The children were recorded as John, Ethel, Frank, Harold, Bernard V Fisher, Edgar R Fisher, and Mary E Fisher who was eight.  After a further ten years only three of her children were still living with Mary Ann, age 62, in April 1911 and they were Harold who was 26, Bernard who was 24, and Mary E Fisher who was 18.  It was nearly seven years later that Mary Ann Fisher nee Collett died at Cheltenham at the age of 69, where her death was recorded during the last three months of 1917 (Ref. 6a 492).

 

 

 

The details of the first three Cheltenham born children of Mary Ann Collett and John Fisher are as follows.  The birth of John Charles Fisher was recorded during the last quarter of 1876 (Ref. 6a 439), and it was there also that his death was recorded in the 1944 (Ref. 6a 494) at the age of 67.  It seems likely that he married Dora Berriman from Swindon at Northleach in 1906, hence his absence from the family home in 1911.  Dora passed away at Cheltenham in 1972 (Ref. 7a 688).  Their marriage produce just one child, Kenneth John Fisher who was born at Cheltenham in the 1908, who also died there in 1996.  It was during the third quarter of 1938 that he married Beryl D Pearman at Cheltenham.

 

 

 

The birth of Ethel Alberta Fisher was recorded during the second quarter of 1878 (Ref. 6a 458), where she also died in 1951 (Ref. 7b 329) when she was 73.  It was in 1902 at Cheltenham that she married John Moffat Robb (Ref. 6a 917) an electrical engineer who had been born at Dunoon in Argyllshire, Scotland in 1877.  John died at Cheltenham in 1925 (Ref. 6a 572) at the age of 48.  Their marriage produced three children, William A Robb, and twins James Moffat Robb and Agnes Moffat Robb.

 

 

 

The birth of Frank Lionel Fisher was recorded during the first three months of 1880 (Ref. 6a 452).  He was a traveller and he died at Bath in 1950 (Ref. 7c 23) at the age of 70.  It is understood that he married Rosina Margaret J Keen who was born in Cheltenham in 1879 and who died in Bristol during 1952 (Ref. 7b 89) when she was 75.  They had one son, Hubert Lyndon Fisher who was born at Croydon in Surrey (Ref. 2a 245) in the last three months of 1905.

 

 

 

 

2O37

Elizabeth Collett was born at Guiting Power in 1850, the daughter John and Elizabeth Collett.  In the census of 1851 she was still under one year old.  It is curious that in 1861 Elizabeth Collet (sic), age 10 years and from Guiting, was living with a family in the Chipping Norton area of Oxfordshire.  No record of her at all has been found within the census of 1871, although it is known that she returned home to Naunton to look after her father, following the death of her mother at the start of that year.  That situation was confirmed in the census of 1881, when she was living with him at The Mill in Naunton, together with other members of her family.  Unmarried housekeeper Elizabeth Collett was 30 and her place of birth was given as Guiting.  No record of Elizabeth Collett has been found after that time, so it is possible that she was married during the 1880s.

 

 

 

 

2O38

Otto John Collett was born at Guiting Power in 1852, the son of John and Elizabeth Collett, and was eight years old in 1861.  During the next decade his family left Guiting when they took over residency of The Mill in Naunton, where in 1871 Otto Collett was 18.  Ten years later, and after the death of his mother, Otto was a bachelor of 28 years when he was still living at The Mill with his father and his other siblings.  His occupation at that time was that of a cattle dealer.

 

 

 

Just prior to the next census in 1891 Otto married Mary Ann Wilkins during the September quarter of 1890, the event being recorded at Stow-on-the-Wold.  Mary Ann was more commonly known as Ann, but was named as May Ann Wilkins in the marriage register.  She was the daughter of Sarah Wilkins who in 1881 was described as a widow and a retired grocer and baker at the grocers shop on the High Street in Bourton-on-the-Water.  Living there with her was her daughter Ann Wilkins who was 29, who was working as a clerk and a tradesman on that occasion.

 

 

 

According to the census in 1891 Otto and Ann were living at Nether Swell near Stow-on-the-Wold.  Otto John Collett from Guiting was 38, while his wife Ann M Collett from Bourton-on-the-Water was 39.  It is possible that Ann was expecting the couple’s first child on the day of the census, since their daughter was born during that same year.

 

 

 

The couple were still living at Hyde Mill in Nether Swell when their second child was born two years later, but sometime after that, the family moved to Maugersbury just south of Stow.  And it was there that the family was living in March 1901.  The Maugersbury census that year recorded the family as Otto John Collett, who was 48 and a miller and a farmer, his wife Ann Mary who was 49 and their two children Kathleen Ellen Collett who was nine, and George Otto Collett who was seven years old.  At the time of the proving of the Will of his brother Samuel George Collett (above) in September 1905 Otto John Collett, executor, was described as a miller.  The second executor was named as Joseph Thomas Wilkins, a mealman, who was most likely Otto’s brother-in-law.

 

 

 

Tragically Otto John Collett died during the first three months of 1910 when he was only 57.  As a result of his passing by April 1911 his widow was still living at Maugersbury with her two children.  The census return listed the three of them as Ann Mary Collett of Bourton who was 59, her daughter Kathleen Helen Wilkins Collett who was 19, and her son George Otto Wilkins Collett who was 17.  It was twelve years after that when Mary Ann Collett nee Wilkins died, her death being recorded at Northleach during final three months of 1923 at the age of 72.  Curiously her birth was not recorded at Bourton-on-the-Water, her given place of birth in various census returns, but was registered at Tetbury during the third quarter of 1852.

 

 

 

2P48

Kathleen Helen Wilkins Collett

Born in 1891 at Hyde Mill, Swell

 

2P49

George Otto Wilkins Collett

Born in 1893 at Hyde Mill, Swell

 

 

 

 

2O39

Emily Collett was born at Guiting Power in 1854, the daughter John and Elizabeth Collett.  Emily was six years old in the census of 1861 and ten years later Emily Collett, age 16 and from Guiting, was working as an assistant in a tailor’s shop in the Market Place in Stow-on-the-Wold in 1871.  That was not just any tailor’s shop, but the premises of master tailor and draper William Walton of Longborough and his wife Anne Walton, formerly Anne Collett (Ref. 2N27) of Somerford Keynes, the sister of Emily’s father John Collett.  Emily was therefore described as the niece to the head of the house William Walton.  Also living with the Walton family at that time was Thomas Collett (Ref. 2N6), who was nine and from Slaughter, the only known son of Joseph and Eliza Collett.  Thomas was very likely attending the school in Stow and was described as nephew to head of the household William Walton.

 

 

 

By the time of the next census in 1881 Emily Collett, age 26 and an unmarried domestic servant from Guiting, was living and working at 12 York Terrace in Cheltenham, the home of retired merchant navy seaman Henry M Simpson from Edinburgh and his Irish wife Elizabeth.  See Appendix One at the end of the first section of Part 2 for two other Colletts from Guiting Power who were living and working in Cheltenham, one of them just a few doors away at 9 York Terrace.  That was Helen M Collett who was 24.

 

 

 

 

2O40

Eva Alberta Collett was born at Guiting Power in 1857, the daughter John and Elizabeth Collett, with her birth being recorded at Winchcombe during the third quarter of that year.  Whenever happened to her after she was born has not been discovered, except that she and two of her sisters, Elizabeth and Eliza, were missing from the family at the time of the 1861, and in 1871 Eva Collett, age 14, was working with a family at Shipston-on-Stour in Warwickshire.  However, it is established that she married Joseph William Millis at Stow-on-the-Wold during the June quarter of 1880, Joseph having been born at Bristol in 1858.  So by the time of the census in April of the following year the childless couple was living on Holyhead Road in the St Michael district of Coventry, when Eva A Mills of Guiting was 24 and her husband Joseph W Mills from Bristol was 22.

 

 

 

Joseph Mills would appear to have come from a wealthy family, since he was a printer and stationer, employing eight hands at his printing works.  At the couple’s home they also employed a general domestic servant, that being Mary Bull who was 17 and from Coventry.  Further confirmation that Eva Mills was the daughter of John and Elizabeth Collett was the fact that living with them in 1881 was Eva’s sister Henrietta Collett (below) from Naunton, who was described as sister-in-law to head of the household Joseph Mills.

 

 

 

Two years later Eva Mills presented her husband with a son George Tom Mills, but rather strangely no record of Eva, Joseph or George Tom has been located in 1891.  By March 1901 Joseph and his son were both recorded as living in Coventry.  Joseph Williams Mills was 42 and from Bristol, and his occupation was that of an advertising contractor.  Possibly working with him as a clerk was his son George Tom Mills of Coventry who was 18.

 

 

 

Why Eva was not listed with her husband and son in Coventry is not known.  What is known for sure is that on that same day in March 1901 Eva Alberta Mills, age 43 and from Naunton (sic), was described as a printer while being recorded at Lower Slaughter.  Perhaps she was only temporarily visiting family relatives in Gloucestershire, because by 1907 she was once again in Coventry, where she died during the September quarter of that year.  As a result of the death of his wife at the age of 50, widower Joseph Williams Mills, age 52, and his son George Tom Mills, who was 28, were still living in Coventry in April 1911.  Just over twenty years later Joseph William Mills died at Coventry at the end of 1932 when he was 74.

 

 

 

 

2O41

Eliza M Collett was born at Guiting Power in 1859 and was the last child of John and Elizabeth Collett to be born there before the family moved to Naunton.  Although missing from the family in 1861 and 1871 like her sisters Elizabeth and Eva (above), Eliza M Collett of Guiting was living at The Mill in Naunton with her widowed father in 1881 when she was 22.  It is reasonable to assume that Eliza was married sometime during the following years, since no further record of her as Eliza Collett has been found.

 

 

 

 

2O42

Henrietta Collett was born at The Mill in Naunton during 1861, but after the seventh of April that year, and it is very likely that her mother Elizabeth Collett was with-child on the day of the Naunton census, following the family’s earlier move there from Guiting Power.  The census ten years later in 1871 confirmed the family was living at The Mill in Naunton where Henrietta was 10 years old.  Upon leaving school, it would appear that Henrietta left Gloucestershire to join her married sister Eva (above) in Coventry.  The 1881 Census for Coventry listed Henrietta Collett from Naunton as being 20 years old, with no occupation, and living at Holyhead Road with her sister Eva Mills and her husband Joseph.

 

 

 

 

2O43

Ada Collett was born at Naunton in 1863, the youngest daughter of John and Elizabeth Collett.  She was just a few years old when her mother died, leaving her to be looked after by her father and her older sister Elizabeth at The Mill in Naunton where she was 17 years old in 1881.  Six years later, during 1887, she married Walter Chesney Fisher who was born at Quinton in 1858, the son of farmer William Wadams Fisher and his wife Mary Ann Marshall.  It is interesting that Ada’s eldest sister Mary Ann Collett (above) married John Fisher in 1875.  By 1891 Ada and Walter had two children who were both born at Quinton in Gloucestershire.

 

 

 

No further children were added to the family over the following decade, and by March 1901 the family had settled in the Grafton district of Stratford-on-Avon.  Walter Fisher, age 42, was a farmer, his wife Ada from Naunton was 37, and their two children were Edith Ada Fisher, who was 12, and Walter Chesney Fisher who was 11.  The same family of four was still living in Grafton ten years later in April 1911 when Walter was 52, Ada was 47, Edith was 22, and Walter was 21.  Sometime later Ada died following which Walter married Mary Ashby.  Walter Fisher eventually passed away on 4th August 1945 at the age of 87.

 

 

 

 

2O45

Thomas Samuel Collett was born at Aldsworth in 1853, barely nine months after his parents were married there.  It was also at Aldsworth where he was baptised on 1st September 1853, the eldest of the four children of Thomas Cook Collett and Minvera Stone, and tragically it was there to that he died during 1861.

 

 

 

 

2O48

Ann Amelia Collett was born at Aldsworth during January 1861, the youngest of the four children of Thomas Cook Collett and Minvera Stone.  Her death before her second birth may have been the result of an illness which also claimed the life of her older brother Thomas (above) during the year of her birth.  It was at Aldsworth that Ann Amelia Collett was buried on 23rd December 1862

 

 

 

 

2O49

Amelia Catherine Collett was born on 17th May 1835 at 60 Mortimer Street in Cavendish Square in London, but died during the following month at St John’s Wood.

 

 

 

 

2O50

Henry John Richard Collett was born on 17th November 1838 at King Street in Westminster but was baptised at Meysey Hampton near Fairford nearly three years later on 3rd October 1841.  He married Jane Johnson Thomas at Hanover Chapel in Peckham on 23rd December 1862 and their full story is told in Part 51.

 

 

 

For the continuation of this family go to

Part 51 – Descendents of The Gloucestershire Line

 

 

 

 

2O51

Frederick William Collett was born on 3rd September 1840 at 47 Basinghall Street in London.  A month later he was baptised at Meysey Hampton on 3rd October 1841.  Tragically he died shortly after, on 30th April 1842 while at 17 Nelson Square in Southwark and was buried in Norwood Cemetery.

 

 

 

 

2O52

Arthur James Collett was born on 13th April 1842 at 17 Nelson Square in Southwark.  He became a chartered accountant and served as a member of Collett & Company (Camden Town), the company established by his youngest brother Mawbey Ernest Collett in 1879.  It was on 9th March 1868 that he married (1) Harriet Amelia Brittain at the Claremont Chapel in Pentonville Road.  Harriet was of Carlton Square on the Old Kent Road and was the daughter of an officer who had served with Admiral Lord Nelson at the time he was killed.  Arthur appears to have been married three times during his life.  This stems from the known facts that he first married Harriet of London and then by the time of the census in 1891 he was married to Rosetta.  Seven years later he married the much younger Harriet from Daventry in Northamptonshire, as confirmed in the next two census returns of 1901 and 1911 which stated Arthur and Harriet had been married for 10 years.  Therefore there is a strong possibility that the first Harriet died in Canada and that it was her death which resulted in the family returning to England.

 

 

 

At the time of his wedding to Harriet Amelia Britten, Arthur was living at 10 Sidmouth Street, Grays Inn Road in London.  Living just a few doors along Sidmouth Street at No. 6 were Arthur’s parents Henry and Amelia Collett.  On the occasion of the birth of the couple’s first child, Arthur was working as a grocer and tea dealer while living with Harriet Amelia at 28 Compton Street in St Pancras.  Shortly after the birth of the child, Arthur and Harriet sailed to Canada, followed five years later by his younger brother Alfred (below).  The 1871 Census for Ontario confirmed that Arthur and Harriet were living at Parry Sound with their two sons William and Francis (born there), and that Arthur was a farmer by then.

 

 

 

The extended family was still living at Parry Sound ten years later where their next four children had been born.  However, in 1883 they returned to England when the farmland owned and worked by Arthur was subsequently passed to his brother Alfred.  Upon their return to England Arthur must have married (2) Rosetta with whom he had two further children who were born at Kentish Town.  In 1891 the family was residing at 59 Willes Road in Kentish Town where the two youngest children had been born.  According to the census that year the family comprised Arthur who was 48, his wife who was 45 and listed as Rosetta Collett, and their two children Rose who was seven and Samuel (Cecil) who was five years old.  Also living with the family was two of Arthur’s children from his first marriage, and they were Francis Collett age 20 and Eliza (Eleanor) Collett who was 13.

 

 

 

Seven years later in 1898 Arthur and Rosetta moved to 70 Constantine Road in Hampstead where, during the following year, Rosetta died after undergoing an operation at the local hospital.  During the following year Arthur married (3) Harriet from Northamptonshire who was thirty years younger than Arthur.  Their marriage was recorded at Rugby register office (Ref. 6d 931) during the third quarter of 1900.  By the time of the next census conducted in March 1901 the new family was living within the Hampstead registration district, where Arthur J Collett was 58 and was living on his own means, while his wife Harriet from Northamptonshire was 28.  The only children of Arthur Collett still living with the couple were Rose Collett and Cecil Collett.  It was also around that time when Arthur was elected to serve Hampstead Borough Council, representing the Belsize Ward from 1903 to 1906.

 

 

 

Less than one year later Arthur and Harriet took into their care the base-born daughter of Arthur’s unmarried daughter Eleanor M Collett.  According to the census in April 1911 Arthur James Collett was 68 when he was living at 70 Constantine Road in Hampstead where he was described as a retired accounts clerk and book-keeper from Blackfriars in London.  His new wife of ten years was Harriet Collett who was 38 whose place of birth was recorded as Daventry in Northamptonshire.  The census return also confirmed that Harriet had not given birth to any children.  Still living with Arthur was his youngest unmarried daughter Rose Collett who was 27.  Completing the family group was Arthur’s granddaughter Ethel Maud Collett who was nine years old and the base-born daughter of his unmarried daughter Eleanor Collett who was living nearby in the Hampstead Union Workhouse. 

 

 

 

Five years later Arthur James Collett died from acute pneumonia and heart failure on 31st March 1916 while he was living at 70 Constantine Road.  His death was registered by his daughter-in-law ‘E E Collett of 58 Southampton Road’ on 1st April 1916, while it was his widow Harriet Collett who was named during the probate process for his personal effects of £953.  She was the wife of Arthur’s youngest son Cecil James Collett.  Constantine Road and Southampton Road are only 200 yards from each other, and are just around the corner from Lawn Road where the Collett family also lived.

 

 

 

2P50

William Henry Collett

Born in 1869 at Paddington

 

2P51

Francis Ernest Collett

Born in 1870 at Parry Sound, Canada

 

2P52

Edmund Alfred Collett

Born in 1872 at Parry Sound, Canada

 

2P53

Herbert Edward Collett

Born in 1875 at Parry Sound, Canada

 

2P54

Eleanor M Collett

Born in 1877 at Parry Sound, Canada

 

2P55

Grace Collett

Born in 1879 at Parry Sound, Canada

 

The following are most likely the children of Arthur James Collett by his second wife Rosetta:

 

2P56

Rose Collett

Born in 1883 at Kentish Town

 

2P57

Cecil James Collett

Born in 1885 at Kentish Town

 

 

 

 

2O53

Charles Edward Collett was born on 21st October 1843 at 4 Warren Street West in St Pancras but died a couple of years later at 30 Penton Place in Newington on 31st March 1846 and was buried at Norwood Cemetery.

 

 

 

 

2O54

Clara Sophia Collett was born on 1st October 1846 at Seymour Street in Camden Town.  It was also at 30 Penton Place that Clara died of pneumonia on 16th June 1848 and was buried at Norwood Cemetery.  Clara was the third of six Colletts to be buried in the family grave at Norwood Cemetery.  Sadly the grave (No. 40) was destroyed during the London Blitz of 1940.

 

 

 

 

2O55

Alfred George Thomas Mawbey Collett was born on 27th May 1848 at 30 Penton Place.  When around 28 years of age he left England and sailed to Canada where he met and married Harriet Hersey of Southampton on 4th October 1876.  The couple made their home at Parry Sound in Ontario where their marriage produced five children.  Five years earlier, Alfred’s older brother Arthur had moved to Parry Sound and when that family returned to England in 1883 the land owned and farmed by Arthur passed to Alfred.  However, three years later Alfred sold the land and placed the family’s furniture and belongings in storage at Parry Sound and then made their way to England.  The family arrived back in London in November 1886 and were living at 7 Myrtle Street in Highbury when Alfred died of bronchitis on 26th December 1886 and was buried at Finchley.  Harriet and the children returned to Parry Sound one month after Alfred had passed away, only to find that their furniture and possessions had been destroyed by fire.  Two of her sons later returned to England and lived in Dartford.

 

 

 

2P58

Alfred Edward Hersey Collett

Born n 1877 at Parry Sound

 

2P59

Ernest Henry John Collett

Born in 1879 at Parry Sound

 

2P60

Bertrand Oswald Mawbey Collett

Born in 1881 at Parry Sound

 

2P61

Lillian Hattie Amelia Collett

Born in 1883 at Parry Sound

 

2P62

Rosalie Gertrude Helena Collett

Born in 1885 at Parry Sound

 

 

 

 

2O56

Mawbey Ernest Collett was born at 47 Anwell Street in Clerkenwell on 29th July 1850 and was baptised at St Mark’s Church on Myddelton Square in Finsbury on 6th October 1850, the youngest child of Henry John Collett and his wife Amelia Sophia Mawbey.  On leaving school he was an apprentice to Elliot’s Book Publishers in Paternoster Row.  It was not until he was in his twenties that he was baptised on 24th September 1873.  Three years later at the Islington Registry Office he married (1) Elizabeth Alice Stare, the daughter of John and Arenea Stare who was born at Southampton on 26th May 1854.  In 1877 he is believed to have taken over the management of W H Callow wholesale ironmongers of Pembroke Street in Islington.  Two years later he established the coachbuilders and ironmonger company Collett & Co.

 

 

 

The marriage produced six children for the couple, but just eleven days after the birth of the last child, Elizabeth died on 17th October 1884 at 59 Willies Road, the home of her brother-in-law Arthur Collett.  At the earlier time of the census in 1881, Mawbey was 30 and his place of birth was confirmed as Clerkenwell.  His occupation on that occasion was that of a coachbuilder and ironmonger, employing seven men and two boys.  It was Mawbey Collett who founded the company of coachbuilders Collett & Co, which had premises in Kentish Town Road.  Mawbey, and his wife Elizabeth, age 26 and from St Mary’s in Hampshire, were living at 1 Hawley Road in St Pancras with their two children, Ernest who was two years old and born at Islington, and Herbert who was one year old and born at St Pancras.  Supporting the family was 18 years old servant Elizabeth Wested of St Pancras.

 

 

 

Following the death of his wife, Mawbey married (2) the widow Ann Pinfold on 2nd April 1885 at St Pancras in London.  Ann had been born Ann Casely at Halstead in Essex on 6th April 1849 and from her first marriage she had one son.  According to the census in 1881 Frederick Penfold was born at Reading around September 1880, and was living at 146 Southampton Street in the town with his mother Ann Penfold who was 31 and from Halstead.  Ann was already a widow by then, and was the housekeeper at a lodging house.

 

 

 

That second marriage for Mawbey presented him with a further five children, and by the time of the next census in 1891 Mawbey, recorded in error as Hawbey E Collett, was 40 and was living within the Pancras & Kentish Town district of London with his wife Ann, age 41, and nine of his children.  The children were recorded as Ernest F Collett, age 12, Herbert V Collett, age 11, William N Collet, age nine years, Harold J Collett who was eight, Percy A Collett who was seven, Thomas A F Collett who was five, Sydney C S Collett who was three, Violet A Collett who was two, and Daisy A Collett who was six weeks old.  Some of the initials for the children’s second names were misinterpreted or incorrectly recorded by the census enumerator.

 

 

 

Ten years later, according to the March census of 1901, Mawbey was visiting Cornwall, but on his own and without his wife Ann or any of his children.  It may well have been a business trip in view of the tin mine industry and the fact that he was a coach ironmonger.  The census details simply described him as Mawbey E Collett, age 50 and from London, who was a coach ironmonger residing at Callington in Cornwall.  There were no other Colletts living anywhere else within that area at that time.

 

 

 

Back home in London, according to the census in 1901, Mawbey’s wife ‘Anne Collett’, age 50, was an employer and the wife of a coach ironmonger living at 68 St Johns Road, Islington, in part of Upper Holloway.  Living at the house with her were just her own five children, Mawbey’s earlier off-spring having gone their separate ways by then. Thomas Collett was 15 and a clerk employed most likely in the family business, Sidney Collett was 13, Violet Collett was 12, Daisy Collett was 10, and Lilly Collett was eight years old.  Curiously, the birthplace for all five children was given as Gospel Oak, which was an inner urban area of north London in the London Borough of Camden, below Hampstead Heath.  It was bordered by the more affluent areas of Belsize Park to the west, Kentish Town to the south, Eastern Hampstead to the North, and Dartmouth Park and Tufnell Park to the east.

 

 

 

It was in early 1910, at the age of 60, that Mawbey sold the family business at 10 Kentish Town Road, following which he and Ann emigrated to America to be reunited with some of his own children who had made the journey in the preceding years.  They sailed from Southampton to New York on 22nd June 1910 on board the Steam Ship SS Teutonic.  Two years later his son Sidney made the same journey, but on the fateful maiden voyage of the RMS Titanic, although he fortunately survived.

 

 

 

During his life in London, when he was not working, Mawbey was a preacher of the Gospel, an activity that he continued in New York state where they settled at Port Byron, where the Reverend M E Collett opened the very first Baptist church in the town shortly after his arrival there in 1910.  He eventually died in 1922 at the Rochester home of his daughter Violet Amelia.  It was at Rochester, Monroe in New York State, that his widow Ann Collett was living when she died there on 25th April 1939. Following which she was buried two days later at the Riverside Cemetery in Rochester.

 

 

 

Rather curiously in an account written about the family just after the sinking of the Titanic in 1912 (see Appendix One at the end of this section of this family line) there is reference to another son of Mawbey Collett, Frederick P Collett, who worked for the General Electric Company in Shanghai, China when, according to the records so far assembled, there was no mention of a son named Frederick.

 

 

 

2P63

Alice Mawbey Collett

Born in 1876 at Islington

 

2P64

Ernest Henry Collett

Born in 1878 at Islington

 

2P65

Herbert Victor Collett

Born in 1879 at St Pancras

 

2P66

William Melville Collett

Born in 1881 at St Pancras

 

2P67

Harold John Collett

Born in 1883 at St Pancras

 

2P68

Percy Alexander Collett

Born in 1884 at St Pancras

 

The following are the children of Mawbey Collett and his second wife Ann Pinfold:

 

2P69

Thomas Alfred Fletcher Collett

Born in 1886 at St Pancras

 

2P70

Sidney Clarence Stuart Collett

Born in 1887 at St Pancras

 

2P71

Violet Amelia Collett

Born in 1888 at St Pancras

 

2P72

Daisy Ann Collett

Born in 1891 at St Pancras

 

2P73

Lily Elizabeth Collett

Born in 1892 at St Pancras

 

 

 

 

2O57

Edward Charles Collett was born at Islington during the third quarter of 1852, the eldest child of Nathaniel George Collett and his wife Eliza.  It was at Fulham in London, during the September quarter of 1876 that he married Charlotte Wadham Hill, who was born at Barnstaple in the last three months of 1857.  By 1881 Edward was an auctioneer, like his father Nathaniel.  He was 29 and was living at 40 Oxford Gardens in North Kensington with his wife Charlotte who was 23.  Four doors along the road, at 32 Oxford Gardens lived Edward’s brother Percy Collett (below).  At that time the marriage had produced the couple’s first two children, their son Denbigh Collett, who was two years old, and their daughter Eveline Collett who was just one year old.  Both children were recorded as having been born at Kensington, whereas it is known that the first child was born at Bayswater and that the birth of their second child was registered at Barnstaple.  On that same occasion the household was support by domestic servant Eleanor P Green, age 18 and of Camden Town.

 

 

 

Over the next ten years a further four children were added to the family, as reflected in the Kensington census of 1891, by which time the family was living at 139 Ladbroke Place not far from Oxford Gardens.  Edward C Collett was 39 and an auctioneer from Islington, Charlotte Collett from Barnstaple was 33, Denbigh Collett from Bayswater was 12 and still attending school, Evylin Collett (sic) was 11, Maud Collett was nine, Ormond Collett was four and had been born at Shepherd’s Bush, George Collett was three and Frank Collett was one year old.  The couple’s two daughter, together with their two youngest sons, had been born at Kensington.

 

 

 

It was also during that same year when Edward Charles was named as a nephew owing three hundred pounds in the 1891 Will of his aunt Mary Jane Cowle nee Collett.  That money had been loaned to Edward by Mary’s late husband and the Will required it to be repaid.  If not repaid then Edward would not be entitled to any share of the Cowle estate.  Whether it was repaid or not is not known, but less than two years later Edward Charles Collett died in London, his death being recorded at Marylebone during the first three months of 1893.

 

 

 

Perhaps it was a combination of the death of her husband and financial worries that resulted in the family being broken up before the end of the century.  Certainly by March 1901 Charlotte Collett, age 43 and from Barnstaple in Devon, was residing at an institution in the Kensington district of London, while her children were recorded at other locations in the city.  However, no obvious record for Charlotte has been found in the next census of 1911 so she may have been remarried by then or passed away.

 

 

 

2P74

Denbigh Collett

Born in 1878 at Bayswater

 

2P75

Eveline Margaret Collett

Born in 1880 at Kensington

 

2P76

Maud Collett

Born in 1881 at Kensington

 

2P77

Ormonde Collett

Born in 1886 at Shepherd’s Bush

 

2P78

George Collett

Born in 1887 at Kensington

 

2P79

Frank Barey Collett

Born in 1889 at Kensington

 

 

 

 

2O58

Florence Agnes Collett was born at Brentford in Middlesex during 1853, the eldest daughter and second child of Nathaniel and Eliza Collett.  In 1881 she was unmarried at 26 and was still living at home with her parents at 70 Ladbroke Road in Kensington.  The census details for that year did not indicate that she had any occupation, nor did it state she was unemployed.  In the 1891 Will of her aunt Mary Jane Cowle, a niece by the name of Frances Alice, the daughter of Nathaniel George Collett was one of three nieces bequeathed articles of wearing apparel of the late Mary Jane Cowle.  According to the next census in 1901 Florence Agnes Collett from Brentford in Middlesex was 46 when she was a domestic servant employed by Charles William Priestley and his wife Annie at their home in the parish of Tormoham and Torquay in Devon.

 

 

 

By April 1911 Florence Agnes Collett aged 57 was staying with her younger brother Sidney and his wife and family at 11 Parsifal Road in West Hampstead, while it was just over thirty years later that Florence Agnes Collett died on 17th November 1941 when she was living at 8 Marine Avenue in Westcliffe-on-Sea in Southend-on-Sea.  Probate of her personal effects valued at £1,113 18 Shillings 7d was granted to Edward Joshua Poole- Conner, a minister of the Gospel, and Isaac Newton Golden, a retired civil servant.

 

 

 

 

2O59

Percy Collett was born at Brentford in 1854, his birth being registered there in the last three months of the year.  Just like his father and his older brother Edward (above), Percy was also an auctioneer during his working life and later became an estate agent like his father.  He married (1) Elizabeth Berridge at Christ Church in St Pancras on 13th August 1878.  Elizabeth was born at St Pancras in 1858 and was the daughter of John Berridge who was a music publisher of 179 Stanhope Street in St Pancras.  The witnesses at their wedding were Percy’s brother Sidney Collett (below) and his father Nathaniel Collett.  The marriage produced a total of eight children for Percy and Elizabeth, although only six of them appear to have survived. 

 

 

 

According to the census of 1881, auctioneer Percy, who was 26, and his wife Elizabeth, age 22, were living at 32 Oxford Gardens in Kensington with their daughter Elizabeth who was one year old and born at Hammersmith.  It also seems very likely that Percy’s wife was pregnant with the couple’s second child at the time of the census, their son being born later that same year.  Supporting the young family on that occasion was seventeen year-old general servant Hannah Tarrant of Greenford in Middlesex.

 

 

 

A further seven children were added to the family after 1881 when they were still living in the Kensington area of London.  This was confirmed in the next census in 1891 when Percy Collett from Brentford was residing within the Kensington parish of St Michael All Angels where his occupation was still that of an auctioneer.  By then his wife Elizabeth was 32, and living with the couple were all of their six children.  They were Elizabeth Collett who was 11, Algernon Collett who was nine, Hubert J Collett and May P Collett who were both seven and very likely twins, Stanley Collett who was three and Adelaide R Collett who was one year old.  Employed by the family was general domestic servant Robert Curdy who was 17.  Once again Elizabeth may have been with-child on that census day, since the couple’s seventh child was born later in 1891.  Tragically their eighth children, their son John Collett, died shortly after he was born and then, during the following year, Percy was widowed by the death of his wife during the birth of a subsequent childbirth who also did not survive.   

 

 

 

Sometime after the spring in 1891 Percy changed career, perhaps following the death of his wife, when he became an estate agent.  Either way, by that time in his life, he had already started to amass some considerable debts.  His poor financial state was more than underlined later on in 1891 when Percy Collett was described in the Will of his aunt Mary Jane Cowle, nee Collett, as a nephew who owed three hundred pounds.  The money had been loaned to Percy by Mary’s late husband and the Will required that it had to be repaid.  If not repaid, then Percy would not be entitled to any share of the Cowle estate.

 

 

 

Two years later the death of his wife Elizabeth Collett nee Berridge was recorded at Greenwich during the third quarter of 1893 when she was 42.  As a consequence of his loss and the need to care for his young family Percy Collett later married (2) either Ellen Amelia Vine or Lomas Amelia Chapman at Greenwich [ref. 1D-1017], a widow who already had six children of her own.  Very little is known about his second wife except that it is rumoured she presented Percy with a further two children, one being Frances born in 1895.

 

 

 

Furthermore, by March 1901, Percy was once again recorded in the census as being a widower, following the death of his second wife.  The census that year also provided no evidence of the two children that he was reputed to have had with the lady.  On that occasion Percy was 46 and was continuing to work as an estate agent while living with his family at 86 Leathwaite Road in the Clapham area of London.  Leathwaite Road is still there today and lies on the south side of the A3, to the west of Clapham Common.  

 

 

 

Still living with Percy at that address were seven of his eight surviving children.  They were Elizabeth Collett, age 21, Algernon P Collett, age 19, May Blossom Collett, age 17, Stanley Collett, age 13, Adelaide R Collett who was 11, Bryan Collett who was nine, and half-sister Frances Collett who was seven.  At that same time Percy’s absent son Hubert was 17 when he was living in St Pancras where he followed in his father’s footsteps by being an auctioneer’s clerk.  Tragically for his children, Percy Collett died just less than twelve months later, when his death was recorded at Wandsworth during the first three months of 1902 when he was only 48.

 

 

 

2P80

Elizabeth Collett

Born in 1879 at Hammersmith

 

2P81

Algernon Percy Collett

Born in 1881 at Kensington

 

2P82

Hubert J Collett            twin

Born in 1883 at Kensington

 

2P83

May Blossom Collett    twin

Born in 1883 at Kensington

 

2P84

Stanley Collett

Born in 1887 at Kensington

 

2P85

Adelaide Rose Collett

Born in 1889 at Kensington

 

2P86

Bryan Collett

Born in 1891 at Kensington

 

2P87

John Collett

Born in 1892; infant death

 

The following child is the only known offspring of Percy Collett and his second wife:

 

2P88

Frances Collett

Born in 1895 at Kensington

 

 

 

 

2O60

Eliza S Collett was born at Norwood in Surrey in 1856.  It would appear that she married around 1880 since by the beginning of April 1881 she was married to harness maker Henry Child who was born at Sydenham in Kent in 1855.  At that time Eliza and Henry were living at 58 Ernest Street in St Pancras with their two-week old baby Charlotte Child.  Under the terms of the 1891 Will of her aunt Mary Jane Cowle, Ada was bequeathed articles of wearing apparel of the late Mary Jane, the total number of garments being divided equally between three nieces.

 

 

 

 

2O61

Sidney Collett was born in 1857 at Norwood.  According to the Census of 1881 he was 23, unmarried and was an electrician living at the family home at 70 Ladbroke Road in Kensington.  It was towards the end of the 1880s that Sidney married Annie whose surname may have been Chesterton.  The census in 1891 recorded the couple at Hampstead in London, by which time the first of their three known children had just been born.  Sidney Collett from Norwood was 33, his wife Annie L Collett from Leicester was 30 and their daughter Muriel R Collett was under one year old.  Two more children were added to the family which was living at 191 Belsize Road in Hampstead in 1901.  Sidney was 43 and a secretary with a public company, Annie L Collett was 40, Muriel R Collett was 10, Sidney G Collett was eight and Irene C Collett was four years of age.  Sidney’s place of birth was confirmed as Norwood in Middlesex, Annie had been born in Leicester, Muriel in Notting Hill and the two younger child at Kilburn in London.  Supporting the family was general domestic servant Miriam Fisher who was 20 and from Sheffield.

 

 

 

Sidney followed in his father’s footsteps as a writer and wrote many religious books including ‘The Scripture of Truth’ which was published in 1906.  In the following census of 1911 Sidney Collett, age 53 and from Norwood, was residing at 11 Parsifal Road in West Hampstead when his occupation was that of a secretary at a public boy’s school.  His wife Annie Lizzie Collett was 50 and the two children living there with them were Sidney Gordon Collett who was 18 and Irene Chesterton Collett who was 14.  Also living with the family was Sidney’s older sister Florence Agnes Collett, while employed at the house was Ernest Frederick Finch, age 26, and Clara Emma Shaw who was 21.  On that same day in 1911 their daughter Muriel Collett from Notting Hill was 20 years old and at an institution within the Holborn area of London where she may have been working.  It would appear that Sidney was widowed sometime after that, and that he subsequently married (2) Ruth who was named as his wife at the time of his death thirty years later.

 

 

 

Sidney and his sister Florence both died within a few months of each other, with the death of Sidney Collett recorded at Hendon register office (Ref. 3a 880) during the second quarter of 1941 when he was 83.  The probate process also confirmed that it was same executors of his personal estate that were used by his sister and named in her probates papers.  That confirmed the home address of Sidney Collett as Brent Cottage on Wickliffe Avenue off Hendon Lane in Finchley, while it was at 31 Woodhouse Road in North Finchley that Sidney died on 8th May 1941.  Probate for his estate of £12,817 6 Shillings 6d was granted to Edward Joshua Poole-Conner, a minister of the Gospel, and Isaac Newton Golden, a retired civil servant.

 

 

 

It was also at Hendon Cemetery where he was buried on 13th May, although no headstone marks the grave, but a notice in The Times on 10th May read as follows.  On May 8, 1941. Sidney Collett beloved husband of Ruth Collett passed peacefully away.  Memorial service at Talbot Tabernacle in Bayswater, London on May 13 at 2.30.  Interment Hendon Cemetery at 3.30.” 

 

 

 

2P89

Muriel R Collett

Born in 1890 at Notting Hill, London

 

2P90

Sidney Gordon Collett

Born in 1892 at Kilburn, London

 

2P91

Irene Chesterton Collett

Born in 1896 at Kilburn, London

 

 

 

 

2O62

Walwyn Collett was born in 1859 at Norwood.  In 1881 he was 21 and, although listed as being a warehouseman working in Manchester, he was living at the family home at 70 Ladbroke Road in Kensington.  By the time of the census of 1901 he was living in Bristol where he was listed as being 41 years old and he gave his place of birth as being Brentford in Middlesex which is close to Norwood Green.  It would appear too, that like his poet father Nathaniel Collett and his writer brother Sidney Collett (above), he was also involved with the written word as he gave his occupation as a ‘hantle traveller’.  Hantle is a Scottish term and has a connection with poetry.  It therefore seems very likely that the story handed down through the family, about one of them being a poet and a wastrel who eventually travelled to China, actually relates to Walwyn Collett.

 

 

 

 

2O63

Walter Collett was originally thought to have been born at Norwood in 1860.  However, new information reveals that his birth was registered at Shoreditch during the September quarter of 1860.  At the age of 19 Walter from Norwood was working as a clerk to a wine merchant and was in lodgings at 35 Westbourne Road in Islington.  That was the home of widow and annuitant Mary Ann Simmonds, age 47, and her three children.  Tragically it was just over two years later that Walter Collett died at the age of 22, his death being registered at Islington during the September quarter of that year.

 

 

 

 

2O64

Rose Collett was born at Norwood in 1864 and was 17 in April 1881.  At that time Rose was living with her parents Nathaniel and Eliza at 70 Ladgrove Road in Kensington where her father was a retired estate agent.

 

 

 

 

2O65

Frances Alice Collett, whose date of birth is not known, has not been identified in her later life.  Her existence relies solely on information in the 1891 Will of her aunt Mary Jane Cowle, in which she was named as the daughter of Nathaniel George Collett and the receiver of one third of the late Mary’s wearing apparel under the terms of her Will.

 

 

 

 

2O66

Ada Lily Collett was born at Islington in 1853, her birth being registered their during the June quarter of the year.  At the time of the 1881 Census she was 27 and was unmarried, when she was living at 23 St Mary’s Road in Willesden in Middlesex with her parents.  Later that same year she married Edward Bennett Calvert, the son of Canon Calvert of St Paul's Cathedral, with the marriage recorded at Hendon during third quarter of the year.

 

 

 

Ada was referred to in the 1891 Will of her aunt Mary Jane Cowle.  That stated she owed one hundred pounds, such sum of money having been loaned to her by Mary’s husband George Cowle prior to his death.  The Will stipulated that the money should be paid into her estate.  Non-compliance with the edict meant that Ada would not be entitled to any share of the considerable Cowle estate.  Under the terms of the Will, Ada was bequeathed articles of wearing apparel of the late Mary Jane, the total number of garments being divided equally between three nieces.

 

 

 

Edward Bennett Calvert was also born around 1851 and it was at Hammersmith in London where his death was recorded in the September quarter of 1930 when he was 79.  Ada Lily Calvert nee Collett did not survive as a widow for very long, when she passed away during the following year, her death being recorded at Chelsea in the June quarter of 1931.

 

 

 

 

2O67

Fanny Collett was born at Chedworth on 31st December 1842, the base-born daughter of unmarried Elizabeth Collett.  Her birth was recorded at Northleach (Ref. xi 371) during the first quarter of 1843.  Two years later her mother married her cousin Henry Collett (Ref. 3N3) with whom she had twelve children.  However, it might appear that Fanny was in some way rejected by her mother’s new family as in 1851 she was living with her widowed grandfather Robert Collett (Ref. 2M28) when she was eight years old and ten years later in 1861 she was living at the home of 83 years old widow and fund holder Elizabeth Wilson of Chedworth.  Elizabeth was a ‘venerable widow and owner of Fields Farm’ and the mother of Robert Collett’s late wife Sarah Wilson.

 

 

 

Fanny never really had the opportunity to marry as she died four months before her twenty-first birthday on 24th August 1863.  She was buried in the family grave in the graveyard of Chedworth Congregational Chapel with her mother Elizabeth Collett, her husband Henry Collett and his daughters (Fanny’s half-sisters) Mary Ann Collett (below), and Sophia Collett (below).  (see Headstone Epitaphs)

 

 

 

Another Fanny Collett, who was also born around 1843, married John Lucas Bleby at Winchcombe in the last three months of 1865 (Ref. 6a 813) who was born there in 1840 (Ref. 11 486).  They had four children, all born at Winchcombe, and John Bleby died in 1915 and his widow Fanny died the following year.  However, the birthplace of that Fanny was Stanway, in north Gloucestershire, and not Chedworth.

 

 

 

 

2O68

Amelia Ann Collett was born at Broadway in 1846, and was the daughter of Francis and Mary Ann Collett, her birth being recorded at Evesham during the first three months of that year.  At the time of the Broadway census in 1841 Amelia Collett was five years old and by 1861, as Amelia A Collett, she was 15.  On both occasions she was living with her parents and her younger brother George (below) at the High Street in Broadway.

 

 

 

Where she was in 1871 is not known for sure, although according to the census of 1881, Amelia A Collett was an unmarried nurse and servant from Broadway who was living and working at The Vicarage in Childswickham, the home of the Reverend Robert H Barlow from Canterbury, the Vicar of Childswickham.  She was 33 years old and it is very likely that two years earlier she had given birth to a base-born daughter who was being looked after by her parents in Broadway.  Previously in this family history it was believed that the child was the issue of their married son George, but it is now known that he died seven years before Anne Collett was born.

 

 

 

After a further twenty years, Amelia was still a spinster.  The census return for March 1901 revealed that Amelia A Collett of Broadway in Worcestershire was 54 and that she was living in Llanigon in Brecon, where she was still working as a domestic nurse.  During the next couple of years she returned to Broadway where she spent her last few years, and it was there that she died at the age of 60, the death of Amelia Ann Collett being recorded at Evesham during the June quarter of 1906.

 

 

 

2P92

Anne Collett

Born in 1878 at Broadway

 

 

 

 

2O69

George Collett was born at Broadway on 30th June 1850, where he was baptised on 28th July 1850 as the son of Francis Collett and his wife Mary Ann.  In between those two dates his birth was recorded at the Evesham register office.  In 1861 George was ten years old and was living with his parents and his sister Amelia (above) at the family’s home in the High Street in Broadway.  No record of George has been found after 1871, but in 1881 his parents had living with them at their home on Main Street in Broadway, their granddaughter Anne Collett who was two years old.  It seems unlikely that Anne was the offspring of George’s unmarried sister Amelia (above) who would have been in her early thirties when the child was born.  Another option is that Anne was the daughter of George, but no record of him has been found in 1881 or any later census, so perhaps he had died leaving Anne an orphan.

 

 

 

This mystery has now been partially resolved thanks to Terence Prescott, who recently discovered that George was in his teenage years when he married, but that he died during the first three months of 1871, hence is absence from the census that year which was conducted on 2nd April, coupled with the fact that he could not have been the father of Annie Collett.  However, it is not absolutely clear who it was that he married as there are two possible options.

 

 

 

The two records of the marriage of two George Colletts at Evesham are as follows; the first took place during the last three months of 1867 [ref 6C 439] when George would have been 17, with the second taking place during the last quarter of 1868 [ref 6C 427] when he would have been 18.  However, against each of the two reference numbers there are two brides’ names, and they are Mary Anne Cartridge (born at Martley, Worcs. during the Sept Qtr of 1851) and Mary Pimble, and Rosannah Fletcher and Matilda Webb (born at Stourbridge, Worcs. during the Dec Qtr of 1854).  On age and name alone, the favourite might be Mary Anne Cartridge.

 

 

 

 

2O70

Edwin Collett was born during 1832 at Aston Blank, later known as Cold Aston, to the west of Bourton-on-the-Water, the eldest child of Joseph Collett and his wife Elizabeth from Aston Blank.  Not long after he was born the family settled in Little Rissington to the east of Bourton, where all of his siblings were born.  According to the Little Rissington census of 1841, Edward (sic) Collett was nine years old and was living there with his parents and his brother Albert (below).  By the time of the next census in 1851 Edwin would have been 19 but was no longer living with his family at Little Rissington, nor has any record of him been found in the British census that year.

 

 

 

By the time of the next census in 1861 Edwin Collett was married with a wife and they had their first child living with them at New Barn Pike in Farmington, just south of Aston Blank and Little Rissington and east of Northleach.  New Barn Pike was a toll gate where Maria Collett from Little Rissington was the toll collector at the age of 26.  Her husband Edwin Collett from Aston Blank was 28 and a carpenter, while their son William R Collett was one year old and had been born at nearby Northleach.  Maria was very likely with-child on the day of the census because the couple’s second son was born at Farmington later that year and prior to the family moving to Great Rissington.  A total of five children were added to their family during that decade and by 1871 the family, less their eldest child, was residing in Great Rissington. 

 

 

 

On the day of the census that year William R Collett aged 11 years and from Northleach was staying with his paternal grandmother, the widow Elizabeth Collett, at her home (described as a private house) in Little Rissington, where the only other occupant was Edwin’s youngest brother Henry Collett, a blacksmith.  The remainder of Edwin’s family was living in a dwelling right next door to the inn at Great Rissington, and they were listed in the census return as Edwin Collett from Cold Aston who was 38 and still a carpenter, Maria Collett from Little Rissington who was 36, and their children Charles H Collett who was nine, Emily Collett who was seven, Alfred J Collett who was five, Elizabeth Annie Collett who was three and Agnes Eliza Collett who was eleven months old.

 

 

 

Over the next five or six years the family continued to live at Great Rissington where a further two children were born into the family.  It was then around 1877 that the family they left Gloucestershire and moved north to County Durham and the town of Sedgefield, where Edwin’s last child was born shortly after their arrival.  So by 1881 the family living at North End in Sedgefield comprised Edwin Collett from Aston in Gloucestershire who was 48 and a joiner, Maria Collett who was 46, Charles H Collett who was 19, Alfred Collett who 15, Elizabeth Collett who was 13, Agnes Collett who was 10, Alwyn Collett who was seven, Marion E Collett who was five and Ellen M Collett who was three years old.  Missing from the family was the couple’s eldest daughter Emily who was 17 and who had already left home by then.

 

 

 

No further family moves appear to have taken place and once again they were included in the next census of 1891 for Sedgefield when the family was at High Row in a dwelling between the Manor House, the home of William Connor a Clerk in Holy Orders, and Four Farm the home of farmer John McMorris.  The Collett family was recorded as Edwin Collett who was 58 and a joiner from Aston Blank, Maria Collett who was 55 and from Little Rissington, Charles Collett who was 29 and a joiner from Farmington, Elizabeth A Collett who was 23 and a dressmaker from Rissington, Alwyn Collett who was 17 and a domestic gardener from Rissington, Maria (Marion) E Collett who was 15 and an apprenticed dressmaker from Rissington, while Ellen M Collett who was born at Sedgefield was 13 and still at school.

 

 

 

During the last decade of the century Maria Collett died leaving Edwin as a widower in the census conducted in March 1901.  By then the family was still recorded at High Row in the Sedgefield parish of St Edmund.  Edwin Collett from Aston in Gloucestershire was still working as a joiner and a carpenter at the age of 68, as was his son Charles H Collett from Farmington who was 39.  Edwin’s eldest daughter Emily Collett from Rissington had returned to the family home to look after her father and at the age of 37 was acting as housekeeper for the family.  Just two more of Edwin’s children were still living with him, and they were his son Alfred J Collett from Rissington who was 35 and a domestic coachman and unmarried daughter Marion E Collett, also from Rissington who was 25 and with no stated occupation.  There was one other individual recorded at the address and that was Reginald Ashton from Tudhoe near Spennymoor in County Durham who was two years old and described as the grandson of Edwin Collett.  He was the son of Edwin’s married daughter Elizabeth Annie Ashton of Tudhoe.

 

 

 

Ten years later, according to the census in April 1911, Edwin Collett was residing at The Square in Sedgefield with two of his children.  Edwin described and having been born in Gloucestershire, was 78 and a retired joiner and a pensioner (D C Asylum) which seems to indicate he had some connection with Durham County Asylum, perhaps where he worked prior to his retirement.  His son Charles Collett from Farmington was 49 and a joiner working at a Durham County coalmine.  Completing the family was his daughter Marion Collett from Great Rissington who was 34 and the housekeeper for her father and her brother.

 

 

 

2P93

William Reuben Collett

Born in 1859 at Northleach

 

2P94

Charles H Collett

Born in 1861 at Farmington

 

2P95

Emily Collett

Born in 1863 at Great Rissington

 

2P96

Alfred J Collett

Born in 1865 at Great Rissington

 

2P97

Elizabeth Annie Collett

Born in 1867 at Great Rissington

 

2P98

Agnes Eliza Collett

Born in 1870 at Great Rissington

 

2P99

Alwyn Albert Collett

Born in 1874 at Great Rissington

 

2P100

Marion E Collett

Born in 1876 at Great Rissington

 

2P101

Ellen Maria Collett

Born in 1878 at Sedgefield, Co Durham

 

 

 

 

2O71

Harvey Collett was born at Little Rissington in 1838, and was baptised there on 25th December 1838, the son of Joseph and Elizabeth Collett.  With no record of Harvey being with his parents in the census of 1841, or that of any later census, it must be assumed that he suffered a childhood death before he was three years old.

 

 

 

 

2O72

Albert Collett was born at Little Rissington in 1840 and was one year old in the June census of 1841.  He appeared in the 1851 Census for that village with his family at the age of 10.  By the time of the census in 1861, when Albert was 20, he was still living with his parents and younger brothers James and Henry, but by that time the family was living at Cold Aston (Aston Blank).  It was on that occasion that all three of them were described as shoemakers.

 

 

 

It was during the next few years that Albert married Caroline Clifford, the daughter of George Clifford and his wife Harriet Slatter.  She was born at Bourton-on-the-Water on 24th December 1834, so it seems highly likely that it was also at Bourton that she married Albert Collett.  Once they were married the couple initially settled in Upper Slaughter, and while they were living there, their first three children were born.  However, around 1870 the family moved to Bourton-on-the-Water, where they were living at the time of the census in 1871.  The census that year recorded the family as Albert Collett, age 30, his wife Caroline, age 35, and their three sons, Frank Collett who was five years old, Ernest A Collett who was three, and Archibald Collett who was only one year old.  Over the next six years two more children were added to the family whilst they continued to live in Bourton. 

 

 

 

By 1881 the enlarged family was still living at Bourton-on-the-Water, at a location called The Bank.  Albert Collett, age 40, was once again a shoemaker, Caroline Collett was 45, and their children were listed as Frank C Collett, who was 15 and another shoemaker, Archibald Collett who was 11, James Collett who was six, and Annie Collett who was three years old.  The two eldest children had been born at Upper Slaughter, while the two younger one had been born at Bourton.  The couple’s missing son Ernest Austin Collett was living and working in the Lambeth district of London by then.  A neighbour of the Collett family, also living at The Bank in Bourton in 1881, was Paris Collett (Ref. 33O1) who was 56.  See Part 33 – The Bourton-on-the-Water Line for further details of Paris and his family.

 

 

 

According to the census of 1891 Albert Collett, age 50 and a shoemaker of Little Rissington, was still living at Bourton with his wife Caroline, who was 55, and just two of their children.  They were Archibald Collett who was 21 and also a shoemaker like his father and his older brother Frank, and Annie M Collett who was 13.  However, by the time of the March census for Bourton-on-the-Water in 1901 Albert Collett, age 61 and from Little Rissington, and his wife Caroline Collett, age 66 and from Bourton, only had their youngest child, their daughter Annie M Collett, still living with them in their old age.  Both ladies were listed in the census as being dressmakers, while Albert was described as a retired shoemaker.  Caroline died during the first decade of the new century so, by the time of the next census in April 1911, Albert recorded as a widower.  The census return confirmed that he was seventy years old, had been born at Little Rissington, and was a retired shoemaker, living alone in Bourton-on-the-Water.

 

 

 

2P102

Frank Charles Collett

Born in 1865 at Upper Slaughter

 

2P103

Ernest Austin Collett

Born in 1867 at Upper Slaughter

 

2P104

Archibald Collett

Born in 1869 at Upper Slaughter

 

2P105

James Collett

Born in 1874 at Bourton-on-the-Water

 

2P106

Annie M Collett

Born in 1877 at Bourton-on-the-Water

 

 

 

 

2O73

Herbert Reuben Collett, was sometimes referred to as Reuben or Hubert, was born at Little Rissington in 1842 where he was baptised on 25th December 1842, the son of Joseph and Elizabeth Collett.  He was listed in the census of 1851 for Little Rissington when he was nine years old.  In 1871 Reuben, age 28 and a labourer of Little Rissington, was still living in that village.  With him was his wife Eliza who was 34 and from Burchett’s Green near Maidenhead in Berkshire and their first four children, all of whom were born at Little Rissington.  They were Frederick, who was six, Louis, who was four, Alfred, who was two, and Harold who was under one year old.  The family was supported by a nursemaid Louisa Mitchell who was 14 from Cold Aston.

 

 

 

By 1881 the census listed Herbert R Collett as 38 when he was working in a livery stable, and by which time his eldest son had left home.  Living with him at Little Rissington was his wife Eliza 43 and the following children.  Louis, age 14, Alfred, age 12, Harold, age 11 and labelled ‘idiot’, Edith, who was eight, Kate, who was six, Edwin, who was four, and Algernon who was two, for which the census return indicated that all of them had been born at Little Rissington.

 

 

 

By 1891 Reuben Collett was 48 but used the name Hubert, his place of birth confirmed as Little Rissington, and his wife was Eliza Collett 53 of Burchetts Green.  Hubert was a farmer at Little Rissington where he and Eliza were living with sons Harold 21, Edwin 14, and Algernon 12.  Ten years later the family still together and living at Little Rissington was made up of Herbert R Collett who was 58 and a job proprietor (?), his wife Eliza who was 62, and their son Harold who was 30.  Over the next few years Herbert Reuben Collett passed away, leaving Eliza as a widow.

 

 

 

Eliza Collett was still alive in April 1911 when she was seventy-five and acting as housekeeper for two of her sons at Little Rissington in a six-roomed dwelling.  On that occasion the census recorded that her place of birth was Reading in Berkshire and that she had given birth to eight children, with seven of them still alive. The two unmarried sons still living with her were Harold Collett and Edwin Collett.  The final member of the household was Eliza’s granddaughter Dorothy Collett who was 10 years old who had been born at Cheltenham.  Having effectively eliminated her sons as being the father of Dorothy Collett, it now seems very likely that she was the base-born daughter of one of Eliza’s two daughters, although neither of them has a known connection with Cheltenham, but nor has any other member of her family.

 

 

 

2P107

Frederick Collett

Born in 1864 at Little Rissington

 

2P108

Louis (Lewis) Collett

Born in 1866 at Little Rissington

 

2P109

Alfred Collett

Born in 1868 at Little Rissington

 

2P110

Harold Collett

Born in 1870 at Little Rissington

 

2P111

Edith (Florence) Collett

Born in 1872 at Little Rissington

 

2P112

Kate Collett

Born in 1874 at Little Rissington

 

2P113

Edwin Collett

Born in 1876 at Little Rissington

 

2P114

Algernon Collett

Born in 1878 at Little Rissington

 

 

 

 

2O74

James Collett was born at Little Rissington in 1845.  In 1851 he was five years old, and ten years later James was 15 and was still living at Little Rissington with his family.  By the time of the next census in 1871 James Collette (sic), age 25 and from Gloucestershire, was residing within the Kensington & St Mary Paddington district of London, and had been married for four years and already had two children.  His wife Ruth Collette, formerly Ruth Pegrum, was 34, Albert J Collette was three years old, and George H Collette was one year old. 

 

 

 

In all a total of five children were born into the family and, according to the next census in 1881, all of them were born while James and his wife were living at Sevenoaks in Kent, while that is now known to be incorrect.  Shortly after they were married the couple were in Sandgate near Folkestone in Kent when their first child was born.  That may have only been a temporary situation, since their next son was born in London, after which the family did settle in Sevenoaks where their remaining three children were born.

 

 

 

With James’ father Joseph Collett having died in the late 1860s, his elderly mother Elizabeth, age 73 from Aston (Blank) was living with the family at 2 Cedar Terrace in Sevenoaks in 1881.  The full census return listed the family as James who was 35 and an evangelist from Rissington, his wife Ruth who was 44 and from Waltham Abbey in Essex, and their five children.  They were Albert J Collett, age 13, George H Collett, age 11, Walter E Collett, who was eight, Herbert E Collett, who was six, and Edwin H Collett who was three.

 

 

 

During the next decade, and upon leaving school, the couple’s eldest son left home to become an apprentice to a London dental surgeon living with his family in Exeter.  So by the time of the next census in 1891 the remainder of the family was still residing at 2 Cedar Terrace in Sevenoaks.  The census return that year confirmed the family as James Collett from Little Rissington who was 45 and an unorthodox evangelist preacher, his wife Ruth from Waltham Abbey was 54, Walter E Collett was 18 and had already started work as an apprentice whitesmith, while Edwin H Collett was 13 and still attending school.  Both sons had been born at Sevenoaks.  Living with the family was James’ niece Florence M Collett from Little Rissington who was 18 and a domestic servant.

 

 

 

Sometime prior to the following census in March 1901 James Collett from Little Rissington passed away.  On that occasion his widow Ruth Collett, age 64 and from Waltham Abbey, was living at Lewisham with her two sons Albert J Collett and Edwin H Collett.  All of the other members of her family have been located in the census that year, whilst no record of her second son George has been after 1881.  Over the following years Ruth’s eldest son Albert became a married man, so in the census conducted in April 1911 it was just Ruth, age 74, who was still living in Lewisham with her youngest son Edwin Howard Collett.

 

 

 

2P115

Albert James Collett

Born in 1867 at Sandgate, Folkestone

 

2P116

George H Collett

Born in 1869 at London

 

2P117

Walter Ebenezer Collett

Born in 1872 at Sevenoaks

 

2P118

Herbert Edgar Collett

Born in 1874 at Sevenoaks

 

2P119

Edwin Howard Collett

Born in 1878 at Sevenoaks

 

 

 

 

2O75

Henry Collett was born at Little Rissington in January 1851 since he was only two months old on the day of the 1851 Census for Little Rissington.  It was also there that he was living with his family in 1861 at the age of 10 years, and again in 1871 when he was 20.  It seems highly likely that not long after April 1871, Henry followed his brother James Collett (above) to Kent to seek work, and it was there that he met his future wife.  Henry married Annie and shortly after the first of their three known children was born.

 

 

 

By 1881 Henry and Annie and their daughter were residing at 8 Thornhill Place in Maidstone.  Henry Collett was 30, but his place of birth was simply stated as Gloucester(shire).  On that occasion he was a blacksmith living with his wife Annie who was 33 and from Hollingbourne in Kent, and their daughter Florence M Collett who was eight years old and also born at Gloucester(shire).  Annie may well have been anticipating the birth of the couple’s second child who was born either later that same year or early in the following year.  Also lodging with the family in 1881 was the Hughesman family from Maidstone, Robert Hughesman, age 26, a railway porter, his wife Mary Ann Hughesman who was 25, and their son Sydney Hughesman who was nine months old.

 

 

 

Sometime during the next few years Henry left Maidstone and settled at Islington in London.  It was there that he was recorded in April 1891 and again March 1901.  Interestingly on both occasion the family’s place of residence was stated in the census returns for both years as being Her Majesty’s Prison Holloway.  In the census return for the first of them Henry Collett from Little Rissington was 40 and his wife Annie was 42.  Recorded with the couple that day were just their two youngest children, Alice Mary Collett who was eight and Henry James Collett who was four.  During the intervening years Annie died, leaving Henry a widower at the age of 50 in 1901.  Once again his place of birth was confirmed as Little Rissington, when his occupation was that of an artizan warder (prison officer). 

 

 

 

Still living with him that day were all three of his children.  Eldest daughter Florence, from Little Rissington, was 28 and was acting as the housekeeper for the family, while Alice was a book-keeper aged 18 and Henry was 14 and working as a commercial clerk.  Ten years later in April 1911 Henry Collett from Little Rissington was 60, by which time he had retired from the prison service and had returned to Kent, where he was living alone in Canterbury.

 

 

 

2P120

Florence M Collett

Born in 1872 at Little Rissington

 

2P121

Alice Mary Collett

Born in 1882 at Maidstone, Kent

 

2P122

Henry James Allington Collett

Born in 1886 at Maidstone, Kent

 

 

 

 

2O77

Joseph Collett was born at Aston Blank where he was baptised on 25th December 1842.  Tragically he died the following year on 11th May 1843.

 

 

 

 

2O78

Caroline Collett was baptised on 14th April 1844 at Aston Blank, the second child of Henry Collett and his wife Rhoda Acock.  She married Paul Beckley of Notgrove at Stow-on-the-Wold during the last three months of 1865, Paul having been born at Notgrove during the second quarter of 1843.  For whatever reason their first born child and son Jesse Beckley lived most of his young life with Caroline’s parents at Aston Blank, as confirmed by the 1871 and 1881 census returns.

 

 

 

In total Caroline and Paul had twelve children, and they were: Jesse Beckley born at Aston Blank in 1866, Sidney Beckley whose birth was recorded at Northleach in the March quarter of 1868, Edwin Beckley whose birth was recorded at Aston in Birmingham during the last three months of 1869, Minnie Beckley whose birth was recorded at Chipping Sodbury in the March quarter of 1872, Arthur Beckley whose birth was recorded at Wheatenhurst in the June quarter of 1873, where the birth of Flora Beckley was also registered in the March quarter of 1875, all before the family settled in Stroud where the next five children’s birth were registered.  They were Edith Beckley (in Sept Qtr of 1876), Ernest Beckley (in Dec Qtr of 1878), Emily Beckley (in June Qtr of 1880), Annie Beckley (in March Qtr of 1882), and Albert Beckley (in March Qtr of 1883).  The last child was added to the family six years later, when the birth of Lily Rose Beckley was recorded at Bishops Cleeve during the June quarter of 1888.

 

 

 

By 1881 the incomplete family was living at Bartletts Green in Randwick near Stroud, and that might tie in with the fact that Paul was listed as a railway signalman, with the main Great Western Railway line passing close to Randwick.  On that occasion only eight of their nine children were living there with them, with their eldest son still living with his grandparents.  The birth places of those eight children included four different locations as Paul’s work on the railway moved him around the country, and they were Birmingham, Pucklechurch in Bristol, Standish and Randwick. 

 

 

 

According to the next census in 1891 Caroline and Paul and only five of their twelve children were living a 5 Railway Terrace in Dodenhall near Droitwich, where the couple was still living in March 1901.  By that time in their lives the only children still living with them were their daughters Annie and Lily, and their son Albert.  It was just over seven years later that Caroline Beckley nee Collett died at Droitwich in Worcestershire during the second quarter of 1908 when she was 65.  Curiously the death of her husband Paul Beckley also occurred during the June quarter of 1908 and had the same Droitwich registration reference number as Caroline, that being 6C 185.

 

 

 

 

2O79

Joseph Collett was born at Aston Blank in 1847, his birth being recorded at Stow-on-the-Wold during the June quarter of that year, the eldest surviving son of Henry and Rhoda Collett.  However, it was just over a year later that he was baptised there on 30th July 1848.  After leaving school Joseph was working as a servant at a house in Chedworth in 1861 when he was 14 years old.  It was six months after the next census that he married (1) Jane Elizabeth Lewis at Hereford during the September quarter of 1871.  Jane had been born at Hereford in the second quarter of 1851.

 

 

 

By the time of the 1881 Census the marriage had produced two children for Joseph and Jane, who was referred to as Jane Eliza Collett age 34 and from Hereford.  According to the census return the family was living at The Lamb Inn at 2 St Mary’s Square in the St Mary de Lode district of the city of Gloucester where Joseph Collett, age 34, was the inn keeper.  The two children living with Joseph and Jane were Mary Jane Collett who was eight, and Chas Collett who was six, both of them born at Gloucester. 

 

 

 

Also living and working with the family was servant Mary Ann Philpotts, age 44, who was also from Hereford.  There were two others at the inn and they were lodger Henry Cox of Gloucester, an ostler of 35, who was also described as a servant at the inn, and boarder Walter Edward Squire who was only four months old and from London.

 

 

 

Ten years later and the enlarged family was still at the same address, with the addition of a further two children.  Sadly Jane had died in Gloucester during the first three months of 1891, when she was only 41, perhaps during the birth of the couple’s last child who also did not survive.  The census that year listed widower Joseph, age 44, as a publican and fruiterer, while his four children were recorded as Mary J Collett, age 18, Charles E L Collett, age 16, Frank Collett, who was eight, and Ethel M Collett who was six years old.  Lodging with the family was equilibrist Nello Wilhelm from Denmark.

 

 

 

Joseph survived as a widower for two and a half years before he married (2) Emily Milverton at Bridport in Dorset during the third quarter of 1893.  By the time of the census in 1901 Joseph and his second wife were residing at 3 Worcester Street in Gloucester, where Joseph was working as a fruiterer and greengrocer at the age of 54.  He and Emily, age 60 and from Bridport, had living with them Joseph’s youngest daughter Ethel M Collett.

 

 

 

Sadly for Joseph, it was just over two years later that Emily died during the second quarter of 1903, leaving Joseph a widower for the second time in his life.  So in April 1911 Joseph Collett, age 64, was being looked after by his unmarried daughter Ethel Maud Collett, while they were still living in Gloucester.  Joseph Collett was in Hereford area of the country ten years later when he died in 1922, his death recorded there during the second quarter of that year.

 

 

 

2P123

Mary Jane Collett

Born in 1873 at Gloucester

 

2P124

Charles Ernest Lewis Collett

Born in 1875 at Gloucester

 

2P125

Frank Collett

Born in 1883 at Gloucester

 

2P126

Ethel Maud Collett

Born in 1884 at Gloucester

 

 

 

 

2O80

Thomas Collett was born at Aston Blank where he was baptised on 25th November 1849, although the birth was registered at Northleach around that same time.  He died less than a week later on 1st December 1849, the second of two sons of Henry and Rhoda not to survive beyond infancy, his death also being recorded at Northleach.

 

 

 

 

2O81

George Collett was born at Aston Blank on 4th February 1851, where he was baptised on 2nd March 1851, his birth being recorded at Northleach during that first quarter of the year.  He married Annie Lyes on 20th March 1869 at Cheltenham Registry Office.  Annie was a dressmaker and the daughter of Samuel Lyes and was born in 1848 at Evesham in Worcestershire.  At the time of their wedding George was a police constable and was living at the Cheltenham Police Station while Annie was living at Edward Parade in Leckhampton.  The witnesses at the marriage were James and Mary Lyes.  In 1873 George was working as a railway-points man and was living with his wife and two sons at Allen’s Row in Glascote near Tamworth in Staffordshire.

 

 

 

Eight years later in 1881 George was 30 when he was working as a gardener while living at Tamworth Road in Bolehall & Glascote.  However, on that occasion he gave his place of birth as Northleach, the registration district for Aston Blank.  Living with him was his wife Annie Collett of Evesham, who was 33, and their five children, all of whom were born at Glascote.  They were George Henry Collett, who was eight, Joseph Collett, who was seven, Walter Collett, who was six, Lennard (Leonard) Collett, who was three, and Wm Alfred Collett who was only nine months old.

 

 

 

Just two more children were added to their family while they were still living at Glascote during the 1880s, although in 1891 the family was recorded within the Tamworth & Fazeley registration district.  George Collett was 40, Annie Collett was 42, and their seven children were George Collett, age 20, Joseph Collett, age 18, Walter Collett, age 16, Leonard Collett, age 14, William Collett, age 11, Samuel Collett who was eight, and Rhoda Collett who was two years old.

 

 

 

By the time of the marriage of his son Joseph in 1899 George was working as a coal merchant and a carting contractor.  Two years after that George Collett, age 49, was confirmed as a coal dealer, and his wife Annie, who was 52, were still living at Main Road in Glascote in 1901.  Annie gave her place of birth as Evesham, while it is curious that George’s place of birth was stated as being Birmingham.  Living with the couple on that occasion were their four youngest children, Leonard Collett, William A Collett, Ernest who was named in error as Elijah S Collett, and Rhoda Collett.

 

 

 

Ten years later in 1911 the couple had just two of their children still living with them at ‘Glenthorne’ on Glascote Road in Tamworth.  George was 60, Annie was 62, Leonard was 33, and Rhoda was 22.  Also living with the family on that occasion was George’s granddaughter Annie Collett who was 10 years old and the eldest daughter of George’s son Walter Collett.  The same census confirmed that George and Annie had been married for forty-two years during which time they had given birth to eight children, of whom one had obviously not survived as there are only seven known children listed below.  One other person was recorded living at the same address, and she was Emily Griffiths who was 27.

 

 

 

It was sixteen years later, at the age of 76 that George Collett died, his death being registered at Tamworth during the first three months of 1927.  It would appear that Annie died of a broken heart, because only a short time after losing her husband the death of Annie Collett nee Lyes was recorded at Tamworth during the second quarter of 1927.

 

 

 

2P127

George Henry Collett

Born in 1871 at Glascote, Tamworth

 

2P128

Joseph Collett

Born in 1873 at Glascote, Tamworth

 

2P129

Walter Collett

Born in 1875 at Glascote, Tamworth

 

2P130

Leonard Collett

Born in 1877 at Glascote, Tamworth

 

2P131

William Alfred Collett

Born in 1880 at Glascote, Tamworth

 

2P132

Ernest Samuel Collett

Born in 1882 at Glascote, Tamworth

 

2P133

Rhoda Collett

Born in 1889 at Glascote, Tamworth

 

 

 

 

2O82

Harriett Collett was born at Aston Blank and was baptised there on 15th January 1854.  She survived for just over two months when she died on 28th March 1854, her death being recorded at Northleach, where her birth was also registered.  An alternative source indicates that she day on the same day, but in 1855.

 

 

 

 

2P1

Mary Ann Collett (previously Ref. 33P35) was born at Bourton-on-the-Water in 1876, the first child of John Brain Collett by his wife Annie.  The family was living in the village of Upper Slaughter in 1881 when Mary A Collett was four years old.  During the intervening years Mary and her parents had spent some time in Bledington where he brother John (below) was born.  However, after living for a few years in Upper Slaughter, and around the time when Mary was about ten years old, her parents took the family to Fulbrook near Burford in Oxfordshire.  It was at Fulbrook that Mary’s two youngest siblings were born and where the family was recorded at the time of the census in 1891, when Mary A Collett from Bourton-on-the-Water was 14.  It must be assumed that Mary was married prior to March 1901, since there is no record of her as Mary Ann Collett from Bourton in the census conducted that year.

 

 

 

 

2P2

John Brain Collett (previously Ref. 33P36) was born in 1878 at Bledington close to the Gloucestershire and Oxfordshire county boundary.  John was the second child and eldest son of John Brain Collett and his wife Annie and by 1881 he and his family were living in Upper Slaughter.  The census return confirmed that he was two years of age and had been born at Bledington in Gloucestershire, the son of a farmer of ninety acres.  The family remained living at Upper Slaughter until around the middle of the decade, when they moved to Fulbrook to the north of Burford in Oxfordshire.  According to the Fulbrook census in 1891 John B Collett from Bledington was 12 years of age and a plough boy, most likely working alongside his father.  During the 1890s something happened to the family which is currently unknown.  What is known is that John Brain Collett separated from his family at that time and by 1901 he was living and working in the Ladywood district of Birmingham.  The census return confirmed that he had been born at Bledington and that he was 22, and at that he was working on the railway.

 

 

 

It was also just after that time when John married (1) Annie Marie Carter and the couple settled down to live in the Ladywood district of Birmingham where their first child was born.  A further three children were born into the family before Annie sadly died while still relatively young.  By April 1911 John Brain Collett was 32 and his wife Annie Marie was 31.  Living with them in Ladywood at that time were five of their children, they being John Brain Collett junior, who was seven, Leonard George Collett, who was five, Albert Edward Collett, who was three, Hilda Annie Collett who was two, and Beatrice Ethel Collett who was just six weeks old.

 

 

 

John’s brother Arthur (below), together with other members of the Collett family, emigrated to New Zealand around 1921.  Included in the party was John’s eldest son, John Brain Collett junior who was 18, a move that may have been prompted by the death of his mother.  Following the death of his wife Annie Marie Collett, John married (2) spinster Ruth Woodall during the second quarter of 1920, the event being recorded at Kings Norton register office (Ref. 6d 70).  His new wife must have been some years younger than forty-two-year old John as that second marriage produced a further three children for John, they being Arthur Collett, Estelle Collett, and Walter Collett.

 

 

 

Three more of John’s children emigrated to New Zealand at later times, to be reunited with their older brother, and they were his son Leonard Collett and daughter Hilda Collett who travelled there together, and his daughter Estelle Collett who went in 1951.  John Brain Collett senior and his second unnamed wife remained living in Birmingham for some years, before the couple later moved to Ludlow in Shropshire when John eventually retired.  And it was at Ludlow that John Brain Collett died and was buried during 1976 at the age of 98.  Walter, the youngest member of John’s family also lived at Ludlow and was still living there in 2008, while another son (either Albert or Arthur) remained living in the Birmingham area, but has since passed away.  The other son (Albert or Arthur) was thought to have moved to live within the London area, but he too had also died by 2008.

 

 

 

2Q1

John Brain Collett

Born in 1903 at Ladywood

 

2Q2

Leonard George Collett

Born in 1905 at Ladywood

 

2Q3

Albert Edward Collett

Born in 1907 at Ladywood

 

2Q4

Hilda Annie Collett

Born in 1909 at Ladywood

 

2Q5

Beatrice Ethel Collett

Born in 1911 or 1910 at Ladywood

 

The following are the three children of John Brain Collett by his second wife Ruth Woodall:

 

2Q6

Arthur Collett

Born in 1921 in Birmingham

 

2Q7

Estelle Collett

Born after 1921 in Birmingham

 

2Q8

Walter Collett

Born after 1921 in Birmingham

 

 

 

 

2P3

Margaret E Collett (previously Ref. 33P37) was born at Upper Slaughter in 1881, not long after the census day that year, to parents John Brain Collett and his wife Annie.  She was possibly around five years old when her family left Upper Slaughter and moved across the county boundary into Oxfordshire, where they settled in the village of Fulbrook, near Burford.  The family was also recorded there in the census of 1891 when Margaret E Collett was attending the local school at the age of nine years.  The family was still living in Fulbrook two years later for the birth of Margaret’s youngest sibling. 

 

 

 

However, what happened between 1894 and 1901 is still a mystery, as no recorded of her parents has been found in the census of 1901, when Margaret E Collett from Upper Slaughter was 19 and living in Hambledon in Surrey.  Although not located in 1901, her sister Evelyn Collett (below) was also recorded at Surrey in 1911 and it was also within the county that Margaret’s brother Walter Richard Collett is believed to have started his own family in 1911.  The lack of Margaret E Collett in the next census in 1911 very likely indicates that she was married by then.

 

 

 

 

2P4

Walter Richard Collett (previously Ref. 33P38) was born at Upper Slaughter in 1883, the son of John Brain Collett and his wife Annie. Walter would only have been around two or three years old when his family settled in the village of Fulbrook near Burford in Oxfordshire where, as Walter R Collett who was living with his family in 1891 at the age of eight years.  No obvious record for Walter’s parents has been found in 1901, while of the day of the census that year Walter Collet (sic), age 18 and from Upper Slaughter, was a boarder at the Charlbury home of the widow Sarah Drinkwater and her large family in Paul Street.  At that time in his life his occupation was that of a domestic gardener.  However, nothing positive has been found to determine where he was living at the time of the next census in 1911, by which time it would appear he was married.

 

 

 

It is also understood that Walter was an engineer sometime during his working life and that he married Caroline Hayes around 1910.  Their son, who may have been the first of several children, was born in Surrey during August that year, when Walter’s sister Evelyn Collett (below) was recorded at Epsom in Surrey.  Their son Thomas Walter Collett was a sergeant in the Royal Army Service Corps when he was killed in action during the Second World War at the end of May in 1941.  Due to the difficult circumstances surrounding his death, the official notification was only sent to his mother by the War Office on 10th August 1942.

 

 

 

2Q9

Thomas Walter Collett

Born on 31.08.1911 in Surrey

 

 

 

 

2P5

Evelyn Collett (previously Ref. 33P39) was born at Fulbrook near Burford in Oxfordshire during 1888, the daughter of John Brain Collett and his wife Annie.  It was also at Fulbrook that the family was living in 1891 when Evelyn was two years old.  It is rather curious that no record of Evelyn and her younger brother Arthur (below), or their parents, has been found within the next census which was conducted during March 1901.  However, by April 1911 Evelyn Collett from Fulbrook in Oxfordshire was 21 when she was presumably a nurse working in a hospital in Epsom in Surrey not far from where her brother Walter was also living around that time.  Hambledon in Surrey was also the place where her sister Margaret had been living in 1901 and where she may have still been living in 1911, but as a married woman.

 

 

 

 

2P6

Arthur Frederick Collett (previously Ref. 33P40) was born at Fulbrook in Oxfordshire on 12th April 1893, the youngest of the six children of John Brain Collett and his wife Annie.  No record of him or his parents has been found within the census of 1901, although it is known that his much older brother John had already moved to Birmingham by then, while his sister Margaret was recorded in Surrey.  Ten years later in April 1911 Arthur Collett age 17 and from Fulbrook was living at Burford in Oxfordshire with his father John Brain Collett [the first] and his mother Annie, who were both in their late fifties.

 

 

 

What is known is that after the death of his father and before the start of the First World War, Arthur emigrated to New Zealand.  On 10th January 1916 at Masterton he enlisted with the New Zealand Expeditionary Force and took up his duties on the following day.  It is established from his military records, as supplied by Susan Jenkins at the New Zealand Archives Office, that he was already married to Ella Mary by then.  Furthermore his entry papers confirmed he was the son of Mrs Annie Collett of Burford in Oxfordshire, and that he had been born in that county of England on 12th April 1893.  He was 5 feet 10 inches tall, weighed 168 pounds, had brown hair, bluish grey eyes, and a fair complexion.

 

 

 

The same records showed that he was a shepherd at the time of his entry into military service, and that he was employed by John Clulow of Alfredton.  As Private A F Collett, service number 10316, he served with the 2nd Battalion of the Wellington Infantry Regiment for a total of two years and three hundred days, of which all bar 160 days were spent overseas.  His discharged came on 6th November 1918 when he was declared no longer physically fit for service on account of wounds received in action, following which he was awarded the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.  The injury he had sustained at Rouen in France was noted as affecting his face with the loss of a bone in his lower jaw.  His address immediately after the war was Bushgrove Pori, Pahiatua.

 

 

 

On 6th May 1916 Arthur sailed from New Zealand and arrived at Suez in Egypt on 23rd June, where he spent the next 33 days.  On 26th July he left Egypt and arrived at Southampton in England on 7th August, and was there in London for 21 days, after which he landed on French soil on 29th August.  Two and a half months later on 12th November 1916 he was seriously wounded during the fighting at Rouen, but it was not until 2nd December that he was taken to a military hospital in Boulogne.  Two day later he was on a boat back to England where he was admitted into King Georges Hospital at Shelford Street in London. 

 

 

 

How long he was there is not clear, while the next entry states that he was transferred to the A M Hospital in Sidcup, Kent on 25th April 1918.  From there, two days later, he was transferred to the General Hospital in Walton, where two weeks later he was declared unfit by the Medical Board.  There then following a period a month’s of convalescence in Torquay before he was placed on board the troopship Marama which sailed out of Southampton on 31st July 1918 bound for New Zealand.

 

 

 

Arthur Frederick Collett married Ella Mary Meads in 1925, Ella having been born in New Zealand during 1903, the daughter of Thomas Harmon Meads and Mary Morrissey who were married in 1896 in New Zealand.  Once married Arthur and Ella lived at Pahiatua in New Zealand, although it is also known that the marriage produced no children for the couple in the relatively short time that they were together.  That was because Arthur Frederick Collett died on 2nd September 1927 at the age of 34 while in Wellington Hospital, the details of his passing being published in the Pahiatua Herald.  His military records state that his death had nothing to do with the injuries he had sustained during the war.

 

 

 

 

2P9

Francis George Brain Collett (previously Ref. 33P43) was born at Upper Slaughter in 1895 and it was there he was living with his family in the 1901 at the age of six years.  The only clues so far to his life can be found in the words on his headstone in the graveyard of St Peter’s Church in Upper Slaughter.  They simply read “In Loving Memory of Francis George Brain Collett a dear husband and father who died on 8th June 1977 aged 82”.  However, it is now known that at the outbreak of The Great War, George, as he was known, enlisted at the age of 19 and was sent to Mesopotamia [now Iraq], where 92,000 of the 410,000 Commonwealth troops died.  In addition to this at the age of 44, and as a member of the Territorial Army, Sergeant Collett was one of the first to be called up in 1939, and came under fire before long as an anti-aircraft gunner with the Royal Artillery on the home front.

 

 

 

Upper Slaughter carries the rare distinction of being only one of a handful of settlements within the UK who welcomed home all 36 of their brave men and women after WW2, and to commemorate this achievement it was George Collett who carved a wooden plaque on which his son Tony Collett, from his first married, painted the names of all of those fortunate men and women.  The plaque is placed alongside one commemorating the returning soldier from WW1, with George’s name appearing on both.  After the First World War, and upon George’s return to Upper Slaughter, he continued working his father’s business of F W Collett & Son, as well being the village's odd-job man, while also being the church sexton and an occasional undertaker.  It was also during the 1920s that Francis George Brain Collett was married, following which his son Anthony was born in 1931.

 

 

 

Within the written history of Upper Slaughter, there are two references to Mrs F G B Collett.  The first of them talks about the remodelling of the whole of Bagehott's Square in the village to accommodate eight cottages, the details of which were recorded by Mrs Collett of the Woman’s Institute, while the second related to the village school, and was written by Mrs Collett, the school correspondent, as follows:  “In 1874 it was enlarged and placed under a management committee appointed in vestry.  A certificated mistress taught about 33 children who paid fees of 2d or 3d.  Attendance rose to 43 in 1904, but fell immediately after reorganisation to 19 in 1932.  The older children then went to Bourton-on-the-Water.  In 1961 the school, an 'aided' school with two teachers, drew some of its 30-odd children from neighbouring parishes.”

 

 

 

Following the death of his first wife, Francis George Brain Collett married (2) Phyllis with whom he had another son George William Collett who was born at Upper Slaughter during 1951.  Following the death of her first husband in 1977, Phyllis Collett married for a second time to become Phyllis Collett Tyler.  She attended the Collett Reunion at Shepton Mallet in 2006 with her son George, when she was living at Dickler Close in Bourton-on-the Water.  In 2012 their son George contacted the Collett website to announce that his mother Phyllis Collett Tyler had passed away during 2011. 

 

 

 

Five years earlier, in 2001, Phyllis Collett Tyler wrote a booklet entitled ‘Cotswold Romance’ the 17th Century story of John Collett of Upper Slaughter who first married his cousin Anne Collett and, when she died in 1675, he then married her sister Mary.  In doing so John committed the most vile and detestable sin of incest.  His marriage to Anne produced no children, but with Mary he had nine children.  So upset were the authorities by this, the sentence of divorce between John and Mary was pronounced in the parish of Upper Slaughter on 1st November 1685, the sentence confirmed by the Dean of the Archbishops Court of Delegates.  The three individuals referred to in this little tale can be found in Part 14 – The John Kyte Collett Line at references 14H6, 14H7, and 14H8.  It may be of interest that there was another connection with the name of Tyler, when Francis’ sister Violet Mary Collett (below) married into that family.

 

 

 

2Q10

Anthony Collett

Born in 1931 at Upper Slaughter

 

2Q11

George William Collett

Born in 1951 at Upper Slaughter

 

 

 

 

2P10

Marjorie Katherine Collett (previously Ref. 33P44) was born at Upper Slaughter on 18th June 1896, the eldest of the three daughter of Francis William Collett and his wife Margaret Bell.  She was four years of age and 14 years old in the next two census returns for Upper Slaughter when she was still living with her family.  It would appear that she never married since, at the time of her death, she was named as Marjorie Katherine Collett, her passing recorded at North Cotswold register office (Ref. 22 1983) during the month of April in 1987 when she was 90 years of age.

 

 

 

 

2P11

Frederick Holt Collett (previously Ref. 33P45) was born at Upper Slaughter in 1898 and was the youngest son of Francis William Collett.  This information is based on the inscription on a headstone in the churchyard of St Peter’s Church at Upper Slaughter which reads “In Loving Memory of Fred Holt younger son of Francis W and Margaret E Collett entered into rest February 13th 1931 aged 33 years”.  It seems unlikely that he was married, particularly since it was his father Francis William Collett, a carpenter, who was named as the administrator of his personal effects valued at £478 13 Shilling 10d at Gloucester on 25th November 1931.  The probate office record referred to him as Fred Holt Collett.

 

 

 

 

2P12

Violet Mary Collett (previously Ref. 33P46) was one half of a set of twins born at Upper Slaughter in September 1900.  She married Mr Tyler and was buried in the churchyard of St Peter’s Church at Upper Slaughter.  Her headstone reads “In Loving Memory of my wife Violet Mary Tyler nee Collett who died on 18th September 1975 aged 75”

 

 

 

 

2P13

Dorothy E Collett (previously Ref. 33P47) was one half of a set of twins born at Upper Slaughter in September 1900.  Tragically she died when she was only twenty years old and was buried in the churchyard of St Peter’s Church at Upper Slaughter.  Her headstone reads “In Loving Memory of Dorothy Elizabeth Collett youngest daughter of Francis William and Margaret Bell Collett who entered into her rest on 20th December 1928 aged 28”

 

 

 

 

2P14

Harriet May Collett was born at Balsall Heath in Birmingham during 1879, the eldest of the nine children of George Edward Collett and Eliza Breakwell.  No record of her or her parents has been positively identified within the census of 1881, but by 1891 the family was living at 291 Moseley Road in Balsall Heath where Harriet’s father had a butcher’s shop.  Harriet M Collett was 11 years old, and shortly after the family moved to Coughton in the parish of Sambourne.  It was there also that she was still living with her family in 1901, when she was recorded as Harriet May Collett who was 21.  It is known that she later married Ernest Johnson who was named as one of the executors of her father’s Will in 1920.  Harriet May Johnson died in 1972, having given birth to twelve children.  One of those children, known as Aunty Trix – Beatrice Maud Johnson, researched the Collett family and knew genealogist Phyllis Collett Tyler (Ref. 2P9).

 

 

 

 

2P16

Una Marie Collett was born at Balsall Heath in 1884 and was living at 291 Moseley Road in 1891 when she was named as Una M Collett aged six years.  By 1901 Una M Collett was 16 when she was still living with her family which had moved to Parkfield House Farm in Coughton nine years earlier.  All that is known about her after that time is that she married Charles Oldacre with whom she had two daughters.  It was as Una Marie Oldacre nee Collett that she died in 1983.

 

 

 

 

2P17

Jesse Collett (previously Ref. 2p4 in Guiting Power appendix) was born at Balsall Heath in Birmingham on 29th December 1885, one of the two sons from the seven children of George Edward Collett and Eliza Breakwell.  He was five years of age in the Kings Norton census of 1891 when he was living there with his family, while ten years later Jesse Collett from Birmingham was 15 and a student being educated at a boarding school in Wolverley near Kidderminster.  After a further ten years, the census in 1911 revealed Jesse Collett aged 25 farming at Bengrove between Alstone and Teddington within the Winchcomb registration district of Gloucestershire.  Staying there with him, as his housekeeper, was his older sister Eva Collett for was 29.  Jesse, or Jessie as he was known, farmed at Bengrove from 1910 until 1913.

 

 

 

From 1913 up until 1935 Jessie managed Larford Farm, just south of Stourport on land adjacent to the River Severn.  Upon the death of his father in 1920, Jesse Collett, a farmer, was named as one of the four executors of his estate.  From Larford Farm Jessie returned to Parkfield House Farm in Coughton, which his brother and his mother had worked after the death of Jessie’s father.  By that time in 1935 the farmland at Throckmorton had been acquired by the Crown Estates during the previous year, with Jessie being taken on as a tenant farmer.  Jesse Collett died at Coughton during 1964. 

 

 

 

It was during 1914 that Jesse Collett married Jane Robb Thomson, with whom he had the three children listed below.  The couple’s eldest daughter Christian McLaren Thomson Collett married Ronald Williams, who later became a bomber squadron leader who was killed in action on 14th July 1943.  That marriage produced a son for Christian who passed away in 1999.  Jessie and Jane’s second child, Dorothy Jean Collett, married Neil Corbett much later in her life, as a result of which there was no issue.  Dorothy Jean Corbett nee Collett died in 2003.

 

 

 

2Q12

Christian McLaren Thomson Collett

Born in 1915 at Astley, nr Stourport

 

2Q13

Dorothy Jean Collett

Born in 1918 at Astley, nr Stourport

 

2Q14

George Robert Thomson Collett

Born in 1923 at Astley, nr Stourport

 

 

 

 

2P20

Flora Dorothy Collett, who was known as Dolly, was born at Balsall Heath in 1890 and was one year old in the census of 1891 when she and her family were living at 291 Moseley Road, where she was very likely born.  Flora D Collett was 10 in 1901 and Flora Dorothy Collett was 20 in 1911, on both occasions she was with her family at Parkfield House in Coughton.  She later married local farmer William Green who was a distant relative of Hubert Green who married Flora’s sister Winifred (below).  In 1920, following the death of Flora’s father, it was William Green, a farmer, who was one of the four executors of his considerable estate.  Flora Dorothy Green nee Collett died in 1955.

 

 

 

 

2P21

Winifred Collett, who was known as Winnie, was born at Coughton in Warwickshire in 1893, youngest daughter of George and Eliza Collett.  Winifred was seven years old and 17 years of age in the Coughton census returns for 1901 and 1911.  Perhaps it was through the marriage of her older sister Dolly (above) to William Green that Winnie may have been introduced to Hubert Green, to whom she was later married.  Winifred Green nee Collett died in 1981.

 

 

 

 

2P22

Otto Collett was born at Coughton in 1894, the last of the nine children of George Edward Collett and Eliza Breakwell.  Otto was six years of age in 1901 and was 16 in 1911 when living with his farming family at Coughton.  Otto later married a lady whose surname was thought to be Gibbs, and it was as Otto Collett, a farmer, that he was one of the four executors of his father’s Will proved in 1920.  Fifteen years later Otto left Coughton to farm in Kent.  That was during 1935, when his mother went to live her remaining life with her eldest daughter Harriet May Johnson.  The marriage of Otto Collett produced two sons and three daughters, although their exact details have been withheld.  It is believed that eldest son George Collett lives in Worcestershire, where he has two sons, while Otto’s youngest son John lives in Norfolk.  Otto Collett died in 1965.

 

 

 

2Q15

George Collett

Date of birth unknown at Coughton

 

2Q16

a Collett daughter

Date of birth unknown at Coughton

 

2Q17

a Collett daughter

Date of birth unknown at Coughton

 

2Q18

a Collett daughter

Date of birth unknown at Coughton

 

2Q19

John Collett

Date of birth unknown at Coughton

 

 

 

 

2P25

William John Collett was born at 22 Cromwell Street in Swindon on 17th January 1870.  By the time of the census on the second of April in 1871 William’s parents were sharing a terraced house at 22 Cromwell Street in Swindon with the Hardiman family.  William’s father was employed by the GWR as was William Hardiman.  The census simply recorded that William J Collett was born in Swindon and that he was one year old.  Ten years later his family had moved and was then living at 7 Bath Street in April 1881, where William was eleven and attending the GWR School in the railway village, as that area of Swindon was called.

 

 

 

He later attended the New Swindon Mechanics Institution Evening Classes and was awarded a prize in December 1884 presented by W. Dean.  This was a leather-bound Webster’s Dictionary which was handed down through the generations to Brian Collett born in 1946 and the compiler of this family history website.  His occupation was that of carpenter with the Great Western Railway prior to his death three months before he reached his twentieth birthday.  He died at 7 Bath Street in Swindon on 29th October 1889, the cause of death being recorded as typhoid.

 

 

 

New information has come to light that may suggest William followed in his father’s footsteps by joining the navy and served on board HMS Endeavour in the years between 1885 and 1889.  It may therefore be that on a trip overseas he contracted the illness which eventually killed him.

 

 

 

 

2P26

Albert Henry Collett was born at 22 Cromwell Street in Swindon on 3rd September 1872.  At the start of the next decade his family moved into new accommodation at 7 Bath Street in Swindon which was provided by the GWR with whom his father was employed.  The census in 1881 confirmed that Albert was eight years old and that he was living with his family at 7 Bath Street.  No record of Albert has been found anywhere in the census of 1891 and this may coincide with the stories within the family that he was a sailor like his father.

 

 

 

In 1900 Albert married Rosina A Lewis (pictured right), the event being recorded at the Gloucester register office during the third quarter of the year.  Rosina was born at Stroud during the first three months of 1877, and was the daughter of brewer’s labourer John Lewis and his wife Sarah A Lewis, both of Stroud.  The couple initially lived in the Kingsholm district of Gloucester St Marks, and it was there at 49 Sherborne Street that they were recorded as visitors in the March census of 1901.  That was the home of twenty-six years old widow Emily Newman who was a labeller in jam making.  Albert was described as 28 and a blacksmith from Swindon.  His wife Rosina was 23 from Gloucester, and also staying at the house with them was the widow Ann Daniels who was 43 and from Nantiglow in Monmouthshire.

 

 

 

Over the next ten years Rosina presented her husband with five children, the first three of which were born while the couple was still living in Gloucester.  By 1907 the family had moved to Wales and it was at 23 Dolphin Street in Newport in Monmouthshire that William and Rosina were living in April 1911.  The census return recorded that the couple had been married for eleven years and that Albert Henry Collett from Swindon was 38 and a dock warehouseman.  Rosina was 33, and their five children were Violet who was 10, Ella who was eight, Mervyn who was six, William who was four, and Arthur who was two years old.

 

 

 

Whilst no date is known for the passing of Albert Henry Collett, he wife Rosina Collett nee Lewis died at Newport during the last three months of 1962 when she was 85.

 

 

 

In August 2000 Donna Collett provided the following information.  Her grandfather was Bertie Collett who, as Bertram H F Collett, was married to Pearl Davies.  Her father was Paul Collett and he had siblings Bertie, Georgie, Anna, Cathy and Christine, all of whom were from Newport.  An attempt to make contact with Donna’s father in 2000 failed, as he did not wish to discuss any aspect of his family’s past life.  However, thanks to new information received in June 2006 from Andrew (Andy) Collett in England and his cousin Karen Rowan (daughter of Patricia Collett) of Australia, a clearer picture of this family has emerged.  This was followed up by more information on this branch of the family from Terence Prescott during 2012/2013 which validated much of what had been written before.

 

 

 

 

 

Albert Henry Collett, who was born at 22 Cromwell Street in Swindon on 3rd September 1872 was a sailor at sometime in his life, possibly during the Great War, judging by his age in the photograph on the right, which is an extract from a larger photograph in which Albert was flanked by his mother Caroline Ruth Collett and his wife Rosina Collett.

 

Albert is known to have spent some time in Gloucester Gaol and that most likely happened around 1906, six years after he had married Rosina.  The story within the family suggests that he made his escape from the prison and fled to South Wales.  The family story also includes the fact that Rosina, and her three children at that time, walked the entire journey from Gloucester to Newport, to be with her fugitive husband.  No record of his later death has so far been found.

 

 

 

It was perhaps that episode in his life that resulted in Albert severing all ties with his Swindon-based family, and it was also that separation which made it so difficult to trace him and his family, that is until this new information about his life came to light.

 

 

 

2Q20

Violet Winifred E C Collett

Born in 1901 at Gloucester

 

2Q21

Ella Agnes Collett

Born in 1903 at Gloucester

 

2Q22

Mervyn Stephen Collett

Born in 1905 at Gloucester

 

2Q23

William Collett

Born in 1907 at Newport, Wales

 

2Q24

Arthur Collett

Born in 1909 at Newport, Wales

 

2Q25

Lewis George Collett

Born in 1911 at Newport, Wales

 

2Q26

Nora Collett

Born in 1913 at Newport, Wales

 

2Q27

Bertram H F Collett

Born in 1915 at Newport, Wales

 

 

 

 

2P27

Elizabeth Annie Collett, who was referred to as Lizzie by the family, was born at 22 Cromwell Street in Swindon between January and March 1874.  By 1881 the family was living at 7 Bath Street in New Town Swindon where Elizabeth was seven years old.  In between the family had lived for a five years at 16 Exeter Street.  Ten years later Elizabeth A Collett from Swindon was living and working in the Edmonton district of London, although she gave her age as being eighteen.  Three years after that Elizabeth had returned to Swindon where she married Frederick Henry Taylor during the first three months of 1894.  Fred, as he was known, was also born at Swindon towards the end of 1873.

 

 

 

Their marriage produced three children who were all born at Swindon, where Lizzie and Fred spent all their married life.  The children’s details are included below.  Initially the couple initially lived with Elizabeth’s widowed mother Caroline Collett at 7 Bath Street, and it was very likely there that their first child was born, and where the three of them were listed in the March census of 1901.  Elizabeth Taylor was 27, as was her husband Frederick, who was employed by the GWR as a railway carriage fitter, while their son William F H Taylor who was only eleven months old.

 

 

 

Within the next ten years a further two children were added to the family which, by April 1911, had moved from 7 Bath Street to 13 Morse Street in Swindon.  The census that year recorded the family as Frederick Henry Taylor, age 36, Elizabeth Annie Taylor, also 36, William Frederick Henry Taylor, who was 11, Frederick Maurice Taylor, who was eight, and Arthur George Taylor who was three.  At that same time Elizabeth’s mother Caroline was living with Lizzie’s brother Maurice but, shortly after, he and his family moved to Lancashire, following which Caroline moved in with the Taylor family, where she remained until her death in 1929.

 

 

 

William Frederick Henry Taylor was born during the second quarter of 1900.  He married Olive May Phillips in Swindon when he was 25, Olive having been born there in the first three months of 1901.  However, they were only married for just eight years when William died at Swindon in 1933, aged 33, coincidentally the same year that his father also passed away.  Olive survived her husband by forty-eight years, when she died at Salisbury in 1981 at the age of 80.  It would appear that their marriage resulted in the birth of two children, the records giving the mother’s maiden name as Phillips.  And they were Barbara O Taylor, born at Swindon in 1926, Gerald W M Taylor, born at Swindon in 1931.

 

 

 

Frederick Maurice Taylor was born towards the end of 1902.  He married Ethel Mason at Swindon in 1929 when he was 27, Ethel having been born during the last three months of 1903.  Frederick Taylor later became the Headmaster of Gorse Hill Junior School in Swindon sometime during the middle of the twentieth century.  It was also in Swindon that he died in April 1987, his wife having already passed away by then, with Ethel’s death recorded in Swindon during the December quarter of 1980.  Their daughter Janet M Taylor was born in Swindon in early 1933, when her mother’s maiden name was confirmed as Mason.

 

 

 

Arthur George Taylor was born between April and June in 1907.  It was during the final months of 1930 that he married Muriel Saunders, who may have been the Muriel Amy Saunders who was born at Malmesbury in 1906.  The marriage produced one son, Ronald F Taylor who was born in Swindon during the second quarter of 1934, when his mother’s maiden name was verified as Saunders.  The couple were married for almost twenty years when Arthur died in Swindon during the spring of 1950.  It is possible that Muriel remarried, since not record of the later death of Muriel Collett has been found.

 

 

 

Fred Taylor senior died in Swindon where his death was recorded during the first three months of 1933.  His widow Elizabeth Anne Taylor nee Collett died in Swindon in late 1937, her passing being registered there during the fourth quarter of that year.  She was 63 years of age.

 

 

 

 

2P28

Caroline Ruth Collett, referred to as Carrie by the family, was born at 16 Exeter Street in Swindon between July and September 1876, although by April 1881 the family was living at 7 Bath Street where Caroline was four years old.  Ten years later when Caroline was fourteen she was the oldest of the eleven children of William Collett and Caroline Ruth Watts still living in the family home at 7 Bath Street in Swindon.  By that time her father had died two years earlier, so Caroline was supporting her widowed mother looking after the younger members of the family.

 

 

 

According to the Swindon census of 1901, Caroline was 24 and was still unmarried and was still living with her mother at 7 Bath Street.  Her occupation at that time was recorded as being a tailoress like her younger sister Nellie with whom she probably worked.  It would appear that she married Frederick Hood about seven years later, sometime around 1908.  Once married the couple initially appear to have been in the Chippenham area of Wiltshire, where the birth of their only child was registered, although by 1911 the family of three was residing at 14 Southbrook Street in Swindon, when the child’s place of birth was given as Swindon.

 

 

 

On that occasion the Swindon family comprised Frederick J Hood, who was 39, his wife Caroline R Hood, who was 34, and their one year old daughter Edith M Hood.  Their daughter, who was known as Eddy, may or may not have been born in Swindon, but her birth was recorded at Chippenham during the third quarter of 1909.  She married Ernest Rex Franklyn at Swindon in 1934 and they lived in the house next door to her parents in Southbrook Street.  Rex, as he was known, was born at Cirencester in 1909.  Caroline and Frederick later moved to Box near Minchinhampton which, curiously enough, was where her mother Caroline Ruth Collett nee Watts was born.  Edith died at Havering in Essex in 1990, while her husband died there in July 2001.

 

 

 

 

2P29

HARRY JAMES COLLETT was born at 16 Exeter Street in Swindon on 9th January 1879.  Shortly after he was born his father William Collett changed his job and the family moved into a terraced house provided by the Great Western Railway at 7 Bath Street in the Railway Village of Swindon New Town.

 

This was confirmed by the census of 1881 when Harry was incorrectly listed as Henry Collett aged two years.  Seven years later when Harry when nine years old his father died, so by 1891 Harry was 12 and was still living at 7 Bath Street with his widowed mother and his some of his brothers and sisters.

 

His two older brothers had left home by then leaving Harry as the eldest male.

 

 

 

In order to retain the GWR living accommodation Harry’s mother Caroline was working for the GWR in 1891.  However, with her advancing years it was incumbent on Harry to secure employment with the company when he left school a few years later in order to retain their home.  By March 1901 he had completed his apprenticeship and the census that year listed him as Harry J Collett, age 22, who was working for the GWR as a railway engine boiler-smith.  On that occasion he was living with his mother and his family at 7 Bath Street.  Also by that time two of his younger brothers were serving their apprenticeships with the railway company.

 

 

 

Towards the end of the next decade Harry met his future wife Alice Louisa Collett of Siddington near Cirencester who was working in domestic service in Swindon.  He married ALICE LOUISA COLLETT (Ref. 1P54) on 13th March 1909 at St Mark's Church in Swindon.  Almost exactly one year later the April census of 1911 placed Harry and Alice living at 7 Bathampton Street (formerly 7 Bath Street), his mother having moved out to live with Harry’s younger brother Maurice in Swindon.

 

 

 

The census return confirmed that the couple had been married for two years, and living with them was the first of their eight children.  Harry James Collett was 32 and a boiler-maker working in the GWR Locomotive Department of the GWR, Alice Louisa was 30 and from Siddington, and their son William Henry John was one year old.  The photograph above was taken before he became a married man, but for the occasion of his wedding he took to having a moustache which he retained for the rest of his life.

 

 

 

For more details about Harry and his family go to Part 1 – The Main Line 1880 to 2008

starting with his wife Alice Louisa Collett (Ref. 1P37)

 

 

 

 

2P30

Ella Agnes Collett was one of twins born at 7 Bath Street in Swindon in January 1881.  She was recorded as being three months old in the Swindon census of 1881 but tragically died later that same year, sometime between October and December.

 

 

 

 

2P31

Nellie Winifred Collett, who was referred to as Nell by the family, was one half of a set of twins born at 7 Bath Street in Swindon in January 1881.  In the census that year she was recorded as Nelley W Collett aged three months.

 

Her father William Collett died when she was just seven years old, following which she continued to live at 7 Bath Street with the rest of her family for the next eighteen years.  However, rather strangely when she would have been ten, she was not recorded with her family in the census return for 1891.  Where she was at this time has not been discovered.

 

 

 

How long she was absent is not known, but Nellie W Collett aged twenty was back living with her family at 7 Bath Street in March 1901.  At that time in her life she was unmarried and was working with her older sister Caroline as a tailoress.  It was just over five years later that Nellie married housepainter Edward Bizley in Swindon, the wedding recorded there (Ref. 5a 33) during the last three months of 1906, the witnesses being Lilian Mary Neal and Walter Sheppard.  Edward was born in Swindon in 1876 and was the son of William Bizley of South Marston and his wife Elizabeth of Bampton in Oxfordshire.  In 1881 Edward, who was later more commonly known as Duke Bizley, was five years old and was living at Hyde Cottages in Highworth with his agricultural labourer father and the rest of his family.

 

 

 

Over the next few years the marriage produced three children for the couple.  The photograph above was taken shortly after the birth of their son.  All three of their children were previously thought to have been born before the census of 1911.  However, the Swindon census return completed in early April that year disproves this theory, since the only child living with Nellie was their daughter Ella who was named after Nellie’s twin sister who died at 3 months.

 

 

 

The census confirmed that Nellie Winifred Bizley was 30, her husband Edward Bizley was 34, and their daughter Ella Winifred Bizley was two years old.  It therefore seems highly likely that Nellie was with-child on that day and that shortly after she presented her husband with the couple’s second child.  Just prior to the start of the Great War Nellie gave birth to the couple’s third and last child after which Edward became involved in the conflict, service number 101489.  It is established from his military records that he served in France, was demobbed in 1919, and overstayed his leave by 23 hours in 1918 for which he lost two days pay.

 

 

 

Edward Bizley died on 5th July 1956 when he and Nellie were living at 16 Evelyn Street in Swindon, his death recorded there (Ref. 7c 436) when he was 79.  Administration of his estate of £3,024 14 Shillings 3d was granted to his widow Nellie Collett.  Three years later widow Nellie Winifred Bizley nee Collett died on 29th September 1959 when she was still living at 16 Evelyn Street.  Her Will, valued at £2,285 3 Shillings 6d, was proved at Gloucester on 20th October 1959 in favour of her two surviving children Ella Winifred Bizley and Norah Joan Bizley, both of them spinsters.  Tragically her son Edward had lost his life during the Second World War.

 

 

 

2Q28

Ella Winifred Bizley

Born in 1909 at Swindon

 

2Q29

Edward Bizley

Born in 1911 at Swindon

 

2Q30

Nora Bizley

Born in 1914 at Swindon

 

 

 

 

2P32

Arthur Stephen Alan Collett was born at 7 Bath Street in Swindon on 2nd October 1882 where he was still living in 1891 at the age of eight with his mother following the death of his father William Collett when Arthur was five.

 

By 1901, when he was nineteen, Arthur was a sapper with the Royal Engineers and was in barracks in Kent.  Shortly after March 1901 it is understood that Arthur sailed to South Africa where he took part in the final phase of the Boer War, during which he obtained the rank of staff sergeant.

 

The Treaty of Vereeniging was signed in 1902 and this put an end to the unpopular ‘scorched earth’ policy employed by Lord Kitchener which was used to destroy Boer farms and move the civilian occupants into concentration camps.

 

 

 

Arthur continued to live in Pretoria for a few years after the end of the hostilities, perhaps in a peace-keeping capacity, and returned to England around 1906.  He was still in the army by April 1911 and was once again billeted in the Elham area of Kent.  It seems very likely that he was de-mobbed just after 1911 when he returned to Swindon, where he took up employment with the Great Western Railway as a boiler-smith, like many of his brothers.  He continued to work for the GWR until 1916 when he became a married man at the age of thirty-four.  Around that time Arthur was offered a new job with the Vickers Aircraft Company in Sheffield, having already met his future wife Mary Maud Bigwood of Devizes.  The couple then moved to Sheffield where they were married on 2nd February 1916.

 

 

 

Mary was born at Devizes on 9th October 1889 and the couple’s first child was born at Devizes almost exactly one year after their wedding, even though they had made a permanent move to Sheffield by that time.  It can perhaps be assumed that Mary was either just visiting her mother or that she was unwell nearing the end of her pregnancy and was being cared for by her mother.  All of the remaining children were born at Sheffield, where Arthur died on 5th December 1949, followed by Mary fifteen years later, who died there on 6th October 1964.

 

 

 

2Q31

Ruby Lillian Maud Collett

Born on 09.02.1917

 

2Q32

Nellie Louise Collett

Born on 18.11.1919

 

2Q33

Arthur William Henry Collett

Born on 16.10.1921

 

2Q34

Charles Fredrick Collett

Born on 12.11.1923

 

2Q35

Glenna Collett

Born on 11.07.1925

 

2Q36

Mervyn Collett

Born on 12.07.1928

 

2Q37

Patricia Mary Collett

Born on 24.09.1930

 

 

 

 

2P33

Maurice Edward Collett was born at 7 Bath Street in Swindon on 8th January 1885 and was only three and a half years old when his father died during the summer of 1888.                                     This photograph of Maurice was taken around 1909.

 

By the time of the census of 1891 Maurice and his family were still living at the house at 7 Bath Street which was rented to them by the Great Western Railway.  The census that year recorded him in error as Morris E Collett aged six years.

 

Ten years later in March 1901 he was still living there aged sixteen, but by then he was employed by the GWR as an apprenticed boiler-smith.

 

 

 

Around eight years later in 1909 Maurice married Florence Beatrice White from Frome in Somerset, with whom he had eight children.  For the first five years of their married life together Maurice and Florence lived at 14 Stanier Street in Swindon, where they were recorded in the census of 1911.  The census that year stated that the couple had been married for two years, so it would appear that the wedding took place only a few months before the birth of their first child who was listed as being two years old.

 

 

 

The full census return recorded the family as Maurice Edward Collett, age 26 and from Swindon, who was by then a fully fledged boiler-smith with the GWR, his wife Florence, age 27 and from Frome, and their first two children Ella who was two and Edward who was just two weeks old.  It seems very likely that the birth of the couple’s two-week old son had not been registered by the time of the census, since it was subsequently changed to Reginald Maurice Collett.  Also living with the family at that time on second April 1911, was Maurice’s widowed mother Caroline Collett who had given up her GWR supplied family home at 7 Bathampton Street to Maurice’s older brother Harry James Collett (a GWR employee) and his young family.

 

 

 

Almost exactly two year later Florence presented Maurice with the couple’s third child while they were still living at 14 Stanier Street.  However, sometime after, either in 1914 or early in 1915, Maurice’s work took him from Swindon to Lancashire where the family took up residence at 1 London Row, Vulcan Village, in Newton-le-Willows, where a further five children were born.

 

 

 

In 1931 Maurice and his family made their final move when they went to live at 426 Wargrave Road in Newton-le-Willows, and it was there twenty-three years later that Maurice Edward Collett died on 24th March 1954.  Florence had died nineteen months before Maurice, when she passed away at Newton-le-Willows on 29th August 1952.  Florence had been born at Innox Hill in Frome on 19th November 1883, the daughter of Frank and Martha White who were also born in Frome.  By 1891 they had left the Somerset town and moved to Swindon where in 1901 Martha White was 49 and Frank, who was 45, was working for the Great Western Railway as an engine painter.  At that time 17 years old Florence B White was employed as a cloth machinist.

 

 

 

2Q38

Ella Florence Collett

Born in 1909 at Swindon

 

2Q39

Reginald Maurice Collett

Born in 1911 at Swindon

 

2Q40

Frederick Arthur Collett

Born in 1913 at Swindon

 

2Q41

Percival Francis Collett

Born in 1915 at Newton-le-Willows

 

2Q42

Bertram William Collett

Born in 1918 at Newton-le-Willows

 

2Q43

Ethel May Collett

Born in 1920 at Newton-le-Willows

 

2Q44

Lily Cecilia Collett

Born in 1923 at Newton-le-Willows

 

2Q45

Mervyn Albert Collett

Born in 1926 at Newton-le-Willows

 

 

 

 

2P34

Percy Ethelbert Collett was born at 7 Bath Street in Swindon on 2nd June 1886.

 

By the time of the census of 1891 his father had been dead for almost three years, although Percy who was four and his family continued to live at 7 Bath Street which was provided by the Great Western Railway for whom his father had worked.

 

Ten years later, when Percy was 14, he had left school and was employed by the GWR with whom he was an apprenticed iron moulder.

 

 

 

On completion of his apprenticeship Percy left Swindon and joined the army and by April 1911 he was billeted at Plymouth.  The census that year simply recorded him as Percy Collett, age 24 and from Swindon, who was unmarried and was serving with the military in Plymouth.  The move to Plymouth became a permanent one, as it was there that Percy lived for the rest of his life.  Just less than eight years later he married Florence May Gabriel of South View, Seymour Road, Mannamead in Plymouth on 18th January 1919, the marriage being registered at Launceston in Cornwall.  In their early years together the couple lived at 4 Penny-cum-Quick in Plymouth, where their only son was born, before moving to 6 Central Park Drive in Plymouth.

 

 

 

Percy Ethelbert Collett died at the City Hospital in Plymouth on 5th August 1952.  His Will was proved in London on 3rd September 1952 when his widow Florence May Collett was named as the executor of his estate of £494 2 Shillings.  It was seventeen years later that Florence died there on 9th July 1969.  Florence May Gabriel was born at Child Okeford near Blandford Forum in Dorset on 10th April 1892, her birth being recorded at Sturminster.  She was the daughter of Stephen and Annie Gabriel and in 1901 Florence, who was eight years old, and her family were living at Chard, just over the Dorset border in Somerset.

 

 

 

2Q46

Stephen Peter Marshall Collett

Born on 07.07.1920 at Plymouth

 

 

 

 

2P35

Mervyn Fred Matthew Collett was born at 7 Bath Street in Swindon on 29th September 1887, the youngest child of William Collett and his wife Caroline Ruth watts.  Mervyn was barely one year old when his father William Collett died. 

 

Mervyn was three years old in 1891 while still living with his family at 7 Bath Street, while ten years later he was still attending school in Swindon at the age of thirteen.

 

During the next ten years he met Lily Thrush of 3 Hinton Road in Swindon, and on 16th July 1910 they were married in Swindon.  Just over three month after they were married Lily presented her husband with the first of their two children.

 

 

 

The above photograph of Mervyn was taken around 1910, perhaps even on the occasion of his wedding.  The couple initially settled in Swindon for perhaps just the first year of the marriage, and it was there that their first child was born.  This was confirmed by the April census of 1911 when the family of three was recorded as living at 14 Handel Street in Swindon.  The census return recorded that Mervyn and Lily had been married for less than one year and that both of them, and their five months old son, had been born in Swindon.  This would perhaps indicate that their son Frederick was a slightly premature ‘honeymoon baby’.

 

 

 

Mervyn was listed as being 23 and his occupation was that of a boiler-smith working for the Great Western Railway, while his wife was only twenty years old.  During the September of the following year the couple’s second and last child was born while the family was still living in Swindon.  However, not longer after that though, Mervyn and his family left Swindon and followed his older brother Percy (above) to Plymouth.  They lived at 35 Clarence Road in Plymouth until it was bombed in the blitz of 1943, following which the family were re-housed at 32 Clarence Road.  Mervyn Fred Matthew Collett died at Plymouth on 4th April 1951 of double pneumonia, while Lily, who was born at Swindon in 1891, died at Plymouth eleven years later on 17th August 1962.

 

 

 

2Q47

Fredrick Mervyn Collett

Born on 30.10.1910 at Swindon

 

2Q48

Maurice William Arthur Collett

Born on 10.09.1912 at Swindon

 

 

 

 

2P36

Ann M E Collett was born at Poulton in 1865 and was six years old in the Cirencester area census of 1871 when she was living with her parents and younger sister Martha (below).  By 1881 the family was living in Stroud where Ann was 15, and ten years later as Ann M E Collett she was 25 and still living within the Stroud census registration district in 1891.  In 1901 she was a seamstress and was still not married at the age of 35 and was living at Brimscombe to where her family had moved.  Ten years later in the census of 1911, Ann was still a spinster living at Brimscombe where she was recorded as Annie Collett aged 45.  The description of where she was living was ‘institution’ rather than ‘household’.

 

 

 

 

2P37

Martha Ellen Collett was born at Arlington in 1868 and in 1871 she was three years old and was living with her parents and older sister Ann (above) within the Cirencester registration district.  By 1881 she was living with her family at Dark Mill in Stroud where she was aged 13 although her place of birth and that of her father were stated as Arlingham, which is on the east back of the River Severn south of Gloucester.  No record of Martha has so far been found within the census of 1891, while it is now established that she married Henry Browning during the third quarter of 1900.  The event was recorded at Stroud (Ref. 6a 735) when the witnesses were named as Catherine Maud Critchley and Reginald Joseph Lee.  Tragically she was only married for just under nine years, when the death of Martha Ellen Browning aged 41 was recorded at Stroud (Ref. 6a 213) during the second quarter of 1909.

 

 

 

 

2P38

James Collett was born at Shorncote in 1872.  Sometime over the next few years his family moved to Stroud where James was nine in 1881, and 19 in 1891.  By 1901 he was living at Brimscombe where he was a 29 year old stick worker, working with his sister Sarah (below).  The Dark Mill at Stroud, where the family was living in 1881 was known for making umbrellas from 1885 and the stick workers were an integral part of the process.  During the next ten years it would appear that James married Elizabeth and by April 1911 they were living at Stroud.  James of Shorncote was 39 and Elizabeth was 38, and living with them was James’ sister Sarah (below).

 

 

 

 

2P39

Sarah Collett was born at Kemble near Cirencester in 1875.  During the next couple of years her family moved to Stroud where Sarah was six years old in 1881 and 16 in 1891.  In 1901 she was living with her family in Brimscombe when she was 26 and was a stick worker, like her brother James (above), employed in the manufacturing and production of umbrellas.  At the age of 36 Sarah Collett of Kemble was still a spinster and in 1911 she was living with her brother James and his wife at Stroud.

 

 

 

 

2P40

Rose Anna Collett was born at Rodborough near Stroud in 1877.  She was listed as being three years of age in the 1881 Census and was living at the family home in Dark Mill in Stroud.  By 1901 she was 23 and unmarried and was named as Rosanna when she was living at the family home in Brimscombe.

 

 

 

 

2P41

Kate Collett was born at Gloucester in 1881 but after the census date.  In 1901 she was 21 and was employed as a domestic housemaid while still living with her family at Brimscombe.

 

 

 

 

2P42

Arthur Collett was born at Brimscombe in 1886.  By the time he was 15 in March 1901 he had already left school and was working as a pin worker while still living at the family home at Brimscombe.  Ten years after that Arthur was 25 and was living and working at Stroud in April 1911.

 

 

 

 

2P43

Ellen Louisa Messenger Collett was born in the hamlet of Foxcote near Withington in 1885, the eldest of the five known children of farmer William Collett and his wife Emma Elizabeth Messenger.  She was six years old in the Foxcote census of 1891 and, after a brief time at Kilkenny in Dowdeswell near Cheltenham, her family was living at Cranham near Coopers Hill in the parish of Stroud by 1901.  By that time Ellen had left school and was working and living away from the family.  In the census of 1901 there are two possible options for Ellen, both born in Gloucestershire.  No obvious record for her has been found within the next census of 1901, six years before she was known to have marriage.  The only possible census entry might Ellen Collitt (sic) who was 17 years of age and from Gloucestershire  who was recorded at Pontypridd in Wales, which is possible bearing in mind her sister Emily (below) had a welsh connection.

 

 

 

It was six years later on 1st April 1907 that Ellen was married by banns to Albert James at St Mary’s Church in Charlton Kings, near Cheltenham.  The parish record provided the following information.  First that the bride was Ellen Louisa Messenger Collett, a spinster of 22 years of 2 Hamlett’s Yard, and the daughter of labourer William Collett.  And that Albert was a bachelor at 27, a labourer from 4 Somerset Cottages, and the son of William James.  The witnesses were William James and Emily Jane Collett.  Albert James, the son of William and Jane James, was born at Church Street in Charlton Kings in 1879 and was a navvy in the census of 1901 when he 21 and still living with his family at Charlton Kings. 

 

 

 

By the time of the next census in 1911 Ellen had provided Albert with a son who was born at Charlton Kings, where the family was still living in April 1911 at 6 Emily Place off Horsefair Street.  Albert James was 31, Ellen James from Foxcote was 26 and their son Ernest James was three years old.  Further children may have been added to the family after that time, while staying with the young family on the day of that census was Ellen younger brother Frank Collett (below).  Ellen L James was only forty-seven when she died, her death recorded at Cheltenham register office (Ref. 6a 481) during the last three months of 1932.  Albert James survived for another twenty years, when his death was also recorded at Cheltenham register office (Ref. 7b 407) during the first three months of 1953 at the age of 74.

 

 

 

 

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Emily Jane Collett was born at Foxcote near Withington in 1887, the daughter of William and Elizabeth Collett whose birth was registered at Northleach (Ref. 6a 375) during the first three months of that year.  As Emily Jane Collett she was four years old in the Foxcote census of 1891, and at the time of her completing her education her family had settled at Cranham near Coopers Hill, Stroud.  Upon leaving school she was employed as a general servant at a home within the Brockworth area near Coopers Hill, not very far from her parents, where she was recorded in March 1901 as Emily Collett, age 14, from Withington.  Six years later Emily Jane was the second witness at the wedding of her older sister Ellen (above) at Charlton Kings.  After a further four years Emily Collett, age 24 and from Foxcote, was living and working in the Cardiff area of So