PART FIFTY-THREE

 

The South Wales Branch Line

 

Updated December 2016

 

 

 

This is the family line of cousins Heather Holloway nee Collett (Ref. 53S6) of New Zealand and

Raymond Collett (Re. 53S7) of Australia, both of whom have been instrumental in its construction.

It was Heather who kindly provided the old photographs, while Ray provided the details for the appendix, which is dedicated to the 150th Anniversary Celebrations in January 2011.

 

 

 

 

 

When Ray was working on his family history some years ago, he received information from the Head Librarian at Newport Public Library that the grandfather of Henry Collett who settled in New Zealand in 1861 was Walter Collett who was born at Kempsford in 1767, where he was also baptised in 1771.  It has since been revealed that Walter was the son of Lawrence Collett and his wife Mary Day, who feature in Part 1 – The Main Gloucestershire Line.  This would place his age at 33 when he married in 1800, and 48 at the time of the birth of his youngest child.  However, Walter’s wife was younger than him by eight years, so it would be perfectly acceptable for her to have given birth to son Samuel when she was 40.

 

 

 

What is of further interest is that the Head Librarian at Newport was none other than John Collett, who was a descendent of Walter Collett, the younger brother of Henry who settled in New Zealand in 1861, he being William John Collett (Ref. 53R18)

 

 

 

 

 

Confirmation of this information means that this family line has its origin in the Gloucestershire family of Thomas Collett who was born in 1485 (Ref. 1D1).  See Part 1 – The Main Gloucestershire Line.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

53M1

WALTER COLLETT (Ref. 1M20) was born at Kempsford in 1767, but was baptised there around four years later on 16th July 1771, the son of Lawrence Collett and Mary Day.  It is known that he was married to Mary from the baptism record for their youngest son Samuel, which took place at St Woolos Church in Newport during the June quarter of 1816, the child having been born either earlier that year or towards the end of the previous year.

 

 

 

It was to London that Walter had made his way once he was an adult, and it was there that he met his future wife.  The marriage of Walter Collett and Mary Marshall took place at St Saviours Church in Southwark, London on 30th July 1800, the bride being named as the daughter of John and Sarah Marshall.  Mary Garle Marshall was born at Southwark on 11th March 1775 and was baptised there, at the Church of St Olave on 29th March 1775.

 

 

 

All of this has now been confirmed as being correct by Heather Holloway nee Collett from New Zealand, the three times great granddaughter of Walter Collett, and by Raymond Collett of Australia, the great grandson of Henry Collett.  It is also established that another Henry Collett (Ref. 1M28), a first cousin of Walter (Ref. 1M20), left Gloucestershire and moved to London where he was married just eighteen months before Walter Collett married Mary Marshall.  There is a further connection with London, in that it was there also that Walter’s likely eldest son, Henry Collett was married.

 

 

 

No record has so far been found to confirm that Henry was the son of Walter Collett and Mary Marshall, or that he was the brother of Walter and Samuel, the couple’s other two sons.  Where there is a possible link is that the children of both families (Walter’s and Henry’s) were born at Christchurch, and both had sons called Walter.  Also in the census of 1881, Samuel, the son of Walter, was living at Royal Oak Hill in Christchurch, where Walter, the son of Henry, was also living at that time.

 

 

 

There is another possible link, albeit perhaps a bit tenuous, in that the wife of Samuel Collett was from Ireland, and it was in a later generation of the Collett family that a daughter was taken in by an Irishman and his family, following the death of the child’s mother around the time that she was born.

 

 

 

By the time of the first national census in June 1841, Walter and Mary were living at Collett Cottage on Church Hill in Christchurch, the dwelling being on the south-facing slope, about one hundred yards from the summit of the hill.  Living in the cottage next door was the widow of their late son Henry who had been killed in a tragic accident in 1838.  The two dwellings were locally known as the Collett Cottages.  It was there also that both families were still living in 1851.

 

 

 

It was just after the census in 1851 that the couple’s next door neighbour, and daughter-in-law Charlotte Collett nee Bray, married Henry Price.  When that happened, Walter and Mary took in to live with them Charlotte’s eldest son Henry Collett age 14, who worked under the guidance of his grandfather as a butcher and a vet for the next three or four years.  Walter had retired in 1850, so that occupied his time during his twilight years.  By the time Walter Collett had died at Christchurch in 1858 at the age of 91, his grandson Henry had already emigrated to Australia during the previous year.

 

 

 

By the time of the census in 1861, Walter’s wife Mary was recorded as a widow at the age of 84.  At that time in her life she had living with her at Christchurch, and presumably looking after her there, her granddaughter Catherine Collett, the eldest daughter of her son Samuel who was also living nearby with the rest of his large family.  The widow Mary Collett nee Marshall died during 1870 and shortly before the next census in 1871.  She was 95 years of age at the time of her passing.  The headstone on her grave, together with other Collett gravestones, are almost the first ones on the left as you pass through the gate of the churchyard at the top of Church Hill.

 

 

 

53O1

Henry Collett

Born in 1806 at London?

 

53O2

Walter Collett

Born circa 1810 at Newport?

 

53O3

Samuel Collett

Born circa 1815 at Newport

 

 

 

 

53O1

HENRY COLLETT was born in 1806 and his occupation was that of a butcher, the same as that of his father Walter Collett.  He was only thirty-two years old when he was tragically killed in an accident with a horse on 30th September 1838, his death being registered within the Newport district of Monmouthshire. 

 

 

 

Just over five years earlier he had married Charlotte Bray at All Souls Church in St Marylebone in London on 20th May 1833, Charlotte having been born at St Aldersgate in London during 1805.

 

All Souls Church was designed by John Nash, favourite architect of King George IV, to provide an eye-catching monument where the newly laid-out Regent Street linked Piccadilly with the new Regent's Park.  The church was consecrated in 1824 by the Bishop of London, and it was therefore a very prestigious place to be married around that time.

 

The church is still a splendid building today,

as shown in this recent photograph.

 

Once they were married the couple moved to Christchurch, to the immediate north-east of Newport in South Wales, where their three children were born.

 

 

 

It was just fourteen days after their son Walter was baptised, that the boy’s father, Henry Collett, was killed in a dreadful horse accident, an account of which appeared one week later in the Newport Merlin on 6th October 1838.  Curiously an alternative source who has mapped out the story of his son Henry in New Zealand referred to his father as a captain with the mercantile marine, rather than the butcher that he is described as here.

 

 

 

By the time the census in 1841, his widow Charlotte Collett was 36 and was living at Collett Cottage on Church Hill in Christchurch with her three children, the cottage adjoining that of her late husband’s parents.  The three children living with her were her daughter Charlotte who was seven, and her sons Henry, who was four, and Walter who was two years old.  Ten years later in 1851, the same family was still living at Collett Cottage on Christchurch Hill in Christchurch, which was the same dwelling as in 1841, but with a slightly different address name.  On that occasion Charlotte Collett was 45 years old and her children were Charlotte 16, Henry 14, and Walter who was 13.

 

 

 

No record of Charlotte or her son Henry has been found in any later census, and the reason for that is that Charlotte became Charlotte Price when she married Henry Price, who was a butcher like her first husband.  And it may have been that action by his mother which weakened her son's resolve to remain living with her in Christchurch.  Initially, he had moved next door to live with his grandparents, where he spent the next three or four years, before finally leaving England for Australia in 1857.

 

 

 

53P1

Charlotte Collett

Born in 1834 at Christchurch

 

53P2

HENRY COLLETT

Born in 1837 at Christchurch

 

53P3

Walter Collett

Born in 1838 at Christchurch

 

 

 

 

53O3

Samuel Collett was born around the end of 1815 or the beginning of 1816.  He was baptised on 9th June 1816 at St Woolos Cathedral in Newport, when he was confirmed as the son of Walter and Mary Collett.  It was around 1842 that Samuel married Catherine from Ireland, the marriage producing eight known children for the couple.  Once married it would appear that Samuel and his wife settled in Christchurch where it is known that all of their children were born.  The Christchurch census of 1851, within the Caerleon & Newport registration district, listed the family as Samuel 34, his wife Kate as 36, and their five children at that time as Walter 7, Catherine 6, William 4, Susan 2, and baby Emily who was not yet one year old.

 

 

 

Within the next ten years a further three children were added to the family.  So by the time of the census of 1861 the completed family comprised Samuel 45, his wife Kate 44, and seven of their eight children;  Walter 17, William 14, Susan 12, Emily 10, Charles 8, Thomas 6, and four-year old Henry.  The couple’s eldest daughter Catherine was living nearby in Christchurch with her widowed grandmother Mary Collett, whom she was looking after in her old age. 

 

 

 

During the next ten years Samuel’s eldest son left home to be married, although he and his wife were living not far away from the family in 1871.  The census return that year recorded the family of Samuel Collett as living ‘near the church’ in Christchurch.  Still living with fifty-four years old Samuel and fifty-five years old Catherine, were sons William 24, Thomas 17, and Henry 15, together with their daughter Emily who was twenty.  Head of the household Samuel was described as having been born in Newport whose occupation was that of a farmer of sixty-eight acres of pasture land.  All of his children were confirmed as having been born at Christchurch.

 

 

 

The absence of unmarried daughter Catherine is a mystery, although it is possible that daughter Susan may have been married by then.  Son Charles was also missing and has so far not been identified in 1871.  Living right next door to Samuel and his family in 1871 was the Collett family of his nephew.  That was the ship-wright Walter Collett, his wife Mary Ann Thomas, and their family.

 

 

 

According to the census of 1881, Samuel Collett of Newport was 65 and was living with part of his family at Royal Oak Hill in Christchurch, from where he worked as a cattle dealer.  Living with him was his wife Kate who was 60 and from Cork in Ireland, and three of their unmarried children.  They were their daughter Kate who was 37, and their two youngest sons Thomas who was 27 and Henry who was 20.  All three children were confirmed as having been born at Christchurch. 

 

 

 

It was only three years after that when Samuel Collett passed away, his death being recorded at Newport register office (Ref. 11a 117) during the first three months of 1884 when he was 67.  An assumption has been made that he was already a widower when he died, since no reference to his wife was made during the probate process, when the following facts were revealed.  Samuel Collett, late of the Parish of Christchurch died there on 23rd January 1884.  Administration of his personal effects was granted on 26th August 1884 to Walter Collett of Somerton, a cattle dealer, and his eldest son and one of his next-of-kin.

 

 

 

53P4

Walter Collett

Born in 1843 at Christchurch

 

53P5

Catherine Collett

Born in 1844 at Christchurch

 

53P6

William Henry Collett

Born in 1846 at Christchurch

 

53P7

Susan Collett

Born in 1848 at Christchurch

 

53P8

Emily Charlotte Collett

Born in 1850 at Christchurch

 

53P9

Charles Collett

Born in 1852 at Christchurch

 

53P10

Thomas Collett

Born in 1854 at Christchurch

 

53P11

Henry Collett

Born in 1856 at Christchurch

 

 

 

 

53P1

Charlotte Collett was born at Christchurch near Newport in 1834 and was baptised there on 15th June 1834, the daughter of Henry Collett and his wife Charlotte Bray.  With the death of her father in 1838 when she was four years old, Charlotte was living at Church Hill in Christchurch in June 1841 when she was seven years old.  Upon leaving school Charlotte entered into domestic service and by 1851, when she was 16 years old, she was working as a servant at the house of the Reed family at 42 High Street in Newport.

 

 

 

She went on to marry William Williams and had a craft shop in Newport in the latter years of the 1850’s.  Her brother Henry (below) had been engaged to her husband’s sister Sally Williams, but that did not result in them ever being married.  Sometime shortly after those events Charlotte passed away without having any children, although the cause of death has not been determined.

 

 

 

 

53P2

HENRY COLLETT was born at Caerleon on 17th March 1837, and was baptised a month later at Christchurch near Newport on 23rd April 1837, the son of butcher Henry Collett and Charlotte Bray.  He was just 18 months old when his father was killed in a horsing accident, and by the time of the census in June 1841 when he was 4 years old and was living with his mother and two siblings at Collett Cottage on Church Hill in Christchurch.  Henry was still living at Collett Cottage on Church Hill in Christchurch with his widowed mother and younger brother Walter (below) at the time of the census in 1851 when he was 14 years of age.  Shortly after that, and after thirteen years as a widow, Charlotte re-married, when she took Henry Price as her second husband. 

 

 

 

That may not have been easy for Henry to accept, because it was around the time of his mother’s second marriage that he is understood to have moved in with his grandparents, who were living in the adjoining Collett Cottage.  It was through his grandfather Walter Collett being a butcher and a vet, that Henry gained a better understanding of animals, which stood him in good stead for later in his life.  However, it would appear that the time spent with his grandfather may have been limited to just four or five years, by which time he was around 17 years old.

 

 

 

At that time there was a thriving transport industry taking horses from nearby Newport to America and there is some anecdotal evidence that Henry worked on one of those ships.  Certainly it was not uncommon for boys of 12-16 to be crewing.  It was also during that period in his life that Henry became engaged to be married to his sister-in-law Sally Williams, the sister of William Williams who married Henry’s sister Charlotte (above).  Sadly, about three years before his grandfather died in 1858, Henry left Christchurch and also broke off his engagement to Sally Williams.

 

 

 

The next episode in his life found Henry shipwrecked at Alexandria in Egypt, where he became involved in the Crimea War [1853-1856].  He joined the Transport Service taking mules from there, and from Spain, to the Crimean Peninsula.  At one stage of the war, the Transport Service was called into action for the attack on Sevastopol and, although no record has been found to confirm that Henry was serving ashore at the time of the event, it is possible that he was involved in some way or other, from the stories that he relayed later to his children.

 

 

 

After the war, he eventually found his way back to England, from where, on Friday 31st July 1857, he sailed out of Liverpool on board the ‘Annie Wilson’ as an unassisted emigrant engineer, bound for Australia.  He was 20 years and 4 months, when he said farewell to his family, never to return to his homeland. 

 

 

 

Just over three months later Henry Collett arrived at Hobson’s Bay in Melbourne on Tuesday 3rd November, where the ‘Annie Wilson’ was one of around 300 or 400 ships bringing gold-seekers to Australia from distance shores.  From that time onwards he worked for last two months of 1857 on a ship taking horses to Bombay and Sepoy for the mutineers of the Indian Rebellion.  Afterwards he sailed to the new Cellular Jail on the Andaman Islands. 

 

 

 

The Cellular Jail is one of the murkiest chapters in the history of the colonial rule in India.  Though the prison was only started in 1896, the history of using the Andaman island as a prison dates back to the India Rebellion in 1857.  So it seems highly likely that Henry’s cargo was one of prisoners captured during the rebellion.

 

 

 

It must have been after that when Henry Collett, with the money he had earned, settled back in Australia where he first tried his luck working on the Victorian goldfields with the Mills family, who had been his travelling companions on the ‘Annie Wilson’.  They all headed to the Daisy Diggings one hundred miles north-east of Melbourne, where eighteen months earlier the ‘Emu Gold Rush’ had established a make-shift town of ten thousand miners.  However, they arrived too late to make their fortune.

 

 

 

Melbourne was awash with unemployed miners, so Henry was fortunate in that he was able to return to the occupation in which he had the most experience, that of working with animals, when he accepted an animal husbandry job in Geelong in Victoria.  After a few years raising sheep it is understood that on Tuesday 7th January 1861 Henry walked onto the wharf at Geelong where he was offered a further job involving stock husbanding at sea.  He accepted the job of shepherd on board the ship ‘Sarah H Snow’ carrying 3050 sheep to Otago in New Zealand.

 

 

 

When the ‘Sarah H Snow’ dropped anchor at Port Chambers in Dunedin on the evening of 26th January 1861 he was still only 23.  It was on the south island that he finally settled down to begin a new life and yet another branch of the Collett family.  It was at Te Waimate, a pioneering sheep station of some 98,000 acres, about 100 miles from Dunedin that he initially settled, before going to Raincliff seven miles north-west of Pleasant Point. Raincliff was another pioneering sheep station of some 50,000 acres, and it was there that he fortuitously met Ann Jane Davis, a Welsh girl, travelling as a companion with Mrs Christie from Scarborough who was to rejoin her husband, who was a surgeon serving in the North Island Maori Wars, which were at their height at that time.

 

 

 

It was in 1863 that Henry purchased 400 acres, the land being in its native state which, being good limestone country, was soon brought under his control and cultivated.  Such were his skills that he generally topped the local market with his sheep, in addition to which he also bred some excellent hacks and roadsters.

 

 

 

It was during the following year that Henry Collett married Ann Jane Davis on 5th April 1864 at St Mary’s Church in the small coastal settlement of Timura, which lies about ten miles south-east of Pleasant Point on the South Island.  Ann had only arrived in New Zealand that same year on board the sailing ship Zealandia.

This photograph is believed to have

been taken on their wedding day.

 

Over the following years Henry and Anne resided in the Pleasant Point district of South Canterbury, where Henry established himself as a well-respected member of the local community.

 

 

 

The marriage produced five children for Henry and Anne although, tragically, the first of them died within the first six months of her life, and the last also did not survive beyond three months.  The three surviving children were Elizabeth Collett, Walter Henry Collett, named jointly after his grandfather and father respectively, and Charlotte Ann Collett named jointly after her grandmother and mother respectively.

 

 

 

This Collett family was the first of the new pioneering breed of foreign settlers to leave their homelands for the fertile lands of South Canterbury.  In fact, so new to that land were they that Henry’s and Ann’s first child was the very first white man’s child to be born at Raincliff Station, where they lived and farmed some 50,000 acres of land.

 

 

 

Following the tragic death of their first child, Henry and Ann left Raincliff shortly after.  Helped by the Purnell family of Raincliff, Henry paid eighty pounds cash for 40 acres of land on the Opihi River, and there he built a wooden hut close to the river where his second child was born.  The new farm that he established there was White Rock Farm, in Opihi Flats, midway between Raincliff and Pleasant Point in South Canterbury. 

 

 

 

There was high drama on the day that the child was born.  The Tengawai, Opihi and Opuha Rivers were all in a state of flood that day, which caused problems for the midwife to reach the family.  However, it was during the floods in the following year that the couple’s temporary home, the wooden hut near the river, was washed away, with Ann and baby Elizabeth narrowly escaping being drowned, while Henry was hurriedly returning from sheep shearing in the MacKenzie country.

 

 

 

As a result Henry built a more substantial three-bedroom limestone cottage on a rise behind the site of his first house, and a little further away from the river.  He called it ‘Daisy Hill’ after the goldfield in Australia.  The heavy rain in early part of 1870 ruined the fuel for his horses when the oat stacks sprouted.  To become financial again, Henry and Ann left White Rock Farm, when they took a small cottage in Silverstream (now Kimbell) on Three Springs Station, where the couple’s third child was born at the end of 1870.  It was while they lived there that Henry rode to work on Burkes Pass Station.

 

 

 

By the time of the birth of the couple’s final two children, the family was once again living on the farm at Daisy Hill, although sadly it was also there that the youngest child died when she was just six months old.

 

The illustration on the right, of the three surviving children of Henry and Ann, has been extracted from a larger picture of the children and was probably made around 1879 when Elizabeth was twelve, Walter was nine, and Charlotte was six.  That year was memorable, since it was the year that the local school first opened (see below). 

 

The vivid colours and ornate embroidery on Walter’s suit suggests that this was a sepia photograph to which the colours have been added.

 

 

 

Henry’s three surviving children were all initially educated at home at Daisy Hill, that is, until a school was built and opened at Opihi Downs in 1879.  It was ten years later when Henry, a follower of the Anglican faith, heard of the plans to build a church at Temuka, that he offered to provide the limestone for the project which was cut from his Pigeons Cliff Farm.  So over the following weeks and months the parishioners carted 500 loads of limestone to Temuka to build the imposing gothic Church of St Joseph, which eventually had seating accommodation for 600 people.

 

 

 

Such was his success, Henry continued to buy more land, and in 1901 and 1902 he purchased 30 acres along the south bank of the river, and 20 acres alongside the road to the Point.  His last purchase of 80 acres took place in 1902 and was the most coveted land of all; the magnificent White Cliffs, so admired by his wife Ann in the Autumn of 1864 when she passed by as a young woman on her way to Raincliff Station.

 

It was later that same year, on 7th July 1902, that Henry Collett was carried, unconscious, into the hospital at Temuka, where died during the next day at the age of 65.  The reason for his hospitalisation was that he had fallen from his horse, when someone was giving him a leg-up into the saddle.

 

 

 

The photograph above was taken shortly before his tragic accident.

 

 

 

At the time of his death his eldest daughter was married with eight children and was living nearby.  His son Walter lived just two miles away and was also married by then, with three children, and farmed the top part of Henry’s farm, while his youngest daughter Charlotte was still living at home.

 

 

 

53Q1

Charlotte Ann Collett

Born on 28.03.1865 at Raincliff

 

53Q2

Elizabeth Collett

Born on 14.02.1867 at Opihi Flats

 

53Q3

WALTER HENRY COLLETT

Born on 17.12.1870 at Kimbell

 

53Q4

Charlotte Ann Collett

Born on 21.02.1873 at Daisy Hill

 

53Q5

Mary Emily Collett

Born on 09.06.1875 at Daisy Hill

 

 

 

 

53P3

Walter Collett, who was named after his grandfather, was born at Christchurch near Newport in 1838 where he was baptised on 16th September 1838, the son of Henry Collett and his wife Charlotte Bray.  Tragically it was on 30th September 1838 that his father was killed in an accident with a horse, when Walter may have been a month old.

 

By 1851 he was living with his mother and brother Henry (above) when he was twelve years old.  Ten years later he Walter had left the family home and was living at 17 Peel Street in Cardiff at the age of twenty-two, by which time he was a married man with a wife and child.

 

This late 19th Century photograph is of ‘Walter Collett of Newport’

 

 

 

Walter married (1) Mary Ann Thomas at Newport, where she was born, during the first quarter of 1859 with whom he had two children.  The couple’s first child was very likely a honeymoon baby, born towards the end of 1859 when Walter and Mary were living within the Newport area.

 

 

 

After the initial few months living in Newport, Walter’s work took him into Cardiff and in April 1861 the young family was living there at Peel Street.  Mary Ann was twenty-one and a dressmaker, while their only child at that time, their son Henry, was just one year old.  It seems likely that Walter was employed at the Cardiff docks, since his occupation on that occasion was that of a ship’s carpenter.

 

 

 

After a while living and working in Cardiff, where their daughter Charlotte was born, Walter and his family made the move to Christchurch where they were living in 1871.  Walter was then thirty-two and his occupation was ship-wright.  His wife Mary was thirty, and their two children were Henry who was twelve of Newport, and Charlotte who was ten years old and of Cardiff.  The family’s address in Christchurch in 1871 was given simply as ‘near the church’.  Walter gave his place of birth as Bishpool, which is an area of Christchurch, and living directly next door to him and his family was his uncle Samuel Collett the farmer and his family.

 

 

 

Tragically five years later in 1876, Mary Ann Collett died and her death was registered in Newport during the second quarter of that year.  She was only thirty-seven years old, having been born at Newport in 1839.  It is possible that she died during childbirth.  Following the death of his wife, Walter married (2) Mary Walters.  Mary was eight years younger than Walter, she having been born at Stanley Hill in Hereford in 1844.  The couple were married during the third quarter of 1877.

 

 

 

Almost exactly one year later Mary presented Walter with the first of the couple’s two children, the birth taking place although it was registered at Newport during the third quarter of 1878.  It was very likely around that time when Walter and his family moved to a new address in Christchurch.  Walter’s and Mary’s second child was born in December 1880, and again the birth was registered in Newport.

 

 

 

According to the census of 1881, the family was living at Royal Oak Hill in the town, by which time Walter was 42 and was working as a grocer.  His wife was listed as Mary aged 34 and from Amley (Hamley) who was described as being a former cook domestic servant.  Living with the couple were Walter’s two sons, William who was two years old, and Edward who was just four months old.  Ten years later in 1891 the family was still living at Royal Oak Hill in Christchurch, when Walter was fifty-two and a dealer in stock, Mary was forty-four, William was twelve, and Edward was ten years old.

 

 

 

Just after the turn of the century Walter was once again described as a grocer and shopkeeper at the age of sixty-two when still living at Royal Oak.  At the time of the census at the end of March in 1901 Walter’s wife was listed as being fifty-four and was a visitor at Caerlicken Farm in Kemeys Inferior the home of Edward Rosser, where her occupation that was of a monthly nurse.  Both of their sons had left South Wales by that time and were living and working in London, although they both returned to the Newport area sometime during the next ten years.

 

 

 

Walter and Mary remained living within the Christchurch / Newport as confirmed by the census in April 1911 when Walter was 72 and Mary was 64.  Living with them was their unmarried son Edward who was 30 years old.  The census return confirmed that both men had been born at Christchurch.  And it was while living within the Christchurch / Newport area that Walter Collett died in 1920, his death being registered at Newport during the first three months of the year.  His age at that time was given incorrectly as being 76, when in fact he was around 81 years of age and it was his wife Mary who was 76.  Mary survived as a widow for a further eight years before she eventually passed away during the second quarter of 1928, while she was still living in the Newport area.

 

 

 

This photograph of the two Collett Cottages was taken around 1920.

 

The sign on the top right-hand corner of the property says “M Collett – Grocer”, so it is possible that M Collett was a reference to the widow Mary Collett, who had taken on the role of running the business following the death of her husband Walter, who was known to have been a grocer as confirmed in the previous census records.

 

 

 

The same photograph was sent via email to Brian Collett in July 2011 by Dale Chappell, whose mother has been the owner occupier of the property since 1984.  It was the previous owner who purchased the then derelict cottages and converted them into one comfortable dwelling, which it still is today although it has been renamed ‘Marandellas’.  Dale’s mother was unaware of the previous Collett connection until this was brought to her attention by the Collett Family History website.  Even more of a coincidence is the fact that she used to work at the Newport Library, alongside William John Collett (Ref. 53R18).

 

 

 

53Q6

Henry Collett

Born in 1859 at Newport

 

53Q7

Charlotte Collett

Born in 1860 at Cardiff

 

53Q8

William Collett

Born in 1878 at Christchurch

 

53Q9

Edward Collett

Born in 1880 at Christchurch

 

 

 

 

53P4

Walter Collett was born in 1843, the eldest son and first child of Samuel and Catherine Collett who was named after his grandfather.  He was seven years old in the census of 1851 for Christchurch, and was seventeen ten years later in the Christchurch census of 1861.  Towards the very end of the next decade Walter married Harriet Senior and by 1871 the childless couple were still living, within the Newport & Caerleon registration district, when Walter was twenty-seven and his wife was twenty-six.  Harriet Senior had been born at Bradwich in Devon.

 

 

 

During the following decade Harriet presented Walter with four children and in 1881 the family of six was living at Somerton Farm in Christchurch.  Walter Collett was described in that year’s census as being 37 and a farmer who was born at Christchurch.  Somerton Farm comprised 140 acres and Walter employed two men to help him manage it.  His wife was confirmed as Harriet of Bradwich and staying with the family on that occasion was Harriet’s unmarried sister Mary Ann Senior of Bradwich in Devon.  Walter’s and Harriet’s four children at that time were Edith who was five, Linda three, one year old Arthur, and Ethel who was just one month, all of whom had been born.

 

 

 

In addition to the two men that Walter employed as farm-hands, his wife Harriet was assisted in the farmhouse by Christiana Merrett who was nineteen and from Christchurch who was employed as a general domestic servant.  Two more children were added to the family during the next four years and, in the census of 1891, Walter was 47 and Harriet was 45.  Living with the couple were all six of their children;  Edith age 15, Linda age 13, Arthur age 11, Ethel age 10, Edgar who was eight, and Frederick who was five years old.  During the following ten years Harriet died, and it may have been that event which resulted in the family moving south of Newport to the village of Nash, near to the south Wales coast.

 

 

 

According to the March census of 1901, Walter was a widower at the age of fifty-seven, and was still working as a farmer.  Once again his place of birth was confirmed as Christchurch.  Listed with him at Nash were five of their six children; Edith 25, Linda 23, Ethel 20, Edgar 18, and Fred who was fifteen, and all of them born.  Only his son Arthur has not been traced in that census or the next, although he was listed living with his family in 1891 as Arthur W Collett aged eleven.

 

 

 

By April 1911 Walter was aged sixty-seven and was still living within the Newport area, and living with him were his three youngest and unmarried children.  Ethel Mary Collett was 30, Edgar Henry Collett was 28, and Frederick George was 25.  It was just less than nine years later that Walter Collett died on 9th February 1920 when he was living at 7 Leicester Road in Newport.  His Will was proved in London on 6th May that year when his married daughter Ethel was named as the executor of his estate of £280 2 Shillings 8d.  She was described as Ethel Mary Capper, wife of John Herbert Capper.

 

 

 

53Q10

Edith A Collett

Born in 1875 at Christchurch

 

53Q11

Linda Harriet Collett

Born in 1877 at Christchurch

 

53Q12

Arthur Walter Collett

Born in 1879 at Christchurch

 

53Q13

Ethel Mary Collett

Born in 1881 at Christchurch

 

53Q14

Edgar Henry Collett

Born in 1883 at Christchurch

 

53Q15

Frederick George Collett

Born in 1885 at Christchurch

 

 

 

 

53P5

Catherine Collett, who was often referred to as Kate, was born at Christchurch in 1844 and was the eldest daughter of Samuel and Catherine Collett.  It was at Christchurch that she lived most of her early life, and was recorded there with her family as Catherine aged six years in 1851.  Ten years later she was again living in Christchurch and was listed as Catherine Collett who was 16 and living as a companion and housekeeper with her elderly widowed grandmother Mary Collett.

 

 

 

Catherine’s whereabouts in 1871 when she would have been in her mid-twenties, has not yet been determined, but by the time of the Christchurch census of 1881 she was back living with her parents at Royal Oak Hill.  The census return recorded that she was Kate Collett aged 37 and from Christchurch, and that she was an out of work domestic servant.  During the next ten years both of Catherine’s parents died, following which, in the census of 1891, Kate Collett was 47 when she was sharing the family home with her younger brother Henry (below).

 

 

 

Sometime later Catherine left Christchurch when she moved to Oystermouth in Glamorganshire to be with her youngest sister Emily who had recently been made a widow.  That was confirmed by the census of 1901 in which she was recorded as Catherine Collett from Christchurch in Monmouthshire who was a single lady of 57, living on her own means.  On that occasion she was a visitor at 1 Victoria Avenue in Oystermouth, the home of her sister Emily Charlotte Morgan.  Also recorded living within that same registration district was her niece, apprentice dressmaker Elizabeth Collett who was sixteen and from Newport, the daughter of Catherine’s brother William Henry Collett, who was still living on the Gower Peninsula at Oystermouth in 1911.

 

 

 

It was just over seven years later that Catherine Collett died, her death being recorded at Bridgend register office (Ref. 11a 457) during the second quarter of 1908 at the age of 63.

 

 

 

 

53P6

William Henry Collett was born at Christchurch in 1846, the son of Samuel and Catherine Collett, and he was four years old in the Christchurch census of 1851 and was fourteen by 1861.  He was still living at the family home near the church in Christchurch in 1871 when he was twenty-four and his occupation was that of a butcher.  Shortly after the 1871 Census, William married Elizabeth at Christchurch where she had been born in 1849.  By the time of the census of 1881 the marriage of William and Elizabeth had produced the couple’s first four of their ultimate eight children.

 

 

 

The family at that time was made up of William who was 34, his wife Elizabeth who was 31, and their children Kate Collett who was eight, Charles Collett who was five, Alfred Collett who was three and baby Edmund Collett who was just five months old.  William Collett was a butcher and a cattle dealer of Christchurch and he and his family were living at Royal Oak Farm in Christchurch.  Living with the family was the widow Mary Ann Evans, age forty-four and of Christchurch, who was curiously described as being William’s step-sister.  Supporting the Collett family were two servants, the widow Hannah Jones 57, and her son Arthur Jones who was 16.

 

 

 

During the next decade the remaining four children were added to the family which was still living at Christchurch in 1891, although no record of daughter Betty has been found, when she would have been three years old.  William and his younger brother Thomas (below) were living in adjacent dwellings at No 2 and No 1 Bolton Place in Christchurch.  The head of the household was recorded as William Hy Collett, age 44 and from Christchurch, who was a butcher and a cattle dealer.  His wife Elizabeth was 40 and from Maindee, and their seven children were listed in the census with them.  They were Kate who was 17 and supporting her mother at home, Charles who was 14, Alfred who was 12, Edward (sic) who was 10, Henry who was eight and Elizabeth who was seven, all of whom were attending school, while baby Florry Collett was two years of age.  Still living with the family and described as a visitor was widow Hannah Jones from Glastonbury who was 67. 

 

 

 

It may be worthwhile mentioning here that William and or Elizabeth, whichever of them assisted the enumerator to complete the next census in March 1901, appear to have been very confused as regards the actual ages of their children, which conflicted greatly were their stated aged in the earlier census returns for 1881 and 1891 and the later one in 1911.

 

 

 

Just after the start of the new century, according to the census of 1901, William Henry Collett, a butcher and dealer and employer from Christchurch was 53 when he and his family were residing at 10 Somerton Place in Newport.  His wife Elizabeth Collett was 50 and from Maindee in Monmouthshire and still living with the couple were seven of their eight children.  The census return confirmed them as Kate E Collett was 23 (instead of 27, who was 17 in 1891 and 37 in 1911), Charles S Collett who was 21 (instead of 24), Alfred Collett who 19 (instead of 23, who was 3 in 1881 and 33 in 1911), Edmund Collett who was 17 (instead of 20), Henry Collett who was 15 (instead of 18, who was 8 in 1891 and 28 in 1911), Bettie Collett who was 13 and Florence H Collett who was 11 and who was 21 in 1911.  From this it must be assumed that William’s third son was indeed called Edmund and, that as Edward Collett, his name had been incorrectly recorded in the census return for 1891.

 

 

 

At that time in March 1901, William’s second eldest daughter Elizabeth was living at 1 Victoria Avenue in Oystermouth, Glamorganshire, with two of William’s sisters.  During the next ten years all of the couple’s other children, with the exception of their youngest daughter, left the family home.  So by April 1911, the depleted Collett family had left the Newport area and instead was living within the Merthyr Tydfil registration district where William Collett was 63, Elizabeth Collett was 60, and the only child still living with them was their youngest daughter Florence Collett who was 21.

 

 

 

53Q16

Kate Elizabeth Collett

Born in 1873 at Christchurch

 

53Q17

Charles Samuel Collett

Born in 1876 at Christchurch

 

53Q18

Alfred Collett

Born in 1878 at Christchurch

 

53Q19

Edmund Collett

Born in 1880 at Christchurch

 

53Q20

Henry Collett

Born in 1882 at Christchurch

 

53Q21

Elizabeth Jane Collett

Born in 1884 at Christchurch

 

53Q22

Betty Collett

Born in 1887 at Christchurch

 

53Q23

Florence H Collett

Born in 1889 at Christchurch

 

 

 

 

53P7

Susan Collett was born at Christchurch in 1848, the daughter of Samuel and Catherine Collett, and she was two years old at the time of the Christchurch census of 1851 and twelve years old in 1861.  By the time of the census of 1871 Susan was no longer living at her parent’s house in Christchurch, and may well have been married by then.

 

 

 

 

53P8

Emily Charlotte Collett was born at Christchurch in 1850, the daughter of Samuel and Catherine Collett, and was recorded as being under one year old in the Christchurch census of 1851 and ten years old in 1861. Emily was still living with her family at Christchurch in 1871 when she was twenty.  No record of Emily has been found in 1881 when she would have been thirty so she may have been married by then.  It is known that an Emily Charlotte from Christchurch married a David J Morgan and that in 1891 the childless couple were living at Oystermouth.  However, sometime during the last decade of the century Emily was made a widow by the death of David Morgan which was confirmed by the census in 1901.

 

 

 

The Oystermouth census for Glamorganshire that March recorded her as Emily Charl. Morgan from Christchurch, a widow of 50 years, who was described as a bathing machine proprietor having her own account.  The only person living with her at 1 Victoria Avenue in Oystermouth on that occasion was her older sister Catherine Collett (above) who was described as a visitor from Christchurch who was living on her own means.

 

 

 

In 1911 Emily Charlotte Morgan was a widow from Christchurch, age sixty, who was still living at Oystermouth.  The only other member of the Collett family from Christchurch to still be living within the Oystermouth area on that occasion was Emily’s niece Elizabeth Jane Collett (Ref. 53Q21).

 

 

 

 

53P9

Charles Collett was born at Christchurch in 1852, the son of Samuel and Catherine Collett.  In 1861 he was eight years old when he was living with his family at Christchurch.  It is unclear what happened to Charles over the following year since he has not been positively identified in any of the subsequent census returns in the United Kingdom.

 

 

 

 

53P10

Thomas Collett was born at Christchurch in 1854, the son of Samuel and Catherine Collett.  In the census for Christchurch in 1861 he was six years old and it was there that he was fifteen years old in 1871.  By 1881 Thomas was still a bachelor at the age of twenty-seven and he was still living with his parents at Royal Oak Hill in Christchurch.  His father Samuel was a cattle dealer and that was also the profession Charles had taken up and, at that time in his life, he was working with his father and his brother Henry (below).

 

 

 

Sometime during the following decade Thomas married Mary from Llandegveth in Monmouthshire, as verified in the next census.  According to the census conducted in 1891 Thomas Collett was living at 1 Bolton Place in Christchurch where he was continuing to work as a cattle dealer but when curiously he gave his age as 38 instead of 36 and confirmed he was born in Christchurch.  Living there with him was his wife Mary Collett who was 34 and nineteen year old servant girl Sarah Duffield.  Living in the dwelling next door at 2 Bolton Place was the family of William Henry Collett (above), the older brother of Thomas.

 

 

 

It was a very similar situation ten years later in March 1901 when again Thomas Collett of Christchurch said he was 48 instead of 46.  He was still working as a cattle dealer and was still living in Christchurch with his wife Mary who was 43 and from Llandegveth.  No record of any children has so far been found, but by April 1911 the couple was still living in Christchurch where Thomas was 57 and his wife Mary was 56.  The census return confirmed they had been married for twenty-three years, during which time they had given birth to one child who did not survive.

 

 

 

Thomas Collett was 63 when he died in 1917, his death being recorded at Newport register office (Ref. 11a 197) during the final three months of that year.

 

 

 

 

53P11

Henry Collett was born at Christchurch in 1856, and was the youngest son of Samuel and Catherine Collett.  In successive census records for Christchurch he was aged five in 1861, fifteen in 1871, and in 1881 he was still a bachelor living at Royal Oak Hill in Christchurch with his parents.  His correct age would have been twenty-five, but the census recorded it in error as being twenty, making him seven years younger than his brother Thomas (above) rather than just two years.  At that time in his life Henry was working with his father Samuel Collett, and his brother Thomas, who were all employed as cattle dealers. 

 

 

 

However, during the next few years both of Henry’s parents passed away, and by the time of the census of 1891, Henry was a bachelor of thirty-five and was living with his older unmarried sister Kate Collett (above) at Christchurch.  Ten years later in 1901 Henry Collett of Christchurch was forty-five and unmarried, and was living at Pleasant View in Christchurch from where he was working as a butcher and a cattle dealer, having his own account – that is being self-employed.  However, a search of the census of 1911 has not been successful in locating him, although it was over seventeen years later that he died in South Wales.  The death of Henry Collett, age 72, was recorded at the Gower register office (Ref. 11a 1088) during the second quarter of 1928.

 

 

 

As a footnote, the graves of most of the people mentioned above can be found in the churchyard at Holy Trinity Church in Christchurch, Gwent in South Wales, which is not far from the nearby Royal Oak Hill where they used to live.

 

 

 

 

53Q1

Charlotte Ann Collett was born at Raincliff Station in South Canterbury, New Zealand on 28th March 1865.  She was the first of five children born to the young Welsh couple of Henry Collett and Ann Jane Davis, and was notable as the first ever white-skinned child to be born on the 50,000 acre farmstead that was Raincliff Station.  Tragically she was not to survive very long, as she died when she was just six months old on the 9th September 1865 when her body was laid to rest in the grounds at Raincliff Station, the grave being marked by the planting of a yew tree in the arboretum. 

 

 

 

In more recent years her grave at Raincliff Station has been marked by a headstone and a memorial plaque, because of its significance in New Zealand’s relatively young history.

 

 

 

 

53Q2

Elizabeth Collett was born at White Rock Farm, Opihi Flats, on 14th February 1867, the eldest surviving child of Henry Collett and Ann Davis from South Wales.  Her birth was dramatic to say the least.  Henry and Ann had recently lost their first child and now, with Ann in labour in their small temporary home, the midwife, who was some distance away could not get to the hut because of rising flood waters from the Opihi River just 100 metres away and the Opuha River, which was already in full flood.  Henry found himself in a terrible predicament and, after an hour’s ride through the sodden countryside he reached Mrs Gould, a friend and neighbour, who could ride and had a good water-horse.  And so it was with her help, that Elizabeth Collett came into the world.

 

 

 

More drama occurred exactly a year later when, in the arms of her mother, Elizabeth was rescued from their table top shortly before the hut was swept away by another flood.  Understandably the fair haired, blue eyed Liz, was always a special girl to Henry and Ann.  Elizabeth was three months short of her seventeenth birthday when she married Frank Octavius Matthews from Gloucestershire in England on 7th December 1883 at Daisy Hill.  It is understood that the family of Frank Matthews was known to the Collett family when they lived in Great Britain.  His married to Elizabeth produced a total of twelve children for the couple, the first few being born on South Island, before the Matthews family move across the water to North Island.

 

 

 

Through hard work and determination, Frank Matthews moved from Totara Valley near Opihi and Pleasant Point to Taranaki where he continued to buy and sell farms.  In the end his total holding amounted to seven farms and a couple of houses.  It was on North Island that he became an established farmer and, in later years, his sons followed in his footsteps.  Elizabeth Matthews nee Collett died on 24th July 1933 and was buried at Waverley Cemetery, where she was joined just over four years later, following the death of her husband on 13th August 1937.

 

 

 

The twelve children of Elizabeth Collett and Frank Matthews were:  Bessie Ann Matthews (born at Woolston on 26.01.1884, who died in 1953); Charlotte [Lottie] Henrietta Matthews (born at Opihi in 1887, who died in South Africa on 25.04.1977); Walter [Jack] Matthews (born at Opihi on 25.07.1886, who died on 04.09.1961); Elizabeth Matthews (born at Opihi during September 1888, who died at Wanganui on 12.08.1968); Flora Matthews (born at Opihi on 25.08.1889); Ernest Frank Matthews (born at Opihi on 06.04.1892, who was killed in action near Wadi an Sir in Jordan on 01.04.1918);  Frederick Collett Matthews MM (born at Opihi on 20.04.1895, who was killed in action at Marfaux in France on 23.07.1918); Leslie Matthews (born at Opihi in 1900, who died at Ngamatapouri on 25.10.1937); Henry [Harry] Robins Matthews (born at Opihi on 04.05.1902, who died on 09.05.1964); Mart Priscilla Gwendolyn Matthews (born at Pleasant Mount on 04.09.1905, who died on 23.01.1981); a still-born son in 1908; and Frank Raymond Matthews (born in 1911, who died on 27.08.1959.

 

 

 

 

53Q3

WALTER HENRY COLLETT was born at Silverstream (now Kimbell) on the Three Springs Station in South Canterbury on 17th December 1870.  He was the only son of Henry Collett and Ann Davis, and shortly after he was born his family moved to Daisy Hill Farm which his father had purchase in 1866.  It was while he was still living with his family at Daisy Hill Farm that Walter married Annie Eliza Maxwell on 9th June 1897.  Annie was from a neighbouring farm, and was the daughter of Alexander Maxwell and Annie Parker, and the sister of Hamilton Maxwell who married Walter’s younger sister Charlotte (below).  The first of Walter’s and Annie’s ten children was born later that same year at Upper Waitohi, in Kakahu.

 

 

 

He first farmed near Annie’s parents’ home, from a small timber cottage where today Alan Cones’ cattle yards are based.  He later farmed on the banks of the Opihi River on the Pleasant Point side of Daisy Hill at Exwick Farm, where he was mixed farmer.  That second family home is still there today, albeit uninhabited and in a dilapidated stated.  Annie Collett nee Maxwell died in 1932, and was followed nine years later by her husband, when Walter Henry Collett died on 23rd November 1941.

 

 

 

Annie Eliza Maxwell was born on 11th November 1877 at her parents' Sunnyside Farm near Cannington Sheep Station and had the distinction of being the first European child born at Cannington.  Around about 1881 her family crossed to Kakahu, and she later attended primary school there.  She lived at home with her parents, providing help on the farm until, at the age of 19, on Wednesday 9th June 1897 at Daisy Hill Farm she married Walter Henry Collett, who was 26.

 

 

 

They lived first at Kakahu about half a kilometre down the road from her parents' house.  There she gave birth to eight of her ten children, with the last two children being born at Daisy Hill.  Walter and Annie leased, then bought nearby Exwick Farm.  The following twelve years saw her family grow into adulthood.  In 1932 she became ill and died in Timaru Public Hospital on 16th July 1932 from breast carcinoma.  She was only 54 years old.  At that time her oldest child ‘Hap Collett’ was 35, while the youngest, Esther, was only 16.  Annie eventually had 22 grandchildren and 57 great grandchildren.  She was a bright, well-spoken, and gentle Christian woman, who was burdened by the Great Depression and the demands of a large, growing family having to cope in a dwelling lacking size and everyday comforts.

 

 

 

53R1

Henry Alexander Parker Collett

Born in 1897 at Kakahu

 

53R2

Estelle May Collett

Born in 1898 at Kakahu

 

53R3

Charlotte Elizabeth Mary Collett

Born in 1901 at Kakahu

 

53R4

Walter Hamilton Davis Collett

Born in 1903 at Kakahu

 

53R5

LLEWELLYN MAXWELL COLLETT

Born in 1905 at Kakahu

 

53R6

Ann Collett

Born in 1907 at Kakahu

 

53R7

Mary Victoria Gwendoline Collett

Born in 1909 at Kakahu

 

53R8

Francis David Collett

Born in 1911 at Kakahu

 

53R9

Andrew James Howell Collett

Born in 1914 at Pleasant Point

 

53R10

Esther Ruth Collett

Born in 1916 at Pleasant Point

 

 

 

 

53Q4

Charlotte Ann Collett was born at Daisy Hill Farm on 21st February 1873, the youngest surviving child of Henry Collett and Anne Davis.  She was among the first pupils enrolled at the Opihi School although, at that time, there were no secondary schools for her to attend.  She fully absorbed the rhythm of farm life and understood it well.  It was on 12th April 1909 at Daisy Hill that Charlotte married neighbouring farmer Hamilton Maxwell, the brother of Annie Maxwell her sister-in-law, and the son of Alexander Maxwell and Annie Parker.

 

 

 

The marriage of Charlotte and Hamilton produced three children, the eldest of which, Nancy Maxwell, compiled the family history in a book entitled The Collett Saga around 1961, to coincide with the centenary of the arrival of her grandfather Henry Collett in New Zealand.  That fascinating work was composed using stories handed down by Henry and his wife Anne Collett to their daughter Charlotte, who then passed it onto Nancy.

 

 

 

Charlotte’s two other children were Alexander Maxwell, who was known as Sandy, and Hamilton Maxwell, who was known as Young Hammy, his father being called Hammy Maxwell.  Nancy Maxwell, who was baptised Annie Parker Henrietta Maxwell, was born on 13.02.1910 and died on 15.10.1986, Sandy was born on 14.02.1912 and was baptised Alexander Collett Davies Maxwell, and he died on 23.04.1986 aged 74, while Hamilton Walter Ernest Maxwell was born on 03.01.1913 and lived most of his later life in Christchurch, where he died in 2008.

 

 

 

Hamilton Maxwell was born at Cannington on 2nd February 1881.  He was raised at Kakahu and attended the Kakahu School. He was fortunate in having Miss Jenny McKay, one of New Zealand's leading poets and feminists, as his teacher.  He was also taught by the Meredith sisters who later were among the first New Zealand women to gain medical degrees.  He worked on his father's farm, Greenhills, and married Charlotte Ann Collett on 12th April 1909.  Six months before his marriage, he bought 80 acres lying between Collett's Road and the Opihi River, quite close to the Hanging Rock bridge. 

 

 

 

On the death of his father in February 1912, the Greenhills title was transferred to him.  Hammy, as he was known, was by then an experienced farmer.  Energetic and determined to make a success of the start given him, Hammy put a lot of effort into his rather hilly 328 acres.  In July 1923 he bought a further 124 acres running along his northern boundary.  With increasing assistance from sons Alex and young Hammy, and nephew Andy Collett, Hammy farmed the 452 acres for the next twenty years.

 

 

 

With guaranteed sales of whatever they produced, at long last living standards rose and as sales soared.  The family began to enjoy the fruits of their success: electricity, phones, automobiles, steam engines, motor lorries, threshing machines, drills, motorcycles, radio, hot running water, and a vastly increased choice in clothing and furniture.  More years like that would have really established the family, when suddenly everything was soured by The Great Economic Depression.

 

 

 

The family business was just kept afloat, but only by the hard labourers of the family members, and by the late 1930 Charlotte and Hammy had survived the ordeal.  But then they were faced with the Second World War to upset everything again.  Their sons Alex and Hammy were away from the farm, Alex on Active Service, while Hammy was deemed not fit for war, and was assigned other work. With no country having more of its man-power called up for service than New Zealand, the country's rural labour force evaporated.

 

 

 

Their daughter Nancy waded in and very effectively assumed an increasing amount of the farm duties.  Understandably Hammy Maxwell, then in his early sixties, was profoundly stressed by the unremitting overwork and isolation.  He died in 1944 and, following the death of her husband, Charlotte assumed the matriarch role and lived another seventeen years before she passed away on 10th May 1961 aged 87.

 

 

 

 

53Q5

Mary Emily Collett was born at Daisy Hill Farm on 9th June 1875, the youngest of the five children born to Henry Collett and Ann Davis.  Unfortunately she survived for only three months, when she passed away during in September 1875, although there is still a mystery surrounding where she was laid to rest.

 

 

 

 

53Q6

Henry Collett was born during the first three months of 1859 and is likely to have taken place within the parish of St Woolos in Newport, with the birth registered in Newport.  He was the son of Walter Collett and Mary Ann Thomas and was recorded as living with his parents at 17 Peel Street in Cardiff in 1861 aged one year, and again in 1871 at the age of twelve years.  At the time of the later census the family was recorded as living ‘near the church’ in Christchurch and, right next door in the adjacent property, was the family of the farmer Samuel Collett who had been born in the St Woolos area of Newport.  He was the uncle of Henry’s father Walter Collett.  At twelve years old Henry Collett was still attending the local school at that time.

 

 

 

With the death of his mother in 1876, his father remarried and it was possibly around that time that Henry moved out of the family home in Christchurch.  So far no record of him has been found in the census of 1881, so at the age of around twenty-two, he may have been out of the country.  Around the mid-1880s Henry married the widow Elizabeth Hall of Bedminster near Bristol, who already had two sons and a daughter from her previous marriage.  By early 1891 the marriage between Henry and Elizabeth had produced three children for the couple and in the census that year the family was living at 42 Stow Hill.

 

 

 

Stow Hill in Newport lies in the parish of St Woolos, so Henry had returned to settle with the same area that he had been born.  The census return for 1891 listed him and his family as Henry Collett 32, his wife Elizabeth 36, her sons George Hall 19 and Ernest Hall 16, and Henry’s three children as Edith Collett 4, Henry Collett aged one year, and Gladys Collett who was just three months old.  By that time in his life Henry Collett was an established groom and cab driver who was managing his own cab business, for which he employed the services of his two stepsons as cab drivers.  Whilst the place of birth of his own three children was given correctly as Newport, Henry curiously stated for some reason that he had been born in London.

 

 

 

In addition to the two Hall boys, two other cab drivers were boarding with the family, and perhaps were also employed by Henry.  They were Edward Powell 28 of Newport, and Worthy Gilson 21 from Bath.

 

 

 

In 1881 the two Hall sons of widow Elizabeth were living with their grandparents George and Jane Hall at their Somerset home at 3 Richmond Terrace in Bedminster.  George Hall (of Bristol) was nine and Ernest Hall (of Bath) was five, and also with them was their younger sister Mary Ann Hall who was two years old.  In fact, in the same census (1881) Elizabeth was a widow at the age of twenty-six, and at that time she was employed as a night nurse at the Bristol General Hospital in Commercial Road in Bedminster, not far from where her parents lived with her three children.

 

 

 

Over the next five years the family of Henry and Elizabeth increased in size and it may have been that which prompted a move to another house on Stow Hill in Newport.  Just after the start of the new century the family were recorded in the census of 1901 as living at 78 Stow Hill in the parish of St Woolos.  Henry Collett, at the age of forty-one years, was a cab proprietor and an employer and, on that occasion, he did acknowledge that he had been born at Newport.  With him was his wife Elizabeth who was forty-six, but gone by that time were her two sons. 

 

 

 

Eldest daughter Edith had completed her education and had since left the family home for work purposes at only fourteen years of age (see separate details later).  All of the couple’s remaining children were listed as Henry, age 12, Gladys, age 10, Mary Ann, who was eight, and Gwendoline who was five.  Ten years later the same family was listed in the 1911 Census of Newport as Henry who was 56 (sic), Elizabeth who was also 56, Henry Arnold Collett, who was 21, Amy Gladys Collett, who was 20, Mary Ann Collett, who was 18, and Gwendoline Collett who was 15.

 

 

 

53R11

Edith Florence Collett

Born in 1886 at Newport

 

53R12

Henry Arnold Collett

Born in 1889 at Newport

 

53R13

Amy Gladys Collett

Born in 1891 at Newport

 

53R14

Mary Ann Collett

Born in 1893 at Newport

 

53R15

Gwendoline Collett

Born in 1895 at Newport

 

 

 

 

53Q7

Charlotte Collett was born in 1860 at Cardiff when her parents Walter Collett and Mary Ann Thomas were living at 17 Peel Street.  Sometime after she was born her father, who was a ship’s carpenter, may have lost his job in Cardiff, because the family was living at Christchurch in a house near the church in April 1871, when Charlotte Collett of Cardiff was ten years old.

 

 

 

Although not proved, it seems very likely that Charlotte married William Saunders when she was barely the legal age to do so.  If that can be confirmed in 1881 Charlotte Saunders was the mother of three children by then.  The census return that year placed the Saunders family as living at 8 Upper Lewis Street in the parish of St Woolos in Newport where it is known Charlotte’s father was born.  Her husband William was 21 of Newport with no stated occupation, Charlotte of Newport was 20, and the couple’s three children were Maud 3, Margaret 1, and Annie who was just six weeks old.

 

 

 

 

53Q8

William Collett was born at Christchurch in 1878, the birth being registered during the third quarter of the year to parents Walter Collett and his second wife Mary Walters.  In April 1881 he was living with his parents at Royal Oak Hill in Christchurch when he was two years old.  He was still there ten years later at the age of twelve.  On leaving school William began working with wood which prompted a moved to London for him and his brother Edward (below).  By the end of March in 1901 the brothers were both living at 5 Sonardale Road in Wandsworth, where William was described as a timber merchant’s manager at the age of 22.

 

 

 

Within the next year or so, William returned to Newport where he married (1) Beatrice Harriet Perrett during the final quarter of 1903 when she was already pregnant with their first child.  Beatrice was born at Llangattock near Crickhowell in 1875, the daughter of John and Elizabeth Perrett.  In 1881 Beatrice was five years old and was living with her gamekeeper father and the rest of her family at Llangrwyney near Crickhowell.

 

 

 

Just prior to her marriage to William Collett, Beatrice was unmarried and was living with her family at Abersychan near Pontypool, where she was recorded as being twenty-six in the census of 1901.  The family home at that time was a hotel in the town, which was being managed by her father John.

 

 

 

Once married the couple settled within the Pontypridd area and it was there that the marriage produced two children for William and Beatrice.  However, it would appear that the marriage only lasted for around eighteen months when Beatrice died during, or shortly after, the birth of their daughter.  The death was registered at Pontypridd during the second quarter of 1905, when Beatrice’s age was given in error as being twenty-six which was William’s age, when in fact she was nearly thirty.  The birth of her daughter Hetty was also registered at Pontypridd during that same period of 1905.

 

 

 

Three years later, and following the death of his first wife, William married (2) Florence Price from Maindee in Newport, with whom he had another son, while their wedding was recorded at Newport during the June quarter of 1908.  However, the Newport census return for 1911 only listed William Collett, his wife Florence Collett, and their son William John Collett.  At that time the family of three was living at 30 Somerton Road in Newport.  William was 32 and a coal merchant, his wife of three years Florence was 30, and their son William John was two years old and had been born at Maindee in Newport, where his mother had also been born.

 

 

 

53R16

Roscoe Elrick Collett

Born in 1904 at Pontypridd

 

53R17

Hetty Beatrice Collett

Born in 1905 at Pontypridd

 

53R18

William John Collett

Born in 1908 at Maindee, Newport

 

 

 

 

53Q9

Edward Collett was born at Christchurch in December 1880 when his parents, Walter Collett and Mary Thomas, were living at Royal Oak Hill where Edward was recorded as being four months old in the census of 1881.  Ten years later he was listed as being ten years old when still living at Royal Oak with his family.  Edward would appear to have followed in his father’s footsteps by becoming a carpenter and a joiner, and during the latter half 1890s he accompanied his older brother William when they moved to London to seek work.  In March 1901 the two brothers were living at 5 Sonardale Road in Wandsworth where Edward was confirmed as being twenty years old.

 

 

 

When Edward’s brother returned to South Wales, Edward also returned to Newport and at the age of thirty he was back living at the home of his elderly parents in April 1911.  It now seems likely that he never married since, at the time of his death his personal effects were handled by Lloyds Bank, rather than any living relative.  Edward Collett was living at Colletts Cottage on Royal Oak Hill in Christchurch, Monmouthshire, when he died on 19th March 1960 at the age of 79.  His death was recorded at Caerleon register office (Ref. 8c 108) during the first quarter of that year, following which his estate was valued at £2,616 9 Shillings 10d.

 

 

 

 

53Q10

Edith A Collett was born at Christchurch in 1875 the first child of Walter Collett and Harriet Senior.  In 1881, at the age of five years, Edith A Collett was living at Somerton Farm in Christchurch with her parents.  Ten years later she was still living with her parents at Christchurch.  However, sometime during the last ten years of the century Edith’s mother died and it may have been that sad event which prompted her father to leave Christchurch and move to the village of Nash near the south coast.  And it was at Nash that she was living with her father in March 1901 at the age of twenty-five.  It is very likely that she was married during the next decade, since no record of Edith Collett of Christchurch has been found in the census of 1911.

 

 

 

 

53Q11

Linda Harriet Collett was born at Christchurch in 1877, and it was as Linda H Collett that she was recorded in the Christchurch census of 1881 as being three years old when living at Somerton Farm with her parents.  Ten years later she was 13 and was still at Christchurch, but after a further ten years she was living in the village of Nash south of Newport with her widowed father at the age of 23.  No record of Linda Collett has been found in 1911 so it is presumed that she was marred by then.

 

 

 

 

53Q12

Arthur Walter Collett was born at Christchurch in 1879 and probably took place at Somerton Farm where his family was living in 1881, when Arthur W Collett was one year old.  He was still living there ten years later in 1891 when he was 11.  What happened to Arthur after that time has not been discovered since no record of him has been found in either of the census returns for 1901 and 1911.  This, coupled with the fact that his younger sister Ethel (below) was the executor of his father’s Will in 1920, may indicate that he did not survive beyond childhood.

 

 

 

 

53Q13

Ethel Mary Collett was born at Somerton Farm in Christchurch during February 1881, the daughter of Walter and Harriet Collett, and was recorded as being just one month old in the census that year.  She was still living at Christchurch with her family in 1891 when she was ten, but, following the death of her mother, she was living with her father at Nash in 1901 when she was twenty.  Sometime during the next few years the family returned to Newport.  The 1911 Census for the Newport registration district included Ethel Mary Collett of Christchurch as a spinster of thirty years, who was acting as housekeeper to her widowed father Walter Collett and her two younger brothers.  At the time of the death of her father in 1920, Ethel was named as the sole executor of his estate, when she was recorded as Ethel Mary Capper, the wife of Herbert John Capper.

 

 

 

 

53Q14

Edgar Henry Collett was born at Somerton Farm in Christchurch in 1883 and was still living there with his family in 1891 when he was eight years old.  Not long after that his mother died and his family then moved to Nash, south of Newport.  By March 1901 Edgar was 18 when he was still living at Nash with his family, from where he was working as an ironmonger’s assistant.  In 1911 Edgar was a bachelor at 28 years of age when he was still living with his father Walter, his sister Ethel (above), and his brother Frederick (below), the three of them having left Nash and by then were living in the Newport area.

 

 

 

Over the years following the Great War Edgar married the much younger Frances Merab who was born on 27th February 1896.  Whether they had any children is not known but it is established that Edgar Henry Collett and his wife were living at 48 Brithdir Street in Cardiff when he died on 20th March 1933 at the age of 50.  Administration of his personal effects valued at £231 17 Shillings was granted to Frances Merab Collett, his widow.  That sad event was recorded at Cardiff register office (Ref. 11a 546) during the first quarter of that year.  Being that much younger than her husband, Frances survived for a further thirty-nine when she passed away during the second quarter of 1972 at the age of 76, which was recorded at St Albans register office (Ref. 4b 687).

 

 

 

 

53Q15

Frederick George Collett was born at Somerton Farm in Christchurch in 1885 and was five years old in the census of 1891 while still living there with his family.  Frederick was still very young when his mother died during the next few years, at which time, it is assumed, the family left Christchurch and moved south to the village of Nash near the south coast of Wales.  Frederick was still attending school in 1901 and was 15 years old while living at Nash with his family.  A little while later Fred, as he was referred to in 1901, and his father and two youngest siblings left Nash and moved back to Newport.  According to the next census in April 1911, Frederick George Collett from Christchurch was a bachelor of 25 who was living in Newport with his father Walter Collett, and his sister Ethel and brother Edgar (above).

 

 

 

 

53Q16

Kate Elizabeth Collett was born at Christchurch in 1873, the eldest child of butcher and cattle dealer William Henry Collett of Royal Oak Farm.  It was as Kate that she was recorded in the census of 1881 when she was eight years old.  Ten years later in the Christchurch census of 1891 she was once again described as Kate Collett when she was 17 with no occupation when she was living with her family at 2 Bolton Place in Christchurch.  It was during the following year that Kate was married when she became Kate Matthews and her son Richard Henry Matthews was born one year later.  However, before she had any further children she was made a widow, and in 1911 she and her son were living at 17 Medug Street in Newport.  Kate Matthews aged 37 was a householder, her son Richard Henry Matthews was seven years of age, and living at the same address was Kate’s unmarried brother Henry Collett (below) who was 27.

 

 

 

Kate never re-married and at the time of her death on 16th October 1937 she was living at 72 Caerleon Road in Newport.  Administration of the personal effects of widow Kate Elizabeth Matthews, valued at £206 3 Shillings 3d, was granted to her son Richard Henry Matthews at Llandaff on 29th November that same year.

 

 

 

 

53Q17

Charles Samuel Collett was born at Christchurch in 1876, the eldest son of William and Elizabeth Collett of Royal Oak Farm, where he was most likely born.  In 1881 Charles was five and ten years later he was fourteen, on both occasions he was living with his family on the farm in Christchurch.  During the 1890s the Collett family left Christchurch and moved into the town of Newport where Charles S Collett was living with his parents in 1901.  Rather curiously his age was stated as being 21 rather than twenty-four, although his occupation was similar to that of his father, being that of a pork butcher and a worker, perhaps working for his employer father.

 

 

 

During the summer of 1905 Charles married Mary Ann Pritchard which was recorded at Pontypridd register office (Ref. 11a 933) in the third quarter of that year.  The witnesses at the wedding were Katie Hughes and Richard Thomas.  Early in the following year Mary Ann presented Charles with a daughter and by 1911 the family of three was living in Penarth near Cardiff.  Charles Collett and his wife of six years Mary Ann were both listed in the census return as being 32 – while Charles was very likely 34, while their daughter Doris Jane Collett was five years old.  Both mother and daughter had been born at Pontypridd.

 

 

 

It was many years later that Charles Samuel Collett died at Llandough Hospital in Penarth on 28th January 1949, his death recorded at East Glamorgan register office (Ref. 8b 349) at the age of 72.  His Will was proved at Llandaff on 26th April 1949 when his home address was revealed as 136 Penarth Road in Cardiff and his widow Mary Ann Collett was given administration of his estate of £604 8 Shillings 6d.  Tragically their daughter was only eighteen years of age when she died at Pontypridd, where her death was recorded (Ref. 11a 457) during the third quarter of 1925.

 

 

 

53R19

Doris Jane Collett

Born in 1906 at Pontypridd

 

 

 

 

53Q18

Alfred Collett was born at Royal Oak Farm in Christchurch in 1878 and was three years old in the census of 1881.  He was 12 years old ten years later in 1891 when he was still living at Christchurch with his parents.  In the next census of 1901 his age was recorded incorrectly as 19 when he would have been nearer 22, when he was a butcher and dealer like his father, but having his own account.  During the next decade Alfred married Letitia who was around five years older than Alfred.  So by the time of the census of 1911 Alfred gave a more accurate account of his age, by saying he was 33.  His wife Letitia was 38 and the childless couple was living in the Merthyr Tydfil area at that time.

 

 

 

 

53Q19

Edmund Collett was born at Royal Oak Farm in Christchurch in October 1880 and was five months in the census of 1881.  He and his family were still living in Christchurch in 1891 when he was incorrectly listed as Edward Collett aged 10 years, but shortly thereafter the family moved to Newport.  On leaving school Edmund took up the same profession as his father and his brothers (above) by becoming a butcher.  The Newport census of 1901 confirmed that Edmund Collett from Christchurch was 17, and not 20 which was nearer to his actual age, when he was described as a butcher and a worker, presumably employed by his father.  No record of Edmund Collet has been located in the census of 1911.

 

 

 

 

53Q20

Henry Collett was born at Christchurch in 1882 and possibly at Royal Oak Farm.  One the day of the census in 1891 Henry Collett was eight years of age when he was still at Christchurch with his family.  However, ten years later, after the family had settled in Newport Henry Collett was incorrectly recorded in the census of 1901 as being only 15 years of age, three years younger than his actual age, just like his siblings.  Upon leaving school Henry had become a painter merchant’s clerk, as recorded in the census that year, when he was still living with his family at 10 Somerton Place in Newport.  By the time of the next census in 1911 he was employed as a clerk at a timber merchants and on the day of the census Henry Collett was 28 and still a bachelor when he was living with his widowed sister Kate Matthews (above) at 17 Medug Street in Newport.

 

 

 

 

53Q21

Elizabeth Jane Collett was born at Royal Oak Farm in Christchurch in 1884 and was named as Elizabeth Collett aged seven years in the Christchurch census of 1891.  On leaving school she became a dressmaker’s apprentice and by 1901 she had left the family home which, by then, was at 10 Somerton Place in Newport.  Elizabeth had given up life in Newport to live and work in Oystermouth on the Gower Peninsula.  And it was there that she was described in the census of 1901 as Elizabeth Collett from Newport who was 16 and employed as an apprentice dressmaker, the niece of Catherine Collett, her father’s eldest sister.  On that occasion she was recorded as a visitor at 1 Victoria Avenue in Oystermouth, the home of her other aunt, the widowed Emily Charlotte Morgan.  By the time of the next census in April 1911 Elizabeth Jane Collett of Newport was 27 and was still living at Oystermouth, where widow Emily Charlotte Morgan was also still residing.

 

 

 

 

53Q23

Florence H Collett was born at Christchurch in 1889 and was referred to as Florrie Collett aged two years in the Christchurch census of 1891.  Ten years after that her family had left Christchurch and were living in Newport, where Florence H Collett was 11 years old in March 1901.  Florence was 21 in April 1911 when she was the only member of her family still living with her parents.  By that time they had moved from Newport and were living in Merthyr Tydfil, where her older brother Alfred Collett (above) and his wife were also living on that occasion.

 

 

 

 

53R1

Henry Alexander Parker Collett was born at home in that part of Kakahu known as the Upper Waitohi, South Canterbury on 27th October 1897, the eldest child of Walter Henry Collett, who was 27, and Annie Eliza Maxwell, who was 19.  His named derived from his paternal grandfather Henry, his maternal grandfather Alexander Maxwell, and his maternal grandmother Annie Parker.

 

 

 

He was destined to be a bachelor, when he dedicated his life to working on the family farm, where he was a sheep shearer.  He also worked on chaff cutters and became the ‘Water-Joey’.  He was a fine shot with a gun and later took up the position of ‘rabbitor’ for the Rabbit Board.  Tragically it was that activity that cut short his life.

 

 

 

While galloping on his horse in 1945, some loose equipment caused the horse to stumble, throwing Henry to the ground, with the horse then rolling on top of him.  The serious injuries he sustained resulted in his death, when he died in Timaru Hospital one week later, at the age of 47.  Coincidentally, both his grandfather and great grandfather were also killed in horse accidents, all three of them being the first born male child in their respective families.

 

 

 

With the acronym of HAP, and a constant grin on his face, he was known at home and throughout the district as Happy Collett, and was one of those rare individuals who was universally well-liked by everyone with whom he came into contact.

 

 

 

 

53R2

Estelle May Collett was born at Kakahu in New Zealand during 1898, the eldest daughter of Walter Henry Collett and Annie Eliza Maxwell.  She attended to the Kakahu Bush School, with her sister Charlotte, and her brothers Walter and Llewellyn (all below), following which she later trained as a nurse.  She married chemist Les Sarney, but tragically died during childbirth at Wanganui on 13th October 1933, when she was just 34 years old.  Whether or not the baby lived, still remains a mystery.

 

 

 

 

53R3

Charlotte Elizabeth Mary Collett was born at Kakahu in 1901, the third of the ten children of Walter and Annie Collett.  She received her primary education at Kakahu Bush School up to 1913 and thereafter went to school in Opihi.  She married Johann Martin Hullen who came from a well-known family in the district.  Their marriage produced three children for the couple.  Charlotte’s husband, who was known as Martin, died on 5th September 1976 at the age of 82, while Charlotte Hullen nee Collett died fifteen years later on 1st July 1991 when she was 90.

 

 

 

The couple’s three children were: Walter Henry Hullen (born at Geraldine on 06.06.1928, who married Flora Agnes Pearce in 1953); Alexander Martin Hullen (born at Geraldine on 05.02.1933, who married Elizabeth Cullen in 1956 and who died on 16.03.2013); and Annie June Mary Hullen (born at Leeston on 23.02.1937, who married John William Woolfe, and who died on 15.01.1995).

 

 

 

 

53R4

Walter Hamilton Davis Collett was born at Kakahu in 1903, and was the second son of Walter Henry Collett and Annie Eliza Maxwell.  Kakahu lies approximately two miles to the east of Raincliff where his grandparents first met and settled, and about five miles north of Pleasant Point where his grandfather initially settled on his arrival from South Wales in 1861.  He attended the Kakahu Primary School up to 1913 and was a pupil at the Opihi School after that date.  He became a gun shearer and, on one occasion, he sheared 300 sheep in a day at Bluecliff Station, creating a New Zealand record which stood for almost a decade.  Perhaps more remarkable was the shearing of 500 sheep by Walter and his older brother ‘Hap Collett’ (above), after driving them up from Opihi in the early dawn to their uncle's shed at Greenhills in Kakahu, and returning the flock at the end of the day.

 

 

 

Walter was more commonly known as Wattie Collett and he was born to be a farmer like his father.  In fact he worked with his father and his brothers on the family’s land at Exwick Farm, which he and his brother Francis David Collett (below) aka Jack Collett, eventually took over in 1935.  It was five years later, and just after the end of the Second World War that Walter Collett married Edith Shirley Pitt on 13th April 1946.  By that time Wattie was 42 years old and was exactly twice the age of his young bride, who was known as Shirley. 

 

 

 

Over the following five years Shirley presented Walter with four children while they were still living at Exwick Farm.  However, by 1952 Wattie had relinquished the family’s interest in the farm, when he sold his share to his brother Jack and, with the money he purchased a freehold farm on his own.  That was some one hundred miles away at Hedgedale in mid- Canterbury near Rakaia, approximately twenty miles south-west of Christchurch.

 

 

 

And it was there at Hedgedale where two more children were born to Wattie and Shirley to make their family complete by 1955.  Walter Hamilton Davis Collett died in 1976 at the age of 72, while Shirley survived for a further seventeen years, when she passed away in 1993 aged 68.  Both of them are interned at the Ashburton Cemetery, where their eldest daughter is also buried.

 

 

 

It was around twenty-three years after Walter and his brother Jack had broken up their farming partnership, that they were reunited towards the end of 1975.  Not long after that Walter Hamilton Davis Collett died on 20th January 1976 and, just over one month later, his brother Jack, who was eight years younger, also passed away.  Edith Shirley Collett nee Pitt survived her husband by seventeen years, when she died on 4th May 1993.

 

 

 

53S1

Marilyn Ann Collett

Born in 1947 at Exwick Farm, Timaru

 

53S2

Jeanette Mary Collett

Born in 1948 at Exwick Farm, Timaru

 

53S3

Henry Walter Collett

Born in 1949 at Exwick Farm, Timaru

 

53S4

David John Collett

Born in 1951 at Exwick Farm, Timaru

 

53S5

Charles Richard Collett

Born in 1954 at Ashburton

 

53S6

Heather Margaret Collett

Born in 1955 at Ashburton

 

 

 

 

53R5

LLEWELLYN MAXWELL COLLETT, who was known as Lew, was born at Kakahu on 8th July 1905, the fifth child of Walter and Annie Collett.  He attended the Kakahu Bush School with his sisters, Estella and Charlotte, and his brother Walter (all above).  Around 1913 his father and mother moved the family to live at Daisy Hill, after which he attended the Opihi School.  He later gained his Steam Traction Engine Certificate and began driving for mill owners Miller Patrick, Burt Kelburgh and Jack Towzer, ranging over most of the country between Timaru and the Southern Alps.  In 1930 he married Rubena Mabel Creighton at the Timaru Registry Office, and their marriage produced three children for the couple.  Times were tough for Lew and Ruby during the Great Depression, but Lew’s previous experience with driving steam traction engines, secured him a job.

 

 

 

It was during 1937 that Lew commenced work with the Public Works Department on the Rangitata Diversion Race Scheme, an extensive irrigation project.  Later, he was involved in land clearance, and he did further work with earth moving machinery for the PWD throughout Southland.  On 4th January 1970, when he was 64, Llewellyn Maxwell Collett died very suddenly while visiting his sister Mary (below), and her husband Frank Collins, and their son Peter Collins at Paeora, just south of Timaru.  Following his death, he was buried in the Pleasant Point Cemetery.

 

 

 

53S7

RAYMOND LLEWELLYN COLLETT

Born on 07.04.1931 at Dunedin

 

53S8

Robert Maxwell Collett

Born on 02.01.1936 at Tuatapere

 

53S9

Elaine Margaret Collett

Born on 14.05.1937 at Timaru

 

 

 

 

53R6

Ann Collett, who was known as Annie, was born at Kakahu in 1907, and was another daughter of Walter and Annie Collett.  She never married and died at Timaru on 23rd April 1986 at the age of 79, following which she was buried at Pleasant Point in New Zealand.  When she was still very young, sometime around 1911, Annie suffered a terrible horse accident, but despite that incident she remained a cheery and likeable person who carried out farm worker duties and domestic work at the family farm, and later on, at the farms of her two sisters.

 

 

 

 

53R7

Mary Victoria Gwendoline Collett was born at Kakahu on 21st June 1909, and was the seventh child of Walter Collett and Annie Maxwell.  It was at Timaru on 6th May 1931 that she married Daniel Francis Collins who was born at Geraldine on 16th December 1906.  Over the following years Mary presented Frank with three children while they were living at Timaru.  Mary and Frank spend the rest of their lives working as a couple on various farm properties.  During the years from 1933 to 1945 they worked the Raincliff and Rockwood Stations, and both of them were well known in the South Canterbury district dance scene.

 

 

 

Their three children were: Donald Francis Collins who was born on 09.11.1936 and who married Carol Elizabeth Lyne; Rosemary Ann Collins who was born on 16.01.1941, and who married Trevor Prentice on 01.09.1962; and Peter John Collins who was born on 01.03.1948 and who married Yvonne [Bonnie] Titterton on 09.01.1971.

 

 

 

Mary Gwendoline Collins nee Collett passed away at Timaru on 8th May 1970, following which it was there also that she was interned.  It was nearly ten years later that her husband Frank died on 4th January 1980.

 

 

 

 

53R8

Francis David Collett was born at Kakahu on 4th July 1911 and was known as Jack.  He was the fourth son of Walter and Annie Collett.  He attended the primary schools at Opihi and Pleasant Point and, once his education was completed, he continued to work on the family’s Exwick Farm.  However, during the difficult time of the Great Depression, the farm business was nearly lost, and in 1932 Jack’s mother also died.  And so it was, that in 1937 Jack and his older brother Wattie (Walter Collett, above) entered into a partnership to take over the farm from their father, who died four years later in 1941.

 

 

 

It was also in 1937 that Jack married Hazel Turner, who was born at Kingston on 25th July 1917.  Seven years later, and towards the end of the Second World War, Hazel presented Jack with the couple’s only child.  In 1952 the farming partnership between the brothers, Jack and Wattie, came to an end, when Wattie sold his share of the farm to his brother so that he could purchase his own farm around twenty miles from Christchurch.

 

 

 

The break-up of the family partnership, and the resulting one hundred miles that then separated the two brothers, meant that they remained distant to each other for many years, without any communication at all.  It was only just prior to their passing that they were eventually reunited, after almost twenty-four years of being apart.  Francis David Collett worked the land at Exwick Farm right up until his death on 25th February 1976, and just one month after his older brother Wattie had passed away.  His widow Hazel Collett nee Turner survived for another twelve years, when she died during 1988.

 

 

 

53S10

Claire Irene Charlotte Collett

Born on 24.05.1944

 

 

 

 

53R9

Andrew James Howell Collett, who was known as Andy, was born at Daisy Hill, Pleasant Point on 2nd May 1914, the fifth and youngest son of Walter and Annie Collett.  He lived at Daisy Hill until he was five years old, when his family moved to Ettrick Farm.  He attended Opihi and Pleasant Point Primary Schools, after which he supported himself with seasonal work on the farm.  That involved ploughing with big teams of horses, the tough life of a mill-hand, and chaff-cutting to fuel the horses which, at that particular time, were considered still to be superior to the new-fangled kerosene tractors.

 

 

 

He later worked at the Smithfield Freezing Works and was a Great Opihi River fisherman.  One of his talents was that he played bagpipes.  In 1941 he married Dorothy Isabel Harvey, who was born on 10th May 1921, with whom he had five children.  The family lived at Timaru, where all of the children were born, and where Andrew James Collett died on 10th September 1997 at the age of 83.  His widow, known as Dot, was still living at Bouverie Street in Timaru in 2010, where she died on 17th March 2013 at the age of 91.  She was a wonderful potter and left behind many of her sculptures for others to treasure.

 

 

 

53S11

Brian Collett

Born on 06.10.1942 at Timaru

 

53S12

John Robert Collett

Born on 22.02.1944 at Timaru

 

53S13

Allan James Collett

Born on 13.11.1945 at Timaru

 

53S14

Beverley Ann Collett

Born on 24.01.1947 at Timaru

 

53S15

Shirley Collett

Born on 03.03.1950 at Timaru

 

 

 

 

53R10

Esther Ruth Collett was born at Daisy Hill, Pleasant Point in 1916, the youngest child of Walter Collett and Annie Maxwell.  The first three years of her life were spent at Daisy Hill, before her family settled at Ettrick Farm.  Esther was twenty years old in June 1936 when she married James Robert Cartwright, who was known as Bob, and with whom she had a daughter Roberta [Robbie] Ann Cartwright.

 

 

 

Bob Cartwright, who was born during 1909 into a well-known South Canterbury pioneering family, was a widower and already had a son, James Robert Cartwright (born 1933), by his first wife Amy Stocker.  Once they were married, Bob and Esther initially leased ‘Rockwood’, but later purchased ‘Highlands’ at Cannington.  Many of the extended Collett family recall happy memories of some great holidays there.

 

 

 

Bob, who was a Highland Games competitor, and a judge, died in 1963 when he was only 54.  Esther tragically followed two years later.  Their daughter Robbie, who was born in 1943, today is Robbie Preston who was the lead co-ordinator, with her cousins Heather Holloway nee Collett, and Raymond Collett, for the 150th Collett Anniversary Celebration at Timaru in January 2011.

 

 

 

 

53R11

Edith Florence Collett was born at Newport in 1886 and was the eldest child of Henry Collett and Mrs Elizabeth Hall.  In 1891 Edith was four years old and was living with her family at 42 Stow Hill in Newport.  After leaving school Edith had the opportunity of entering the teaching profession but required her to move north to Longton near Stoke-on-Trent in Staffordshire.  And it was there that she was recorded as Edith F Collett, an elementary school teacher in 1901 at the very young age of fourteen.

 

 

 

Whether she secured the position with the help of a distant family relative living in the village of Longton at that time has not been confirmed.  That may have been Josiah George Collett age 31 and from Wednesbury in Staffordshire, and his wife Alice Maud Mary Collett 29 of Hanley, Staffordshire.  Their family at that time comprised sons George Ernest Collett 6, and William Edward Collett 4, both born at Longton.  Edith was still a single lady ten years later in April 1911, when she was still living and working in Longton.  In the census return she was recorded as Edith Florence Collett aged twenty-four from Newport.

 

 

 

 

53R12

Henry Arnold Collett was born at Newport in 1889 and was the eldest son of Henry and Elizabeth Collett.  He was one year old in 1891 when he was living with his family at 42 Stow Hill in Newport, and ten years after in 1901 he was twelve years of age and was living at 78 Stow Hill with his family.  It was as Henry Arnold Collett that he was recorded in the census of 1911 when he was twenty-one and still living with his family in Newport.

 

 

 

 

53R13

Amy Gladys Collett was born at Newport in January 1891 and, as Gladys Collett, she was three months old at the time of the census in April that same year when she was living at 42 Stow Hill with her family.  It was again as Gladys Collett that she was listed in the next census in March 1901 when she was ten years old and living with her family at 78 Stow Hill in Newport, from where he father Henry operated a cab company.  It was in April 1911 that she was recorded as Amy Gladys Collett who was twenty, unmarried, and still living with her parents in Newport.

 

 

 

Four years after that Amy G Collett married Thomas G Hyndman at Newport with the event recorded at the register office (Ref. 11a 545) during the third quarter of 1915 when the witnesses were Fred Ball and Edith Harris.

 

 

 

 

53R14

Mary Ann Collett was born at Newport in 1893 and the birth may have taken place whilst her parents were living at 42 Stow Hill in Newport.  However, sometime after she was born her family moved to another house on Stow Hill, that being number 78, where they were living in 1901 when Mary Ann was eight.  Ten years later Mary Ann Collett was eighteen and was still living with her parents in Newport.

 

 

 

 

53R15

Gwendoline Collett was born at Newport in 1895 and possibly at 42 or 78 Stow Hill in Newport.  It was at the latter that Gwendoline was living with his parents in 1901 when she was five, and she was still living with them at Newport in 1911 at the age of fifteen.  It would appear that Gwendoline never married since it was as Gwendoline Collett that she died at Portsmouth where her passing was recorded (Ref. 20 0846) during the fourth quarter of 1974 when she was 78.

 

 

 

 

53R16

Roscoe Elrick Collett was born on 17th April 1904, the birth being registered at Pontypridd (Ref. 11a 580) during the second quarter of that year.  He was the son of William Collett and his first wife Beatrice Harriet Perrett who died shortly after he was born.  His father eventually remarried a few years later but before that Roscoe and his sister Hetty were taken into care.  In 1911 his father, his new wife and his half-brother were living at 30 Somerton Road in Newport and by that time his sister Hetty had been adopted by the Collins family (see details above) of Pontypridd.

 

 

 

However, somehow or other after the break-up of his family Roscoe left Wales and ended up in the care of a family in Gloucestershire where he subsequently spent the rest of his life.  According to the census in 1911 Roscoe was incorrectly recorded as Rocoa Collett from Wales who was six years old when he was living with the King family at Selsley Hill in North Woodchester just south of Stroud.  Sidney King was 52 and from Beverstone near Tetbury, while his wife Catherine was 43 and from Norton in Wiltshire and they had nine children ranging in age from two years to twenty-one.  It therefore seems highly likely that Roscoe was not related to the family, despite being described as their nephew.  

 

 

 

Twenty-four years later Roscoe E Collett married Doris Mason at Gloucester during the first quarter of 1935.  The couple are known to have they lived at Middleyard in Kings Stanley near Stonehouse in Gloucestershire, and it was at Gloucester register office (Ref. 22 2312) that the death of Roscoe Elrick Collett was recorded during the first three months of 1976 when he was 71.  Doris survived for twenty-six years as a widow until her death during 2002.

 

 

 

Roscoe was known as Ross, while Doris Collett nee Mason was referred to by the family as Dolly.  She was the great aunt of Keith Brown of Australia, whose wife Judy kindly provided much of the information for the compilation of this family line, as well as some details for her own line in Part 35 – The Melksham to Wisconsin Line.  Dolly Mason was the daughter of Oliver Mason and his wife Miss Cox, whose parents were Thomas and Eliza Cox.  It was the couple’s other daughter, Louisa Cox who married Thomas Lewis, and in turn it was their son William Lewis who was the grandfather of the aforementioned Keith Brown.

 

 

 

 

53R17

Hetty Beatrice Collett was born on 28th May 1905, the birth being registered at Pontypridd during the second quarter of that year.  Following the death of her mother Beatrice during the following year Hetty and her brother Roscoe (below) were taken into care.  By April 1911 Hetty was incorrectly recorded as being five years old, which may have been a badly written eight, when she was living at 3 Prosser Street in Pontypridd with the Collins family.  Her place of birth was given at Penrhiwceiber which lies about five miles to the north of Pontypridd. 

 

 

 

Head of the household was Meredith Collins, age 33, a coalminer from Lurgan in County Armagh.  His wife was May Jane from Veryan in Cornwall was 34 and they had been married for eight years and had a daughter Selina W M Collins who was four years old who was born at Tideford in Cornwall.  Hetty Beatrice Collins was described as the couple’s adopted daughter.

 

 

 

Hetty B Collins married Leslie S Steed at Pontypridd, the wedding being recorded at Pontypridd register office (Ref. 11a 675) during the first the months of 1928.  Leslie S Steed died in Cornwall in 1966 at the age of 63 when his death was recorded at Bodmin register office (Ref. 7a 2) during the third quarter of that year.  It was seventeen years later that Hetty Beatrice Steed passed away aged 80 with her death recorded at Truro register office (Ref. 21 0549) during the third quarter of 1983.

 

 

 

 

53R18

William John Collett was born at Maindee, Newport in 1909 – see below.  He was the son of William Collett from Christchurch and his second wife Florence Price from Maindee.  At the time of the census in 1911, William John Collett was three years old and was still living with his parents in the Newport area.  It would appear that he lived all his life in Newport, since in 1953 he was the Head Librarian of the Newport Public Library.  He was a good librarian and much liked by his staff and, although he had no particular interest in family history, he did confirm that his South Wales family came originally from Gloucestershire.

 

 

 

This valuable snippet of information was passed to Raymond Collett (below) during a family visit to octogenarian William John Collett in 1990s.  During his time at Newport Library and towards the end of his working life, one of the librarians there with William was the mother of Dale Chappell who, from 1984 to 2011, was the owner occupier of ‘Marandellas’ the former Collett Cottages at Church Hill in Christchurch, even though she was unaware of the Collett connection.  In the census of 1841 the cottages were occupied by Walter Collett (Ref. 53M1) and it was there that his grandson Walter Collett (Ref. 53P3) died in 1920.

 

 

 

Footnote:  There were two births recorded at Newport register office, the second of which would appear to be this particular William John Collett.  The first was William John Collett whose birth was recorded there (Ref. 11a 254) in the first quarter of 1907, while the birth of the second William John Collett was recorded there (Ref. 11a 303) during the first quarter of 1909.  It was the first of these who therefore must have died in 1974 at the age of 67, his death recorded at Newport (Ref. 28 0504) when his date of birth was stated as being 16th January 1907.

 

 

 

 

53S1

Marilyn Ann Collett was born at Exwick Farm in Timaru on 9th April 1947, the eldest child of Walter Hamilton Davis Collett [Wattie Collett] and Edith Shirley Pitt.  She first lived at Opihi where she attended Rakaia Primary School and later went to Ashburton Technical College where she trained as a chef.  It was after that when she worked as Head Chef for the Ashburton Licencing Trust for a time.  It would appear that Marilyn gave birth to a son prior to her marriage to Harold Poyntz, with whom she had a further three children while the family was living at Ashburton and Geraldine.  Harold was born on 2nd June 1932.  Marilyn’s first born child was Bevan Clarence Smith.  He was born on 25th September 1964 and he later married Tina Glassy who was born on 27th June 1966.

 

 

 

The three children that Marilyn had with Harold Poyntz were: Brent Murray Poyntz who was born at Ashburton on 17.06.1966, but who tragically was killed on 21.03.1968 in a tractor accident; Anthony [Tony] Ross Poyntz who was born at Geraldine on 13.11.1968; and Julie Ann Poyntz who was born at Ashburton on 02.05.1970, who married Graeme Perkinson on 20.02.1995, but who was not still marriage in 2010.

 

 

 

Marilyn Ann Poyntz nee Collett died at Ashburton on 4th April 2003 and, it was there also, at the Ashburton Cemetery, that she was laid to rest with her parents.

 

 

 

 

53S2

Jeanette Mary Collett was born at Exwick Farm in Timaru on 25th July 1948, the daughter of Wattie and Shirley Collett.  She attended Rakaia Primary School, and in 2010 is residing at St. Alisa Rest Home in Christchurch, New Zealand.

 

 

 

 

53S3

Henry Walter Collett was born at Exwick Farm in Timaru on 19th September 1949, the eldest son of Wattie and Shirley Collett.  He was a pupil at Rakaia Primary School and later attended Ashburton Technical College.  He married (1) Sandra Mary Chatterton at Ashburton on 17th April 1976 and they had two sons.  Sandra was born at Darfield on 26th October 1956.  Over thirty years after he was first married Henry married (2) Buawkaew [Gail] Phenpien on 22nd July 2008, although by then they a set of twin daughters.

 

 

 

53T1

Benjamin Davis Collett

Born on 03.04.1981 at Ashburton

 

53T2

Nicholas Lloyd Collett

Born on 01.04.1983 at Ashburton

 

The following are the children of Henry Walter Collett by his second wife Gail Phenpiem:

 

53T3

Kimberly Pardthana Collett

Born on 24.04.2002 at Christchurch

 

53T4

Michaela Parichut Collett

Born on 24.04.2002 at Christchurch

 

 

 

 

53S4

David John Collett was born at Exwick Farm in Timaru on 4th May 1951, the fourth child and second son of Wattie and Shirley Collett.  From Exwick Farm, David and his family moved to Hedgedale near Rakaia when he was only a couple of years old, and it was there that he went to Rakaia Primary School.  His higher education was completed at Ashburton Technical College.  It was in the mid-1980s that David purchased a 540-acre farm at Pendarves, and in 1994 he bought a third farm comprising 300 acres at Dorie.  He married Carmen Lee Cunningham who was born in 1968 and their marriage produced two children for the couple, both born at Lincoln, before David John Collett died at Christchurch on 18th June 2001 at the age of 50.  It was his daughter Grace who kindly provided the new information for the file update in November 2014.

 

 

 

53T5

Nathan James Cunningham

Born on 05.11.1990 at Lincoln

 

53T6

Grace Lee Collett

Born on 16.06.1996 at Lincoln

 

 

 

 

53S5

Charles Richard Collett was born at Ashburton on 7th May 1954, the youngest son of Wattie and Shirley Collett.  Just like his older sibling he too went to Rakaia Primary School, and also attended Ashburton Technical College.  He was later a prolific sheep shearer and was well-known for shearing up to 300 animals in a single day.  One day he attempted to break the then record of 400 and finished a very long hard day just three short of a new record.  However, undeterred on another day he achieved the grand total of 412 sheep sheared in a day.

 

 

 

Charles married Trudy Helen Williamson at Ashburton on 11th March 1978, but they were later separated after the birth of their two children.  Trudy was born at Ashburton on 27th June 1959.  In 2010 Charles was living near Rakaia while his two children were still live at Ashburton at that time.

 

 

 

53T7

Clinton Andrew Collett

Born on 22.02.1983 at Ashburton

 

53T8

Emma Helen Collett

Born on 31.03.1986 at Ashburton

 

 

 

 

53S6

Heather Margaret Collett was born at Ashburton on 29th August 1955, the youngest child of farmer Walter [Wattie] Hamilton Davis Collett and Edith Shirley Pitt.  Heather grew up on the family farm at Hedgedale near Rakaia, where she attended the Rakaia Primary School.  On leaving Ashburton Technical College, she trained in nearby Christchurch as a tailoress in the rag trade.  Heather married James Gordon Holloway at Ashburton on 7th April 1979, James having been born at Winchester in England on 14th November 1944.  Over the six years following their marriage, Heather presented James with two sons, while the couple were living at Darfield.

 

 

 

In 2010 Heather was living in the city of Christchurch with her husband Jim, who had his own taxi business, together with their two sons, James Robert Holloway, who was born on 11th November 1982, and Matthew Walter Holloway, who was born on 16th January 1985.  Both sons were talented rugby players and in 2010 James was working in London where he is a builder.

 

 

 

The initial contact relating to the compilation of this family line was made by Heather Holloway nee Collett during 2010, whose cousins are Robbie Preston (above) and Ray Collett (below) in Australia.  It was these three cousins, led by Robbie, who were the organising committee for the 150th Anniversary Celebration of the arrival of Henry Collett on New Zealand soil, which took place at Timaru on 21st to 23rd January 2011.

 

 

 

 

53S7

RAYMOND LLEWELLYN COLLETT was born at Dunedin on 7th April 1931, the eldest of the three children of Llewellyn Maxwell Collett and his wife Rubena Mabel Creighton.  He received his early educated at Pleasant Point, Montalto, Tuatapere, and Colac Bay Primary Schools, and for his secondary education he attended Riverton District High School, now Aparima College, where he was Head Prefect, Dux Scholl, and Southland Boys High School.  After all of these he studied at Otago University, Dunedin Teachers' Training College, and Sydney University.

 

 

 

Ray later married (1) Dianne Clark of Pleasant Point, from whom he was later divorced.  He became an Administrative Master in various Sydney High Schools, and lectured at New South Wales University.  He then married (2) Lorraine Gaye Jarrett of Northmead, Sydney, who was a teacher, and the marriage resulted in the birth of two children.  Sadly when the youngest child was three years old, Ray’s second marriage ended in divorce during 1978.

 

 

 

The life of Henry Collett and the four generations that followed him, has been documented by Ray using the information previously gather by Nancy Maxwell, and it is this information that has been used to bring this family line up to date.

 

 

 

In 2011, his two cousins and Ray organised the 150th Anniversary Celebration at Timaru of the arrival of Henry Collett in New Zealand in 1861.  He lived at Paddington, Sydney in Australia, and over the years Ray had invested in property there, had enjoyed yachting, and also carried out administration work for CYC’s Sydney to Hobart Race.

 

 

 

Ray passed away during the morning on 4th October 2016 at about 8 a.m. having suffered a long year of recurring illness and faded away very quickly during the last week of his life.  His son Glenn, his wife Heidi and their four children, were among many members of the extended family who visited Ray during the previous day, one of whom was his younger brother Max Collett (below).

 

 

 

53T9

Glenn Llewellyn Collett

Born on 21.06.1973 at Whangarei, NZ

 

53T10

Philippa Gaye Collett

Born on 28.01.1975 at Hornsby, Sydney

 

 

 

 

53S8

Robert Maxwell Collett, who is known as Max, was born at Tuatapere on 2nd January 1936, the son of Llewellyn and Rubena Collett.  He attended primary schools at Tuatapere, Colac Bay, and Riverton, all in Southland, and after went to Riverton District High School and Nightcaps High School.  He held various jobs including working at the coal mines, aerial top dressing, car sales, and at Cromwell Council. 

 

 

 

He married Dawn Woodward at Invercargill on 30th September 1958.  Once married the couple initially lived in Invercargill, where their first two daughters were born, before moving the forty miles to the north-east to Gore, where a further two girls were added to the family.  For some years they lived at Cromwell in Central Otago.  Following Dawn’s untimely death on 14th January 2004 Max lived at Invercargill where he is now retired.

 

 

 

53T11

Sandra Ellen Collett

Born on 02.08.1959 at Invercargill

 

53T12

Carol Ann Collett

Born on 16.08.1961 at Invercargill

 

53T13

Julie Marie Collett

Born on 28.04.1963 at Gore

 

53T14

Jane Elizabeth Collett

Born on 28.04.1966 at Gore

 

 

 

 

53S9

Elaine Margaret Collett was born at Timaru on 14th May 1937, the youngest child of Llewellyn Maxwell Collett and his wife Rubena Mabel Creighton.  She lived with her family at Pleasant Point, Montalto P.W.D. camp, Tuatapere, and Colac Bay, where she attended Colac Bay Primary School.  One of her childhood memories was the homecoming at Colac Bay of World War Two hero John Daniel Hinton, who was awarded the Victoria Cross for leading an assault in Greece during 19841.

 

 

 

Jack Hinton, as he was known, was born in Colac Bay, Southland, on 17th September 1909.  He was a sergeant with the 20th Battalion The Canterbury Regiment, and was twice captured and imprisoned by the Germans during the war, but escaped both times.  He died on 28th June 1997.  He received his Victoria Cross from King George VI on 11th May 1945, at Buckingham Palace in London.

 

 

 

Elaine attended Riverton Primary and Secondary Schools and Nightcaps District High School. While there she was awarded ‘Best All-Round Pupil’.  She also represented Western Southland at netball. She married Frank Anthony Coory of Dunedin, who sadly died on 20th December 1973, when the couple’s eldest child of four was only eleven years old.

 

 

 

Elaine worked in histology, and was a supervising technician at Otago Medical School, from where she is now retired.  In her retirement she enjoys playing croquet, Tai Chi, and Probus.  Today she lives at Normanby in Dunedin.  Just five years before she was made a widow, there was an earlier tragedy in her live, when her youngest daughter died the day after she was born on 1st November 1968.

 

 

 

Her three surviving children are: Denise Coory who was born at Dunedin on 21.05.1962, who married Dunedin Paul Killen who was born on 13.08.1960, and today lives at Concord, Sydney where she is an accountant; Richard Anthony Coory who was born at Dunedin on 25.03.1964, who married Bronwyn Kathleen Wilson at St. Mary's Church, Mosgiel, on 08.04.1989.  Richard has a Bachelor of Horticultural Science Honours degree, and they have a vineyard and successful landscaping business in Tuki Tuki Valley near Hastings, where they live with their two Hastings born children Georgia and Tessa; and Louise Coory who was born at Dunedin on 26.12.1966 and now lives in Sydney.  She has Bachelor of Commerce and Applied Sciences. In a career change she graduated Juris Dr and has since been admitted to the Supreme Court of New South Wales in Sydney.

 

 

 

 

53S10

Claire Collett was born at Exwick Farm on 24th May 1944, the only child of Francis David (Jack) Collett and Hazel turner.  She attended primary and high school at the Point, and took an agricultural short course of study at Massey.  Being good a sport, Claire was a South Canterbury tennis rep.  She was also a livestock judge, and eventually inherited the family farm, although she was not able to properly work the 283-acre farm, as a result, her living standards dropped.

 

 

 

There was a suggestion that she was helped through those difficult times by family, friends and neighbours alike.  Claire Collett died on 21st February 2008 at the age of 64.  Following her passing, the bulk of her estate was bequeathed to five South Canterbury organisations with which she had been involved, together with another bequeath to the Orana Wildlife Park. 

 

 

 

 

53S11

Brian Collett was born at Timaru on 6th October 1942, the eldest child of the five children of Andrew James Collett and Dorothy Harvey.  He attended Main and Marchwiel Primary Schools, and later Timaru Technical College.  He also completed university courses at Melbourne and Canterbury.  He then worked for three years in London for architects Howard Sants Partnership.  It was after that, when he returned New Zealand to work largely in layout and design projects, involving shop fit-outs.

 

 

 

Brian has won nine New Zealand ‘Shop of the Year’ awards.  It was during 1968 that he married (1) Christine Roper who was born on 24th December 1948, and with whom he had two sons.  A few years after the birth of their second son, Brian and Christine were divorced, following which Brian married (2) Galina Kim, a talented exhibiting artist and Moscow trained pianist.  They both have studios in the Sumner district of Christchurch, where they live with their two sons.  The younger son, Sasha, is a talented musician like his mother, and plays the piano and the clarinet.

 

 

 

53T15

Rohan Allen Collett

Born on 14.05.1976 at Christchurch

 

53T16

Shaun Roderick Collett

Born on 15.02.1978 at Darfield

 

53T17

Max Kim Collett

Born during 1986

 

53T18

Sasha Kim Collett

Born during 1996

 

 

 

 

53S12

John Robert Collett was born at Timaru on 22nd February 1944, the son of Andrew and Dorothy Collett.  He attended Timaru Main and Marchwiel Primary Schools, followed thereafter by Timaru Technical College where he took part in the South Canterbury Art Course.  He also played rugby for South Canterbury at school level.  On completing his education he became a sign writer and a designer of sign graphics.  Today John lives in Vancouver where he collects, and restores, and writes about, vintage motorcycles.

 

 

 

 

53S13

Allan James Collett was born at Timaru on 13th November 1945, the third of three sons of Andrew and Dorothy Collett.  He attended Marchwiel and Grantlea Primary Schools and Timaru Technical College.  He Qualified as a draftsman and on 16th January 1981 he married Elizabeth Ann Waters at St. Stephen's Presbyterian Church in Invercargill.  And it was at Invercargill that they continued to live after they were married, and where their two children were born.

 

 

 

53T19

David Edward Collett

Born on 23.11.1983 at Invercargill

 

53T20

Anita Melanie Collett

Born on 02.07.1986 at Invercargill

 

 

 

 

53S14

Beverley Ann Collett was born at Timaru on 24th January 1947, the eldest of the two daughters of Andrew and Dorothy Collett.  Like her older brother Allan (above), she also attended Marchwiel and Grantlea Primary Schools and Timaru Technical College.  She played netball for South Canterbury, and worked for Telecom.  She was a skilled craftsperson and an accomplished artist and won NZ awards.  Today she is a diversional therapist at Calvery Hospital.

 

 

 

It was on 7th October 1967 at Timaru that Beverley married Ivan John Harvey who was born at Haldane on 13th July 1945.  Over the following six years Beverley presented Ivan with three children while the couple were living at Invercargill.  They are: Lisa Daphne Harvey who was born on 20.11.1970, who married Alan McDowell with whom she has two children Jessica Amy McDowell (born 14.09.2001) and Laura Ella (born 09.05.2007); Wendy Sheree Harvey who was born on 04.03.1972, who married Brent Stirling with whom she has three children Danielle Renee Harvey Low (born 29.03.1990), Damien Stirling (born 02.09.2005), and Dominic Jake Stirling (born 10.12.2007); and Andrew John Harvey who was born on 05.12.1973, and who lives in Adelaide.  He has a Bachelor of Science (Hons 1), and has a Chemistry doctorate, and is vice-president of Bionomics, an advanced medical research company.

 

 

 

 

53S15

Shirley Collett was born at Timaru on 3rd March 1950, the youngest of the five children of Andrew James Collett and Dorothy Harvey.  As with her two siblings before her, she also attended Marchwiel and Grantlea Primary Schools and Timaru Technical College.  She then trained as a kindergarten teacher and later, at Teachers College, she undertook a diploma course at the University of Canterbury.  In the first decade of the 21st Century Shirley lives at New Brighton and has two children.  John Payne was born on 14.02.1972 and is now a builder; and Jodi Van Roose who was born on 14.11.1976.

 

 

 

 

53T9

Glenn Llewellyn Collett was born at Whangarei in New Zealand on 21st June 1973, the eldest of the two children of Ray Collett and Lorraine Jarrett.  He attended primary schools at Pennant Hills in Sydney and Taree, after which he attended Dover Heights and Vaucluse High Schools.  He married Heidi Genevieve Carmel Graham on 16th December 1995 and they have four children.  Glen is a certificated refrigeration mechanic and has worked for Coco Cola and other similar companies.  He and his wife recently purchased 200 hectares of land near Bega in New South Wales, in order to raise their family in a rural environment.

 

 

 

53U1

Ebonny May Carmel Collett

Born on 14.04.2003 at Hornsby

 

53U2

Hannah Lucy Genevieve Collett

Born on 06.03.2005 at Hornsby

 

53U3

Jana Heidi Ruby Collett

Born on 08.01.2007 at Hornsby

 

53U4

Henry Llewellyn Collett

Born on 14.07.2008 at Hornsby

 

 

 

 

53T10

Philippa Gaye Collett was born at Hornsby in Sydney on 28th January 1975, the younger of the two children of Ray Collett and Lorraine Jarrett.  She was educated at Taree High School, and followed that by attending the Charles Sturt University, where she gained a Bachelor of Education degree.  From there she went on to take up the occupation of a teacher.  She purchased an historic stone cottage in Broken Hill where she taught.  She later moved to Sydney with Matthew Simon Palmer and they married at Blackheath in August 2007.  They now have a house at Glebe, and their son, Elijah Samuel was born on 30th June 2008.

 

 

 

 

53T11

Sandra Ellen Collett was born at Invercargill on 2nd August 1959, the eldest of the four daughters of Robert Maxwell Collett and his wife Dawn Woodward.  She attended East Gore and St George Primary Schools, and Tweedsmuir Intermediate School, and Kingswell High School.  Sandra works in Mental Health at Southland Hospital Board.  Her partner was David William McClutchie who was born at Hasting on 13th May 1951 but who sadly passed away on 26th January 2000.

 

 

 

The four children of Sandra and David were all born at Invercargill and are: Wade Nicholas David McClutchie, born 25.12.1979, who lives at Invercargill with his partner Kim Mortimer and their daughter Ella Jan Taylor McClutchie, born 10.10.2007; Morgan James McClutchie, born 25.03.1982, who lives with his partner Chloe Matahaere-Cleaver and their daughter Alexus Mia Dawn McClutchie, born 11.10.2007; Kurt Maxwell McClutchie, born 28.12.1988; and Jayton Frank Clutchie, born 28.11.1992.

 

 

 

 

53T12

Carol Ann Collett was born at Invercargill on 16th August 1961, the daughter of Robert and Dawn Collett.  She also attended the same schools as her older sister (above), following which she became a nurse aid.  She married John Junior Henare who was born at Wairoa Hawkes Bay, and they have three children who were all born at Invercargill.  Kelley Dawn Henare was born on 20.03.1979 and has a partner Jonathan Walker and a child, Jurnee Walker, born 01.05.1997.  Jarad Robert Henare was born on 10.12.1980, but tragically died on 14.06.1981, and Janna Tehei Henare was born on 16.03.1983.

 

 

 

 

53T13

Julie Marie Collett was born at Gore on 28th April 1963, the daughter of Robert and Dawn Collett.  She married (1) Larry Brent Howley of Invercargill, but they were later divorced, after the birth of their five children.  It was at Riverton on 9th October 1997 that Julie married (2) Nigel McWilliams with whom she now has a daughter who was born in 2003.

 

 

 

The five children from her first married were all born at Invercargill and are: Michael Brent Howley, born 05.07.1982; Brendan Lawrence Howley, born 30.07.1983; Tracey Marie Howley, born 19.12.1985; Tamara Jane Howley, born 10.05.1989; and Eva Leigh Howley, who was born on 28.05.1992.

 

 

 

 

53T14

Jane Elizabeth Collett was born at Gore on 28th April 1966, the youngest of the four daughters of Robert Maxwell Collett and his wife Dawn Woodward.  After attending Cromwell College she worked at Kyeburn Station with her then partner Michael John McKee.  In February 2003 she qualified as a sawyer in New Zealand’s first ever women’s bushcraft team, which went on to beat the USA 2-1.  She now works at Alliance FW.  Jane and Michael have two children.  Casey Ahlan Collett, who was born at Invercargill on 21.01.1989, and Riley Donovan who was born on 05.11.1990.

 

 

 

 

53T15

Rohan Allen Collett was born at Christchurch on 14th May 1976 and was the older of the two sons of Brian Collett and his first wife Christine Roper.  He attended Sheffield Primary School and Darfield High School.  He later achieved a First-Class Honours Degree as a Bachelor of Architect, and now has his own architectural practice in Christchurch.  His partner is Kirsty Simpson, and together they have two sons.

 

 

 

53U5

Fergus Collett

Born in 2010

 

53U6

Beau Collett

Born in 2012

 

 

 

 

53T16

Shaun Roderick Collett was born at Darfield on 15th February 1978, the second of the two sons of Brian and Christine Collett.  Like his older brother Rohan (above), Shaun also attended Sheffield Primary School and Darfield High School.  At Canterbury University he received his degree, a Bachelor of Commerce, following which he became a computer engineer based in Queenstown.

 

 

 

 

53T19

David Edward Collett was born at Invercargill on 23rd November 1983, the eldest of the two children of Allan James Collett and Elizabeth Ann Waters.  He attended Grasmere Primary School, Collingwood Intermediate School and James Hargest High School.  He was later awarded an Honours Degree in Surveying from Otago University.  Today David works for Land Information NZ in Wellington, and his interests including tramping and cycling, and during 2012/2013 he was cycling through England, Wales and France.

 

 

 

 

53T20

Anita Melanie Collett was born at Invercargill on 2nd July 1986, the youngest of the two children of Allan James Collett and Elizabeth Ann Waters.  She was educated at Grassmere Primary School, Collingwood Intermediate and James Hargest High School.  She later achieved a Bachelor of Science Degree at Otago University.  She holds a Teaching Diploma in Secondary Education, and currently is teaching in Invercargill.  Her interests include conservation and music.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

APPENDIX

 

 

 

January 2011 – 150th Anniversary Celebration at Timaru

 

 

 

 

 

 

BACK ROW:

Andrew Hunter,  Allan Collett,  David Collett,  Richard Coorey,  Glen Collett

Lester Groundwater,  Don Howard,  Matthew Holloway

 

THIRD ROW: 

Virginia Hunter,  Anita Collett,  Elizabeth Collett,  Heidi Collett

Bronwyn Coorey,  Caroline Groundwater,  Faye Howard nee Woolfe

Roberta Preston nee Cartwright,  Flou Hullen,  Heather Holloway nee Collett

 

SECOND ROW:

Logan Hunter,  Sam Preston,  Tessa Coorey,  Georgia Coorey

Grace Collett,  Hannah Collett,  Ebonny Collett

 

FRONT ROW

Raymond Collett, with his grandson Henry Collett

Nicola Hunter,  James Holloway,  Max Collett,  Jana Collett

Jeanette Collett,  Walter Hullen,  Donald Collins

 

 

 

During the evening of the 26th January 1861, Henry Collett, age 23 years, a South Canterbury pioneering farmer arrived at Port Chalmers.  On the 22nd and 23rd of January 2011, the sesqui-centenary of that event, 120 of his 440 descendants assembled at the Grey Way Lounge, Phar Lap Racecourse, in a combined family reunion.  Families Collett, Matthews and Maxwell, in buses, over two days visited the farms, former homes and schools of family members in the Opihi, Kakahu, Cannington and Pleasant Point areas.

 

 

 

Henry Collett from Christchurch in South Wales and his Welsh wife Ann Davies had three surviving children: Elizabeth Collett born 1867 who married Frank Octavious Matthews; Walter Collett born 1870 who married Annie Eliza Maxwell; and Charlotte Ann Collett born 1873 who married Annie’s brother, Hamilton Maxwell.  Elizabeth Matthews had 12 children, Annie Collett had 10 children and Charlotte Maxwell who had three children..

 

 

 

It was the descendants of these three family lines who gathered at the Point Cemetery on the 23rd January, 2011, to witness the unveiling of a bronze plaque (below) to commemorate the arrival of Henry Collett in New Zealand 150 years earlier.  The actual unveiling was done with surprising success by the latest Henry Collett, calculated the eighteenth, or thereabouts, Henry since 1450, although it was preceded by some anxious training moments, since he is only 2 years and 7 months old.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The combined families’ reunion was called by descendants Robbie Preston, ‘Rhoborough Downs’ Station, McKenzie country, and Heather Holloway, Christchurch.  Together with Ray Collett from Sydney, who wrote a short book and web pages for the occasion, they met several times to plan venues and cover costs for venues, meals, buses, printing, plaque and invitations.

 

 

 

The reunion was judged to be a great success and well worth attending, which is just as well because it may be 50 years until the next gathering, the bicentennial, is held.  The last one was held in 1969 at ‘Daisy Hill’.  The organisers are particularly grateful to John McKercher and John and Heather Gunn for access to the still standing, just, Maxwell Cottage, Rolly Hill, the new owner of Daisy Hill, and Alan Cone and Judy for allowing us to visit their wonderfully restored, Maxwell former home, and wander at will around their magnificent gardens.  Attending the reunion was Roger Maxwell, a former minister in the Jim Bolger Government who is going to explore the heritage situation of Alex Maxwell’s ‘Sunnyside’ Cottage.

 

 

 

The family believes that, especially today, when home entertainment, the internet and mobile phones are isolating people from personal contact, it is more important than ever to meet together and rekindle our links with the past.

 

 

 

The event was covered by the local newspaper, which also included a much larger group photograph of all of those who attended, not just those with a Collett link as shown in the photograph at the start of this appendix.

 

 

 

 

 

The following was the programme of events

 

 

 

Friday Night.  6.00 pm onwards.  For the early arrivers, at the Grosvenor Hotel, 26 Cairns Tce Timaru. Meet old friends over a drink or a cuppa.  Drinks to be paid for, platter food included in registration. Pick up Registration Pack.

 

 

 

Saturday Morning. 9.15 am at Grey Way Lounge, Phar Lap Race Course, Washdyke.  Pick up Registration Pack.  View charts, old photos and memorabilia.  Morning tea, notices.  Photographs taken, pay then pick up at dinner or picnic.  Lunch box provided for those who have ordered it.  Buses to Pleasant Point Cemetery.  Commemorative plaque placed on Henry’s grave.  Toilets at the Point.

 

 

 

Saturday Afternoon. 1.00 pm buses to ‘Daisy Hill’, Kakahu School, ‘Green Hills’, site of Walter’s first home, site of Frank and Elizabeth’s first home.

 

 

 

Saturday Evening.  Dinner at Grey Way Lounge.  From 5.30 a social hour, bar available.  Seated by 6.30 Dinner, cutting the sesquicentennial cake, an opportunity to join in a combined family microphone chat.  Photographs taken.

 

 

 

Sunday Morning. Free time.  Suggest trip to Cannington to visit Alex and Annie Maxwell’s amazing first home, still standing, just.  It’s an 1875 pioneer’s cottage, rarely seen now.  Visit baby Charlotte Ann’s grave at ‘Raincliff’.

 

 

 

Sunday Afternoon. 12.00 midday.  Pleasant Point Domain.  Picnic, Spit Roast, games.  Concludes about 3.00 pm.