PART FORTY-ONE

 

The Middlesex Harefield Line - 1772 to 2011

 

(see also The Middlesex Ickenham & Ruislip Line - 1720 to 1910)

 

This line commences with Henry Collett (Ref. 1M28)

of Kempsford in Gloucestershire

 

Updated July 2016

 

This is the family line of Jean Oakes nee Ferguson (see Ref. 41P10) of Cheshire

depicted in capitals, and Cheryl Collett (Ref. 41S1) in the USA, whose great grandfather

was George Collett (Ref. 41P6) of Harefield & Washington depicted by the underlining.

As a result of the August 2008 update it is also the family line of

Trevor Collette (Ref. 41S6) of Kingston in Ontario

 

The April 2010 update was thanks to Rebecca Humphreys of Farnham in Surrey

whose great great grandfather was Henry James Collett (Ref. 41P1)

 

A previous update included the family line of Brian Arthur Collett (Ref. 41R29)

of Sutton in Surrey who kindly provided the new information regarding his family

 

The revision of February 2013 included the line of David George Collett (Ref. 41R17)

 

 

 

 

41M1

HENRY COLLETT (Ref. 1M28) was the second son of Robert and Mary Collett and was born at Kempsford on 2nd April 1772 where he was baptised on 27th April 1772.  He was born into a tragic family as his older brother John had died an infant death, his only younger sister Elizabeth also died in the same way when he was just approaching his fifth birthday, and shortly after that his father died.

 

 

 

So the family, that would have otherwise been six in number, was reduced to just three, they being Henry, his widowed mother Mary, and his only surviving younger brother John.  Mary then appears to have sought solace with a local blacksmith by the name of Joseph Bunce, as a result of which, just over a year later, she brought into the family a base-born child.  This was followed eighteen months later by a second base-born child, the father for whom was not known.

 

 

 

It was initially believed that at some time in his life Henry left Gloucestershire and made his way to Cornwall, most likely for work reasons.  It was also believed that it was there that he met Elizabeth Withiell who was born in Cornwall in 1770.  Not long after they met it was understood that they were married at Philleigh on 16th August 1792, when Henry Collett was recorded as being a farmer.

 

 

 

It has long been acknowledged that there was a seven years gap between the date of their wedding and the birth of their first confirmed child, leading to speculation that there may have been others born during this period.

 

 

 

Since then, new information has come to light which places a question-mark over Henry’s marriage to Elizabeth Withiell.  The alternative option, which is now considered to be more realistic, was that Henry moved to London, rather than Cornwall, where he married Elizabeth Woods on 31st December 1798 at St Mary’s Church on Marylebone Road in the City Borough of Marylebone.  This date correlates better with the birth of their first child.

 

 

 

Sometime after they were married the couple left the City of London and settled at Harefield in Middlesex, where all of their children were born.  The baptisms for all of the children listed below were conducted at St Mary’s Church in Harefield.

 

 

 

Previously it was thought that more children than listed below had been born in the years between 1793 and 1800 and that one of these may well have been Thomas Collett born in 1793.  This now seems unlikely but is still worth a mention, as Thomas Collett in 1841 was the Registrar of Births, Deaths and Marriages for the Brentford, Staines & Uxbridge registration district which included Harefield.  It was in that capacity that he recorded the birth in December 1840 of Richard Benjamin Collett, the grandson of Henry Collett, and the eldest son of Richard Collett (below) who was born in 1809.  The brief details of Thomas Collett, the registrar, and his family can be found in Part 41 – The Ickenham & Ruislip Line, which was previously an appendix included in this family line but which has now been separated from it.

 

 

 

At the time of his son Richard’s marriage, in December 1837, Henry was reported to be working as a watchman.  This too seems at odds with him being a farmer in Cornwall in 1792 and again might be a further clue that he was not the Henry Collett who married Elizabeth Withiell at Philleigh.

 

 

 

Four years after the marriage of his son Richard, at the time of the first national census in 1841, Henry and his wife Elizabeth were both listed as being 70 years of age, while they were living at Copper Mill Lane in Harefield.  Living there with them was their married son Richard and his family, including the aforementioned grandson Richard Benjamin Collett.

 

 

 

Almost four years later Henry’s wife Elizabeth Collett died at Harefield, during the second quarter of 1845, leaving Henry as a widower, who was confirmed was being 79 at the time of the next census in 1851.  The detail in the census return recorded that he was born at Kempsford and that he was a labourer with a pension.  Still living with Henry at that time was his son Richard, together with his wife Sarah and their eight children.  Henry Collett survived for almost another two years after the census day, and died at Harefield during the first quarter of 1853.

 

 

 

41N1

John Collett

Born in 1800 at Harefield

 

41N2

Robert Henry Collett

Born in 1802 at Harefield

 

41N3

WILLIAM COLLETT

Born in 1804 at Harefield

 

41N4

Elizabeth Collett

Born in 1806 at Harefield

 

41N5

James Collett

Born in 1807 at Harefield

 

41N6

Richard Collett

Born in 1809 at Harefield

 

41N7

Jonathan Collett

Born in 1811 at Harefield

 

41N8

Ann Collett

Born in 1812 at Harefield

 

41N9

Sarah Ann Collett

Born in 1816 at Harefield

 

 

 

 

41N1

John Collett was born at Harefield in 1800, the eldest son of Henry Collett and his wife Elizabeth Woods.  Because of the connection with Ickenham, through his brother William Collet (below), it was originally thought that he may have been the John Collett who married Charlotte Montague from Ickenham near Ruislip in Middlesex.  However, it can now be confirmed that John, the husband of Charlotte Montague was born around ten years earlier, so could not have been the son of Henry and Elizabeth Collett.  It is more likely that he was related in some way to the aforementioned Thomas Collett, the registrar for the Brentford, Staines & Uxbridge registration district in 1840.

 

 

 

In view of the Ickenham connection it is considered worthwhile providing the details of the family of John Collett and Charlotte Montague, and Thomas the registrar, which can now be found in the second section of this family line, Part 41 – The Ickenham & Ruislip Line which was previously an appendix at the end of this file.

 

 

 

 

41N2

Robert Henry Collett was born at Harefield in 1802, where he was baptised at St Mary’s Church on 9th May 1802, the second child born to Henry and Elizabeth Collett.  Robert Henry Collett later married Ann Stevens at St Mary’s Church in Lambeth on 24th May 1836 following the publication of banns.  The couple both signed the register in their full names and the witnesses were Leonard Collett and Hannah Dunn.  At this moment in time it is not known who Leonard Collett was, or what relationship he had to Robert Henry Collett.  However, it is known that he married Hannah Dunn at that same church almost exactly one year later, since the records there confirm that Leonard Collett married Hannah Dunn at St Mary Lambeth on 14th May 1837. 

 

 

 

Robert was around thirty-four at the time of their wedding, while Ann was about ten years younger than Robert, and their marriage produced three known children, and all of them were born at Harefield.  In the Harefield census of 1841 he was recorded simply as Robert Collett a grocer, having a rounded age of 35, while his wife Ann was 25.  Living with them at Copper Mill Lane were their three children, Mary Ann Collett, who was five, Henry Collett who was three, and Ruth Collett who was two years old.  Also listed with the family in 1841 was 70-yar old Ruth Stevens, who was very likely Ann’s mother.  Ten years later it was the same situation, except that the Harefield census of 1851 provided more accurate details of Robert’s and Ann’s ages.

 

 

 

Robert Hen. Collett was 48, by which time he was described as a gardener and a seedsman, while Ann Collett was 38.  Their three children were again recorded as Mary Ann Collett, who was 14, Henry Collett, who was 13, and Ruth Collett who was 11 years of age.  During the next decade the two oldest children left the family home in Harefield, leaving just the youngest child still living there with her parents in 1861.  By that time the family was residing in a dwelling on the road leading to Copper Mills and was made up of Robt Hy Collett of Harefield, who was 58 and a nurseryman and a gardener, his wife Ann, who was 47, and their daughter Ruth who was 21 and described as being deaf.  Living just one dwelling away from them was the family of Jonathan Collett (below), Robert’s younger brother.

 

 

 

Where the couple’s unmarried daughter Mary Ann Collett was at that time has not been determined, but following the death of Ann Collett during the 1860s, Mary had returned home to look after her widowed father by the time of the next census in 1871.  The Harefield census that year recorded Robert Henry Collett, age 69 and a gardener, living at Park Lane with just his two daughters, Mary A Collett, age 34, and Ruth Collett who was 31 and an invalid having been deaf for eighteen years.

 

 

 

On that occasion in 1871, living just one house along Park Lane from Robert and his two daughters, were the two sons of his late brother Jonathan Collett, Charles and Frederick Collet, although their surname was written with only one t.  According to the next Harefield census in 1881, Robert H Collett was a widower of 80 years who had been born at Harefield, who was still living at Park Lane with his two daughters Mary A Collett and Ruth Collett who was incorrectly recorded as Edith Collett.  As ten years earlier, just living next door but one was Robert’s nephew Charles Collett, and next to him was another nephew James Theophilus Bolton Collett, the son of Robert’s brother Richard (below) who was simply listed as James T B Collett.

 

 

 

Robert Henry Collett died not long after the census in 1881, and may well have been followed shortly after by his invalid daughter Ruth, since neither of them were recorded in the next census of 1891, by which time his surviving daughter Mary Ann Collett had returned to Watford where she was living before Robert was made a widower.

 

 

 

41O1

Mary Ann Collett

Born in 1836 at Harefield

 

41O2

Henry Collett

Born in 1837 at Harefield

 

41O3

Ruth Collett

Born in 1839 at Harefield

 

 

 

 

41N3

WILLIAM COLLETT was born at Harefield in 1804, where he was baptised at St Mary’s Church on 8th December 1804.  He married Elizabeth Sheerwood (see below) who was also born around 1803, but at nearby Ickenham near Ruislip in Middlesex.  Once they were married the couple settled in Harefield, where all of their children were born.

 

 

 

William’s occupation was that of a butcher, as verified by the census in 1841, which also confirmed that he was married to Elizabeth and that they were living in Harefield village with five of their children.  Also living with them was Betty Sheerwood, age 65, who was very likely Elizabeth’s mother.  William and Elizabeth were both recorded with a rounded age of 35, whereas the age of their children was more accurately stated.  William was 15, Ellen was nine, Isaac was four, Jacob was two, while the youngest member of the family at that time was baby Emma, who was just six months old.

 

 

 

No trace has been found of the three missing children, George, Abraham and Sarah, in any of the national census records, so it must be assumed that they had died as infants prior to 1841.  Nor has any trace been found of William’s youngest son John, either in the census of 1851 or any later census records.  In 1851 the family living at Harefield was recorded as William, age 47, like his wife Elizabeth, Ellen who was 20, Isaac 14, Jacob 12, Emma 10, David who was six, and Job who was five, and all of them with the exception of Elizabeth had been born at Harefield.

 

 

 

By April 1861 William was described as a master butcher, while he and his wife Elizabeth, both aged 57, were living with their four unmarried sons at the High Street in Harefield.  Once again their place of birth was confirmed as being Harefield and Ickenham respectively.  Their unmarried sons were William, who was 34, Jacob, who was 21, David, who was 17, and Job who was 15.  Also living with the family was George Collett Jones, who was eight years old and born at Harefield, who was listed as being the grandson of William and Elizabeth.  George was the son of their daughter Ellen and was most likely base-born, hence the reason for him being with his grandparents.

 

 

 

William and Elizabeth both appeared in the 1871 Census and both were 67, and the only one of their children who was still living with them was Job, who was 26.  By April 1881 William Collett, age 77 and a butcher from Harefield, was living with his married son Jacob and his family in the High Street in Harefield.  At that same time William’s wife Elizabeth Collett, age 79 and from Ruislip, was staying with another of her married sons, David and his family, at the Grocer’s Shop in Harefield.  It has been assumed that both William and Elizabeth passed away during the next decade, since no record of them has been found within the census of 1891.

 

 

 

41O4

William Henry Collett

Born in 1826 at Harefield

 

41O5

Mary Collett

Born in 1829 at Harefield

 

41O6

Ellen Collett

Born in 1831 at Harefield

 

41O7

George Collett

Born in 1832 at Harefield; infant death

 

41O8

Abraham Collett

Born in 1833 at Harefield; infant death

 

41O9

Sarah Collett

Born in 1835 at Harefield; infant death

 

41O10

Isaac Collett

Born in 1836 at Harefield

 

41O11

JACOB COLLETT

Born in 1838 at Harefield

 

41O12

Emma Collett

Born in 1840 at Harefield

 

41O13

David Collett

Born in 1843 at Harefield

 

41O14

Job Collett

Born in 1845 at Harefield

 

41O15

John Collett

Born in 1846 at Harefield; infant death

 

 

 

 

41N4

Elizabeth Collett was born at Harefield in 1806 and was baptised there in St Mary’s Church on 26th March 1806.

 

 

 

 

41N5

James Collett was born at Harefield where he was baptised at St Mary’s Church on 15th March 1807, the son of Henry and Elizabeth Collett.  No mention of him has been found in any of the census records.

 

 

 

 

41N6

Richard Collett was born at Harefield in 1809 and it was there that he was baptised in St Mary’s Church on 26th December 1809, the son of Henry and Elizabeth Collett.  At the age of 28 he was a labourer working at a local mill on the occasion of his marriage to Sarah Bolton at Harefield on 25th December 1837.  Sarah was 26 and had been born at nearby Chalfont in Buckinghamshire in 1811, and she was the daughter of gardener Henry Bolton and his wife Elizabeth.

 

 

 

Richard and Sarah were both residing in Harefield at the time of their wedding, and both of them made the mark of a cross on the marriage certificate, which was witnessed by Sarah’s mother.  After they were married the couple continued to live with Richard’s parents at Copper Mill Lane in Harefield, where all of their children were born.

 

 

 

The Registrar at Uxbridge, whose name appears on the birth certificate for the couple’s second child, was Thomas Collett.  It is possible that he was related in some way to Richard, but this has not yet been determined.  Richard’s occupation, as stated on the birth certificate at that time in 1840, was that of a groom.  For more details of Thomas Collett the registrar see Part 41 – The Ickenham & Ruislip Line.

 

 

 

Six months later the 1841 Census confirmed that the family was still living with Richard’s parents Henry and Elizabeth Collett, at their home in Copper Mill Lane in Harefield.  The family comprised Richard Collett who was 30, his wife Sarah who was 25, their daughter Elizabeth who was two years old, and their son Richard who was only six months old.

 

 

 

Ten years later, according to the census of 1851, Richard Collett was 41, while Sarah was 39.  During the previous ten years a further six children had been added to the family, and the couple and their eight children were still living at the Harefield home of Richard’s father Henry Collett from Gloucestershire.  The eight children recorded on the census return in 1851 were Elizabeth Collett, age 12, Richard Benjamin Collett, age 11, Sarah Collett who was nine, Mary Ann Collett who was eight, Ann Collett who was six, James Collett who was three, and twins John and Harriet Collett who were both two months old.  All of the children were confirmed as being born at Harefield.

 

 

 

Two years later the family was completed with the birth of Richard’s and Sarah’s final child.  However, it would also appear that one of the twins, John, died while still very young, just after the census in 1851.  Ten years later in 1861 the Harefield census that year listed the family as Richard, age 52, who was working as a labourer, while his wife Sarah was 48.  Only five of their nine children were living with them at that time, and they were Richard B Collett, age 20, Anne Collett, age 15, James Collett, age 12, Harriet Collett, age 10, and Thomas Collett who was seven years old.

 

 

 

It was also at Harefield that Richard Collett died just over five years later on 11th June 1866 at the age of 57.  His death was recorded at Uxbridge, and the informant was his married daughter Elizabeth Green, nee Collett.  The death certificate recorded that Richard was formerly a gas maker, and that the cause of death was bronchitis.

 

 

 

His widow Sarah Collett continued to live at Harefield after his passing, and was recorded there in the census of 1871 when, as the widow Sarah Collett, she was 58.  The only member of her family living with her on that occasion was her granddaughter Emily Mary Collett, who was three years old.  Emily was the base-born child of Sarah’s unmarried daughter Mary Ann Collett.

 

 

 

41O16

Elizabeth Collett

Born in 1838 at Harefield

 

41O17

Richard Benjamin Collett

Born in 1840 at Harefield

 

41O18

Sarah Collett

Born in 1841 at Harefield

 

41O19

Mary Ann Collett

Born in 1842 at Harefield

 

41O20

Ann Collett

Born in 1845 at Harefield

 

41O21

James Theophilus Bolton Collett

Born in 1848 at Harefield

 

41O22

John Collett                  twin

Born in January 1851 at Harefield

 

41O23

Harriet Collett               twin

Born in January 1851 at Harefield

 

41O24

Thomas Collett

Born in 1853 at Harefield

 

 

 

 

41N7

Jonathan Collett was born at Harefield in 1811 and it was there that he was baptised in St Mary’s Church on 17th December 1811.  He later married Margaret and both he and his wife were listed as having a rounded age of 25 in the Harefield census of 1841.  By that time the marriage had produced two children for Jonathan and Margaret, and they were Charles, for was four, and Maria who was still under one year old.

 

 

 

Maria did not survive and died during the next few years, although the couple’s loss was offset by the birth of a second daughter shortly after.  One further child was added to the family during the next five years, so by the time of the census in 1851 the family living in Harefield was made up of Jonathan, who was 40, Margaret, who was 38, and their three children, Charles, age 13, Elizabeth Margaret who was seven, and George who was four years old.  It should be noted that Elizabeth has been difficult to trace in the following census returns because she often used her second forename.

 

 

 

It is highly likely that Jonathan and Margaret were preparing for the birth of another addition to the family on the census day in 1851, with another son born to the couple shortly thereafter.  However, further tragedy seems to have struck the family after the census that year, when their son George died during early months of 1855, but once again their loss was partly compensated by the birth of the couple’s final children. 

 

 

 

Only two of the three new children were recorded in the Harefield census of 1861 when the family was living in a cottage on the road leading to the Copper Mills, just one dwelling away from Jonathan’s older brother Robert Henry Collett (above).  At that time Jonathan Collett, age 49, was an agricultural labourer, and his wife as Margaret Collett was 48.  With them were their three surviving sons, Charles Collett, who was 23 and also an agricultural labourer, Jonathan Collett, who was 11, and Frederick H Collett, who was eight years old.  Sometime during the next decade both Jonathan and Margaret died, leaving just their youngest son still living with their eldest son at Harefield, with their other son Jonathan having left home for work reasons by then, although he and his sister Elizabeth did return to the family home in Harefield at a later date.

 

 

 

41O25

Charles Collett

Born in 1837 at Harefield

 

41O26

Maria Collett

Born in 1840 at Harefield; infant death

 

41O27

Elizabeth Margaret Collett

Born in 1844 at Harefield

 

41O28

Robert George Collett

Born in 1846 at Harefield

 

41O29

Jonathan Collett

Born in 1851 at Harefield

 

41O30

Frederick Henry Collett

Born in 1853 at Harefield

 

 

 

 

41N8

Ann Collett was born at Harefield in 1812 and baptised there at St Mary’s Church on 26th December 1812, the daughter of Henry Collett and Elizabeth Woods.

 

 

 

 

41O1

Mary Ann Collett was born at Harefield in 1836.  She never married and at the age of 44 in 1881, she was living with her elderly widowed father Robert Collett at Park Lane in Harefield, with her unmarried sister Ruth, who was recorded in error as Edith Collett.  The earlier census returns for Harefield in 1841 and 1851 included Mary Ann Collett as being five years old and 14 years of age, respectively.  For the latter she and her family were living at Copper Mill Lane.

 

 

 

She was absent from the family home in 1861 when her parents were living on the road leading to the Copper Mills in Harefield.  That was because she and her brother Henry (below) were both living and working in the Watford area, where Mary Ann Collett from Harefield was 23 (sic).  However, following the death of her mother during the 1860s, Mary Ann had returned to Harefield by the time of the census in 1871 to look after her widowed father and her invalid sister Ruth, who were then living in Park Lane, where Mary A Collett, age 34, was recorded as a domestic servant.

 

 

 

It was the same situation ten years later when the family of three was again shown as residing in Park Lane in Harefield where head of the household was Robert H Collett, age 80, with no stated occupation, and his daughters unmarried Mary A Collett, age 44, and Ruth Collett, age 41, who was deaf.  It is known that her father died shortly after that, and her younger sister may also have passed away around the same time.

 

 

 

Whether by coincidence or not, unmarried Mary A Collett, age 53 and from Harefield, was living within the Watford registration in 1891, where her unmarried cousin Harriet Collett (Ref. 41O23), age 40 and from Harefield, was also living at that time.  In addition to those two members of the family, also living in the same registration district was their niece Rosina Collett (Ref. 41P32), who was 16 and also from Harefield

 

 

 

Mary’s time at Watford appears to have been short-lived, because by March 1901 she was living at Cheltenham in Gloucestershire with her brother Henry (below) and his wife Ann.  The census that year recorded that Mary A Collett from Harefield was 64 years old, but with no listing for her in the next census of 1911 it must be assumed that she had died during the first decade of the new century.

 

 

 

 

41O2

Henry Collett was born at Harefield in 1837 and was three years old in the census of 1841, when he was living at Copper Mill Lane in Harefield with his parents Robert Henry and Ann Collett.  Ten years later in 1851 Henry was 13 and was still living with his parents.  On leaving school he took up the occupation of a baker, and both he and his sister Mary Ann (above) were living and working in the Watford registration district of Hertfordshire in 1861, when he was recorded as Henry Collett, age 23, from Harefield.  Shortly after that Henry married Ann Sears who was born at Rickmansworth in 1835. 

 

 

 

It would appear that the marriage did not produce any children for Henry and Ann, since in the census of 1871 the childless couple were living in Reading St Mary, where Henry Collett from Harefield was 33, while his wife Ann from Hertfordshire was 35.  By the time of the census in 1881, Henry, age 43, was a baker living at Newbury Street in Wantage in Berkshire (part of Oxfordshire from April 1974).  With him was his wife Ann, age 45, together with her nephew George T Sears, who was 15 and from Paddington in London.

 

 

 

Sometime during the following years the couple returned to live in Reading, where they were incorrectly recorded at the time of the census in 1891.  Henry Callett (sic) from Harefield was 53, and his wife Ann was 55.  Another move took place during the 1890s, since by March 1901, Henry Collett, age 63 and from Harefield, and his wife Ann Collett, age 65 and from Rickmansworth, were then living in Cheltenham, where Henry was described as a journeyman baker.  Living there with them was Henry’s older sister Mary A Collett (above).

 

 

 

 

41O3

Ruth Collett was born at Harefield in 1839, the youngest of the three known children of Robert Henry Collett and his wife Ann Stevens.  According to the census records she lived all her early years at Harefield, where in 1841 she was two when living at Copper Mill Lane, and again in 1851 when she was 11.  By 1861 Ruth and her parents were living on the road leading to the Copper Mills, where she was described as being deaf at the age of 21.  Following the death of her mother during the 1860s, Ruth’s older sister Mary Ann returned to Harefield to look after her and her widowed father.  The next census in 1871 confirmed that the three of them were living in Park Lane in Harefield where Ruth Collett was 31 and was listed as being an invalid who had been deaf for the past eighteen years.

 

 

 

It was very likely because of her disability that she never married and in the census of 1881 she was again registered as being deaf at the age of 41, although she was incorrectly recorded in the census as Edith Collett.  On that occasion, as ten years earlier, she was again living with her elderly widowed father Robert Collett and her unmarried sister Mary A Collett (above) at Park Lane in Harefield.  With her father passing away during the next few years, it has not been determined exactly what had happened to Ruth after that time, but her absence from all of the following census returns indicate that she too died during the 1880s.

 

 

 

 

41O4

William Henry Collett was born at Harefield, the son of labourer William Collett and his wife Elizabeth, who were both named as residents of Harefield on the child’s baptism record.  Curiously that same baptism record for the ceremony conducted at Harefield on 15th January 1826, the same day that two other children were baptised there, also gave the birth date of William Henry Collett as 15th January 1825, whereas the other two children’s date of birth was at an earlier time in the previous year.

 

 

 

William Henry Collett was listed as being aged 15 in the census of 1841, although his given age in the subsequent census returns deviated from this.  For example in 1861 he was 34, and at that time he was still a bachelor and was still living with his parents at their home in the High Street in Harefield.  His occupation was that of Master Butcher, like his father, with whom he was presumably working.

 

 

 

Seven weeks after the day of the census William married Ann Calcutt of Northamptonshire on 27th May 1861 at Limehouse in Stepney.  The witnesses at the ceremony were David Collett, William’s younger brother, and Eliza Climpson.  The marriage register recorded that both William and Ann were living at West India Road, which was in Poplar Close by Limehouse.

 

 

 

Ann was born on 1st February 1838 at Steane Park, just north-west of Brackley, the daughter of James Calcutt and Hannah Matthews who were married at Lower Heyford in Oxfordshire on 3rd November 1834.  What may be of interest is that James Calcutt was a shepherd born at Stonesfield in Oxfordshire, which also had a contingent of Colletts living there.  See Part 38 - The Oxfordshire Stonemasons.

 

 

 

Living near to William and Ann in Poplar at that time was William’s younger sister Emma who had just married George Goodman.  Ann, being much younger than William, formed a close relationship with her sister-in-law Emma, who was a similar age, and this closeness was continued by each of their eldest children, they being Henry, the son of William, and Harriet, the daughter of Emma, who were married nearly twenty years later.

 

 

 

During the ten years following their wedding day, the marriage produced five children for William and Ann, and all of them were born at Mile End Old Town in Stepney.  The birth certificate for their third child Laura, revealed that the family was living at 7 William Street in Mile End Old Town.  Within the next two years the family left William Street and by April 1871 they were living at 18 Roberts Place in Mile End Old Town in the St Philips West Tower Hamlets district of London, from where William was continuing to work as a butcher.

 

 

 

According to the 1871 Census the respective ages given for William and Ann were incorrect, being 40 and 39, whereas they should have been nearer 44 and 32, with their age difference being twelve years.  The reason for this may have been the embarrassment caused by the great difference in their ages.  In that same census William’s and Ann’s children were listed as Henry, who was eight, Eliza, who was six, and Louisa (sic) who was two years old.  It seems highly likely that Ann was with-child on the day of the census in 1871, since the couple’s fourth child was born later that same year.

 

 

 

A few years later Ann presented her husband with their fifth child, but this happy event was followed shortly after by a major tragedy for the family, when William died at the age of 50.  It was in 1875 that William Henry Collett died and was buried at St Saviours Church in Bow Common.  His age at the time of his death was given as 55, which again was in conflict with his actual age.  So by the time of the census of 1881 Ann Collett was recorded as being a widow.  However, although she has been located within the census records for that year, she did not have her children with her. 

 

 

 

The 1881 Census confirmed that Ann Collett, from Steane Park near Brackley, was a widow and was a general servant working at the Kings Arms public house at 18 Moor Street in Soho.  Ann gave her age as being 40, when in fact she was 42.  Moor Street is still there today, just off Cambridge Circus on Shaftesbury Avenue.  The proprietor and licenced victualler of the inn was Mr W Wheatley, 46 of Colmworth in Bedfordshire, with his younger wife Emily who was 29 and from Kingland in Middlesex.  The couple’s daughter was two years old Beatrice who was born at Soho.  Three of Ann’s children were also living in the Soho area at that time, and they were Henry Collett who was head of the household, who said he was 21, when he was nearer 18, his sister Amy, who was eleven, and his brother Arthur, who was six years old.

 

 

 

Ten years later in 1891 Ann was listed as living at 29 Hilldrop Crescent with her unmarried daughter Laura.  Ann Collett was 49 and was employed as a cook, while Laura, who was 20, was a domestic housemaid.  Hilldrop Crescent is still there today, just off the A503 Camden Road.  As no record of daughter Eliza has ever been found, except in the 1871 Census, it might be assumed that she may have died around 1875, when her father passed away, and when she was approximately 10 years old.  With no record for Ann found in the 1901 Census, coupled with no mention of her in 1894 at the time her daughter Laura was married, it must be assumed that she had died sometime between April 1891 and October 1894.

 

 

 

41P1

Henry James Collett

Born in 1862 at Stepney

 

41P2

Eliza Collett

Born in 1865 at Stepney

 

41P3

Laura Collett

Born in 1869 at Stepney

 

41P4

Amy Collett

Born in 1871 at Stepney

 

41P5

Arthur Collett

Born in 1874 at Stepney

 

 

 

 

41O5

Mary Collett was born at Harefield in 1829, the eldest daughter of William Collett and his wife Elizabeth Sheerwood.

 

 

 

 

41O6

Ellen Collett was born at Harefield in 1831, the daughter of William Collett and Elizabeth Sheerwood.  As Ellen Collett she was listed in the census of 1841 as being nine years old.  It is understood that when she was around the age of 21 she fell pregnant and in 1853 she gave birth at Harefield to a base-born son who was given the name George Collett Jones, the father being named as James Jones of the Middlesex Militia.  During the following two consecutive years Ellen gave birth to two more children fathered by James, and it was only after, or around the time of, the birth of the third child that James Jones married Ellen Collett at Harefield on 11th July 1855.  All three children were born at Harefield, as were all of their remaining seven children.

 

 

 

The Harefield census in 1861 confirmed that Ellen Jones, age 31, was married to James Jones who was also 31.  Living with them were four of their five children, Livinia (sic) Jones who was seven, Emma Jones who was six, Mary Jones who was four, and Aaron Jones who was eleven months old.  Ellen’s missing son George Jones was then eight years of age and the census confirmed that he was living nearby with his grandparents at their home on the High Street in Harefield.  It would also appear that later in his life when George was old enough to do so, he dropped the Jones from his name, and that may have been a consequence of him being base-born and being raised by his Collett grandparents.

 

 

 

During the following decade Ellen presented James with a further five children, as confirmed by the next Harefield census in 1871, when the family was living in a dwelling on the High Street.  By that time the couple’s eldest daughter Lavinia Jones had left the family home and was living elsewhere.  The enlarged family was therefore recorded as James Jones, age 41 and from Rickmansworth, his wife Ellen Jones, age 42, Emma Jones, age 15, Mary Jones, age 13, Aaron Jones, age 12, Frederick Jones who was eight, David Jones who was six, Alice Jones who was four, Lily [Caroline Lily] Jones who was two, and Ernest Jones who was two months old.  Excluding the head of the household, all of the other members of his family were born at Harefield.

 

 

 

By 1881 Ellen, then confirmed as Helen Jones, was a widow at 50 who had been born at Harefield.  She was working as a letter carrier, while living in the third house along the High Street in Harefield.  Also living in the High Street at that time was her brother Jacob Collett and his family (see below), while living with Ellen on that occasion were just three of her ten children.  They were her sons Frederick Jones, age 18, and David Jones, age 16, both of them working as brick-maker’s labourers, and her daughter Caroline Jones who was 11.  Once again all three children were confirmed as having been born at Harefield, and from this it would appear that her youngest child Ernest had not survived.

 

 

 

Within the Collett Family Bible there is a reference to the death of Helen Ellen Morgan nee Collett who died on 7th June 1927.  Since Ellen Collett of Harefield, born in 1831, was still recorded in the census of 1881 as Helen Jones, it is possible that she was married for a second time sometime after then, to become Ellen Morgan.  Unfortunately there is no mention of Helen Ellen Morgan’s age at the time of her death, but if she was Ellen Collett she would have been ninety-four which seem improbable but not impossible.

 

 

 

41P6

George James Collett (Jones)

Born on 15.06.1853 at Harefield

 

 

 

 

41O10

Isaac Collett was born at Harefield in 1836, the son of William Collett and his wife Elizabeth Sheerwood.  He was confirmed as being four years old in the 1841 Census and was 14 in 1851, when he was living with his parents at Harefield.  It was just four years later that Isaac Collett died at Harefield where he was buried on 3rd February 1855 at the age of 20.

 

 

 

 

41O11

JACOB COLLETT was born at Harefield in 1838, his birth recorded at Uxbridge (Ref. 3 281) during the last three months of that year, the son of William Collett and Elizabeth Sheerwood.  He was listed as being two years old in the Harefield census of 1841 and was 12 at the time of the census there in 1851.  On leaving school he took up employment as an agricultural labourer and in 1861, when he was 21, he was unmarried and was still living with his parents at the High Street in Harefield.  Four years later Jacob Collett married Margaret Lacey at nearby Uxbridge in early 1865, following which the couple settled in Harefield, where all of their children were born.  Margaret was born at High Wycombe in Buckinghamshire in 1845, and was the daughter of Alice Lacey.

 

 

 

At the time of the 1871 Census for Harefield, Jacob gave his age as 32, while Margaret stated she was 26.  By that time in their lives the couple had only two of their four children living with them, following the premature deaths of the other two.  Isaac Collett was four years old, and Ellen Collett was not yet one year old.  Ten years later, according to the census in 1881, Jacob Collett from Harefield was working as a brick-maker at Harefield, when he gave his age in error as 39.  This was the year he was born, rather than the 41 years of age that it should have been.  Margaret stated she was 35 and born at High Wycombe. 

 

 

 

The couple’s children living with them at that time were Isaac Collett 14, Ellen Collett 11, Emma Collett who was nine, Flora Collett who was five, and Alfred Collett who was two years old, and all of them confirmed as having been born at Harefield.  Jacob’s son Isaac had already followed in his father’s footsteps and in 1881 he was working with his father as a brick-maker’s labourer. 

 

 

 

Also living with the family was Jacob’s father William Collett the butcher who was 77, and a lodger in 14 years old Robert Bugbee of Harefield who was an agricultural labourer, and he was very likely related to Richard Bugbee, who later married Emily Mary Collett (Ref. 41P27).  At that time in 1881, the Collett family was living in a dwelling on the High Street in Harefield, only a few doors away from Jacob’s sister Helen Jones nee Collett (above).  Also on the day of the census Jacob and Margaret may have been expecting the birth of their next child, who was born later that same year, and was followed by two more children born into the family over the next four years.

 

 

 

The three new arrivals were confirmed in the next census in 1891 when Jacob was 50, and his wife was 45.  However, by that day three of the couple’s four eldest children had already left the family’s home in Harefield, so still living with them was Emma Collett, age 17, Alfred Collett, age 13, Mabel Collett who was nine, George Collett who was seven, and Ellen Collett who was five years old.

 

 

 

According to the March census in 1901, Jacob Collett and his family were still residing at an address on the High Street in Harefield, where Jacob, age 62, was employed as a bricklayer’s labourer.  Still living there with him was his wife Margaret who was 55, while the only children still living with the couple were Thomas A Collett, who was 22 and a labourer at the nearby cement works, Louis G Collett who was 18 and a bricklayer’s apprentice, and their daughter Ethel Collett who was 15 and a cotton spinner.

 

 

 

Ten years later the census in 1911 confirmed that only the two youngest sons were still living with farm labourer Jacob Collett, who was 73, and his wife Margaret who was 65, at 9 Waterloo Villas on the High Street in Harefield.  They were Alfred Thomas Collett, who was 28, and Lewis George Collett who was 25.  All three men were confirmed as having been born at Harefield, while Margaret’s place of birth was simply stated as Buckinghamshire.  It should be noted that the surname was incorrectly recorded with just one T, and also that the age of the two sons conflicted with their ages in all of the previous census returns, since Alfred was nearer 32, while Lewis was 28.

 

 

 

41P7

Jonas Collett

Born in 1865; infant death

 

41P8

Isaac Collett

Born in 1866 at Harefield

 

41P9

David Collett

Born in 1868; infant death

 

41P10

ELLEN ELIZABETH COLLETT

Born in 1870 at Harefield

 

41P11

Emma Collett

Born in 1872 at Harefield

 

41P12

Flora Collett

Born in 1875 at Harefield

 

41P13

Alfred Thomas Collett

Born in 1878 at Harefield

 

41P14

Mabel Collett

Born in 1881 at Harefield

 

41P15

Lewis George Collett

Born in 1883 at Harefield

 

41P16

Ethel Collett

Born in 1885 at Harefield

 

 

 

 

41O12

Emma Collett was born at Harefield in December 1840 and was six months old at the time of the census in 1841 which took place on 6th June that year.  By 1851 Emma was 10 and was living with her family at Harefield in the Uxbridge & Hillingdon registration district.  It would appear that on leaving school Emma sought work in the Watford area and in the 1861 Census she was incorrectly listed as being 22.  It was probably while she was at Watford that she met miller George Goodman and, less than a year after the census day, they were married at Holy Trinity Church in Kentish Town on 20th January 1862.

 

 

 

George was a similar age to Emma, having been born at Rickmansworth in 1839.  The couple’s first child, Harriet Goodman, was born in July the same year that they were married.  Not long after that the family settled in Poplar, living near to where Emma’s older brother William Henry Collett (above) was living at that time.  There then followed the birth of a further thirteen children born to the couple over the next two decades.

 

 

 

In 1871 the family of seven was living in the ‘Leather Market’ district of St Olave Southwark on the south side of the River Thames in London.  The census return listed the family as living in a house on William Street in Bermondsey, where George was 31 and still working as a miller, his wife Emma was 30, and their five children at that time were Janet Goodman, who was eight, Alice Goodman, who was seven, Eliza Goodman, who was five, David Goodman, who was three, and George Goodman who was two years old.

 

 

 

Rather curiously the couple’s eldest child Harriet Goodman was not living with the family on that occasion.  Instead, it looks as though she was living with her father’s brother Robert Goodman and his wife Emma Goodman, formerly Washbrook, at Watford, when she was described as being 11 and a silk winder.  However, ten years after that Harriet Goodman was visiting her cousin Henry James Collett (Ref. 41P1) at 16 Church street in Soho, whom she married shortly after the census in 1881.

 

 

 

During the next ten years three children were added to the family which, by the time of the census in 1881, was living at 4 Abbey Street South in Bermondsey.  Abbey Street today is the B202 link road between Tower Bridge Road (A100) and Jamaica Road (A200).  George was no longer a miller, his occupation then being that of a carman, while living with him was his wife Emma and six of their children.  They were Eliza Goodman, who was 15 and working as a domestic servant, David Goodman, who was 14 and still at school, George Goodman, who was 13 and an errand boy, Edmond Goodman, who was nine, Ellen Goodman, who was two, and Ernest Goodman who was just seven months old, having been born on 12th August 1880.

 

 

 

Two more children were born into the family shortly after the census year and so by 1891 the Bermondsey family comprised George Goodman 54, Emma Goodman 52, George Goodman 22, Edmond Goodman 18, Ellen Goodman 12, Ernest Goodman 10, Alfred Goodman who was eight, and John Goodman who was seven years old.

 

 

 

Just after the turn of the century George was still working as a carman in London at the age of 62, when he and his family were living at 33 Abbey Street in Bermondsey.  Emma was then 61 and just three of her children were still living there with her and her husband.  They were Edmund Goodman, who was 28 and a weights and scales maker, Ernest Goodman, who was 20 and a printer’s labourer, and John Goodman, who was 17 and employed as a wharf clerk, all three of them simply noted as having been born in Surrey.  The couple’s first child, and their eldest daughter Harriet Goodman, married her cousin Henry James Collett in 1881.  See Henry James Collett (Ref. 41P1) for further details of their family.

 

 

 

Emma’s and George’s son Ernest Obid Goodman, who was born on 12th August 1880, married Charlotte Payn on 17th July 1907.  Charlotte was the daughter of fishmonger Harvey Payn of Westminster and his wife Elizabeth Payn of Bradford.  In 1901 Charlotte was a shop assistant living with her parents in the Newington area of London.

 

 

 

Ernest and Charlotte had many children but only one daughter, Irene Lillian who was born on 4th August 1924 who later married Ronald Heard Valsler.  And it was their daughter-in-law Janey Bullock, the wife of their son Colin Valsler, who kindly provided the details to open this branch of the family.

 

 

 

 

41O13

David Collett was born at Harefield in 1843, the son of butcher William Collett and his wife Elizabeth Sheerwood.  At the time of the census in 1851 David Collett was six years old, while ten years later, when he was 17, he was still living at home with his parents at the High Street in Harefield.  At that time in his life he was employed as an agricultural labourer.  Just over one month after that David Collett was one of the witnesses at the Stepney Limehouse wedding of his older brother William Henry Collett (above) on 27th May 1861, at which he made his mark, rather than sign his name.

 

 

 

He later married Charlotte Ward at Uxbridge during the April-June quarter of 1866, Charlotte having been born at Reading in 1839.  Once they were married the couple moved to Harefield where they lived for the rest of life.  Five years later in 1871 they were confirmed as living in Harefield, where David was 28 and Charlotte 32.  By that time their family comprised two daughters Lottie, who was four years old, and Elizabeth, who was under one year old, and a son William David Collett who was three years old, all three of them having been born at Harefield.

 

 

 

Ten years later the Harefield census of 1881 confirmed that David Collett was 37 and that he was working as a builder.  Living with him was his wife Charlotte, age 41, whose occupation was stated as being that of a grocer.  This was perhaps an indication that she was the proprietor of the grocer’s shop in Harefield.

 

 

 

Living with David and Charlotte in April 1881 were their seven children.  They were Lottie, age 14, who had left school and was assisting her mother in her grocer’s shop, William, who was 12, Elizabeth, who was 10, Joseph who was eight, Alfred who was six, Alice who was five, and Grace who was two years old.  Also living with the family at that time was David’s mother Elizabeth Collett, age 79 and of Ickenham, together with David’s younger brother Job Collett (below).

 

 

 

In the 1891 Census for Harefield, David Collett was 48 and his wife Charlotte Collett was 51.  The children still living with them on that occasion were Lottie, who was recorded as Lettia Collett, age 24, William Collett, age 22, Elizabeth Collett, age 20, Joseph Collett, age 18, Alfred Collett, 16, Alice Collett 15, and Grace Collett who was 11.

 

 

 

Just after the start of the new century David was still working as a builder and was then 57 in March 1901.  He was still living at Harefield with his wife Charlotte who was 61 who, it appears by then, had retired from running the Harefield grocer’s shop, since she was listed as having no occupation.  According to the next Harefield census in 1911, David Collett of Harefield was 67 and was still living there with his wife Charlotte who was 71 and also from Harefield.  Still living with the elderly couple was their unmarried son Alfred Collett who was 36, and David’s brother Job Collett (below) who was 65.

 

 

 

In addition to them, David’s and Charlotte’s married daughter Alice had returned to the family home, together with her baby son, but minus her husband.  The census listed the two on them as Alice Creighton, age 35 and from Harefield, and her son Francis Collett Creighton who was just one month old.  Just over five years later, on 23rd June 1916, Charlotte Collett nee Ward died while she and her husband were still living in Harefield, and she was followed two years later by David Collett, who died there on 21st April 1918.  A headstone in the churchyard of St Mary’s marks their joint graves.

 

 

 

As a builder, David Collett had acquired a considerable fortune by the time he passed away.  His Will was proved in London on 1st August 1918 when his address was given as Cumberland House in Harefield.  The executors of his estate of £29,122 10 Shillings 8d were named as his son Joseph Collett and Alfred Collett, who were both builders, William Gregory, a gentleman, and Evelyn Hurden, another builder.

 

 

 

41P17

Lottie Collett

Born in 1866 at Harefield

 

41P18

William David Collett

Born in 1868 at Harefield

 

41P19

Elizabeth Collett

Born in 1870 at Harefield

 

41P20

Joseph Collett

Born in 1872 at Harefield

 

41P21

Alfred Collett

Born in 1874 at Harefield

 

41P22

Alice Collett

Born in 1875 at Harefield

 

41P23

Grace Collett

Born in 1878 at Harefield

 

 

 

 

41O14

Job Collett was born at Harefield on 27th June 1845, and was the youngest surviving child of William Collett and his wife Elizabeth Sheerwood.  On leaving school he became a bricklayer, like many other members of the Collett family, and in 1861 he was 15 when he was living at the family home in the High Street in Harefield.  By the time of the Harefield census in 1871 he was still unmarried at the age of 26.

 

 

 

A further ten years later and Job was still a bachelor at 34, when he was still working as a bricklayer.  According to the 1881 Census, Job Collett of Harefield was living with his brother David Collett in the property known as the grocer’s shop in Harefield.  Job was 45 by the time of the next census in 1891, but so far no record of him ten years after that in 1901.  It is known that he was a bachelor all his life and that he was a very eccentric character and was very careful, virtually Scrooge-like, with his money.  At one time later in his life he was employed as a bird scarer, presumably at nearby London Airport.

 

 

 

On the occasion of the 1911 census for Harefield, Job Collett was living there with his brother David Collett (above) and his wife Charlotte, and their son Alfred, when he was once again confirmed as being a bachelor at the age of 65.

 

 

 

Job Collett died at Harefield on 10th June 1934, at the age of 89, and left a considerable sum of money in his Will.  His life is marked by a marble vault in St Mary’s Church at Harefield on which there is the following inscription ‘Job Collett son of William and Elizabeth of Harefield born 27th June 1845 died 10th June 1934’.  The newspaper article reproduced in Appendix Two of this family line refers to Job visiting the church and planning the expensive tomb sixteen years before he died.

 

 

 

His first Will was made on 5th December 1923, over ten years before he died.  This dictated that his estate would be held in trust for twenty years after his death and then divided into three, split equally between nephews Harry Collett and his son Bert, Arthur Collett, and Isaac Collett and his son Isaac.

 

 

 

The aforementioned Harry Collett and Arthur Collett were Henry James Collett (Ref. 41P1) and his brother Arthur Collett (Ref. 41P5), while Harry’s son Bert was a reference to Herbert Collett (Ref. 41Q1) the eldest son of Henry (Harry) James Collett.  Isaac was the cousin of Harry and Arthur.  In fact it was only as a result of a visit from Henry (Harry) James Collett and his son Herbert (Bert), after the making of his first Will, that Job re-wrote the document excluding the two of them because they did not adhere to Job’s strict abstinence policy.

 

 

 

A Codicil to the Will was therefore made on 3rd November 1925 which removed Harry and Bert Collett, who were replaced by Thomas Collett and his son Thomas.  Also Isaac’s grandson was added, this being in addition to the inclusion of his son Isaac.  However, all of these terms and conditions were later superseded when Job made his last Will and Testament.

 

 

 

Under his final Will the eventual main beneficiaries to his estate were his nephews, although it would appear that the Will was not proved until 1937, perhaps because of family disputes over its contents.  In October that year the Sunday Pictorial included a headline article about the ‘miser’ Job Collett.  This is reproduced in Appendix Two at the end of this family line.

 

 

 

Upon his death, the cottage in which he had lived most of his later life passed to his eldest nephew Isaac Collett, with the stipulation that it must be renovated before he received his inheritance.  In the newspaper article, Isaac makes reference to the eight years following the death of Job that it would take before any of the beneficiaries would receive their inheritances.

 

 

 

 

41O16

Elizabeth Collett was born at Harefield in 1838 and was twelve years old in 1851.  She later married the younger James Green who was born at Rickmansworth in 1845.  That event took place after September 1861 when, as Elizabeth Collett, she was a witness at the wedding of her brother Richard (below).  For some reason no record of Elizabeth has been found six months earlier at the time of the census in 1861, nor ten year after in 1871, as either Elizabeth Collett or Elizabeth Green.

 

 

 

However, it was in the census of 1881 that Elizabeth and her husband James were living at 7 Cumming Street in Clerkenwell.  Elizabeth Green from Harefield was 41, while James Green, age 35, was an attendant at the public baths in Clerkenwell.  Living with the couple at that time was their daughter Julia Green, age 17 and of Rickmansworth, and Elizabeth’s niece Emily Collett, age 13 and born at Harefield.  Emily was the base-born child of Elizabeth’s younger sister Mary Ann Collett (below), with whom she was actually living in 1891.

 

 

 

 

41O17

Richard Benjamin Collett was born at Harefield on 10th December 1840 and was 11 in 1851 and 20 in April 1861.  Five months later on 14th September 1861 at Hillingdon, he married Caroline Hughes who was born at Harefield in 1842.  Richard’s occupation at that time was that of a zinc worker.  Caroline’s father, who was a witness at the wedding, was William Henry Hughes, also of Hillingdon, who was a copper worker.  The second witness to sign the marriage certificate was Richard’s sister Elizabeth Collett (above).

 

 

 

Shortly after they were married Richard and Caroline were living at Abbey Road in Merton, Surrey, where their first child was born.  The child’s birth certificate stated that Richard Benjamin Collett was a copper forger.  A year or so later the family had made the one mile move from Merton to Wimbledon, where they were living at the time of the birth of the couple’s second and third child.  The 1871 Census for Kingston & Wimbledon listed Richard as 30, Caroline as 29, and their two children as Arthur, who was five, and Clara who was two years old.

 

 

 

The birth certificate for the couple’s third child six years later placed the family as living at 2 Vine Cottages on Hubert Road in Wimbledon and made reference to Richard being employed as a foreman at the Garratt Copper Mills.  Four years later the census of 1881 recorded the family of five still living at 2 Vine Cottages, but by then Richard was working as a commercial clerk at the copper works.  The family at that time comprised Richard B Collett, age 40, and Caroline Collett, age 39, both of them from Harefield, with their three children Arthur F Collett, age 15 who was a draper’s porter, Clara C Collett, age 12, and Bernard B Collett who was only three years old.

 

 

 

After the census in 1881 the family appear to have moved and, although their location in 1891 has not been determined, Richard’s son was living and working in the Putney area of London where he was recorded incorrectly as Arthur Collette, while Richard’s daughter Clara was recorded at Eton.  The remainder of the family has not been positively identified in 1891, so it is not clear where Richard and Caroline, and their son Bernard were at that time.

 

 

 

Ten years on from then, Richard Collett, age 60, and Caroline Collett, age 59, were living in the village of Nutfield near Redhill in Surrey, where Richard was working as a foreman at the Fullers Earth Works.  Living with the couple at Nutfield was son Bernard who was 23 and also employed at the Fullers Earth Works, but as an engine driver.

 

 

 

At the time of the marriage of his son Arthur during the second half of the first decade of the new century, Richard Collett, as father of the groom, was recorded on the marriage certificate as a Works Foreman.  Sometime during the next few years Richard and Caroline left Nutfield and moved to Horley, south of Reigate in Surrey, although it would appear from Richard’s death certificate that he continued to work at the Fullers Earth Works in Nutfield, and very likely with his son Bernard.  And it was at Reigate that Richard and Caroline were confirmed as living at the time of the census in 1911.  Richard Benjamin Collett was 70, while Caroline was 69.  Also living nearby in Reigate at that time was their youngest son Bernard, who was married by then, with a family of his own.

 

 

 

Sadly, it was later that same year that Richard Collett died on 9th October 1911 and, according to the certificate drawn up at Horley on the following day, this happened at Cockley Pits in Nutfield, where Richard was a foreman at the Fullers Earth Works.  The certificate also confirmed his age as being 70, and that the cause of death was acute bronchitis.  The informant of the death to the registrar at Horley was his son Bernard, who was present at Cockley Pits when his father passed away.  Following the death of her husband, Caroline Collett moved to Newbury to live with her son Arthur at Shaw-cum-Donnington, where she died almost exactly eight years later on 11th October 1919.

 

 

 

41P24

Arthur Frederick Collett

Born in 1865 at Merton

 

41P25

Clara C Collett

Born in 1868 at Wimbledon

 

41P26

Bernard Bolton Collett

Born in 1877 at Wimbledon

 

 

 

 

41O18

Sarah Collett was born at Harefield in 1841 and was nine years old in the Harefield census of 1851.  She may have been the Sarah who married Charles Holloway, a brick-maker from Denham in Buckinghamshire.  In 1881 Sarah, from Harefield, and Charles were living at Railway View in Horton Road in Hillingdon with their seven children.  Charles was 41, Sarah was 40, and their children were John, who was 17, Ann, who was 12, Charles, who was eight, Edith who was seven, Richard who was six, May who was four, and Frederick Holloway who was three years old.  All of the children had been born at Yiewsley in the London Borough of Hillingdon.

 

 

 

 

41O19

Mary Ann Collett was born at Harefield in 1842 and was eight years old at the time of the 1851 Census when she was living with her parents Richard Collett and Sarah Collett nee Bolton at the home of her grandfather Henry Collett of Gloucestershire.  No trace of her has so far been found in the 1861 Census.

 

 

 

Around 1867 unmarried Mary Ann Collett gave birth to a base-born daughter Emily.  However, the child was taken from Mary Ann and had been placed in the care of her widowed mother by the time of the census in 1871, when Emily Mary Collett was recorded as the grandchild of Sarah Collett at the age of three years.  Her mother Mary Ann has not been found in the census of 1871.

 

 

 

However three years later, in 1874, Mary Ann Collett married Thomas Crook who was born at Hill End in Harefield in 1846.  The marriage certificate confirmed that Mary Ann was the daughter of Richard Collett, a labourer of Harefield.  It is possible that Thomas Crook had been previously married, since he brought into his marriage to Mary Ann Collett a son who had been born at Harefield around two years before he married Mary Ann.

 

 

 

By the time of the census in 1881, Mary Ann Crook, age 38 and from Harefield, was living at Hill End in Harefield with her husband and their two children.  Thomas Crook, age 34, was a labourer and their two children were Henry Crook aged nine years, and Ernest Crook who was one year old, who had also been born at Harefield.  At that same time Mary’s daughter Emily was staying with Mary’s older sister Elizabeth Green nee Collett (above).

 

 

 

Ten years later according to the census in 1891, the Crook family was still living at Hill End, where Mary Ann Crook was 49, Thomas Crook was 43, and their son Ernest Crook was 11.  Eldest son Henry Crook, who would have been 19, was not living at the family home by that time, but instead, there were two members of the Collett family living there with them on that occasion.

 

 

 

They were Emily M Collett, age 23 and from Harefield, who was the base-born daughter of Mary Ann Collett, and Herbert E Collett who was 19, who was actually Herbert Henry Collett (Ref. 41P31).  Both of them were described as being the stepchildren of the head of the house Thomas Crook.  Whilst this was true in the case of Emily, the reference to Herbert as a stepchild was an error, since he and Emily were cousins.

 

 

 

Just after the turn of the century Mary was listed in the 1901 Census as being aged 57, while her husband Thomas was 53.  Both were still living at Harefield where Thomas was employed as a general labourer and where Mary Ann died two years later.  The death of Mary Ann Crook nee Collett was recorded in the Harefield Parish Register, which stated that she was buried there during June 1903.

 

 

 

41P27

Emily Mary Collett

Born in 1867 at Harefield

 

 

 

 

41O20

Ann Collett was born at Harefield in 1845 and was six years old in 1851, and 15 years of age in 1861.  Ann later married house painter Frederick Ridrup who was born in 1843 and by 1901 both of them were still living in Harefield.  However, it is likely that she married Frederick after 1891 as there is no listing of her as Ann Ridrup in any of the earlier census records.  There is also a chance that Ann was first married to William Windfield and, although his wife was Ann Elizabeth, she was also born at Harefield around 1845.

 

 

 

 

41O21

James Theophilus Bolton Collett was born at Harefield in 1848, and was two years old and 13 years of age in the Harefield census returns in 1851 and 1861.  It was around five or six years later that he married Ann and, apart for a brief period shortly after he married Ann, James appears to have lived most of his life at Harefield.  It was the age of the couple’s first child in the census of 1871 which seems to indicate the couple were married around the time that James and Ann were both 18 years of age.  Their first child was born at Marston Moretaine, south-west of Bedford, where Ann had been born in 1848, so perhaps she was staying with her parents for the birth.

 

 

 

Not long after the birth, the family of three moved to Harefield, where all of their remaining children were born, and by the time of the census in early April 1871 Ann had presented James with two children.  James Collett was 24, Ann Collett was 23, and their two children were Margaret Collett who was three, and Harriet Collett who was just one year old.

 

 

 

By 1881 James, age 33, was working as a gardener and labourer, while his wife Ann was 32.  Living with them at Park Lane in Harefield were their daughters Margaret, age 13, Harriet, age 11, Sarah who was nine, Rose who was five, and their sons Walter, who was three, and James who was one year old.  And right next door to their dwelling in Park Lane was the home of four of James’ cousin Charles Collett (below), while just two doors away was their uncle Robert Henry Collett.

 

 

 

Ten years later the census in 1891 recorded the family as James Collett, age 43, who was working as a cowman, his wife Ann Collett, age 42 and from Marston in Bedfordshire, Walter Collett, age 15, who was a milk boy, James Collett, age 10, who was at school, Reginald Collett who was four years old and also a scholar, but who was recorded as Bignal Collett, and Daisy Collett who was two.  Also living with the family as a boarder was Elizabeth Roe who was six years old and born in London.  James’ and Ann’s third daughter Sarah had already left the family home by then and was living and working in Rickmansworth.

 

 

 

In March 1901, at the age of 52, James was still working as a gardener and was still living in Harefield with his wife Ann who was 51.  Living with them at that time was their unmarried eldest daughter Margaret whose age was given incorrectly as 30, rather than 33, and she and her mother were both confirmed as having been born at Marston Moretaine.  Also living with them were the couple’s two youngest children Reginald, who was 14, and Daisy who was 12, both of them confirmed as having been born at Harefield.

 

 

 

By April 1911 only their son Reginald was still living with James and Ann.  James Collett of Harefield was 62, his wife was 61, and their unmarried son was strangely recorded as 28, although this seems likely to have been an error in translation, his age really being 23.  It is not clear whether, at sometime after the children had grown up, that James and Ann moved away from Harefield to live at Uxbridge, since Harefield lies within the Uxbridge district.  What it known is that the death of James Collett was registered five years later at Uxbridge during 1916.

 

 

 

41P28

Margaret Sarah Collett

Born in 1867 at Marston Moretaine

 

41P29

Harriet Collett

Born in 1869 at Harefield

 

41P30

Sarah Ann Collett

Born in 1871 at Harefield

 

41P31

Herbert Henry Collett

Born in 1872 at Harefield

 

41P32

Rosina (Rose) Collett

Born in 1876 at Harefield

 

41P33

Walter Herbert Collett

Born in 1878 at Harefield

 

41P34

James Thomas Collett

Born in 1880 at Harefield

 

41P35

Reginald Richard Collett

Born in 1887 at Harefield

 

41P36

Daisy Beatrice Collett

Born in 1889 at Harefield

 

 

 

 

41O23

Harriet Collett was a twin with her brother John and was born at Harefield during January 1851 and was two months old in the census that year.  John appears not to have survived beyond his early childhood but Harriet was recorded as being 10 years old in the census of 1861, which confirmed she was born at Harefield, where she was living at that time with her family.

 

 

 

For some reason she did not appear in either of the census returns for 1871 and 1881, but she was living in the Watford area in 1891, at the age of 40.  Also living within the same area was Harriet’s cousin Mary A Collett (Ref. 41O1) who was 53 and from Harefield, as was Rosina Collett (Ref. 41P32) who was also from Harefield and was 16 years old.  All that is known about Harriet after this is that she died during 1916 while living in the Uxbridge.

 

 

 

 

41O24

Thomas Collett was born at Harefield in 1853, where he was living with his family in 1861 when he was seven years of age.  He was the youngest child of Richard Collett and his wife Sarah Bolton, but tragically he died around the time he was 18, when his death was registered at Uxbridge prior to the April census in 1871.

 

 

 

 

41O25

Charles Collett was born at Harefield in 1837, the eldest surviving child of Jonathan and Margaret Collett.  In 1841 he was four years old, and was 13 in 1851.  In 1861 Charles Collett, age 23 and and an agricultural labourer was still living with his family in a cottage on the road leading to the Copper Mills.  With the death of both of his parents during the 1860s, Charles assumed the role of head of the household and looked after his younger brother Frederick Henry Collett (below).  So by the time of the next census in 1871, when Charles was 32, he only had living with him at Park Lane in Harefield his youngest brother Frederick. 

 

 

 

On that occasion the pair of them were recorded with an incorrect spelling of their surname, it having only one t.  So Charles Collet, age 32, was an agricultural labourer of Harefield, while his much younger brother Frederick, age 18, was employed as a bricklayer’s labourer.  By that time in his life Charles was very likely resigned to leading the life of a bachelor, and it was in that capacity that he continued to live out the rest of his life at Harefield.  Living just one dwelling away from him and his brother on Park Lane in 1871 was his uncle Robert Henry Collett with his two unmarried daughters.

 

 

 

According to the next census in 1881 Charles was 42 when he was still living at Park Lane in Harefield with his unmarried siblings Elizabeth, age 35, Jonathan, age 31, and Frederick who was 27.  All four of them were listed as having been born at Harefield, and as Elizabeth had no stated occupation, it seems reasonable to assume that she performed the role of house keeper for her brothers.  It is interesting to note that the dwelling in Park Lane in which they were living on that occasion was situated right next door to the family of their cousin James T B Collett (above), and two doors away from their uncle Robert Henry Collett.

 

 

 

In 1891 the same four siblings were living at White Heath Farm in the Hill End area of Harefield, which was adjacent to The Plough Inn.  Charles Collett, age 50 rather than 53, was a labourer of Harefield, and recorded there with him was his sister Margaret (below) and his two brothers Jonathan and Frederick.  Ten years after that Charles gave his age as being 61 in the census of 1901, when he was still living at Harefield.  By that time in his life he was employed as a gardener and labourer, while still living there with him was Elizabeth, Jonathan, and Frederick.  With no trace of him found in the census of 1911, it is likely that Charles Collett died during the first decade of the new century.

 

 

 

 

41O27

Elizabeth Margaret Collett was born at Harefield in 1844 and was recorded as Elizabeth Margaret Collett, age seven years, within the Harefield census of 1851, when she was living there with her parents Jonathan and Margaret Collett.  No record of her has been positively identified in 1861, but in the census of 1871 Margaret Collett, age 24, was living in Harefield.  By the time of the census in 1881, and following the deaths of both of her parents, Elizabeth Collett, age 35 and from Harefield, was acting as housekeeper for her three unmarried brothers at the house of her older brother Charles (above) on Park Lane in Harefield.

 

 

 

She was still living there with her three brothers ten years later, but on that occasion she referred to herself as Margaret Collett, age 42 (sic) from Harefield.  Her brother Charles was once again the head of the household at White Heath Farm at Hill End in Harefield, next door to The Plough Inn.  The same group of four siblings was still living together in Harefield in March 1901, when once again she was recorded as Elizabeth Collett, by which time she was 53 (sic).  No record of Elizabeth or Margaret has been found in the census of 1911, when she would have been in her mid sixties.

 

 

 

 

41O28

Robert George Collett was born at Harefield in 1846, the son of Jonathan and Margaret Collett.  He was four years old at the time of the Harefield census in 1851, but tragically four years later he died during the last week of February in 1855, following which he was buried at Harefield on 2nd March 1855 at the age of just nine years, under the name of Robert George Collett.

 

 

 

 

41O29

Jonathan Collett was born at Harefield in 1849.  In 1851 he was one year old, and was 11 years of age in 1861.  In 1871 Jonathan Collett, age 22 and from Harefield, was living and working in the Watford area, but by 1881, and following the deaths of his parents, unmarried Jonathan returned to Park Lane in Harefield to live with his surviving siblings Charles, Elizabeth, and Frederick.  At that time he was 31 and was working as a general labourer.  Living next door to the quartet was their cousin James T B Collett (above) and his family, and next door to him another cousin Charles Collett.

 

 

 

According to the next census in 1891, Jonathan Collett from Harefield was 39 (sic) and a labourer, living at White Heath Farm at Hill End in Harefield.  Also living there with him was his brother Charles and sister Margaret (above), and brother Frederick (below).  A similar problem occurred ten years later when, in the 1901 Harefield Census, Jonathan again gave an incorrect age saying he was 48 rather than 51.  At that time he was employed as a bricklayer’s labourer, who was very likely working with his bricklayer brother Frederick (below).  Still living with the two brothers was their sister Margaret (above) and older brother Charles.

 

 

 

Sadly by the time of the next census in April 1911, Jonathan Collett and his brother Frederick were living in an institution in Harefield, which may have been the local workhouse.  Jonathan Collett was 62 and he confirmed that he had been born at Harefield.

 

 

 

 

41O30

Frederick Henry Collett was born at Harefield in 1853 and was the youngest child of Jonathan and Margaret Collett.  In the Harefield census of 1861 Frederick was eight years old, but not long after that both of his parents died, after which he was looked after by his eldest brother Charles Collett (above).  In 1871 when he was 18, Frederick was confirmed as living on the road to the Copper Mills in Harefield with his brother Charles, with whom he was also living at Park Lane in Harefield in 1881.  Also returned to the family by then was Frederick’s sister Elizabeth and brother Jonathan (above).  All of the four siblings were unmarried, with Frederick being employed as a bricklayer at the age of 27.

 

 

 

It was at White Heath Farm, Hill End in Harefield that the four of them were still living together in 1891, when Frederick Collett was 36 and was continuing to work as a bricklayer.  Curiously ten years after that in March 1901, Frederick said he was 43 which may simply be a misinterpretation of 48.  At that time he was still working as a bricklayer, possibly with his brother Jonathan who was a bricklayer’s labourer, with whom he was also still living, together with his other brother Charles and sister Margaret.  The two younger brothers were still together ten years later, but according to the census in 1911 they were living in an institution in Harefield, where Frederick Collett, age 58 and from Harefield, was recorded.

 

 

 

 

41P1

Henry James Collett was born at Mile End Old Town in Stepney on 31st December 1862.  He was eight years old at the time of the census in 1871, when he and his family were living at 18 Roberts Place in Mile End Old Town, from where his father William Henry Collett was working as a butcher.  Sadly Henry’s father died four years later, following which his widowed mother Ann was forced to enter into domestic service, when she took up the position of general servant at the Kings Arms public house in Soho. 

 

It was not previously known what had actually happened to Henry and his four siblings at that time in their lives, since none of them were living with their mother by the time of the census in 1881.

 

 

 

However, thanks to new information received from his great great granddaughter Rebecca Humphreys in 2010, the full story of his life can now be told.  The photograph of Henry (above) was also supplied by Rebecca and is an extract from a larger family group picture taken during the First World War.

 

 

 

In April 1881, Henry Collett was living at 16 Church Street in Soho with his younger brother Arthur who was six, and his sister Amy who was eleven.  He gave his age as being 21, although he was actually nearer eighteen years of age, and on that occasion he was working as a porter for a printer.  The three siblings had probably moved to Soho to be near to their widowed mother Ann, who had found work at the Kings Arms in Moor Street.  Also living with them at 16 Church Street was eighteen years old Harriett Goodman who was recorded as a visitor.

 

 

 

In fact Harriet Goodman (show on the right around 1916) was the first cousin of Henry James Collett, the daughter of George Goodman and his wife Emma Collett (Ref. 41O12), the sister of Henry’s father William Henry Collett.

 

It is possible, although not proved, that Henry and Harriet may have already been in a relationship with each other by that time in April 1881, since the two of them were married towards the end of that same year.  The marriage took place at the church of St James in Piccadilly in the final quarter of 1881, when Harriet was nineteenth years old, she having been born on 26th July 1862. 

 

 

 

At the time of their wedding Henry and Harriet were living at Golden Square in Soho, between Regent Street and Shaftesbury Avenue.  Henry’s occupation was recorded as being that of a porter for a bricklayer, that is, a hod-carrier.  The couple’s first child, Herbert, was born while the couple was still living at Soho during the following year.  The marriage produced a further three children for Henry and Harriet before they left Soho for a new home in South London, they being Louisa, Harry and Dorothy.

 

 

 

By 1891 the family of six was living in the Lambeth district of Newington at 6 Monkton Street, which is still there today and is just off the Kennington Road (A23).  According to the census that year, Henry was 29 and was employed as a hotel porter.  Harriet was also 29, and their four children were listed as Herbert, who was 10, Louisa, who was seven, Harry, who was six, and Dorothy who was three years old.  Over the next ten years a further five children were added to the family, including a set of twin boys.

 

 

 

The census return at the end of March in 1901 placed the Collett family living at Block No 6 in Victoria Dwellings in the Battersea district of London.  Henry Collett from Stepney was 38, when he was working within the estate as the resident mechanic, while his wife Harriet from Uxbridge was also 38, and was described as a housekeeper.  Henry’s and Harriet’s children, still living at the family home on that occasion were, Herbert, age 19, Dorothy, age 12, the twins Edmund and George, who were both five years old, Irene who was four, Violet who was two, and baby Laura who was just twelve days old.

 

 

 

By that time in 1901 the couple’s eldest daughter had left the family home to marry William Joyce.  The only other missing child was their second son Harry, who may have died while still a child, since no further record of him has been found after 1891, nor has any member of the family any memory of him.  The family’s accommodation in 1901 was built by The Metropolitan Artizans' and Labourers' Dwellings Association and, although Henry’s occupation was recorded as the resident mechanic, he was in fact the caretaker for Victoria Dwellings, with his wife being the housekeeper there.  The Association had bought some of the land around Battersea Park from the Crown for the project at £1,600 per acre. 

 

 

 

Other bodies were also involved in developing the area, such as the Artizans' and General Labourers' Dwellings Company, who built Shaftesbury Estate.  Charles Barry Junior was the architect to the MA&LD Association, which also had dwellings in King's Cross and later became known as the Victoria Dwellings Association.  The buildings comprising Victoria Dwellings consisted of three blocks; one for artisans and made up of 98 tenements of 3 or 4 rooms, and two for labourers, each having 90 tenements of 1 or 2 rooms.  They were of four storeys and were built in yellow stock brick.  The Victoria Dwellings at Battersea Park Road were demolished in 1983.

 

 

 

It seems rather odd that, to date, no record of any member of the family has been identified within the census returns completed in April 1911, except the eldest daughter Louisa, who was married by then.

 

 

 

Henry James Collett was extremely patriotic and joined up at the outbreak of the First World War.  However, due to the fact that he was fifty-one he could not be put on front line duty and so was part of the volunteer non-combatant force.  It is believed that he was awarded the military medal for his service to King and Country.  In 1920 Henry and Harriet were living at 31 Landseer Street in Battersea, where they received the tragic news that their son George had died as a victim of the flu pandemic.  George had not been well as a result of his capture by the Germans during the Great War and his subsequent enforced labour in a salt mine.

 

 

 

At that time in his life, Henry was employed as a maintenance man at the Royal Mail Sorting Office on Lavender Hill.  Henry and Harriet were at the centre of a very lively and closely knit family.  Their youngest daughter Laura lived on the top floor of 31 Landseer Street with her family.  Her husband was a strong communist and had lively debates with his father-in-law.  Henry’s eldest daughter Louisa lived at 62 Landseer Street, whilst his other daughter Irene, lived next door to her at number 60.

 

 

 

Henry’s and Harriet’s house hosted all manner of family gatherings and get-togethers, and their grandchildren would often be found there.  Harriet did everything she could to support her children during great difficulties, especially her daughters.

 

 

 

Sometime around 1924, Henry went to visit his rich uncle Job Collett in Harefield.  Unfortunately Job was a strong believer in abstinence and did not approve of Henry’s social habits and, as a result of this, Job removed Henry (referred to as Harry) and his eldest son Bert from the second writing of his Will in 1925. 

 

 

 

In Appendix Two, at the end of this family line, there is a newspaper article which was published in 1937 after the Will of Job Collett was proved and settlement of his estate finally resolved, the main beneficiary being Henry’s cousin Isaac Collett (below).

 

 

 

Henry James Collett died just before the start of the Second World War.  He was a real character and could often be seen walking home swinging his walking stick and wearing his light, near white, planter’s suit.  Landseer Street was bombed at the time of the blitz on London during WWII, hence the reason it does not exist today.

 

 

 

41Q1

Herbert Collett

Born in 1882 at Soho

 

41Q2

Louisa Ellen Collett

Born in 1884 at Soho

 

41Q3

Harry Collett

Born in 1885 at Soho

 

41Q4

Dorothy Mary Collett

Born in 1888 at Westminster

 

41Q5

Edmund John Collett               twin

Born in 1895 at Battersea

 

41Q6

George A Collett                       twin

Born in 1895 at Battersea

 

41Q7

Irene Harriet Rose Collett

Born in 1896 at Battersea

 

41Q8

Violet Collett

Born in 1899 at Battersea

 

41Q9

Laura Julia Collett

Born in 1901 at Battersea

 

 

 

 

41P2

Eliza Collett was born at Mile End Old Town in Stepney on 5th June 1865.  The only other information so far found relating to Eliza is within the 1871 Census in which she was six years of age and was living with her family at 18 Roberts Place in Mile End Old Town.  Four years after that her father died in 1875 and by April 1881 Eliza’s widowed mother was working as a general servant at the Kings Arms in Soho.  No trace of Eliza or her sister Laura (below) has been found at that time, while her other siblings were living at 16 Church Street in Soho.

 

 

 

Two of Eliza’s siblings reappeared in the next census in 1891, but nothing after 1871 has ever been found for Eliza, so it was assumed that she had passed away as a child.  However, an entry in the Collett family bible includes the information that William Hayes and his wife Eliza both died in May 1933.  It is therefore possible that Eliza Hayes may have been the former Eliza Collett and if so, she would have been sixty-eight at the time of her death.

 

 

 

Other entries in the bible record the deaths of Eliza’s brother Arthur Collett (below) on 3rd August 1933 and Helen Ellen Morgan nee Collett on 7th June 1927.  The position of the latter of these two individuals within the family has not been positively identified, although it is possible that she was the former Ellen Jones nee Collett (Ref. 41O6).

 

 

 

 

41P3

Laura Collett was born at Mile End Old Town in Stepney on 7th June 1869 and at that time her family was living at 7 William Street.  Her birth certificate confirmed her parents as William and Ann Collett.  Laura was listed in the 1871 Census as living with her family at 18 Roberts Place in Mile End Old Town, but was recorded in error as Louise Collett aged two years.  So far no record of Laura or her sister Eliza (above) has been found ten years later in the census of 1881, following the death of their father in 1875.

 

 

 

By 1891 Laura was twenty years old and was a domestic housemaid living once again with her widowed mother Ann Collett at 29 Hilldrop Crescent in Islington St Lukes, midway between Kentish Town and Lower Holloway.  Three and a half years later on 1st October 1894 Laura married George Pitts by banns at All Saints Church in Great Barford just to the east of Bedford.  George was a railway porter from Great Barford and was living at Caledonian Road in Islington at the time of their wedding.  The church record indicated that it was Laura’s brother Henry Collett who gave away the bride, with no reference made at all to her deceased father, or her mother, who may have also passed away by then.

 

 

 

Just over six years after Laura and George were married they were living in Islington with their first child and, according to the census return for 1901, the family of three was listed as Laura Pitts, age 30 from Stepney, George Pitts, age 31 of Great Barford, who was working as a builder’s general labourer, and their son George Pitts, who was one year old and born at Kings Cross.

 

 

 

During the next decade two further children were added to the family which, by April 1911 was living in the Greenwich registration district of London.  The family on that occasion comprised George Pitts of Great Barford who was 42, Laura Pitts of Stepney who was 40, and their son George who was eleven, and with them their two daughters Dorothy, who was nine, and Ena who was four.  All three children were listed as having been born at Islington prior to the family’s move to Greenwich.

 

 

 

They later had another daughter Emma Pitts who appears to have been born at Great Barford.  Emma was the grandmother of Phil of Harrow who kindly provided the information relating to his family line.  Phil was born and lived in Ipswich and after attending university he moved to Harrow, coincidentally close to his ancestral roots at Harefield.

 

 

 

Later in their lives, Laura and George Pitts lived at 47 Friendly Street in Lewisham that is, until George passed away, at which time Laura moved to Finchley Road in Ipswich to be near to her daughter Emma and her family.  Laura Pitts nee Collett was described as a small, happy lady, who was always whistling, and who loved her canaries.

 

 

 

 

41P4

Amy Collett was born after the second of April 1871, and the event probably took place at 7 William Street in Mile End Old Town in the Stepney area of London where her family was living on the day of the census that year.  Four years later in 1875, Amy’s father William Collett died and that tragic event appears to have resulted in the family being separated.  According to the census in 1881, Amy was eleven and was living at 16 Church Street in Soho under the care of her older brother Henry (above), who was head of the household at the age of twenty-one.  Also living there with them was their brother Arthur (below).  No Amy Collett has been found in the census of 1891, so it is probably safe to assume that Amy was married by that time.

 

 

 

 

41P5

Arthur Collett was born at Stepney in 1874, the youngest child of William Collett and Ann Calcutt.  Sadly his father died when he was only one year old, and it would appear that this caused the break-up of the family.  By 1881 Arthur was six years old and was being looked after by his eldest brother Henry James Collett (above) and his older sister Amy at 16 Church Street in Soho.  Also living and working in the Soho area of London was their mother who was employed as a domestic general servant at the Kings Arms Inn at Moor Street.

 

 

 

For whatever reason, no record of Arthur has so far been found in any of the census returns after 1881.  However, there are three later known references to him; the first being a photograph taken during the Great War which shows Arthur, described as Uncle Arthur, with his twin nephews Ted and George Collett in their army uniforms.  The note also stated that Uncle Arthur was a coalman.  The second reference placed Arthur as one of three beneficiaries under the terms of the 1923 Will of his uncle Job Collett (Ref. 41O14).

 

 

 

The third and last known fact about Arthur was recorded in the Collett Family Bible.  This stated that he died on 3rd August 1933, although no age or place was indicated.  If this was indeed a reference to Arthur Collett of Stepney who was born there around 1874, then he would have been approximately sixty years old when he died.  It would also seem likely that he never married.

 

 

 

 

41P6

George James Collett was born at Harefield on 15th June 1853 and was originally baptised George Collett Jones.  He was the son of Ellen Collett and James Jones and may have been a twin with his sister Lavinia.  However, by the time of the census in 1861 George was staying at the High Street home in Harefield of his grandparents William and Elizabeth Collett, not far from his family.  His family was growing and his parents had an eleven month old baby, so perhaps George was living with his grandparents to ease the situation in the family home.

 

 

 

On 24th April 1874 at Harefield, George married Emily Mary Heath who was born on 14th August 1854 in the hamlet of Shredding Green in the parish of Iver in Buckinghamshire.  Emily was the daughter of William Heath and Susan Norman.  The couple’s first three children listed below were born at Harefield where, in 1881, they were living at Chapel House, and where George Collett was working as a gardener.  Chapel House was part of the Harefield Manor House estate in Chapel Road.

 

 

 

The census details confirmed that George Collett was 27 and from Harefield, that his wife was Emily, age 26 and from Iver, and that their children were George Collett junior, who was five years old, and the twins Lewis and Beatrice who were both two years of age.  Between early April 1881 and December 1885 the family moved from Harefield to live at Watford, where their son Cyril was born.  It is possible that there may have been other children born between 1878 and 1885, but none have so far been discovered.

 

 

 

Sometime after the birth of the child, George and Emily emigrated to North America, taking their children with them.  It was originally thought that the move took place after the turn of the century, but it would appear that they must have sailed to America prior to 1891, since the family was not listed in that year’s census, nor has any record of them in the UK been found within the census of 1901.

 

 

 

Unlike many immigrants to America, George and his family did not enter the country through Ellis Island in New York Harbour, but it is understood that they lived their early years in that country in the town of Minnesota.  What has been established is that George James Collett died at Washington DC on 27th September 1913 and was buried there at the Glenwood Cemetery.  His widow Emily lived for another sixteen years before she died on 15th September 1929, when she was buried with her husband.  It is understood that Emily had relatives that lived in Washington and it was probably this fact that originally persuaded George and Emily to seek a new life in the Brave New World, and eventually settle there.

 

 

 

41Q10

George William Collett

Born on 22.04.1875 at Harefield

 

41Q11

Lewis John Collett                   twin

Born on 31.08.1878 at Harefield

 

41Q12

Beatrice Maude Collett             twin

Born on 31.08.1878 at Harefield

 

41Q13

Cyril Henry Collett

Born on 15.12.1885 at Watford

 

 

 

 

41P8

Isaac Collett was born at Harefield in 1866 and he later married Mary Ann Gubby on 26th May 1890 at the Church of St Mary the Virgin in Harefield.  Mary had been born at Norwood, Middlesex, in 1864.  Shortly after they were married Isaac and Mary moved north to live at Sculcoates in Kingston-upon-Hull, and it was there that all of their children were born.  By early April 1891 the couple was expecting the birth of their first child when they were residing within the parish of Sutton-with-Stoneferry in the East Riding of Yorkshire.  Isaac Collett was confirmed as being 23, while his expectant wife was 26.  During the next decade four children were born into the family, and all of them born at Sculcoates near Kingston-upon-Hull.

 

 

 

The 1901 Census confirmed that the family was still living at Sculcoates where Isaac was 34 and where he was working as a labourer at the local cement works.  It also confirmed that Mary was three years older than her husband, at the age of 37, while her place of birth was then stated as being Southall in Middlesex.  Their children on that occasion were Isaac who was nine, George who was four, Alfred who was two, and new arrival William who was not yet one year old.  Over the next few years a further two children were added to the family.

 

 

 

Ten years later the family was still living at Sculcoates when, according to the census of 1911, Mary Collett was recorded in error as still being 37 instead of 47.  Isaac Collett was 43 and their six children were Isaac who was 19, George who was 15, Alfred who was 13, William who was 10, Edward who was eight and Sidney who was six years old.  At sometime during the next five years, possibly around the outbreak of war, Isaac and Mary returned to live at Harefield and in April 1918 the couple was living at 6 Waterloo Villas in Harefield when they received the tragic news of the death of their son Alfred, who had been killed in action during the First World War.

 

 

 

In addition to the death of their son Alfred, Isaac and Mary must have suffered another family loss, since in a newspaper article in 1937 Isaac made reference to only having three children.  The article took the form of an interview with Isaac about the passing of his uncle Job Collett (Ref. 41O14), and the inheritance that had been left to his nephews, due to Job never having married and so had no children of his own to whom his estate could be passed.

 

 

 

As the eldest nephew, Isaac had been made the executor of the Will by his uncle, in which he and selected other nephews were named as the sole beneficiaries.  An earlier Will of 1923 and Codicil of 1925 also referred to Isaac as Job’s nephew, in addition to which his eldest son Isaac was also listed as a beneficiary.  Also in the Codicil to the Will, Isaac’s own grandson Isaac Collett, the only known child of his own son Isaac, was also named as a beneficiary.

 

 

 

Upon the death of Job Collett in 1934 his cottage at Harefield passed to Isaac Collett, the elder, who was nearing completion of its restoration under the terms of the Will in 1937.  See Isaac’s interview by a Sunday Pictorial reporter in October 1937, which has been reproduced at the end of this family line.  This provides a fascinating insight to the man that was his rather curious uncle Job Collett.

 

 

 

41Q14

Isaac Collett

Born in 1892 at Sculcoates

 

41Q15

George Thomas Collett

Born in 1896 at Sculcoates

 

41Q16

Thomas Alfred Collett

Born in 1898 at Sculcoates

 

41Q17

William Collett

Born in 1900 at Sculcoates

 

41Q18

Edward Joseph Collett

Born in 1903 at Sculcoates

 

41Q19

Sidney Collett

Born in 1905 at Sculcoates

 

 

 

 

41P10

ELLEN ELIZABETH COLLETT was born at Harefield on 6th September 1870 and she later married John Harman in Middlesex during 1889.  John was born in 1869 at Norwood and was the son of Edward Harman (1832 – 1909) of Islington and Mary Ann Pierce of St Luke’s in London.  It is possible, though not yet proved, that this particular Harman family may have been in some way connected to the Harman family that were the owners of the Harman Brewery in Uxbridge.

 

 

 

The marriage of Ellen and John produced six children for the couple and all born at Harefield, these being: John (1889); Robert (1893); Ellen (1895); Alfred (1897); Ernest (1899); and Mabel who was born on 24th February 1900.

 

 

 

The couple’s eldest son John Harman junior enlisted with the 16th Battalion of the Middlesex Regiment at the outbreak of the First World War.  And so it was as Private Harman 6278 that he was tragically killed in action on 26th April 1917, following which he was buried at the Etaples Military Cemetery, fifteen miles south of Boulogne in France.  At the time of his death John was 28 and was not married.  His parents Ellen and John, who were listed as his next of kin, were living at 8 Waterloo Villas in Harefield when they received the sad news.

 

 

 

The inscription on a headstone at Etaples Military Cemetery reads “In Memory of Private John Harman 6278, 16th Bn., Middlesex Regiment who died on 26 April 1917, age 28, son of John and Ellen Elizabeth Harman, of 8 Waterloo Villas, Harefield, Middx.  Remembered with Honour”

 

 

 

Ellen’s and John’s younger son Alfred Harman was interviewed for the making of a book about village life in Harefield.  His recollections of his last day at school and starting his first job around 1910 can be found at the end of this family line in Appendix One.

 

 

 

The couple’s youngest child, daughter Mabel Harman, married James Ferguson on 1st August 1921 and the marriage produced two children, James Ferguson who was born at 8 Waterloo Villas in 1922 and Jennifer Ferguson.  And it was James’ daughter Jean Oakes nee Ferguson who kindly provided the basic details which enabled this family line to be constructed.  Her grandmother Mabel Ferguson, nee Harman, lived all her life at Harefield, where she died in 1984.

 

 

 

Ellen Elizabeth Harman nee Collett died at 8 Waterloo Villas on 13th May 1940, and it was there also, nearly four years later that her husband John Harman died on 9th April 1954.

 

 

 

 

41P11

Emma Collett was born at Harefield in 1872, the daughter of Jacob and Margaret Collett.  She was nine years old in 1881 when the census that year recorded her living with her family in the High Street at Harefield, where he father was a brick-maker.  Emma was still living with her parents ten years later in 1891 when she was 17.  During the next two years she married Philip Wiggins, a bricklayer from Southall in Middlesex.

 

 

 

Over the following sixteen years Emma presented Philip with nine children, while the family was still living in Harefield.  In 1901 Philip Wiggins was 29, and his wife Emma was 28, by which time they had three children Philip, Alfred and Nora.  During the next ten years the remaining six years were added to the family.  So far April 1911 the full family was Philip Wiggins 39, Emma Wiggins 38, Philip Wiggins 17, Alfred Wiggins 14, Nora Wiggins 12, Ethel Wiggins who was nine, Mabel Wiggins who was eight, May Wiggins who was seven, Daisy Wiggins who was five, George Wiggins who was two, and Dora Wiggins who was five months old.

 

 

 

 

41P12

Flora Collett was born at Harefield in 1875, the daughter of Jacob Collett and his wife Margaret Lacey.  Flora was five years old in the Harefield census of 1881, when she was living there with her family.  By the time she was 15 or 16, she had left her family in Harefield, although no positive identification for her whereabouts has so far been found.  Towards the end of the century Flora married William Bowden, but again, no record of the couple has been found in the census of 1901, by which time their marriage had produced their first two children.

 

 

 

However, during the first decade of the new century a further three children were born into the family, the last of which was born after the family had settled in Harefield.  The census in 1911 listed the family as William and Flora Bowden, both 35, Mabel Bowden 12, George Bowden 11, Ethel Bowden who was eight, Emma Bowden who was four, and Ellen Bowden who was two years old.

 

 

 

 

41P13

Alfred Thomas Collett was born at Harefield in 1878, and as Alfred Collett he was two years old in the Harefield census of 1881.  Ten years later he was again Alfred Collett, age 13, although in the March census of 1901 he was unmarried Thomas A Collett, age 22, who was still living with his family on the High Street in Harefield, from where he was working as a labourer at the local cement works.  Alfred is understood to have been involved in the Boer War with the Middlesex Regiment and also later served in the early days of the First World War.

 

 

 

In 1911 Alfred Thomas Collett curiously gave his age as being 28, rather than 32, when he was one just one of two children still living at Harefield with his parents.  It would appear that it was shortly after the census day that he married Lillian Woodley and at the outbreak of war in 1914 he rejoined the army, but was later disabled and given an honourable discharge on 20th November 1915, when the army record simply named him as Thomas Collett.  The only information known about Lillian comes from the census in 1901 when she was 18 and born at Camberwell, although at that time she was working as a domestic servant at a house in Lewisham.

 

 

 

Previously it was known that Thomas and Lillian had a son Thomas who was named in the 1925 Codicil to the 1923 Will of Thomas Alfred’s uncle Job Collett (Ref. 41O14) – (see Will in Legal Documents).  No other details had been found regarding any further children that the couple may have had until 2013.

 

 

 

New information received in early 2013 from Dave Collett from Grayshott in Hampshire indicates that Alfred and Lillian had a total of seven children, as listed below, although the order they were born in is not known.  The couple’s youngest child was very likely David George Collett who was born in 1929, who was only two years old when his father died.  This would place his death around 1931.

 

 

 

Alfred Thomas Collett was buried at St Mary’s Church in Harefield during 1931, the same grave being the resting place for his widow Lillian who died at Harefield some years later.  The Alfred and his family were resided at 66 High Street in Harefield at the time of his death.  The property was one of a number of terraced houses built by the earlier members of the Collett family and were originally known as Waterloo Villas.  Their son David George often talked about 'The Collett Trust' and it is understood that it was a reference to how the family building business ended up, and that the dwelling formed part of the trust holding.

 

 

 

Interesting Note:  In 1918 Isaac and Mary Collett (Ref. 41P8) were living at 6 Waterloo Villas, while living next door at 8 Waterloo Villas in 1917 was his married sister Ellen Elizabeth Harman nee Collett (above).  Both couples lost a son in the Great War during each of those years; they were Alfred Collett the son of Isaac and Mary, and John Harman the son of John Harman and Ellen Elizabeth Collett.  See Appendix One, a comment made by Alfred Harman in 1910 about the earlier Collett family of house-builders.  Two later members of the family, Thomas Collett and David George Collett - the two sons of Thomas Alfred and Lillian Woodley listed below - built their own homes in Harefield during the early 1960s.

 

 

 

41Q20

Gwyneth Collett

Date of birth unknown at Harefield

 

41Q21

Constance Collett

Date of birth unknown at Harefield

 

41Q22

Eunice Collett

Date of birth unknown at Harefield

 

41Q23

Pink Collett

Date of birth unknown at Harefield

 

41Q24

Thomas Collett

Born before 1925 at Harefield

 

41Q25

John Collett

Born after 1925 at Harefield

 

41Q26

David George Collett

Born on 06.05.1929 at Harefield

 

 

 

 

41P14

Mabel Collett was born at Harefield in 1881 and just after the census in April that year.  She was nine years old in the Harefield census of 1891, but had left the family home to be married by March 1901.  It was just prior to the census that year that Mabel, age 20, married Harry Short, who was 21, after which the childless couple settled in the area of Rickmansworth, where they were living on 31st March 1901, and where Harry was employed as a general labourer.

 

 

 

Over the next ten years Mabel presented Harry with three children, and by April 1911 the family was living in Harefield.  Harry Short was 32, Mabel Short was 29, and their three children were Alfred Short who was ten, Mabel Short who was four, and Thomas Short who was one year old.

 

 

 

 

41P15

Lewis George Collett was born at Harefield in 1883, the youngest son of Jacob Collett and Margaret Lacey.  In the census of 1891 for Harefield he was recorded simply as George Collett, age seven years.  By the time of the next census in March 1901 Louis G Collett was 18 and was still living with his parents at the family home on the High Street in Harefield, where he was working with his father as a bricklayer’s apprentice.  He was still unmarried ten years later, when he was still living at Harefield with his parents, when he was recorded as Lewis George Collett, age 25 instead of 28.

 

 

 

 

41P16

Ethel Collett was born at Harefield in 1885, the youngest child of Jacob and Margaret Collett.  She was five years old in 1891 and in 1901 she was 15, when she was still living with her parents at High Street in Harefield, where she was also working as a cotton spinner.  Within the next four years Ethel married Edward (Ted) Cooper who was the same age as Ethel.  During the years up to 1911 Ethel and Ted had three children, so in the census that year the family living at Harefield comprised Edward Cooper, age 25, Ethel Cooper, also 25, and their three children Ethel Cooper who was five, Ellen Cooper who was two, and Edward Cooper who was just one month old.

 

 

 

 

41P17

Lottie Collett was born at Harefield in 1866, the eldest child of William Collett and Charlotte Ward.  It seems likely that she was baptised as Charlotte, after her mother, but was referred to Lottie all of her life.  All her early years were spent with her family in Harefield, where she was four years old in 1871, and 14 years old in 1881.  She was still living with her parents at Harefield in 1891, when she was recorded as Lettia Collett, age 24, which must surely be a simple error in transcription. 

 

 

 

It was during the next few years that Lottie married William Gregory, as confirmed by the March census in 1901, when she and William were living at Watford Urban with their first child.  Lottie Gregory from Harefield was 34, while her husband William Gregory from Ruislip who was also 34, was employed as a railway clerk.  Their daughter was six years old Gladys L Gregory who was born at Midway Park in Hertfordshire.

 

 

 

Lottie may well have been with-child on the day of the census since, shortly thereafter the census day she gave birth to another daughter.  This was confirmed in the next census in 1911 when the family of four were living in the Uxbridge area.  On that occasion Lottie Gregory and her husband William were both 44, while their two children were Gladys Lilian Gregory, age 16, and Winifred Alice Gregory who was nine years old.

 

 

 

 

41P18

William David Collett was born at Harefield in 1868, the eldest son of David and Charlotte Collett.  It was the Harefield census in 1871 in which he was recorded as William David Collett aged three years. In 1881, at the age of 12, he was still living at Harefield with his family, as he was ten years later in 1891, when he was 22.  His mother managed the grocer’s shop in Harefield, so it seems logical that by the time of the census in 1901 William, age 31, was working as a baker and shopkeeper in the village.  Living with him at 118 High Street in Harefield were his sisters Alice and Grace (below), who was also working with him as his shop assistants.  With no record at all of William in the next census of 1911, when he would have been around 42 years old, it might be assumed that he had either left England for one of the colonies, or had passed away by then.

 

 

 

 

41P19

Elizabeth Collett was born at Harefield in 1870, and was under one year old in the Harefield census on 1871.  She was 10 in 1881 and 20 in 1891, when on both occasions she was still living at Harefield with her parents.  One source says that she was described as Clara Beth Collett in the census of 1891, while being simply Elizabeth in both the 1871 and 1881 census records.  With no record found of her as Elizabeth Collett in 1901, it may be safe to assume that she was married by then.

 

 

 

 

41P20

Joseph Collett was born at Harefield in 1872 and in 1881 he was eight years old and living with his family at the grocer’s shop in Harefield.  He was still living there with his family in 1891 when he was 18.  It seems likely, although not yet proved, that Joseph married Annie Maria Cawdell shortly after the 1891 Census, perhaps in late 1892 or early 1893.

 

 

 

By 1901 the marriage between Joseph and Annie had produced three children for the couple, but at the time of the census bricklayer Joseph, who was 27, was a patient in hospital in St Marylebone.  His wife Annie, who was born at Luton, was 28 and she was living at Willesden in Middlesex with their three children.  They were Grace aged seven years and born at Aveley near Thurrock in Essex, Winifred who was four and born at Harefield, and one year old Charles who was born at Harlesden, not far from Willesden.  The whole family was listed living together at Willesden in the census of 1911, when Joseph and Annie Maria were both 38, Grace Annie Collett was 17, Winifred Lillian Collett was 14, and Charles William Collett was eleven years old.

 

 

 

At the time of the death of Joseph Collett on 27th October 1918 he was residing at 35 Winchelsea Road in Harlsden, Middlesex, when administration of his personal effects of £94 6 Shillings 8d was granted to his widow Annie Collett in London on 20th March 1920.

 

 

 

41Q27

Grace Annie Collett

Born in 1893 at Aveley nr Thurrock

 

41Q28

Winifred Lillian Collett

Born in 1896 at Harefield

 

41Q29

Charles William Collett

Born in 1899 at Harlesden

 

 

 

 

41P21

Alfred Collett was born at Harefield in 1874 and was six years old and 16 years of age in the two Harefield census returns for 1881 and 1891, when he was living there with his parents on both occasions.  For whatever reason, perhaps due to him taking part in the Boer War, no trace has been found of Alfred in the census that took place at the end of March in 1901.  By the time of the census in April 1911, Alfred was once again living with his parents David and Charlotte Collett in Harefield, when he was listed as an unmarried man at 36 years of age.

 

 

 

What is known from his death record is that his later occupation was that of a baker, like his brother William (above) who ran the village bread shop in Harefield in 1901, ably assisted by Alfred’s two younger sisters Alice and Grace (below).  And so it was that Alfred Collett, the baker, died at Harefield on 24th March 1920.

 

 

 

New information received in early 2013 from Dave Collett indicates that shortly after the census in 1911 Alfred Collett became a married man and that he and his wife had a number of children.  Possibly the couple’s youngest child was David George Collett who was born in 1918 and who was only two years old when his father died.

 

 

 

41Q30

David George Collett

Born circa 1918 at Haresfield

 

 

 

 

41P22

Alice Collett was born at Harefield on 2nd March 1876, the daughter of David Collett and Charlotte Ward.  Alice’s mother was the shopkeeper at the grocer’s shop in Harefield in 1881, when Alice was five years old.  Ten years later Alice was still living there with her parents when she was 15.  Just after the turn of the century, and at the age of 25 in 1901, unmarried Alice Collett was working as a shop assistant with her brother William (above) at his baker’s shop at 118 High Street in Harefield.

 

 

 

Four years later on 24th April 1905 Alice Collett married Francis Creighton at Uxbridge and later, in 1923, Francis Creighton was one of the trustees in the Will of Alice’s uncle Job Collett (Ref. 41O14).  (see Will in Legal Documents).  Francis was known as Frank and was born at Uppercleugh, Applegarth in Dumfriesshire, Scotland on 13th August 1879, the youngest son of William Creighton and Jane Armstrong Ker.  At the time of the census in 1901 Francis Creighton was 22 and was working as a builder’s clerk, while living at 74 High Street in Harefield with his widowed father and two older brothers.

 

 

 

According to the census in April 1911, Alice Creighton nee Collett was recorded staying with her parents in Harefield, with her one month old son.  Alice Creighton was 35 and from Harefield, while her son was Francis Collett Creighton.  Tragically Francis Collett Creighton, who was born at Haringey on 5th March 1911, only survived for just over three years, before he died at Harefield on 6th October 1914.  Where Alice’s husband was at the time of the census in 1911 has not been determined.

 

 

 

Sixteen months prior to the death of her first child, Alice presented Frank with another son, Norman Collett Creighton, who was born at Harefield on 27th May 1913, and who died at Beaconsfield on 9th July 1998.  Norman later married Jean Lingard Harrison at Harefield on 4th January 1936, and they had three children, one of whom was Jane Rosemary Creighton who married Anthony Burrows at Gerrards Cross on 12th September 1964.  And it was Anthony who kindly provided the information about their Creighton family.  It was also at Harefield that Alice Creighton nee Collett died on 25th June 1935 at the age of 59, while her husband Frank Creighton lived on for another twenty-four years, before he passed away at Harefield on 27th December 1959.

 

 

 

 

41P23

Grace Collett was born at Harefield in 1878 and was the youngest child of David and Charlotte Collett.  In 1881 her family was living at the grocer’s shop in Harefield which was managed by her mother.  Grace was two years old at that time, and was 11 years old in 1891.  By the time of the next census in 1901 she was 22 and was working as a baker’s assistant in Harefield at the shop run by her brother William (above) at 118 High Street.  In 1910 Grace Collett married Evelyn Hurden at Edmonton in North London.  Just as her sister Alice’s husband had been a trustee in the Will of her uncle Job Collett, so was Grace’s husband Evelyn.  (see Will in Legal Documents)

 

 

 

Evelyn was five years younger than Grace and was born at Bow in London in 1883, the son of joiner Christopher Hurden and his wife Mary, both of Bosham in Cornwall.  In 1901 Evelyn was living at Harefield with his family, where he was also working as a joiner.  Not long after they were married Grace and Evelyn were living in Harefield, as confirmed by the census in 1911.  Grace Hurden from Harefield was 32, while her younger husband Evelyn Hurden was 27.  No record of the death of Grace Hurden has so far been found, but it is established that Evelyn Hurden died at Harefield on 19th February 1943.

 

 

 

 

41P24

Arthur Frederick Collett was born at Abbey Road in Merton on 30th November 1865.  His birth certificate for the registration district of Croydon gave the sub-district as Mitcham in Surrey, and his father as Richard Collett, a copper forger.

 

However, not long after he was born he and his parents were living just one mile from Merton at Wimbledon, where Arthur’s two siblings were born. 

 

According to the 1881 Census, and at the age of 15, Arthur and his family were living at 2 Vine Cottages in Hubert Road in Wimbledon, from where he was employed as a draper’s porter.

 

 

 

The census record also confirmed his place of birth as being Merton.  Ten years later in 1891, the census on that occasion placed Arthur living and working within the Wandsworth & Putney registration district of London.  However, his name was incorrectly recorded as Arthur Collette, age 26, although the census return did confirm his place of birth as Merton.  The photograph above would appear to have been taken possibly before, or around the time that, he was married in 1908.

 

 

 

He later became a master decorator and specialised in ecclesiastical decoration.  In association with his work he travelled to Czechoslovakia to learn everything he could about stained glass window making and restoration.  And it may have been during the spring of 1901 that he was there, as he has not so far been located in the UK national census which took place that year.

 

 

 

Perhaps it was his work that took him to the Newbury area where he met Edna Digweed, to whom he was later married.  Eddie, as she was known within the family, was eighteen years younger that Arthur and was born during 1883 at Yattendon, a village to the north-east of Newbury.  At the time they met Edna was living with her parents at Shaw-cum-Donnington on the northern outskirts of Newbury.

 

 

 

Edna’s father was Levi Digweed, a blacksmith, who was born at Greenham near Newbury in 1858, who was only seven years older than his future son-in-law.  Edna’s mother was Fanny Levi who was also born in 1858.  Edna was 17 and was working as dressmaker at the time of the 1901 Census for Shaw-cum-Donnington, when she was living there with her family.

 

 

 

The marriage between Edna, aged 24, and Arthur, aged 42, took place at St Mary’s Church in Shaw-cum-Donnington on 23rd September 1908.  Arthur’s place of residence was stated as being St Nicholas Road in Newbury and his father was confirmed as Richard Benjamin Collett.  Less than three years later, the pair of them were settled in Shaw-cum-Donnington where, according to the census of 1911, Arthur Frederick Collett was 45, and his wife Edna was 27.  By that time Edna had presented her husband with their first child, Amy Beatrice, who was one year old.

 

 

 

Sadly the marriage only lasted for just less than five years since, tragically on 23rd May 1913, Arthur fell from a ladder while working on the redecoration of St Mary’s Church and never recovered from his injuries.  Around that time the family was living at Shaw Cottage in Shaw-cum-Donnington.  However, during their short life together the marriage produced three children for Arthur and Edna, all three being been while the couple were living in Newbury.  Edna Collett, nee Digweed, survived for a further thirty-seven years and died at Newbury on 25th May 1950.

 

 

 

41Q31

Amy Beatrice Collett

Born in 1909 at Newbury

 

41Q32

Raymond Bernard Collett

Born in 1912 at Newbury

 

41Q33

Arthur Frederick Collett

Born in 1913 at Newbury

 

 

 

 

41P25

Clara C Collett was born at Wimbledon in 1868 and was 12 years old and living at 2 Vine Cottages in Hubert Road in Wimbledon in April 1881.  During the next ten years the family left Wimbledon, and in 1891, Clara Collett from Wimbledon was 22 and was living and working in the Eton registration district of west London.  She married Charles George Page who was born at East Grinstead in 1867, the son of tobacconist George Page of East Grinstead.

 

 

 

Once they were married the couple settled in East Grinstead where their children were born.  They were Leonard Charles Page and Hilda Margaret Page, although there may have been others.  According to the East Grinstead census of 1901, their parents were Clara Page from Wimbledon, who was 32, and her husband Charles Page, age 33, who was working as a town postman at that time.  Two further children were added to the family over the next few years, so by 1911 the family living at East Grinstead comprised Charles Page 43, Clara Page 42, Leonard Page 12, Hilda Page 10, Elsie Page who was seven, and Freda Page who was six years old.

 

 

 

 

41P26

Bernard Bolton Collett was born at Wimbledon on 25th May 1877, his second name coming from his grandmother’s maiden name.  At the age of three years he was living with his family at 2 Vine Cottages on Hubert Road in Wimbledon.  Where Bernard and his parents were living in 1891 has not been discovered, but sometime after 1881, he and his parents moved to Nutfield near Redhill in Surrey.  And it was there that the three of them were living in March 1901.  At that time Bernard, age 23, was working with his father Richard at the local Fullers Earth Works, where he was an engine driver.

 

 

 

It may have been during that period in his life that he met Beatrice Annie Holmes to whom he was married less than two years later.  The couple were married by banns at Holy Trinity Church in Wimbledon on 17th January 1903.  Beatrice was born at Clapham on 2nd October 1877, and was the daughter of cabinet maker John Holmes and his wife Sophia.

 

 

 

At the time of their wedding Bernard was 27 and was living at Nutfield where he was working as an engine driver, while Beatrice was 24 and she was living at 155 Graham Road in Wimbledon.  During their life together the marriage produced five children for Bernard and Beatrice.  Four of them were living with the couple in the Horley area of Reigate in Surrey by the time of the census in April 1911.  On that occasion the family was listed as Bernard and Beatrice Collett who were both 32, Ethel who was seven, Ivy who was five, Leonard who was four, and Herbert who was just three months old.

 

 

 

In October 1911 Bernard was still working at the Nutfield Fullers Earth Works, where his father Richard was still working as a foreman.  Sadly it was Bernard who was on hand to witness his father’s death at Cockley Pits on the ninth of October, and it was Bernard who reported the death to the registrar at the Horley sub-district of Reigate, where his father and mother were then living.

 

 

 

Tragically Bernard Bolton Collett died while he was still fairly young, when he passed away on 3rd April 1915 while he was attending the St James Infirmary in Ouseley Road in Balham.  He was just 39 years of age and the cause of his passing was cardiac failure, coupled with chronic bronchitis and emphysema.  Immediately prior to him being admitted into hospital, Bernard was living at 118 Penwith Road in Wandsworth, where he was employed as a stoker at a local block of residential flats.  His death was reported to the South west Battersea sub-district of Wandsworth by his sister-in-law C Holmes.  It is interesting to note that both Ouseley Road in Balham and Penwith Road in Wandsworth are still there in 2008.

 

 

 

Following Bernard’s death the family was tragically split up.  This resulted in his two oldest boys, Leonard who was eight and Herbert who was not yet five years old, being taken from the family and placed in the care of a local Doctor Barnardo’s Home.  Only the two daughters, who were old enough to support their mother, and their baby brother Arthur, who was just over two years of age, remained living with their mother Beatrice, who lived the life of a widow for the next fifty years.  Beatrice Annie Collett, nee Holmes, died on 3rd April 1966, at the age of 89.

 

 

 

41Q34

Ethel Eveline Collett

Born on 23.07.1903

 

41Q35

Ivy Collett

Born on 16.09.1905

 

41Q36

Leonard Archibald Collett

Born on 05.03.1907

 

41Q37

Herbert Charles Collett

Born on 30.12.1910

 

41Q38

Arthur Richard Collett

Born on 23.12.1912

 

 

 

 

41P27

Emily Mary Collett was born at Harefield in 1867 and was the base-born daughter of Mary Ann Collett.  Following her illegitimate birth, Emily was taken into the care of her widowed grandmother Sarah Collett at Harefield.  And it was with her grandmother that Emily Mary Collett, age three years, was living at the time of the census in 1871.  During the next few years her grandmother passed away, which resulted in Emily going to live with her aunt Elizabeth Green nee Collett (Ref. 41O16).  Elizabeth was her mother’s older sister and in 1881 Emily Collett, age 13, was living at 7 Cumming Street in Clerkenwell, the home of James and Elizabeth Green.

 

 

 

Over the following years Emily was reunited with her mother Mary, who was married by then.  The 1891 Census recorded her as Emily M Collett of Harefield, age 23, when she was living at the Hill End home in Harefield of Mary Ann Crook nee Collett and her husband Thomas Crook.  The census return confirmed her relationship to Thomas Crook as stepchild, being the former child of his wife.

 

 

 

Shortly after that Emily married general labourer Richard Bugbee who was born at Harefield in 1860, who was most likely the brother of Robert Bugbee, age 14, who was a lodger with the family of Jacob Collett in Harefield in 1881.  Although it is known that Emily and Richard had five children, it is curious that no record of Emily or her family has been found in 1901. 

 

 

 

However, ten years later the family of seven was recorded as living in Harefield, where all of the children had been born.  The census in 1911 listed Emily Bugbee as 44, while her husband Richard was 50.  Still living with them were their five children, they being Richard 19, George 16, Ethel 12, Louisa 10, and Florence who was eight.

 

 

 

 

41P28

Margaret Sarah Collett was born at Marston Moretaine near Bedford, either at the end of 1867 or early in 1868.  It was also at Marston Moretaine that she was baptised on 3rd March 1868, the daughter of James and Ann Collett.  In 1881 she was 13 when she was living with her family at Park Lane in Harefield.  She was still living with her parents after the start of the new century when she 33, unmarried, and working as a domestic nurse in March 1901.

 

 

 

 

41P30

Sarah Ann Collett was born at Harefield towards the end of 1871, the third child of James and Ann Collett.  In 1881 Sarah was nine years old when she and her family were living at Park Lane in Harefield.  However, on leaving school she left her family in Harefield when she took up employment as a domestic servant at a private house in the High Street in Rickmansworth.  The census in 1891 recorded that Sarah A Collett from Harefield was 18 years old and a general servant, where she was working alongside Edith Heard, age 22, who was nurse supported by nursemaid Minnie Allum who was only 11 years of age.

 

 

 

It may have been around three years later that Sarah Ann married George Henry Nicholls, who was born at Hayes in Middlesex in 1867, the son of Benjamin and Mary Nicholls.  One year later Sarah presented George with what appears to be their only child, George Henry Nicholls junior.  By 1901 the family of three was living in the Ruislip area where George was 35 and a labourer at a brick field, Sarah was 29, and their son George was seven.  Ten years later the same family was still residing within the Ruislip registration district.  George Henry Nicholls from Hayes was 43, Sarah Nicholls was 38, and their son George Henry Nicholls was 16, both of them having been born at Harefield.

 

 

 

 

41P31

Herbert Henry Collett was born at Harefield during 1872.  There are a couple of mysteries surrounding this member of the family.  Firstly he was sometimes referred to as Herbert H Collett, Herbert Henry Collett, and Herbert E Collett, with the first two of these corresponding more closely with the fact that later in his life he was called Harry Collett.  Secondly, he has not been located anywhere in the UK in the 1881 Census, when he would have been around eight years of age. 

 

 

 

He then reappeared in the 1891 Census living with his aunt Mary Ann Crook nee Collett (Ref. 41O19) at her Hill End home in Harefield.  In that year’s census return he was recorded as being the stepson of head of the house Thomas Crook.  Around the middle of the 1890s Herbert was married and by the time of the 1901 Census he was living at Hill End in Harefield with his wife Elizabeth and their three children, Herbert who was four, Violet who was two, and Ernest who was one year old.

 

 

 

Herbert’s age was stated as being 28 and his place of birth was Harefield, and at that time he was working as a bricklayer’s labourer.  Elizabeth, who was born at Luton in 1872, was working as a servant in a shop in the village of Harefield in 1901.  It seems highly likely that she was pregnant with Herbert’s third child on the day of the census, since the couple’s second daughter was born later that same year.

 

 

 

Sadly it would appear that the couple’s second son Ernest died not long after the census day in 1901, since a third son born into the family was given the same name three years late.  Over the next five years five more children were added to the family, which by 1911 was still living in Harefield.  Herbert Henry Collett was 38, Elizabeth Collett was 37, and their seven children were Herbert, age 14, Violet, age 12, Gladys who was nine, Ivy who was seven, Ernest who was five, Irene who was two, and Nellie who was just three months old.

 

 

 

It would appear that the couple’s eldest son was later referred to as Bert, and in the 1923 Will of Job Collett (Ref. 41O14), there is mention of a Bert Collett, the son of Job’s nephew Harry.  So it may be that in later life Herbert was indeed referred to as Harry Collett, as discussed above.  However, it is likely that Harry and or Bert fell out of favour with Job Collett in 1925, since a Codicil to the Will made later that year replaced Bert Collett with another of Job’s nephews, this being Thomas Collett, the son of Thomas Alfred Collett.  (see Will in Legal Documents)

 

 

 

41Q39

Herbert Collett

Born in 1896 at Hill End, Harefield

 

41Q40

Violet Collett

Born in 1898 at Harefield

 

41Q41

Ernest Collett

Born in 1899 at Hill End, Harefield

 

41Q42

Gladys Collett

Born in 1901 after 31st March

 

41Q43

Ivy Collett

Born in 1903 at Harefield

 

41Q44

Ernest Collett

Born in 1905 at Harefield

 

41Q45

Irene Gladys M Collett

Born in 1908 at Harefield

 

41Q46

Nellie Collett

Born in December 1910 at Harefield

 

 

 

 

41P32

Rosina (Rose) Collett was born at Harefield in 1876 and was five years old in the census for Harefield in 1881.  Upon leaving school Rose seems to have gone into domestic service, which caused her to leave her family home in Harefield to take up employment in the Watford registration district, where she was listed at Rosina Collett, age 16 and from Harefield.  The only other members of the Collett family from Harefield that were living in that same area on that occasion were Rosina’s aunts, the cousins Mary A Collett (Ref. 41O1) and Harriet Collett (Ref. 41O23).  By the time of the census in 1901 Rose was recorded in the St George Hanover Square area of London as Rosina Collett from Harefield who was 25.

 

 

 

It was just over three years later that she married John Oakley from Harpenden in Hertfordshire at All Saints Church in St John’s Wood within the London Borough of Westminster on 15th June 1904.  The record of the marriage confirmed that Rosina Collett was 28 and the daughter of James Collett, while John Oakley was 25 and the son of James Oakley.

 

 

 

Over the remainder of that decade Rosina gave birth to four children although tragically only two were still alive by the time of the census in 1911.  On that occasion the family of four was residing in St Albans where it was Rosina Oakley from Harefield who was 35 who signed the census return.  Her husband of six years was farmer labourer John Oakley who was 33 and their three-roomed accommodation may have been provided by his employer.  Their two surviving children had both been born at Redbourn in Hertfordshire and were Dorothy Oakley who was five and already attending school and Ivy Oakley who was two years old.

 

 

 

Whether she was a casualty of the Great War or a victim of the flu pandemic that followed, the death of Rosina Oakley was recorded at St Albans register office (Ref. 3a 1661) during the last three months of 1918 when she was 42.

 

 

 

 

41P33

Walter Herbert Collett was born at Harefield in 1878 and was three years old in the 1881 Census for Harefield.  He was still there with his family ten years later in 1891, when his age was recorded as 15.  By the time of the 1901 Census he had left the family home, was married, and was living and working at Ruislip in Surrey.

 

 

 

It was around, or just after, the turn of the century that Walter had married Florence who was born at Derby in 1877.  Both of them were 23 years old in March 1901, by which time Walter was employed as a domestic coachman.  It would also appear that the couple had a long wait for the birth of their first child, who was born nearly ten years later, although it is possible there had been earlier children born to the couple who did not survive.

 

 

 

Certainly the census in the April 1911 confirmed that the family of three was living in the Lambeth district of London.  Walter H Collett from Harefield was 32, as was his wife Florence Collett from Derby, while their son Herbert Collett was just one year old.  It is possible that the couple were blessed with other children after that time, although nothing further is known about the family after 1911.

 

 

 

41Q47

Herbert Collett

Born in 1909

 

 

 

 

41P35

Reginald Richard Collett was born at Harefield on 12th February 1887 where he was baptised on 24th April 1887, the son of gardener James Collett and his wife Ann.  He was living there at Park Lane with his family at the time of the census in 1891 when he was incorrectly recorded as Bignal Collett aged four years.  Ten years after that he was still living with his parents at Harefield where he was working as a farmer’s boy at the age of 14.  After a further ten years, according to the census in 1911, Reginald Collett of Harefield said he was 28, unless that was a misinterpretation of 23, which was his actual age.  By that time he was still a single man living at Harefield with his parents James and Ann Collett.

 

 

 

 

41Q1

Herbert Collett was born at Soho in 1882.  This may have taken place at Golden Square in Soho where his parents Henry James Collett and Harriet Goodman were living at the time of their wedding in the latter part of 1881.  Ten years later the family was living at 6 Monkton Street in Lambeth, where Herbert was incorrectly recorded as being ten years old.

 

 

 

After another ten years Herbert was still living with his parents, by which time the family had left Lambeth and instead was living in Block 6 at Victoria Dwellings in Battersea, as confirmed by the census in 1901.  Herbert Collett from Soho was more accurately described as being 19 and his occupation was that of a plumber’s labourer.

 

 

 

A few years later Herbert married Edith Louisa, with whom he had five children, the first three of which were born while the couple was living in Battersea.  By April 1911 the family had moved west along the south bank of the River Thames, and was living in the Wandsworth area.  The family was recorded as Herbert Collett, age 29, his wife Edith was 26, and their three children were Louisa Collett, who was five, Rose Collett, who was three, and Herbert Collett who was one year old.  Sadly the eldest of their two known sons, Herbert, who was also known as Herbie, drowned while swimming in the River Thames.

 

 

 

Edith Louisa Collett of 22 Westover Road in Wandsworth was already a widow when she died there on 10th December 1946.  The administrator for her estate of £73 12 Shillings 6d in London on 23rd January the following year was her son Herbert Henry Collett, a moulder.

 

 

 

41R1

Louisa Collett

Born in 1905 at Battersea

 

41R2

Rose Collett

Born in 1907 at Battersea

 

41R3

Herbert Henry Collett

Born in 1909 at Battersea

 

41R4

Victor Collett

Date of birth unknown

 

41R5

Kate Collett

Date of birth unknown

 

 

 

 

41Q2

Louisa Ellen Collett was born at St Martin’s in Soho in 1884, the eldest daughter of Henry James Collett and his wife and cousin Harriet Goodman.  By the time she was seven years old her family was living at 6 Monkton Street in Lambeth.  Louisa was in her teenage years when she married William Joyce, although this had not happened by the time of the March census in 1901, when she was still Louisa E Collett, age 16.  She had left the family home by then and was employed as a general domestic servant while was living and working in the Battersea area, not far from where her parents were living.

 

 

 

Her marriage to (1) William Joyce, took place sometime during the early years of the new century, and produced four children for the couple.  Louisa and William were living in the Wandsworth area by 1911, not far from her older brother Herbert Collett (above) and his family.  However, it was during the First World War that William Joyce died, leaving his widow Louisa with her four children, Dorothy Joyce, Kitty Joyce, Billy Joyce, and Jessie Joyce.

 

This picture of Louisa was taken during the war and, with her in the larger picture from which it was extracted, was her mother, her father, and her brother Ted, who was home on leave from the army.  Two of her mother’s Goodman nieces were also included in the photograph.

 

 

 

After the war, Louisa married (2) Harry Palmer and moved, with her four children and his two sons from his previous marriage, to 62 Landseer Street in Battersea, to be near to her parents at 31 Landseer Street and right next door to her sister Irene at 60 Landseer Street.

 

 

 

Unfortunately Harry Palmer turned out to be a terrible alcoholic, so when Louisa died her mother Harriet Collett could not face Palmer being responsible for her grandchildren.  Instead she persuaded the war office to treat them as war orphans and so they were removed from Palmer.  As a direct result of that action the children grew up much happier under the guardianship of their grandmother Harriet and their Uncle Ted Collett, Louisa’s younger brother (below) who jointly took responsibility for their future welfare.

 

 

 

 

41Q3

Harry Collett was born at St Martin’s in Soho in 1885.  Apart from being recorded as six years old in the Lambeth census of 1891, when he and his family were living at 6 Monkton Street in Lambeth district of Newington, no further record of him has been found, and his absence from the family in 1901 would suggest that he may have died during the 1890s.

 

 

 

 

41Q4

Dorothy Mary Collett was born at Westminster in 1888, although her birth was recorded at the Islington register office (Ref. 1b 248) during the fourth quarter of that year.  She was three years old in 1891 when she was living at 6 Monkton Street in Lambeth with her family.  During the 1890s the family moved again, so by March 1901 Dorothy was twelve years old and was living with her family at 6 Victoria Dwellings in Battersea.  Like most of the other members of her family, the whereabouts of Dorothy has not been traced in the census of 1911.  However, before she was 20 years old she had given birth to two illegitimate daughters following relationships with two American soldiers during the Great War.  Happily, the second of the two GIs returned to England from America after the war to marry Dorothy, and to take her and her two daughters, Maisie and Sybil, back to America to live with him.

 

 

 

 

41Q5

Edmund John Collett was one of a set of twins born at Battersea on 29th July 1895 and throughout his life he was known as Ted.

 

In the census of 1901 Ted was listed as Edmund Collett and at that time he and his family were living at 6 Victoria Dwellings in Battersea.

 

As stated earlier in this family line, and rather strangely, no record of Ted or any member of his Collett family has been found in the census of 1911. 

 

It is known that he served with the British Army during the war.  However, while on front-line duty, he was injured and had to have a silver plate put into his head.  The operation was carried out at Northallerton in Yorkshire in 1916.

 

 

 

It was also around that time when his brother-in-law William Joyce, the husband of his sister Louisa (above), was killed in action.  Whilst his sister Louisa re-married after the war, she too died after a few years, at which point Ted, and his mother Harriet, took over the care of Louisa’s four children.  By November 1925, he had found work as a part-time postman in Wandsworth. This eventually became a full-time job, which he loved, and he eventually received a long-term Service Medal from Queen Elizabeth II during 1961.

 

 

 

It was in October 1926 that Ted married Doris Carlotta at Grampound in Cornwall.  The couple had moved to Cornwall to be nearer to Doris’ family.  Their marriage produced no children of their own, but this was compensated for by the couple continuing to look after the welfare of Ted’s sister Louisa’s orphaned children as if they were their own.

 

 

 

 

41Q6

George A Collett was born at Battersea on 29th July 1895, and was a twin with his brother Ted (above).  In March 1901 he and his family were living at 6 Victoria Dwellings in Battersea, when he was listed in the census as being George Collett of Battersea aged five years.

 

 

 

As with the other members of his family, no record of George has been found in the census of 1911.  However, at the outbreak of war, when George was 19, he joined the Royal Fusiliers.  He became Private G A Collett No. 134918 and served on the frontline, but was taken prisoner and was put to work in the salt mines.  He returned to England after the war, but was very weak and died on 20th November 1920 during flu pandemic which killed so many of the men who had survived the war.  His army record showed that his next-of-kin was his parents Henry James and Harriet Elizabeth Collett of 31 Landseer Street in Battersea.

 

 

 

 

41Q7

Irene Harriet Rose Collett was born at Battersea on 28th September 1896 and was four years old by the time of the March census in 1901.  At that time Irene and her family were living at 6 Victoria Dwellings in Battersea.  Irene would have been 14 in April 1911 but so far, no record of her has been found.  What we know however, is that Irene was still living in the Battersea area in 1914, since it was there on 4th April 1915 that she married Joseph Holland Malins, who was a lorry driver and a porter.  He was partially disabled while still a child, when a costermonger’s large wheelbarrow ran over his leg.  The broken leg was incorrectly set at the time of the accident, and as a result he had a raised boot to level out his walking.  Irene therefore took in ironing to earn extra money for the family.

 

 

 

Irene and Joseph both loved music; Irene sang and knew all the latest songs, while Joseph played the piano in the local pubs.  Immediately after they were married Irene and Joseph lived first at 60 Landseer Street, right next door to her sister Louisa, and not far from her parents at 31 Landseer Street.  They had eight children and, after living at Landseer Street, the family moved to a house in the adjacent road of Longhedge Street.  Landseer Street has been replaced by Parkfield Industrial Estate, while Longhedge Street survived the redevelopment and is still there today, just off Battersea Park Road (A3205).

 

 

 

During the Second World War Joseph Malins was employed in the Home Guard and also worked for the American Army, driving trucks out of the large Blandford camp in Dorset.  Irene and the Malins family were evacuated from London and placed in the relative safe of Bournemouth, to be nearer to her husband.  After the war Joseph was diagnosed with cancer at St Guy’s Hospital in London.  On being discharged from the hospital, he went and played the piano in the Duke of Cambridge public house on Battersea Bridge Road.  Joseph Holland Malins died in 1947 while he was living at 87 Stewart Road in Bournemouth.  Irene knew that he would prefer to be buried in London, so she arranged for his body to be taken to South London, to be buried at the Garrett Lane Cemetery in Tooting.

 

 

 

Following the death of her husband, Irene continued to live at 87 Stewarts Road, which she shared with her second youngest daughter and her husband.  Eventually four of her daughters emigrated to America with their husbands so, in the early 1960s, Irene decided to follow them in order to be able to visit them when she wanted.  A few years later in 1965, when she was living in America, Irene received the news that her eldest son Walter was to become the first Mayor of Battersea and Wandsworth.  She then made a permanent returned to England in 1966, just in time to attend the Mayor’s reception and dinner-dance with the Lord Mayor of London.

 

 

 

And it was sixteen years later that Irene Harriet Rose Malins nee Collett died at Bournemouth in May 1982.  Of her children, Irene’s eldest son Walter Malins married Johanna Sheehan and was the first Mayor of Battersea and Wandsworth during 1965-1966.  On his retirement he moved to Bournemouth, and at the start of the twenty-first century he was living in Tunbridge Wells.  Walter Malins is the grandfather of Rebecca Humphreys who, together with her grandfather and her father Peter, kindly provided all the family details and photographs for the family of Henry James Collett and his descendents.

 

 

 

Irene’s eldest daughter Violet Malins married Bill Halliday and the couple lived in London with her sister Irene and her husband.  Violet and Bill later moved to Bournemouth and then to York, where widow Violet was still living in 2010.  Daughter Irene Malins married Ted Andrews and lived in London with her sister Violet, before she and Ted emigrated to America, where they settled in Indianapolis.  Joining them in America were Irene’s three sisters: (a) Sylvia who married American GI Herman Paige, who initially lived in Arkansas, before settling in Indianapolis; (b) Loretta, known as Mickey, who married Ken Symes who lived in Bournemouth before moving to Indianapolis; and (c) Dorothy who married another GI, Richard Clifton, this couple settling first in Texas, and then in Michigan. 

 

 

 

The remaining two children were Edmund Malins who married Joan Fletcher, and Josephine Malins who married Ian Drummond, both siblings making their respective homes in Bournemouth.

 

 

 

 

41Q8

Violet Collett was born at Battersea in 1899 and was two years old and living at 6 Victoria Dwellings in Battersea in March 1901.  Violet later married Harry Jennings, a Canadian who had stayed on after the end of the First World War, and they later moved back to Canada.  Harry Jennings eventually became a Major in the Canadian Army. The marriage of Harry and Violet produced one daughter for the couple, Betty Jennings, and all three of them returned to England to visit the Collett family during the 1930s.  The family recall that they appeared to be extremely glamorous, with their fancy clothes and luggage, in comparison to their poorer English relations.

 

 

 

 

41Q9

Laura Julia Collett was born at 6 Victoria Dwelling in Battersea on 19th March 1901 and was just twelve days old at the time of the census on 31st March that year.  During the middle of the Great War, and unbeknown to anyone in the family, Laura fell pregnant and to everyone’s amazement she went into labour during 1916, giving birth to her first son, Johnny Collett.  The identity of the boy’s father has always remained a secret. 

 

 

 

Laura eventually married John Levis with whom she had a further two sons, George Henry Levis and Jimmy Levis.  Laura and her family occupied the top floor of her parents’ house at 31 Landseer Street.  John Levis was an ardent communist who had lively debates with his father-in-law Henry James Collett.  George Henry Levis was born in 1922 and at the outbreak of the Second World War he joined the Royal Marines.  Two years into the conflict he was attached to the cruiser HMS Galatea which was part of the Mediterranean Battle Fleet for Operation Landmark supporting the Libyan offensive.

 

 

 

The ship sailed out of Alexandra on 6th December 1941 and one week later was the subject of a concerted assault by enemy aircraft on 14th December 1941.  The attack from the air lasted seven hours, by which time a German U-boat had arrived on the scene under cover of darkness and fired torpedoes into the cruiser, sinking the vessel in the early hours of 15th December.  Of the 600 crew on board HMS Galatea, only 120 men were rescued by two destroyers from the same fleet.  Sadly George Henry Levis was one of those who lost their life on that fateful night, at the tender age of 19.

 

 

 

The naval record confirmed that he was a Marine from Plymouth, with his service number being PLY/X3729.  The record also confirmed that his next-of-kin was Simon John George and Laura Julia Levis of Battersea, and that his name is one of many on Panel 59 of the Plymouth Naval Memorial on The Hoe in Plymouth.

 

 

 

41R6

Johnny Collett

Born in 1916 at Battersea

 

 

 

 

41Q10

George William Collett was born at Harefield on 22nd April 1875 and was five years old in the Harefield census of 1881.  Sometime during the next decade George accompanied his parents when the family emigrated to North America prior to the census of 1891.  Around the turn of the century he and his family were living at Minnesota, but at the time of his death on 7th March 1907 the family was living at Washington DC where George was buried.  His grave at the Glenwood Cemetery in Washington was also used for the burials of his parents in 1913 and 1929, and his brother Lewis in 1914.  George never married and was 32 years old when he died.  During his short life he worked as a printer in a print shop with his younger brother Lewis (below).

 

 

 

 

41Q11

Lewis John Collett, who was one half of a set of twins, was born at Harefield on 31st January 1878.  He accompanied his parents when the family emigrated to North America sometime before 1891.  Just like his brother George (above), Lewis also worked as a printer at the same print shop as his brother before his untimely death in 1907.  Lewis never married and died at Washington DC on 22nd January 1914, aged 36, just four months after his father had died, with whom he was buried at Glenwood Cemetery.  His older brother George had been buried in the same grave seven years earlier, and his mother was buried there fifteen years later.

 

 

 

 

41Q12

Beatrice Maude Collett, who was one half of a set of twins, was born at Harefield on 31st January 1878.  Around the age of ten years she sailed to America with her family.  They initially settled to live in Minnesota, but later moved to Washington DC.  Beatrice married Eugene Karl Pestell, with whom she had three children.  It may be that Beatrice and her family also lived in Washington since, upon her death on 24th January 1957, she too was buried at Glenwood Cemetery in the Collett family grave with her parents, two of her brothers and her husband.

 

 

 

 

41Q13

Cyril Henry Collett was born at Watford on 15th December 1885 and shortly after, he and his family sailed to America and initially settled down to live in Minnesota.  Some years later the family move from Minnesota to live in Washington, where both his older brothers and his parents died and were buried.

 

 

 

At the age of just 20 years and eight days Cyril Henry Collett married Narcissa Laura Frazier on 23rd December 1905.  After they were married the couple lived in Washington DC and the marriage produced six children for Cyril and Narcissa, all of whom were born in the District of Columbia.

 

 

 

During his life Cyril was employed by the Internal Revenue Service.  He was also a part-time motion picture operator, a trade that was later taken up by his son Robert.  When they died Cyril and Narcissa were buried in the family grave at Glenwood Cemetery in Washington.

 

 

 

41R7

Cyril Edward Collett

Born on 19.01.1907 at Washington

 

41R8

Emily E Collett

Born on 10.07.1909 at Washington

 

41R9

Marguerite I Collett

Born on 16.02.1914 at Washington

 

41R10

Robert Lee Collett

Born on 09.12.1919 at Washington

 

41R11

Ralph William Collett

Born on 18.12.1921 at Washington

 

41R12

Bradley Lewis Collett

Born on 16.06.1926 at Washington

 

 

 

 

41Q14

Isaac Collett was born at Sculcoates in Kingston-upon-Hull during the third quarter of 1892.  It was there he was still living with his family in 1901 at the age of nine.  The only other fact known about him after that time was that he was referred to in the 1923 Will of his father’s uncle Job Collett (Ref. 41O14).  In the Will (see Will in Legal Documents) Isaac was named as the son of nephew Isaac Collett.  The Codicil to the Will in 1925 also referred to another Isaac Collett, as the son of Isaac the younger.  This therefore confirms that this Isaac Collett, who was born at Sculcoates, was married and that the marriage produced at least one off-spring as detailed below.

 

 

 

The discovery of the administration of the personal effects of Isaac Collett on 10th October 1939 in London indicates that he and his wife Margaret lived at Plough Cottage, Hill End in Harefield.  However, it was actually at Springfield House on Beechcroft Road in Wandsworth where he died on 19th August 1939.  That would mean he was only 48 when he died, whereas his father Isaac Collett was still alive at that time, although his wife was Mary.

 

 

 

41R13

Isaac Collett

Date of birth unknown

 

 

 

 

41Q15

George Thomas Collett was born at Sculcoates near Hull on 6th August 1896.  He was five years old and 14 years of age in the two Sculcoates census returns for 1901 and 1911.  It appears that he never married and died at Hillingdon in London during the first quarter of 1971 at the age of 74.

 

 

 

 

41Q16

Thomas Alfred Collett was born at Sculcoates during the last three months of 1898.  He was three years of age in the Sculcoates census of 1901 and was 12 ten years later in 1911 when he and his family were still residing in Sculcoates.  As soon as he was old enough, and while he was still living in Hull, he enlisted with the 23rd Battalion of the Royal Fusiliers with which he became Private Collett G/71552.  The Commonwealth War Graves Commission listed him as T A Collett.  Tragically at the age of 19 he was killed in front line action at Mesnil in France on 1st April 1918 and was buried in the Mesnil Communal Cemetery Extension.  At the time of his death, Alfred’s parents Isaac and Mary had returned to Harefield in Middlesex, where his father had been born, their address there being 6 Waterloo Villas.

 

 

 

 

41Q17

William Collett was born at Sculcoates on 19th October 1900 and was five months old in the Sculcoates census on 1901.  He and his family were still living there in 1911 when William was 10.  He possibly never married, like his brother George (above) and Sidney (below), and all three of them may have been living together at Hillingdon in the early 1970s when first George died in 1971 and was followed by William who also died there during the second quarter of 1972.  Two years after that the death of Sidney was also recorded there.

 

 

 

 

41Q18

Edward Joseph Collett or Edward Joe Collett was born at Sculcoates on 1st February 1903 and was eight years old in 1911.  Once again it seems that he too never married and at the time of his death during the final quarter of 1977 he was living in the Haverfordwest area of Dyed in Wales.

 

 

 

 

41Q19

Sidney Collett was born at Sculcoates on 16th April 1905 and was six years of age in the Sculcoates census of 1911.  It seems logical that Sidney, and his two older unmarried brothers George and William, eventually left the East Riding of Yorkshire to seek their fortunes in London.  Since it was in the Hillingdon area of Middlesex that Sidney died during the third quarter of 1976.

 

 

 

 

41Q20

Gwyneth Collett, whose date of birth is not known, was the eldest daughter of Alfred Collett of Harefield.  She was known within the family as Gwyn. 

 

 

 

 

41Q21

Constance Collett, whose date of birth is not known, was born at Harefield.  She never married but had a son who has children from two marriages and who it is believed lives in Cornwall.

 

 

 

41R14

Kevin Collett

Date of birth unknown

 

 

 

 

41Q22

Eunice Collett, whose date of birth is not known, was born at Harefield.  Upon marrying she became Eunice Pavey and she and her husband had a daughter Sue Pavey.  Prior to her death Eunice lived near Rickmansworth in Hertfordshire.

 

 

 

 

41Q23

Pink Collett, whose date of birth is not known, was born at Harefield.  She married Jack Newton who was a bricklayer, and they had a son Leslie Newton who still lives in Harefield.  By 2013 both Pink and her husband are deceased.

 

 

 

 

41Q24

Thomas Collett, whose date of birth is not known, was born at Harefield before 1925 and was a carpenter like his brother David (below).  In 1925 he was named as the son of Thomas Alfred Collett in the Codicil to the 1923 Will of Job Collett (Ref. 41O19).  It was with his brother that they built their two homes on the High Street in Harefield around 1963.  Thomas married Jean and their marriage produced a son.  Thomas and Jean were both living at 59 High Street in Harefield when they passed away.

 

 

 

41R15

Alan Collett

Date of birth unknown at Harefield

 

 

 

 

41Q25

John Collett, whose date of birth is not known, was born at Harefield after 1925 and before 1929.  He later married Jennifer with whom he had a daughter.  During his life he worked at the Denham Film Studios and was living with his wife and daughter in the Staines area at the time of his death.  Jennifer and Madelaine are now believed to be living somewhere in Spain

 

 

 

41R16

Madelaine Collett

Date of birth unknown

 

 

 

 

41Q26

David George Collett was born at Haresfield on 6th May 1929, where his father Alfred Collett died two years later.  He is believed to have been the youngest child of Alfred and his so far unnamed wife.  David was a carpenter and he later married Doreen Mary Ryder with whom he had a son and a daughter.  At the time of his death he was living at 57 High Street in Harefield, next door to his brother Thomas (above).  The two adjacent houses of 57 and 59 High Street were built by the two brothers just after 1962.

 

 

 

41R17

David George Collett

Born on 20.07.1962 at Harefield

 

41R18

Michelle Georgina

Born on 10.01.1969 at Harefield

 

 

 

 

41Q29

Charles William Collett was born at Harlesden in 1899 and was one year old and was living at nearby Willesden in 1901 with his mother Annie and his two sisters.  On that same day Charles’ father Joseph was a patient at a hospital in St Marylebone in London.  Sometime later Charles was married and it is believed that he had ‘many’ children including, but not limited to, the five known children listed below.  The order of the birth of the five children has not yet been confirmed.

 

 

 

41R19

Stanley Charles Collett

Born in 1921

 

41R20

Vera Collett

Date of birth unknown

 

41R21

Muriel Collett

Date of birth unknown

 

41R22

David Collett

Date of birth unknown

 

41R23

Leslie Collett

Date of birth unknown

 

 

 

 

41Q30

David George Collett was most likely born at Haresfield around 1918, where his father Alfred Collett, a baker, died in 1920.  He is believed to have been the youngest child of Alfred and his so far unnamed wife.  David later married Dorothy Mary Ryder with whom he had a number of children, David being the eldest.  And it was Dave who made contact in 2013 to enable this branch of the family to be opened up.

 

 

 

41R24

David (Dave) George Collett

Born on 20.07.1962

 

 

 

 

41Q31

Amy Beatrice Collett was born at Newbury in 1909 and was one year old in the April census of 1911 when she was living with her parents at Shaw-cum-Donnington, where it is likely that she was born.

 

Following the accidental death of her father Arthur Frederick Collett in 1913 at the age of 48, Amy was cared for by her much younger mother Edna who was 30 at the time of his death.

 

Sadly, for whatever reason, it was only daughter Amy that stayed with her mother.  When she was 13 her two brothers Raymond and Arthur were both taken into the care of the local Doctor Barnardo’s Home for orphaned children, even though they were not strictly speaking orphans.

 

 

 

Amy married Norman Parker with whom she had a son Derek.  What happened to her husband is not known, but Amy and Derek sailed to Canada, where Derek died while in Northumberland County.  Amy later married Herbert Kane who was born in 1897 and who died in 1974.

 

 

 

Amy was eventually reunited with her brothers who had been subject to a Barnardo’s Home children’s transfer to Canada.  It was after Amy had met up with her brothers that Arthur decided to add the e to the end of their surname which upset Amy so much that she did not speak to him for almost ten years.  Amy Beatrice Kane, nee Collett, died at Campbellford in Ontario on 30th April 1994.

 

 

 

 

41Q32

Raymond Bernard Collett, who was referred to as Ray, was born at Newbury on 18th February 1912, just over one year before his father died from a work related accident. 

 

That tragic event ultimately resulted in both Raymond and his brother Arthur (below) being taken into a Barnardo’s Home, leaving just their older sister Amy still living with their mother.

 

Doctor Thomas John Barnardo opened the first of his establishments for the homeless and destitute at Stepney Causeway in London in 1870 and by the time of his death in 1905 there were 96 homes across England, and he had ‘rescued’ 60,000 children.

 

 

 

Ray was one of many children sent to Canada as part of the Barnardo’s Homes children’s transfer to that country.  At that point in his life, having already been parted from his sister, he was separated from his younger brother, who travelled to Canada on another ship a year later.  Both boys were at the same home in September 1922, that being at 4 Hillade Road in Luton.  At the age of ten Ray left Luton that month and travelled to Southampton, where he boarded the ship Minnedosa on 14th September and arrived in Quebec eight days later on 22nd September 1922.

 

 

 

The immigration record for Ray stated that his ultimate destination was Toronto.  He grew up in Hastings township near Havelock in Ontario and before the Second World War worked as a reporter for the Toronto Star newspaper.  In 1938 he joined the Canadian Army as a public relations officer and later served overseas, returning to Canada in 1946 as a Major Ray Collett. 

 

 

 

A little while later he appears to have settled in Toronto where he married Reta Mary Ratz on 22nd November 1947.  Reta was born in Huron County in 1918, the daughter of Jacob and Martha Ratz.  The couple met while they were both in the service of the Canadian Army with whom Reta was a nurse and, like Ray, was a commissioned officer having the rank of Lieutenant Nursing Sister.

 

 

 

Ray and Reta first lived at Oakville and later moved to Toronto where they raised their two adopted children Robert and Catherine, until their retirement.  At that time they moved from North York to Thornhill and then to Lakefield in 1983.  Both were active members of the church and within the local community.  Ray was an ardent curler and was a life-time member of the Lakefield Curling Club.

 

 

 

Following her death at Lakefield on 14th September 2004, Reta was buried in the United Church Cemetery at Crediton in Ontario.  And it was there also that Ray was buried on 3rd November 2007 following his death from an extended illness on 26th October 2007 at South Lake Regional Health Centre in Newmarket, Ontario.  For the six months prior to his passing, Ray lived with his daughter Kathy and son-in-law Wayne Mundy in Keswick.  At the time of his death he had two granddaughters and three great grandchildren.

 

 

 

Ray's career in business and consumer-relations spanned nearly fifty years.  Following the war years he worked in advertising, marketing and was a management executive in Toronto and Montreal.  When he retired in 1979 Ray was the President and Chief Executive Officer of the Better Business Bureau of Canada.

 

 

 

41R25

Robert Collett

Date of birth unknown

 

41R26

Catherine Collett

Date of birth unknown

 

 

 

 

41Q33

Arthur Frederick Collett, who was referred to as Art, was born at Newbury on 27th April 1913.

 

Just one month after he was born his father tragically died from a fall off a ladder while at work on 23rd May 1913.

 

When only nine years old, Art and his brother Ray (above) were taken from their mother and sister Amy (above) and placed in the care of a Barnardo’s Home. 

 

This picture of Art was taken at his wedding in 1938.

 

 

 

After just a short time spent together with his brother at the Barnardo’s Homes at 4 Hillade Road in Luton, Ray was sent to Canada as part of the child emigration scheme which saw children sent to Australia and Canada after the First World War.  That happened in September 1922 when Ray was just ten years of age, leaving nine years old Art at the home.

 

 

 

The following year, upon reaching his tenth birthday, Art was also sent to Canada.  Just as his brother had, Art travelled to Southampton from Luton and boarded the ship Melita bound for Quebec.  The ship departed on 7th April and arrived at Quebec on 15th April 1923.  The immigration form for Art stated that his final destination was Toronto and Peterborough in Ontario.  The ships log also stated that 132 boys and 12 girls made the crossing.

 

 

 

Once in Canada Art was employed on various farms in Ontario, and when he was in his early twenties he met his future wife Reta Hutcheon.  Just over eighteen months before the outbreak of World War Two, he married Florence Reta Hutcheon on 19th February 1938 at St Andrew’s Presbyterian Church in Campbellford, Ontario.

 

 

 

By the time of their marriage Art had already elected (in the 1930s) to add an ‘e’ at the end of his surname.  The reason for this was to avoid the name being incorrect pronounced and incorrectly spelt, which is probably a sentiment shared by many of those worldwide with the Collett surname.  And it was in that way that the marriage was registered in the name of Arthur Frederick Collette, as was the later registration of the births of the couple’s two children, who were both born in Ontario.

 

 

 

Reta’s family had originally emigrated from Scotland to Canada and came from Aberdeenshire.  It was also said that the vast majority of the settlers at Northumberland County were made up of her ancestors.  Reta was born at Northumberland County in Ontario on 22nd July 1912, and once they were married the couple made their home in Campbellford, where Art worked in the local industry and the insurance business.  He felt compelled to volunteer to join the forces against the Germans, but was rejected for medical reasons.

 

 

 

Following the arrival of their two sons, the family of four later moved to Peterborough, where Art opened a grocer’s shop.  And it was while there that a surprised Art received his call-up papers to enter the war.  He joined the Cameron Highlanders and was part of the occupation force in Germany, for which he was awarded the Canadian Volunteer Service Medal with bar, and the Victory Medal.  The Cameron Highlanders were disbanded upon completion of their duties.

 

 

 

Art is known to have driven ammunition trucks during the war and at the end of which he was working in Signals tracking down German units which refused to surrender.  By the time he returned to Canada he was fairly fluent in the German language.  After the war the family returned to Campbellford and Art open his own insurance and real estate business.  He joined the British Empire Service League which eventually became the Royal Canadian Legion with whom he served in various roles over fifty-five years, and for which he received the Legion’s Certificate of Merit.

 

 

 

In 1954 the family moved again, on that occasion to Trenton, where Art ran his successful real estate business until 1965 at which time he joined the Federal Government’s Department of Public Works.  During that time he worked in Timmins, North Bay and Toronto until his retirement, when he and Reta moved to Belleville.

 

 

 

Although it was never mentioned by him, Art was probably unhappy and bitter, like his brother Ray, about being separated from their mother and sister at such an early age.  However, the two brothers were reunited for the first time since their separation and that joyous event happened during the Second World War.  Their sister Amy also eventually sailed to Canada to be reunited with them.  This seems likely to have happened in the 1930s since it was after they were reunited that Art decided to change his surname which greatly upset Amy.  In fact she did not speak to her brother for almost ten years after the name change.

 

 

 

Towards the end of the twentieth century Art and Reta were living at Belleville in Hastings County where Reta died on 29th January 1998 and was cremated and buried at the Burnbrae Cemetery.  Just over four years after the death of his wife, Arthur was returning home from his brother Ray’s birthday party when he was killed in a motoring accident in wet driving conditions.  And it was at Campbellford, where his sister Amy had lived and died eight years earlier, that Arthur died on 22nd February 2002.  And like his wife, Art was cremated and buried at Burnbrae Cemetery.

 

 

 

41R27

John Arthur Collette

Born on 09.08.1938 at Ontario

 

41R28

Gerald Irvine Collette

Born on 30.10.1944 at Ontario

 

 

 

 

41Q34

Ethel Eveline Collett was born on 23rd July 1903.  She later married Alfred William Spall who was born on 19th November 1903.  The marriage resulted in a son Dennis Spall who was born on 3rd May 1939 and who later married Beryl Christine Witherick.  Ethel Eveline Spall, nee Collett, died on 14th February 1959, followed twenty years later by her husband who died on 29th December 1979.

 

 

 

 

41Q35

Ivy Collett was born on 16th September 1905.  She later married Rodney Beaumont with whom she had two children.  Rodney was a few years older than Ivy having been born on 25th May 1899.  Their daughter Thelma Beaumont, who was born on 5th January 1935, married Michael Holliday who was born on 29th January 1930.  Ivy’s and Rodney’s son Rodney Charles Beaumont, who was born on 15th November 1941, later married (1) Stephanie Crimmins and (2) Delia Hindmoor.  All of Ivy’s and Rodney’s four grandchildren came from their son’s first marriage.  Ivy Beaumont, nee Collett, died on 20th February 1981 and was followed by her husband Rodney, who died six years later on 29th August 1987.

 

 

 

 

41Q36

Leonard Archibald Collett was born on 5th March 1907.  He later married Lillian Maud Holiday who was born on 15th June 1909 and who presented her husband with two children.  Leonard Archibald Collett died on 27th December 1969 and, just under nine years after, Lillian died on 19th July 1978.

 

 

 

41R29

Brian Arthur Collett

Born on 08.09.1933

 

41R30

Valerie Jill Collett

Born on 15.03.1947

 

 

 

 

41Q37

Herbert Charles Collett was born on 30th December 1910.  During the Second World War he served with the Merchant Navy and was involved with the Atlantic and Russian convoys.  He later married Jean Sophia Kemish with whom he had two children.  Herbert’s wife was born Jean Sophia Holmes and was the niece of Herbert’s mother Beatrice Ann Collett nee Holmes.  This meant that Jean’s aunt was also her mother-in-law.  Herbert Charles Collett died on 9th December 1988, while his wife Jean was still living in 2009.

 

 

 

41R31

Paul Charles Collett

Born on 01.02.1946

 

41R32

Margaret Ann Collett

Born on 22.07.1950

 

 

 

 

41Q38

Arthur Richard Collett was born on 23rd December 1912.  He married Doris May Hawkins just prior to the Second World War, and together they had two children.  Arthur was only 54 years old when he died on 27th December 1966, while his wife Doris died just over four years later on 8th March 1971.

 

 

 

41R33

Carol Joan Collett

Born on 18.12.1939

 

41R34

Mark Francis Collett

Born on 08.03.1945

 

 

 

 

41Q39

Herbert Collett, who was likely to be referred to as Bert in his later life, was born at Hill End in Harefield in 1896.  He was four years of age in 1901 when he was living with his family at Hill End in Harefield.  He was 14 in 1911 when he was still living at Harefield with his parents Herbert and Elizabeth Collett.

 

 

 

In the 1923 Will of his father’s uncle Job Collett, there was a reference to Bert the son of nephew Harry Collett and it is understood that this was indeed a reference to Henry Collett and his son Herbert.  However, both names were removed from the Will by a Codicil made out in 1925.  (see Will in Legal Documents)

 

 

 

 

41Q45

Irene Gladys M Collett was born at Hill End in Harefield on 10th January 1908, one of the children of Herbert and Elizabeth Collett, who was two years old in the Harefield census of 1911.  Although not yet proved, it now seems very likely that she married widower Leonard Ernest Collett (Ref. 34Q29) in the Reading area, the event recorded at Reading register office (Ref. 6a 324) during the third quarter of 1946.  It is not known if there were any children, but it is known that both Irene and Leonard passed away within three years of each other while residing in the Reading and Wokingham area of Berkshire.  The death of Irene Gladys M Collett was recorded there during the third quarter of 1990 (Ref. 19 349) and it was during October 1993 that 86 years-old Leonard Ernest Collett died.

 

 

 

 

41R3

Herbert Henry Collett was born at Battersea in London during 1909, the son of Herbert Collett and his wife Edith Louisa.  Not long after he was born his parents moved to Wandsworth where the family was living in 1911 when Herbert was one year old.  The only other fact known about him at this time is that his later occupation was that of a moulder, and that was how he was described when Herbert Henry Collett was named as the administrator for his widowed mother’s personal effects in 1948, following her death at 22 Westover Road in Wandsworth during the previous December.

 

 

 

 

41R6

Johnny Collett was born at Battersea in 1916 and he was the base-born son of Laura Julia Collett who later married Simon John George Levis.  Very little is currently known about Johnny accepted that he served with the Royal Air Force during the Second World War.

 

 

 

 

41R7

Cyril Edward Collett was born at Washington DC on 19th January 1907.  He was a banker and also took an active part in World War Two with the US Navy.  Cyril never married and died on 7th September 1969.

 

 

 

 

41R8

Emily E Collett was born at Washington DC on 10th July 1909.  She married Walter Tobin, but the marriage produced no children for the couple.  Like her older brother Cyril (above), Emily also worked in a bank.  She lived a long life and on 25th April 1994, aged 85.

 

 

 

 

41R9

Marguerite I Collett was born at Washington DC on 16th February 1914.  She married Paul Smith with whom she had two children.  It is understood that she did not have a full-time occupation but perhaps enjoyed part-time work during her life.  Like her older sister (above) she too lived a long life and was just three months short of her ninety-first birthday when she died on 19th November 2004.

 

 

 

 

41R10

Robert Lee Collett was born at Washington DC on 9th December 1919.  He was a motion picture operator during his life and he married Virginia Webster on 14th April 1940, with whom he had three children and about whom no details are currently available.  Robert Lee Collett died on 19th September 1997 and Virginia was still alive at the time of writing in March 2008.

 

 

 

 

41R11

Ralph William Collett was born at Washington DC on 18th December 1921.  He married Lois Chisholm on 3rd January 1942 and that the marriage produced at least one child, who tragically died while still a minor.  Ralph served with the US Army during World War Two, but was captured by enemy forces and spent some time as a prison of war in Germany.  Just like his older brother Robert (above), Ralph also worked in the film industry and was employed by the US Archives in their film division.  Longevity must have been a familiar trait for this particular Collett family, as Ralph was almost 85 years of age when he died on 27th June 2006.

 

 

 

 

41R12

Bradley Lewis Collett was born at Washington DC on 16th June 1926 and was celebrating his eighty-second birthday in 2008.  He married Verona Duckwall on 2nd September 1947 when Veronica was 17 years of age, she having been born on 24th May 1930.  The marriage produced just the one daughter for Bradley and Veronica, who celebrated their sixtieth wedding anniversary in 2007.

 

 

 

Before he was marriage Bradley served with the US Navy and saw action during the Second World War.  During his civilian working life he was employed by the credit card companies of Diner’s Club and Carte Blanche.  Bradley’s brothers and his father were huge fans of the sport of horseracing, as Bradley was, and they spent many happy hours together at the racetrack, a habit that has also been acquired by Bradley’s daughter Cheryl.  Sadly it was on 26th January 2012 that Bradley Lewis Collett padded away at the age of 85.

 

 

 

41S1

Cheryl Collett

Born on 20.10.1954

 

 

 

 

41R13

Isaac Collett, who date of birth is not known, was referred to as Isaac the son of Isaac the younger in the 1923 Will of Job Collett (Ref. 41O14).  (see Will in Legal Documents)

 

 

 

 

41R17

David George Collett, who is known as Dave, was born on 20th July 1962, the eldest child of David George Collett and his wife Doreen Mary Ryder.  Father and son worked together as carpenters up until 1983 when David junior became a member of the Ministry of Defence Police for the next nine years.  He married Marion Lesley Pinkstone, who was born on 27th September 1957, who presented Dave with two sons.  In 2013 he is a police officer in Surrey with two sons.  And it was Dave from Grayshott in Hampshire who kindly provided the details that opened up his family’s branch of this line of the Collett family.

 

 

 

41S2

Christopher David Collett

Born on 10.03.1988

 

41S3

Jonathan Andrew Collett

Born on 13.12.1989

 

 

 

 

41R18

Michelle Georgina was born at Harefield on 10th January 1969, the second of the two children of David George Collett and Doreen Mary Ryder.  She was a police officer and lived in Welwyn Garden City, where she died on 28th September 2011.

 

 

 

 

41R19

Stanley Charles Collett was born on 12th August 1921 and was the son of Charles William Collett.  All that is currently known about Stanley is that he was known as Sandy and, prior to being married, he served with the British Army during the Second World War and saw active service in North Africa and Italy.  Just after the war he married Jane Saville, who was known as Joan, and moved from London to Hemel Hempstead where their two sons were both.  During his working life in Hemel he was employed as a welder at Lucas making car headlights and other automotive parts.  He died on 21st September 2011.

 

 

 

41S4

Richard John Collett

Born in 1947 at Hemel Hempstead

 

41S5

William Stanley Collett

Born in 1954 at Hemel Hempstead

 

 

 

 

41R27

John Arthur Collette was born at Campbellford in Ontario on 9th August 1938.  In 1960 he married (1) Wanda Lee Towns with whom he had a son who was born while the couple were living at Kingston in Ontario.

 

Wanda Lee Towns was born on 4th January 1940.

 

Some years later John married (2) Gloria Donovan.

 

In 2008 John was living at Barrie in Ontario and where he was a retired government tax auditor, while Wanda lives near her son in Kingston and is retired from her work with the Ministry of Health.

 

 

 

41S6

Trevor Arthur Collette

Born on 17.06.1966

 

 

 

 

41R28

Gerald Irvine Collette was born at Campbellford on 30th October 1944.  He married Patricia Boyle on 26th June 1965 at St George’s Anglican Church in Trenton, Ontario.  Patricia was born at Peterborough in Ontario on 30th July 1946 and the married produced two children for the couple.  Both of the children were born while Gerald and Patricia were living at Trenton.  In 2008 Gerald and Pat were living in Trenton where Gerald used to work as a guard for the correction service before he retired.  Their daughter Diane currently lives in Ottawa.

 

 

 

41S7

Stephen Collette

Born on 09.04.1971

 

41S8

Diane Collette

Born on 20.01.1973

 

 

 

 

41R29

Brian Arthur Collett was born on 8th September 1933 and he married Shirley Iris Watson on 18th August 1956, with whom he had two children.  Shirley was born on 1st June 1935.  From 1947 to 1949 Brian spent time at technical college and on leaving he took up employment as an apprentice printer.  Two years later he entered National Service with the Royal Navy with whom he served for two years.

 

 

 

In 1981 Brian went into partnership with two other like-minded people and together they set up their own printing company, where he worked until he retired in 1993.  And it was thanks to new information received from Brian about his family that has enabled his line to be extended from Bernard Bolton Collett (1877-1915), which had previously been a ‘dead end’.

 

 

 

41S9

Alan Collett

Born on 13.02.1963

 

41S10

Ian Collett

Born on 27.11.1965

 

 

 

 

41R30

Valerie Jill Collett was born on 15th March 1947.  She married (1) Christopher Torrance who was born on 24th March 1941 and later (2) Philip Maillard who was born on 12th June 1948. 

 

 

 

 

41R31

Paul Charles Collett was born on 1st February 1946.  He married Pamela Hart who was born on 21st August 1949.

 

 

 

 

41R32

Margaret Ann Collett was born on 22nd July 1950.  She married Graham Bernard McLeod who was born on 17th October 1947 and with whom she had two sons, David Robert McLeod who was born on 25th September 1972, and Simon John McLeod who was born 31st July 1974.

 

 

 

 

41R33

Carol Joan Collett was born on 18th December 1939.  Carol later married John William Cartwright who was born on 10th November 1934 and their marriage produced two sons for the couple, Martyn Richard Cartwright who was born on 31st May 1967, and Spencer Mark Cartwright born on 13th October 1970.

 

 

 

 

41R34

Mark Francis Collett was born on 8th March 1945 and he later married Roberta Cotterill who was born on 9th November 1942.

 

 

 

 

41S1

Cheryl Collett was born at a hospital in Washington DC on 20th October 1954, but grew up in Maryland where she lives today at Mount Airy.  Thanks go to Cheryl for kindly providing the details of her family line back to her great grandfather George James Collett of Harefield.

 

 

 

 

41S2

Christopher David Collett was born on 10th March 1988, the eldest of the two sons of David George Collett and his wife Marion Lesley Pinkstone.  In 2013 Chris is an accountant from Knaphill in Surrey.

 

 

 

 

41S3

Jonathan Andrew Collett was born on 13th December 1989, the youngest of the two sons of Dave and Marion Collett.  Today Jon is a mechanic from West End in Woking, Surrey.

 

 

 

 

41S4

Richard John Collett was born at Hemel Hempstead on 15th August 1947, the eldest of the two sons of Stanley Charles Collett and Jane (Joan) Saville. 

 

Richard was married in the first half of the 1970s and the marriage produced two daughters for Richard and his wife.

 

 

 

41T1

Claire Collett

Born on 27.08.1976

 

41T2

Hayley Collett

Born on 09.06.1978

 

 

 

 

41S5

William Stanley Collett was born at Hemel Hempstead in 3rd August 1954, the younger of the two sons of Stanley Charles Collett and Joan Saville. 

 

He was known as Bill and trained as a mechanic and engineer at Hemel Hempstead.  He married Elaine Austin during 1976 and their two children were born at Hemel Hempstead before the family moved to Scotland in 1985.  It was in 1996 that Bill return south, when he settled in Northamptonshire.

 

 

 

41T3

Paul Philip William Collett

Born in 1979 at Hemel Hempstead

 

41T4

Jennifer (Jenni) Elaine Collett

Born on 31.05.1983 at Hemel Hemp.