PART SIXTY-TWO

 

The Trowbridge to New Zealand Line

(including the line to Canada from Langley Burrell in Wiltshire)

 

This is the first of two sections of this family line

 

Updated March 2017

 

 

The vast majority of the later generations of this family line were previously included in Part 35 – The Melksham to Wisconsin and Ontario Line and Part 44 – The First Broughton Gifford Line.  However, the contents of the late 18th Century Wills of Henry Collett, [1779], John Redman [1784], and his wife Elizabeth Redman nee Fox [1793] confirm that Joseph Collett, who married Jane Redman, was the brother of William Collett, who married Esther Redman.  The earlier information relating to the family of Joseph and Jane was contained within Part 35, while the earlier information for William and Esther was contained in Part 44.

 

This revamped Part 62 – The Trowbridge to New Zealand Line therefore brings together these two families, which includes Clive Franklyn Collett (Ref. 62O36) the First World War fighter pilot.

 

 

One of the earliest Collett families in Trowbridge was that of William and his wife Mary.  The baptism records for their three children at the Church of St James in the town confirm that their daughter Mary Collett was baptised on 12th December 1656, that their son William Collett was baptised on 10th August 1665, and that another daughter Hannah Collett was baptised on 25th April 1667.

 

 

However, this line starts nearly one hundred years after that, with the aforementioned Henry Collett who died in 1779.  This is now the family line of brothers Phillip John Collett (Ref. 62R1) and Geoffrey Peter Collett (Ref. 62R3) in New Zealand, and Shirley Ann Anderson nee Collett (Ref 62Q38) in England, who were all previously in Part 44.  Also included here are the following individuals from Part 35:  Geraldine Leslie Hopkins nee Collett (Ref. 62P5) in Canada; Don Cameron the grandson of Gertrude Annie Collett (Ref. 62O1) in Australia; and Ian Hextall (Ref. 62N24) in Scotland.

 

 

Added in November 2014 was Appendix One which lists another Trowbridge family, that of Daniel Collett and his wife Jane Morgan, which hopefully will later form an integral part of this family line sometime in the future.  Thanks to good work in 2016 by David Hankey from Leicestershire, whose Collett ancestors are those in Part 44 – The First Broughton Gifford Line, it is now established that John Collett (Ref. 62L9) was not the husband of Sarah Elmes.  That particular John Collett can be found in Part 35 – The Melksham to Wisconsin and Ontario Line (Ref. 35M1).  This means that the nine children of John and Sarah (previously 62M27 to 62M35) have been removed from this family line and relocated in their rightful place within Part 35.

 

 

 

62J1

HENRY COLLETT was married to Martha probably around 1750, which may place his year of birth around 1725.  The details for Henry and Martha and their six children were unearthed in 2003 by researcher Bernard Welchman on behalf of Martin Collett whose family line this is.  At that time, it was suggested that the children had born and baptised at Bradford-on-Avon, but it now seems more than likely that they were baptised at Trowbridge.  Indeed, the baptism record for the fifth child provides evidence of a link with Trowbridge.  It was on 18th May 1759 that Sarah Collett was baptised at the Silver Street Presbyterian Church in the town, where her parents were named as Henry Collett and his wife Martha.  Furthermore, this correlates with the 1779 Will of Henry Collett in which he was referred to as Henry Collett, Yeoman of Trowbridge. 

 

 

 

Henry Collett’s Last Will and Testament was made on 26th March 1779 and was signed by him with the mark of a cross.  The Will was proved at Salisbury (Sarum) on 20th April 1799, placing his death on one of the days during the intervening four weeks.  Within the Will there are references to his four sons, but no direct mention of his wife.  It does however name a Martha Collett who received just one guinea but without mention of the relationship, so it seems unlikely that she was his wife or his youngest daughter who had not yet reached full age.  It would therefore appear that he was already a widower at the time if his passing.

 

 

 

The actual order in which the names were stated in his Will was his son Henry Collett with £100, his son William Collett with £400, his son Stephen Collett with £200, and his grandson Henry Collett with a silver tankard – the son of his son Joseph Collett.  Stephen also inherited his father’s home, while Joseph, who received no money, was bequeathed some household furniture that was shared between him and his brother William, in addition to which it was Joseph who was appointed the sole executor.  The other named beneficiaries were Elizabeth Bosey, Martha Collett, and the Reverend Mr Cross, each of whom received one guinea.

 

 

 

Apart from the obvious absence of any mention of his wife, there was no mention of his daughter Sarah, who would have been twenty years of age, or his younger daughter Martha if she was not the Martha who received one guinea.

 

 

 

62K1

Henry Collett

Born circa 1750 at Trowbridge

 

62K2

Joseph Collett

Born circa 1752 at Trowbridge

 

62K3

William Collett

Born circa 1754 at Trowbridge

 

62K4

Stephen Collett

Born circa 1756 at Trowbridge

 

62K5

Sarah Collett

Baptised in 1759 at Trowbridge

 

62K6

Martha Collett

Born circa 1761 at Trowbridge

 

 

 

 

62K2

Joseph Collett was born at Trowbridge around 1752, the son of Henry and Martha Collett, and was 20 years of age at the time of his marriage in 1772, although his age at the time of his death in 1809 was 55.  On the occasion of his wedding, Joseph was described as a Yeoman of Trowbridge, the same description given to his father in his Will of 1779.  He married Jane Redman at Melksham on 29th October 1772, the Sarum Marriage Licence Bond having been issued the previous day. 

 

 

 

Jane was a spinster also aged 20, and the Bondsman was her father John Redman who was described as a Yeoman of Shaw near Melksham, while her mother was Elizabeth Fox.  John and Elizabeth Redman were also the parents of Esther Redman who married Joseph’s brother William Collett (below) in 1780.  Once they were married Joseph and Jane may have initially lived in Melksham where their first child was baptised.  Not long after that the family of three moved to the village of Kington St Michael, to the north of Chippenham, where their remaining children were all born.

 

 

 

Upon the death of his father in 1799 Joseph was appointed sole executor for his Will, in which rather curiously Joseph was not bequeathed a monetary lump sum like his three brothers, and was only named in the Will in the following way:  “Also I give all my household goods and furniture in my now dwelling house (except the dressers and shelves in the hall and kitchen which I give to my son Stephen) to my two sons Joseph and William Collett from and immediately after my decease in equal shares and proportions.  Also all the rest residue and remainder of my goods chattels estate and effects not herein before given or disposed of I give and bequeath the same (after paying my just debts legacies and funeral expenses) unto my son Joseph Collett whom I appoint sole Executor.”  All of this therefore raises the question that it was more than likely that Joseph was the eldest son of Henry Collett and not his second son as indicated by the researcher in 2003.

 

 

 

Another beneficiary under the terms of the Will was Joseph’s son Henry who was to be given his grandfather’s silver tankard.

 

 

 

Joseph’s father-in-law John Redman died in 1784 and in his Will made on 13th December 1783 was a reference to his daughter Jane, the wife of Joseph Collett.  “I also give devise and bequeath unto my daughter Jane (now the wife of Joseph Collett) the sum of Eighty Pounds of lawful money of Great Britain to be paid her by my said Executrix within twelve months after my decease.”  Something changed within the next six months, as the Codicil to the Will dated 5th July 1784 included the following passage.  “I the above named John Redman, being at this time of sound mind, memory and understanding do hereby make this Codicil unto my last Will and Testament, in order to ratify and confirm the gift of all my houses and tenements with the backsides orchards, gardens and appurtenances thereunto belonging situate at certain places called Biddestone and Long Dean in the County of Wilts, unto my said daughter Jane now the wife of Joseph Collett, to hold the same unto my said daughter and to her heirs (or Executors Administrators and Assigns) forever.”

 

 

 

Upon the death of Joseph’s mother-in-law, the Will of Elizabeth Redman proved at Sarum on 12th March 1798 again mentioned daughter Jane, wife of Mr Joseph Collett, when she was bequeathed the sum of one hundred pounds.  Jane was also included in another paragraph as follows:  “Also I give and bequeath unto my three daughters all and singular my household goods and furniture and wearing apparel equally to be divided between them share and share alike at the discretion of my said Executor.”

 

 

 

It was thirty years after the death of his father that Joseph Collett died at Kington St Michael on 7th November 1809.  He was buried in the churchyard of St Michael’s Anglican Church on 11th November 1809 and the burial record confirmed his aged as 55 and that he was the husband of Jane Collett.  At the time of the baptism of his two daughters in January 1784 Joseph was the churchwarden at St Michael’s Church.  In his Will of 1809 Joseph was referred to as ‘gentleman of Kington St Michael’.

 

 

 

62L1

William Henry Collett

Born circa 1774 at Melksham

 

62L2

Ann Collett

Born circa 1777 at Kington St Michael

 

62L3

Daniel Collett

Born circa 1779 at Kington St Michael

 

62L4

Martha Collett

Born circa 1782 at Kington St Michael

 

62L5

Sarah Collett

Born circa 1783 at Kington St Michael

 

62L6

John Collett

Born circa 1785 at Kington St Michael

 

62L7

Hester Collett

Born circa 1788 at Kington St Michael

 

62L8

Joseph Collett

Born circa 1790 at Kington St Michael

 

62L9

John Collett

Born circa 1794 at Kington St Michael

 

62L10

Stephen Collett

Born circa 1796 at Kington St Michael

 

 

 

 

62K3

William Collett was born at Trowbridge around 1754, the son of Henry and Martha Collett.  When he was twenty-six he married Hester Redman on 28th March 1780 at Melksham.  It was as Esther Redman that she was baptised at Melksham on 10th March 1762, the daughter of John Redman and Elizabeth Fox.  It is possible that she was around two years old when she was baptised in order to be twenty years of age when she married William.  Jane Redman, the older sister of Esther Redman, had married William’s brother Joseph Collett (above) at Melksham eight years earlier in 1772.

 

 

 

Two days prior to his wedding day William’s father made his Will and sadly died during the next few days.  The Will was proved at Salisbury in April that same year, from which William received four hundred pounds and a share of Henry’s household goods and furniture.

 

 

 

It was during the following year that Esther presented William with the first of their three known children.  All of them were all born at Melksham and it is possible that there may have been others in addition to the three listed below.  It is also known that their son William, who was born at Melksham in March 1785, was not baptised there until 9th January 1786.  The couple’s two other children were Elizabeth, who was born in 1780, and John who was born in 1787.

 

 

 

Esther’s father John Redman of Shaw, Melksham, died in 1785 and his Will was proved at Market Lavington, south of Devizes in Wiltshire.  In that document he referred to his daughter as Esther, now the wife of William Collett, who was bequeathed two hundred pounds plus “an equal share of the my several dwelling houses situated near the Market Place in the Borough of Bradford in the said County of Wilts”.

 

 

 

By the time Esther’s mother Elizabeth Redman nee Fox passed away around ten years later, during the middle of the 1790s, Esther had already been dead for a number of years.  Therefore, her mother’s Will, which was proved at Salisbury in 1798, only included mention of her husband William Collett and her only daughter Elizabeth Collett.  In the case of granddaughter Elizabeth Collett, she was to receive the sum of ten pounds, whereas her son-in-law William, together with his brother Joseph (above), bound by a Joint Note of Hand, had to repay a loan of one hundred pounds together with any interest that may have been due at the time of her decease.

 

 

 

62L11

Elizabeth Collett

Born in 1780 at Melksham

 

62L12

William Collett

Born in 1785 at Melksham

 

62L13

John Collett

Born in 1787 at Melksham

 

 

 

 

62L1

William Henry Collett was the son of Joseph Collett and Jane Redman and he was baptised at Melksham on 8th February 1774.  Within a couple of years, he and his parents moved to Kington St Michael near Chippenham, and it was there that all of William’s siblings were born.  When he was only five years old his grandfather Henry Collett, Yeoman of Trowbridge, died and upon the proving of his Will in April 1779 William was named as Henry Collett, the son of Joseph Collett, to whom was bequeathed his grandfather’s silver tankard.

 

 

 

At the age of 32, William married Sarah Kearsey on 20th February 1806 at Ashley to the east of Corsham.  The Sarum Marriage Licence Bond was issued two days before the event and the bondsman was Sarah’s brother John Kearsey, a yeoman of Ashley.  The bond also listed the bride and groom as Sarah Kearsey residing at Ashley, spinster, and William Collett, occupation yeoman, residing at Slaughterford.  Sarah Kearsey was born at Chedworth in Gloucestershire in 1782 and was baptised at Chedworth on 28th December 1782.  She was one of nine children of Richard Kearsey who was born at Bisley in Gloucestershire in 1745 and who died at Ashley in 1807.

 

 

 

Richard Kearsey’s wife (and Sarah’s mother) was Judith Dane, who was the daughter of Giles Dane and Mary Clerk who are the five times great grandparents of Judy Brown of Australia who has kindly provided some of the details in this family line.  It is also interesting to note that the husband of Judy Brown, Keith Brown, is related to Doris Mason who married Roscoe Collett whose family details are provided in Part 53 – The South Wales Branch Line.

 

 

 

At the time of their marriage, William Collett was described as a yeoman of Slaughterford, while Sarah was a spinster of Ashley.  Slaughterford lies between Ashley and Kington St Michael.  In addition to being a yeoman, William was also a churchwarden, but this must have been at neighbouring Biddestone, just to the west of Chippenham.

 

 

 

Whilst all of William’s and Sarah’s children were born at Slaughterford they were not baptised there, since the Church of St Nicholas was destroyed by Cromwell’s New Model Army during the Civil War.  However, it was through the efforts of William Henry Collett of Slaughterford that the church was rebuilt around 1823.  In the church today there is a plaque bearing his name as an acknowledgement of this event.  Until that time, all religious ceremonies had to be conducted in the church at nearby Biddestone.

 

 

 

Within the “Land Tax Assessments 1780 to 1830 for Slaughterford” there is a reference to William Collett leasing land from 1803 right through to 1826.  This included a statement that ‘in 1827 the land that William Collett had been leasing was taken over by John Gibbs at the same tax rate’.  It continued by saying ‘After 1826 William Collett ceased to be a land tax payer in Slaughterford’.  He would have been 46 years old at that time and perhaps this might suggest that he and Sarah were no longer living there.  The full statement, regarding the lands leased by William Collett, has been reproduced below.

 

 

 

Land Tax Assessments 1780 - 1831 for Slaughterford in Wiltshire

as they relate to William Henry Collett, yeoman of Slaughterford

 

 

 

According to the Records of Land Tax Assessments held in the Wiltshire Records Office, William Collett was leasing substantial land at Slaughterford from the Honorable Charles William Wyndham between the years 1803 to 1826.  William's tax assessment on this land for the initial period between 1803 and 1811 was Six Pounds Seven Shillings and Six Pence per year.  From 1812 to 1816 the rate was increased to Twelve Pounds Fifteen Shillings then, from 1817 the rate increased to again Twelve Pounds Seventeen Shillings and Six Pence with the exception of 1819 which was assessed at Twelve Pounds Fifteen Shillings.  The variation in the tax rate for 1819 may have been connected with him leasing some additional land from the late Charles Gardner which was assessed at Two Shillings and Six Pence.  He leased land twice from the late Charles Gardner, once in 1817 and again in 1819, and on both occasions he paid Two Shillings and Six Pence in land tax.  Up until he ceased leasing land from Charles Wyndham in 1826, William was paying Twelve Pounds Seventeen Shillings and Six Pence in land tax.  Of all the people in Slaughterford paying land tax, the Land Tax Assessment showed that William Collett paid the largest amount.  For example, in 1817 the nearest tax rate was assessed at Three Pounds Fifteen Shillings compared to William's tax rate of Twelve Pounds Fifteen Shillings.  In 1827 the land that William had been leasing was taken over by John Gibbs at the same tax rate.

 

 

 

After 1826 William Collett ceased to be a land tax payer in Slaughterford which may suggest that, at the age of 52, William retired from farming.  Certainly it is known that he and Sarah eventually left Slaughterford to live at Cornwell House in Walcot in Bath, where Sarah is known to have died many years later.  There is a record in the census of 1841 of a William Collett, with a rounded age of 60, living in the Bath registration district, but he did not have a wife Sarah listed with him on that day.  It was nearly eight years later that William Henry Collett died at Bath United Hospital in the St James district of the city on 19th March 1849.  He was survived by his wife for a further eighteen years, when Sarah Collett nee Kearsey passed away at Cornwell House in the Walcot district of Bath on 8th October 1867.  Over seven years earlier Sarah Collett from Gloucestershire was 70 years old when she was recorded in the census of 1861 residing within the Bath & Walcot registration district of Somerset.

 

 

 

It is now understood that William’s son Thomas named his father as his next-of-kin and administrator of his personal effects which was thrown into confusion when William died four years after his son, but before settlement of the estate could be resolved.  So administration of the estates of both father and son in 1849 and 1845 respectively was granted to William Collett, the eldest son of William Henry Collett.  And so it was, many many years later, that those two estates were settled at the Principal Registry on 13th January 1883 and on 30th January 1883 respectively.

 

 

 

62M1

Mary Anne Collett

Born in 1807 at Slaughterford

 

62M2

William Collett

Born in 1808 at Slaughterford

 

62M3

John Collett

Born in 1810 at Slaughterford

 

62M4

Thomas Collett

Born in 1811 at Slaughterford

 

62M5

George Collett

Born in 1813 at Slaughterford

 

62M6

Stephen Collett

Born in 1814 at Slaughterford

 

62M7

Sarah Collett

Born in 1816 at Slaughterford

 

62M8

Joseph Collett

Born in 1818 at Slaughterford

 

62M9

Edwin Collett

Born in 1819 at Slaughterford

 

 

 

 

62L2

Ann Collett was believed to have been born around 1777 and most likely at Kington St Michael, where all of her younger siblings were born.  It was also there that she was married by licence to William Batchelor Mogers on 21st February 1801, when the witnesses at the ceremony were her father Joseph Collett and her two sisters Hester and Sarah Collett (below).  William Batchelor Mogers was born around 1775 and he died in 1827 at Harts Nursing in Southampton.  Ann Mogers nee Collett survived her husband by twenty-five years when her death was recorded at Bristol during the second quarter of 1852.  During their life together Ann presented William with nine children, the first two when the family was living at Woolverton in Somerset.  They were William Batchelor Mogers (born 1802), John Collett Mogers (born 1806, died 1866), Judith Mogers (born 1808), Frances Ann Mogers (born 1811), Henry (Harry) Mogers (born 1814, died 1875), Thomas Mogers (born 1815), Robert Mogers (born 1817, died 1869), Henrietta Mogers (born 1821, died 1886) and Elizabeth Mogers (born 1823, died 1903).

 

 

 

 

62L3

Daniel Collett was born at Kington St Michael around 1779, according to the census returns completed by him in 1841, 1851 and 1861.  And it is them which place him as most probably the eldest son of Joseph Collett and Jane Redman, although no birth or baptism record to verify this has been found to date.  Daniel Collett was in his late forties when he married Mary Buckland of Kington St Michael at Kington on 18th February 1828.  Mary, who was twenty-two years younger than Daniel, was the eldest daughter of Jacob Buckland and Mary Day, and the sister of Elizabeth Buckland who married Daniel’s younger brother Joseph Collett (below), and the sister of Edwin Buckland who married Louisa Collett (Ref. 62A/D1).  Louisa Collett was baptised at nearby Hullavington on 13th March 1806, the daughter of Arthur and Anne Collett.  Because of the complex inter-relationship between the Collett family and the Buckland family, details of the latter have been included in the Appendix at the end of the second section of this family line to help clarify the situation.

 

 

 

Once married, Daniel and Mary settled in the Wiltshire village of Keevil, to the east of Trowbridge, where their four known children were all born.  In the first national census in June 1841, Daniel was recorded as being 60 years old, while his wife Mary was 40.  Although it is well established that adult ages were rounded in the first census, the two ages do correspond closely with their respective ages in the next two census returns.  The couple’s four children were more accurately recorded in 1841 as Henry Collett who was eleven, Mary Collett who was ten, Joseph Collett who was six, and Rosa Collett who was three years old.

 

 

 

Ten years later, in the more detailed census of 1851, Daniel Collett, age 72, was a farmer of 164 acres at Keevil, where he employed six men.  His wife Mary from Kington St Michael was 50, and the children still living at Keevil with them were Henry who was 21, Marianne as ‘Mari’ who was 19, Joseph who was 16, and Rosa who was 13.  Not long after that Daniel’s and Mary’s eldest son Henry left the family home in Keevil to be married and started a family of his own at Lushill near Castle Eaton by the River Thames within the Highworth registration district of Swindon.  Then, towards the end of the 1850s, the couple’s other son Joseph became a married man, but continued to live at Keevil.

 

 

 

Between those two events their two daughters were also married and left Keevil.  So by the time of the census in 1861, Daniel and Mary had no members of their family living with them, just son Joseph living nearby with his new family.  On that occasion Daniel Collett was 83, and his place of birth was curiously named as Melksham where his parents had been married and where his older sibling had been born, while his wife Mary, age 60, was correctly confirmed as having been born at Kington St Michael.  It was later that same year that Daniel Collett died at Keevil on 26th October 1861.  His Will was proved one month later on 26th November 1861 and listed effects of under £4,000.  The oaths were given by Daniel’s two sons, farmer Henry Collett of Pew Hill, and farmer Joseph Collett of the said parish, and by Joseph Maslen of the said parish, his executors.  Joseph Maslen was Daniel’s son-in-law through the marriage to his daughter Marianne.

 

 

 

Nearly ten years after the death of her husband, his widow Mary Collett, age 70, was living at the home of her daughter Marianne Maslen at Longlease Farm in Westbury, by which time she too was a widow.  It was a similar situation ten years after that in 1881, except by that time Marianne Maslen had left Westbury and was living at Wick Farm in the village of Goosey, near Wantage in Berkshire.  Still living with her was her mother Mary Collett from Kington St Michael who was 80, who must have passed away shortly after that time.

 

 

 

62M10

Henry Collett

Born in 1829 at Keevil

 

62M11

Marianne Collett

Born in 1830 at Keevil

 

62M12

Joseph Collett

Born in 1834 at Keevil

 

62M13

Rosa Jane Collett

Born in 1837 at Keevil

 

 

 

 

62L4

Martha Collett was born around 1782, and was baptised in a joint ceremony at Kington St Michael with her sister Sarah (below) on 8th January 1784.  At that time the girls’ father Joseph Collett was the churchwarden at St Michael’s Anglican Church, where they were baptised.  Twenty-seven years later Martha married John Stump by licence at Kington St Michael on 23rd September 1811.  The parish register recorded that Martha was living of Easton (Piercy) near Chippenham at that time, while her husband was of Leigh Delamere, close by Kington St Michael.  The witnesses at the ceremony were Joseph Stump and Ann Stump who may have been John’s parents.  It may also be of interest that the second wife of Thomas Collett (Ref. 22M1) was Anne Pheunecia Stump, who were married at Corsham on 14th June 1831.  Anne having been born around 1785, making her around 46 when she married Thomas.

 

 

 

 

62L5

Sarah Collett was born in 1783 and was baptised on 8th January 1784 at Kington St Michael in a joint ceremony with her sister Martha (above).  Sarah was over 40 years of age when she married Joseph Mattick (or Mattock) on 22nd December 1825.  The wedding took place at Yatton Keynell courtesy of a Sarum Marriage Licence Bond issued on 16th December 1825.  The witnesses at the ceremony were John Collett who may have been Sarah’s brother, and Mary Ann Collett.  In view of Sarah’s advanced years, the marriage only produced one child for the couple, and he was baptised John Collett Mattick.  He was born in 1827 and died in 1883.

 

 

 

 

62L6

John Collett was born at Kington St Michael, where he was baptised on 17th January 1786.  Tragically he was around five years of age when he died in 1791 and was buried at Kington St Michael on 6th March 1791.

 

 

 

 

62L7

Hester Collett was born at Kington St Michael and she was baptised there on 30th April 1788, the daughter of Joseph Collett and Jane Redman.  Hester’s father was the churchwarden at Kington St Michael at the time of her christening.  She was 26 years old when she was married by licence with the consent of her parents to butcher HENRY COLLETT at Yatton Keynell on 27th October 1814, with both of them said to be ‘of this parish’.  The witnesses at the wedding ceremony were William Redman and Sarah Collett.  William Redman was presumably related to Hester’s mother Jane Collett nee Redman, while Sarah Collett was very likely Hester’s older sister (above) who was not married herself until 1825, but who was also married at Yatton Keynell.  It seems highly likely from the details in the later census records that Henry was Harry Collett who was baptised at Melksham on 21st August 1786, the son of another Joseph Collett.  For an assumption as to the family of Henry/Harry Collett from Melksham go to Appendix Two at the end of this section of Part 62.

 

 

 

The marriage between Hester and Henry produced six known children one of which, their son Henry, later gave his place of birth as Giddea Hall.  And it was at Giddea Hall in Yatton Keynell that Hester Collett died and was buried at Yatton Keynell on 13th January 1842.  Curiously no record of the couple has been found within the census of 1841.  Following the death of his wife Henry married the much younger (2) Martha from Box in Wiltshire, with whom he had a daughter when he was about 59 and she was around 37.  The Box connection, coupled with a butcher connection, is very interesting because in 1841 Henry’s son Henry Collett, age 16, was living and working at the Box home of butcher James Visey who was 30, and also in Box at that time was Martha ‘Vezey’ who had a rounded age of 30.  She may therefore have been his sister.

 

 

 

Curiously on the day of the census in 1851 married Henry Collett from Melksham, age 69 and a master butcher, was residing at his home at West Yatton in Yatton Keynell with just his daughter Ann Collett for company, who was five years old and born at Yatton Keynell.  His absent wife Martha Collett from Box, who was 41, was recorded in the same census as a married nurse at the Castle Combe home of tiler and plasterer John Milsom and his family.

 

 

 

According to the next census in 1861 all three of them were together and living at Yatton Keynell, albeit under the incorrect Collitt spelling of their surname, when Henry Collitt was 74 and a butcher from Melksham, Martha Collitt was 52 and from Box, and Ann Collitt of Yatton Keynell was 15 years of age.

 

 

 

Henry Collett was living at Giddea Hall in Yatton Keynell when he died in early 1880, following which he was buried at Yatton Keynell on 24th February 1880 and, with no record of his wife Martha in the census of 1881, it would appear that she passed away either prior to his death in during the following twelve months.  There is another later Collett connection with Giddea Hall in 1881, the details of which can be found in the Appendix at the end of Part 31 – The Third Wiltshire Line, where it relates to the Collett family of South Wraxall and Thomas Collett (Ref. 31n1).

 

 

 

62M14

Jane Collett

Born in 1815 at Yatton Keynell

 

62M15

Llewellyn Collett

Born in 1817 at Yatton Keynell

 

62M16

Caroline Collett

Born in 1818 at Yatton Keynell

 

62M17

Elizabeth Collett

Born in 1821 at Yatton Keynell

 

62M18

Henry Collett

Born in 1825 at Yatton Keynell

 

62M19

William Collett

Born in 1830 at Yatton Keynell

 

The following is the child of Henry Collett by his second wife Martha, possibly Martha Visey (Vezey):

 

62M20

Ann Collett

Born in 1845 at Yatton Keynell

 

 

 

 

62L8

Joseph Collett was baptised at Kington St Michael on 2nd December 1790, the son of Joseph Collett and Jane Redman.  It was also at Kington St Michael on 9th May 1833 that Joseph married Elizabeth Buckland (Ref. 62l1 in Appendix), the eldest daughter of Jacob Buckland and Mary Day of Kington St Michael where she was born in 1805.  In addition to this, Elizabeth’s sister Mary Buckland (Ref. 62l2 in Appendix) married Joseph’s older brother Daniel Collett (above) and her eldest daughter Emma Jane Collett also married into the Buckland family when she wed Edward Buckland (Ref. 62m4 in Appendix), as did her second daughter Mary Anne Collett when she married Arthur Henry Buckland (Ref. 62m5 in Appendix), Edward’s brother, the two of them being the sons of Elizabeth’s brother Edwin Buckland and his wife Louisa Collett – see below.

 

 

 

Even at the age of 43, Joseph Collett was recorded in the parish’s marriage register as being a bachelor of Kington St Michael.  The couple was married there by licence and the witnesses were Edwin Buckland and Ann Buckland, who are now known to be two more of Elizabeth’s siblings, as detailed in the Appendix at the end of the second section of this family line.  Furthermore, it was the aforementioned Edwin Buckland who married Louisa Collett at Kington St Michael in 1830, and again the details of their family can be found in the Appendix at the end of the second section of this family line.

 

 

 

By June 1841 Joseph Collett was 40 (rather than 50) and his wife ‘Eliza’ was 30 (rather than 35), by which time Elizabeth had presented Joseph with three children, although their first born son did not survive.  So the two daughters living with the couple at the time of the census were Emma who was 6 and Mary who was 4.

 

 

 

According to the census of 1851 for Kington St Michael, Joseph Collett was 58 and was a yeoman farmer of 220 acres, employing seven farmer workers.  His wife ‘Eliza’ was 45, and listed with the couple were their children Emma 15, Mary 13, Henry who was nine, and Eliza who was five years old.  Having already lost his eldest son Henry as a baby, Joseph’s youngest son Edward, who would have been seven years old, must have suffered the same fate, since he was not listed with the family in 1851 or in any later census.

 

 

 

Ten years later the family was still living at Kington St Michael within the Chippenham & Christian Malford registration district in 1861 and comprised Joseph 68 and Eliza 55, and their children Emma Collett who was 25, Mary A Collett who was 23, Henry Collett who was 19 and Eliza Collett who was 15.  When Joseph Collett died five years later on 18th December 1865 at the age of 74, he was recorded as living at Lower Piercy (Priory) Farm in Kington St Michael.  He was buried in the churchyard of St Michael’s Anglican Church.  Sadly, for his family, his youngest daughter Eliza died just over a year later.  The Will of Joseph Collett, yeoman of Kington St Michael, was proved at Salisbury on 13th February 1866 when his widow Eliza Collett was named as the sole executrix.  His personal estate was valued at under £3,000. 

 

 

 

On the day that the next census was conducted in 1871 widow Eliza Collett was 65 and head of the household at New Priory Farm in Kington St Michael, a farm of 229 acres on which she employed two men and two boys, plus general servant Margaret Elmes who was 33 and dairymaid Susan Gainey who was 21.  Living there with her was her married daughter Emma Jane Buckland and her husband Edward Buckland, together with their daughter Edith Buckland who was seven and Eliza’s other grandchild Amy Louisa Buckland who was five and the daughter of Eliza’s other married daughter Mary Anne Buckland the wife of Arthur Henry Buckland.

 

 

 

By 1881 Eliza Collett was 75 when she was still living at New Priory Farm in Kington St Michael, which was described as a holding of 268 acres on which she employed two men, three boys and three women, one of which was live-in servant Jane Elmes who was 19.  Still living there with her was her daughter Emma Buckland and her husband, farmer Edward Buckland, who was then described as the head of the household, together with their daughter Alice Buckland aged 14 and their son Ernest Buckland who was seven years old.  It is quite likely that Margaret Elmes (in 1871) and Jane Elmes (in 1881) were in some way related to Sarah Elmes who married Joseph’s brother John Collett (below) in 1811.

 

 

 

According to the next census in 1891 Eliza Collett was 85 when she was once again living at New Priory Farm in Kington St Michael, which was continuing to be managed by her eldest daughter Emma Jane Buckland and her husband Edward.  The other members of the household were Emma’s son Ernest who was 17 and the four children of Eliza late daughter Mary Anne Buckland who had died in 1889.  They were Arthur Collett Buckland, Amy Louisa Buckland, Alice Buckland and Annie Laura Buckland.  It was just three years after that when Elizabeth Collett nee Buckland died at Kington St Michael during 1894.

 

 

 

62M21

Emma Jane Collett

Born circa 1835 at Kington St Michael

 

62M22

Mary Anne Collett

Born circa 1837 at Kington St Michael

 

62M23

Henry Collett

Born circa 1838 at Kington St Michael

 

62M24

Henry Collett

Born circa 1841 at Kington St Michael

 

62M25

Edward Collett

Born circa 1843 at Kington St Michael

 

62M26

Eliza Collett

Born circa 1845 at Kington St Michael

 

 

 

 

62L9

John Collett was baptised at Kington St Michael on 17th June 1794, another son of Joseph Collett and Jane Redman. 

 

 

 

 

62L10

Stephen Collett was baptised at Kington St Michael on 1st February 1797, the youngest child of Joseph Collett and Jane Redman.  Like his brother Joseph (above), Stephen was also a yeoman farmer and on 24th February 1832 he was married by licence to (1) Sophia Rawlings.  The wedding took place at Writhlington in Somerset, near Radstock, just south of Bath.  The parish register stated that the groom was Stephen Collett, a bachelor of Writhlington, and that the bride was Sophia Rawlings, a spinster of Writhlington.  The marriage produced four children for the couple, who were born at Easton Piercy, before Sophia died, which perhaps tragically took place during or shortly after the birth of their fourth child.  It was very shortly after her death that Stephen married (2) Louisa Davis with whom he had another son Daniel, just three months after the census day on 6th June 1841.

 

 

 

The Kington St Michael census that year listed the family living there as farmer Stephen Collett age 40, his younger second wife Louisa Collett who was 30, his daughter Clara Collett who was eight, his son John Collett who was seven, his daughter Constance Collett (who was named as Constant) who was five year, and son Lot Collett was three years of age.  At that time the family was living with farmer HENRY COLLETT, age 60, from the county of Wiltshire who, sadly has still not been identified.  Curiously ten years later three of Stephen’s children were living with the same Henry Collett at Easton Piercy, when it was indicated that he was their uncle.  Further research is therefore necessary to determine where Uncle Henry Collett, the unmarried farmer who was born at Kington St Michael around 1776, fits into this family.

 

 

 

Louisa Collett nee Davis must have died sometime during the 1840s and, sadly for the young family, Stephen Collett died in the autumn of 1850, his death being recorded at the register office in Chippenham during the third quarter of that year, where he was also buried.  As a result of their loss the three children, John, Constance, and Daniel, were taken into the house of their uncle, the aforementioned Henry Collett at Easton Piercy.  All of the children of Stephen Collett were christened at Kington St Michael, and in his Will proved in 1852 he was referred to as a ‘yeoman of Kington St Michael’.

 

 

 

62M27

Clara Jane Collett

Baptised on 27.02.1833 at Kington

 

62M28

John Collett

Born in 1834 at Kington St Michael

 

62M29

Constance Prudence Collett

Born in 1836 at Kington St Michael

 

62M30

Lot Collett

Baptised on 08.06.1838 at Kington

 

The following is the only known child of Stephen Collett and his second wife Louisa Davis:

 

62M31

Daniel Collett

Born in 1841 at Kington St Michael

 

 

 

 

62L11

Elizabeth Collett was born at Melksham in August 1780 where she was baptised as Betty Collett on 12th January 1781, the daughter of William Collett and Hester Redman.  It was as Elizabeth Collett that she was named in her grandmother’s Will of 1798, in which she received the sum of ten pounds.  By that time in her life, at the age of 18, her mother had been dead for around eleven years and her father had been remarried for seven years.

 

 

 

 

62L12

William Collett was born at Melksham in March 1785, and it was there also that he was baptised there on 9th January 1786, the son of William Collett and his first wife Hester Redman.  He later married Harriet Mence at St James’ Church in Paddington, London on 21st December 1811.  Harriet was born at St Pancras in London around 1790, and was very likely heavily pregnant with their first child.  And it was their grandson Horace Edwin Collett (1848-1902), the son of Edwin Collett (1824-1893), who settled in New Zealand around 1880, although over twenty years earlier their married daughter Harriet Rayner was the first to settle in that country in 1859.

 

 

 

It would appear that he was unmarried when he received the offer of a good job with the General Post Office [GPO] that took William to London from Wiltshire, where he took up the appointment of clerk in the Accountant’s General Office between 1802 and 1811.  Once married William and Harriet settled in the London Borough of Hackney where all of their children were born and baptised.  The majority of the children were baptised at St Leonard’s Church in Shoreditch, while their daughter Louisa Caroline was baptised at St Mary’s Church in nearby Haggerston.  It was also at Haggerston in 1840 that the couple’s eldest child William died of consumption, and was therefore missing from the family in 1841.

 

 

 

In June 1841 William and Harriet were living at Haggeston within the Shoreditch census registration district.  The census that year recorded William and Harriet as both having a rounded age of 50, while the age of their children was recorded more accurately.  They were Charles, age 20, Edwin, age 17, Helen, age 15, George, age 12, and Louisa who was 10.  The couple’s four eldest children had already left the family home by that time.

 

 

 

Ten years later William was more accurately described as being 65, while his wife Harriet was 61. At that time their place of residence was 8 Great Cambridge Street in Haggerston within the St Leonards district of Shoreditch, and living with them was their widowed son Charles who was 29, their unmarried son George who was 21, their daughter Louisa who was 19, and son Frederick who was 17.  William Collett died just over five years later on 27th October 1856 at Dalston, a district within the Borough of Hackney in London.  By the time of the census in 1861 Harriet Collett was 71 and a lodger at 7 Hart Street in Battersea.

 

 

 

62M32

William Collett

Born in 1812 at Hackney

 

62M33

Harriet Collett

Born in 1814 at Hackney

 

62M34

Hester Collett

Born in 1815 at Clerkenwell

 

62M35

Henry Collett

Born in 1817 at Shoreditch

 

62M36

Charles Collett

Born in 1821 at Shoreditch

 

62M37

EDWIN COLLETT

Born in 1824 at Shoreditch

 

62M38

Helen Collett

Born in 1825 at Shoreditch

 

62M39

Alfred Collett

Born in 1827 at Shoreditch

 

62M40

George Collett

Born in 1829 at Shoreditch

 

62M41

Louisa Caroline Collett

Born in 1831 at Shoreditch

 

62M42

Frederick William Collett

Born in 1833 at Shoreditch

 

62M43

Horace Walter Collett

Born in 1835 at Shoreditch

 

 

 

 

62M1

Mary Anne Collett was the eldest of nine children of William Henry Collett and his wife Sarah Kearsey, and was born at Slaughterford on 2nd March 1807.  She later married Richard Pook towards the end of the 1830s, and the marriage produced two daughters and one son for the couple.  Richard Pook who was baptised at Culmstock in East Devon on 25th December 1792, the son of Richard and Sarah Pook.  By June 1841 Mary Ann Pook was listed as living at Avon Street in the Clifton area of Bristol within the Clifton & Keynsham census registration district of Gloucestershire.  She was described as being 30 to 34, while her husband Richard Pook was recorded as being 40 to 44.  Living there with the couple was the first of their three known children, Sarah Pook who was ten months old.

 

 

 

Their second daughter was born around 1842 and 1843, while their son Richard Pook was born at Clifton in Bristol during 1844.  In 1851 the incomplete family was still living at Clifton but at Hotwell Road.  The census return that year listed the family as Richard Pook who was 60 (sic), a pork butcher from Culmstock in Devon, his wife Mary A Pook from Slaughterford was 43, and just two of their three children were Sarah Pook who was 10, Jane Pook who was eight and Richard Pook who was six years old.  The birthplace of all three children was confirmed as Clifton.

 

 

 

Although no record of the family has been revealed within the next census of 1861, it is established that Richard Pook senior died at the age of 77, his death recorded at Clifton (Ref. 6a 52) during the first quarter of 1869.  His widow survived him by three years, when Mary Anne Pook nee Collett died in 1872.  During the previous year a scandal hit the headlines when Edmund Walter Pook was arrested for the murder of Maria Clousen at Eltham in London.  It was around that time in his life when Mary Anne’s son Richard adopted his mother’s surname, which may have arisen from the shame and embarrassment of being a member of the Pook family living and working in London at that time.

 

 

 

62N1

Richard Pook Collett - formerly Richard Pook

Born in 1844 at Clifton, Bristol

 

 

 

 

62M2

William Collett was born at Slaughterford on 30th August 1808, the son of William and Sarah Collett.  He was later baptised at nearby Biddestone on 3rd October 1808, since there was no church at Slaughterford.  Because of the Biddestone connection it was thought that William had married Jane Walters at Biddestone on 5th December 1825, but this has since proved to be incorrect, and it has since been confirmed that it was William Collett (Ref. 35M22) who married Jane Walters.

 

 

 

What is now known is that this William Collett did marry Mary Benjamin of Horton in Gloucestershire, and that the marriage was registered at Chipping Sodbury in the final quarter of 1838.  By June 1841 William and Mary were living at Leonard Stanley with their first child.  William’s rounded age was 30, while Mary’s was 20, and their daughter Emma was one-year old.

 

 

 

William was an agricultural labourer and it may have been his work that was the reason why he was not with his wife and family in both census records for 1851 and 1861.  His mother’s brother was James Kearsey who was a significant figure in Coates near Cirencester, and it seems likely that he employed William to work on his land and had provided him with a tied cottage in which to live.

 

 

 

In 1851 William was listed as living at Coates at the age of 42, when his place of birth was confirmed as being Slaughterford. The only person listed with him was a lodger and agricultural labourer Alfred Pepworth who was 15 and born at Coates.  At that same time, in March 1851, William’s wife Mary was living at Horton with her two daughters.  Mary was 33, married, and the head of the house in the absence of her husband, and was described as an agricultural labourer’s wife.  Both of her daughters were confirmed as having been born at Horton and they were ten years old Emma and four years old Ellen.

 

 

 

By 1861 William was 52 and had returned to Horton within the Hawkesbury & Chipping Sodbury registration district of Gloucestershire, although his wife and youngest daughter were not recorded there on that occasion.  William was listed as married, the head of the household, and born at Slaughterford.  Lodging with him at that time was agricultural labourer Joseph Gardener 35 of Iron Acton and his wife Hannah 35 of Horton.

 

 

 

At that same time William’s wife Mary was 42 and the 1861 Census confirmed she had been born at Horton, but that she was living at Tiltups End near Horsley, just south of Nailsworth.  Living with her was her daughter Ellen who was 14 and whose place of birth was given at Coates, rather than Horton.  On that occasion Mary and Ellen were boarders at the home of forty years old William Cooper, an agricultural labourer of Horsley, and his wife Maria.  Mary’s occupation in 1861 was stated as being that of a dressmaker.

 

 

 

For the first time since June 1841, William and Mary were recorded as living together at Horton Road in Horton in 1871.  William was 62 and was still working as an agricultural labourer, while Mary at 52 was still listed as a dressmaker.  Curiously living with them was boarder Emily Hodges who was just three years of age, and from Horton.  By 1881 labourer William 72 and Mary 63 were living at Horton House in Horton and with them on that occasion was labourer and lodger Elias Watts 35, a married man from nearby Hawkesbury.

 

 

 

Just less than two years after the census William Collett of Horton Hill, Chipping Sodbury, was named on 30th January 1883 as the administrator and the recipient of the personal estate of his late brother Thomas Collett (below) of 73 Dale Street in Liverpool, who died there on 17th September 1845.  Seventeen days earlier, on 13th January 1883, William was also the named administrator of the personal estate of his father William Henry Collett who had died in March 1849. 

 

 

 

It was also sometime between the census days in 1881 and 1891 that William’s wife Mary passed away, following which William moved to the north of England to live with his eldest daughter Emma and her family.  According to the census of 1891 widower William was living with Emma Sparrow of Horton at Londonderry Cottage in Longnewton (Long Newton) near Stockton-on-Tees.  He was 83 and it was Slaughterford where he said he was born, while his relationship to head of the house George Sparrow, was that of father-in-law.  William Collett died two years later in 1893.

 

 

 

62N2

Emma Collett

Born in 1839 at Horton, Chipping Sodbury

 

62N3

Ellen Collett

Born in 1846 at Horton, Chipping Sodbury

 

 

 

 

62M3

John Collett was born at Slaughterford on 15th March 1810 and may have died while still an infant, although no record of his death has been found at Biddestone or Slaughterford.  So there is another possibility that he left home and never acknowledged Biddestone or Slaughterford as the place of his birth.

 

 

 

 

62M4

Thomas Collett was born at Slaughterford on 29th July 1811, the son of William Henry Collett and Sarah Kearsey.  He was baptised by the Reverend Rice Powell at Biddestone Parish Church on 6th January 1812 where Thomas’ father was the churchwarden.  It was originally thought that he may have died while still an infant, like his brother John (above).  However, new information received from Don Cameron in later 2012 confirms that he reached adulthood and that his occupation was that of a butcher.  Thomas may or may not have married Mary in the middle 1830s with whom he had four children who were all baptised at St Peters Church in Liverpool.  

 

 

 

The Liverpool census in June 1841 placed the young family living at Old Hall Street when Thomas Collett was 29, Mary Collett was 28, George Collett was three years of age, and Thomas Collett was just eight months old.  Living with the family was Elizabeth Ashton who was 14, and all five of them were noted as not having been born within the county.  It was around the time of the birth of his last child that Thomas Collett of Slaughterford/Biddestone died at Liverpool on 17th September 1845, the same quarter of the year that his son Thomas also died there.

 

 

 

At that sad time in their lives Thomas and Mary and their children were residing at 73 Dale Street in Liverpool, where only the youngest child had been born, since the family was living at 53 Old Hall Street in Liverpool in 1843 according to Gore’s Directory in which Thomas was listed a butcher.  The couple’s eldest son was born on 22nd March 1838, although his baptism did not take place for well over two years, and eventually took place at St Peters on 11th October 1840 when his parents were named as Thomas and Mary Collett.  No baptism record for son Thomas has been found to date, but Sarah was baptised at St Peters on 19th March 1843, while Harriet was baptised there on 27th April 1845, when again the parents were confirmed as Thomas and Mary.

 

 

 

By the time of the census in 1851 the occupants of 73 Dale Street were George Pate, age 30, who was a widower and a butcher from Caldicott in Cheshire and his unmarried uncle Peter Smith, age 54, who was a former farmer from Wrexham in Denbighshire.  What had happened to the survivors of the family of Thomas Collett is not known at this time.  It has now been discovered that Thomas Collett named his father William Collett as his next-of-kin, but tragically William died four years later before the estate could be settled.  As a result, it was Thomas’ older brother William (above) who was responsible for the administration of the estates of both Thomas and his father, both of which were settled within three weeks of each other during January 1883.

 

 

 

It was on 30th January 1883 that the Administration of the Personal Estate of Thomas Collett, late of 73 Dale Street, Liverpool in the County of Lancashire, was granted at the Principal Registry to William Collett of Horton Hill, Chipping Sodbury in the County of Gloucester, a farm labourer.  Thomas was described as a butcher and bachelor (?) who died on 17th September 1845 at 73 Dale Street, his personal effects amounting to £38 17 Shillings 9d.  The earlier Administrator of the Personal Estate of William Collett, Thomas’ father, was granted to his son William on 13th January 1883.

 

 

 

62N4

George Collett

Born in 1838 in England

 

62N5

Thomas Collett

Born in 1840 in England

 

62N6

Sarah Collett

Born in 1843 at Liverpool

 

62N7

Harriet Collett

Born in 1845 at Liverpool

 

 

 

 

62M5

George Collett was born at Slaughterford in 1813 and was baptised on 14th February 1814, the son of William Collett and Sarah Kearsey, at the church in Biddestone where his father was the church warden.  According to the census in 1841 he was 25, indentured, and not born in the county, when he was living at working at Hill Farm in Batheaston in Somerset, the home of farmer Edwin Aust and his wife Ann who were both 30.  In addition to George Collett, the couple employed a servant, Henry Grant who was 15.  It was shortly after the census day on 6th June 1841 that George Collett married (1) Mary Aust from Colerne in Wiltshire at the church of St John the Baptist in Batheaston, Mary presumably being Edwin’s younger sister.  Whilst no record of the marriage has been located, the detail which more than likely confirms this to be valid, is that George’s youngest daughter Jane M Collett was visiting the widow Sarah Aust, age 67, a farmer at Colerne on the day of the census in 1861, who was probably her maternal grandmother.

 

 

 

The marriage of George Collett and Mary Aust produced just two daughters, who were born when the couple was living at Saltford in Somerset, their births being recorded at Keynsham.  By 1851 the family of four was residing at Whitley near Melksham, where they were recorded in the census that year.  George Collett, age 38 and from Slaughterford, was a farmer and a maltster of 55 acres employing three men, his wife Mary Collett, age 35, was born at Colerne, his eldest daughter Mary Kate Collett was eight, and his youngest daughter was Jane Melisient (sic) Collett who was six.  Living with the family was unmarried John Williams, age 30, a general servant and labourer from Marshfield in Gloucestershire.

 

 

 

Not long after the census in 1851 Mary Collett nee Aust died, following which George married the widow (2) Ann Collett formerly Ann Lovell at Bedminster in Somerset (Ref. 5c 1178) on 2nd August 1853.  As it states above, George’s daughter Jane was, in all probability, visiting her grandmother at Bath Lane in Colerne in 1861 when she was 16 and her place of birth was confirmed as Saltford.  However, no reliable record of George, and his second wife, or his older daughter Mary has been identified at that same time.

 

 

 

By the time of the census in 1871 George and Ann had left the west country and had moved nearer to London, settling in the south Oxfordshire village of Checkendon, midway between Wallingford and Henley.  Their home on that occasion was Bottom Farm where George Collett from Slaughterford was 58 and a farmer of 400 acres employing five men and four boys, his wife Anne Collett was 50 and born at Fovant, west of Salisbury, and his unmarried daughter Jane Collett was 26.  Supporting the family were servants Ann Small aged 21, and Alfred Smith who was 16 and a groom.

 

 

 

During the next five years George took his family into the neighbouring county of Buckinghamshire and it was at Aylesbury that his death was recorded (Ref. 3a 332) which confirmed that George Collett had died at Haddenham on 6th August 1876 at the age of 63.  The details regarding the publication of his Will were as follows: “The Will of George Collett formerly of Checkendon in the County of Oxford but late of Haddenham in the County of Buckingham, farmer, who died 6 August 1876 at Haddenham was proved at the Principal Registry by Joseph Collett of Keevil in the County of Wilts, farmer, one of the Executors.”  Joseph (Ref. 62M12) was his cousin, while George’s personal effects were recorded as being under £2,000.

 

 

 

After the death of her husband Ann went to live with her widowed sister at Colstons Parade in the St Mary Redcliffe district of Bristol, as confirmed by the census in 1881.  Head of the household was Jane Smith, a widow at 49, and Head of a Ladies School & Preparatory, who had been born at Fovant.  Living with her was her daughter Jessie B. Smith, age 14, her niece Edith R. Smith, age 23, a governess and school mistress, her nephew Edward A. Smith, age 21 and a clerk, her widowed sister Annie Collett, who was 59 and living off the interest of money Invested.  Two other people were listed at the address and they were Edith F. Harris, a boarder of six years, and domestic servant Ellen Long who was 19.

 

 

 

Ann Collett was still living at Colston Parade in Bristol ten years later when the census of 1891 described the dwelling as a private school managed by widow Jane Smith, age 61, who had living with her, her widowed sister Annie Collett widow who was 72 and living on her own means.  Other living at the house were Alice Smith, widowed sister aged 71, also living on her own means, Edith R. Smith, unmarried niece aged 33, a governess employed by Jane Smith, Jane Coles an unmarried general domestic servant who was 23, and bachelor Herbert E. Robertson, age 24, a lodger and the Curate of St Mary's Church in Redcliffe, Bristol.  It was not long after that when Ann Collett, formerly Ann Collett nee Lovell, passed away in Bristol.  Who her first Collett husband was, now needs to be investigated.

 

 

 

62N8

Mary Kate Collett

Born in 1842 at Saltford, Somerset

 

62N9

Jane Millicent Collett

Born in 1844 at Saltford, Somerset

 

 

 

 

62M6

Stephen Collett was born at Slaughterford in 1814.  While still a young man he became the ‘black-sheep’ of the family when he committed highway robbery, for which he was transported to Australia as a convict.  It may have been as a result of that which brought about his premature death in 1834 when he was still only twenty years old.

 

 

 

 

62M7

Sarah Collett was born at Slaughterford in 1816.  Later in her life she married stained glass window artist Joseph Bell, of the well-known stained glass window company of Joseph Bell & Sons of Bristol.  Sarah Bell nee Collett died in 1895.

 

 

 

 

62M8

Joseph Collett was born at Slaughterford in 1818, the son of William and Sarah Collett.  It is possible that he was the Joseph Collett with a rounded age of 25 who was living alone at Kington St Michael in 1841.  He later married Harriet who was born at Berkeley in Gloucestershire and in the late 1850s the couple was living in Wales, where their son was born.  At the time of the Merthyr Tydfil census in 1861 the family was listed as Joseph Collett, age 42, Harriet Collett, age 46, and George Collett who was two years old. Ten years after that the three of them were residing at Aberdare where Joseph was 54, Harriet was 58, and George was11.

 

 

 

At some later time the family left Wales and moved to Herefordshire, where they were living in 1881. That year’s census recorded the family living at 41 Eign Road in Hereford St Owen.  Joseph was a general labourer at 62 and his wife Harriet was 67.  Their son George was a bookseller’s assistant, age 22, and his place of birth was stated as having been Troedyrhiw near Merthyr Tydfil in Wales.  Joseph Collett died in 1888.

 

 

 

62N10

George Collett

Born in 1858 at Troedyrhiw in Wales

 

 

 

 

62M9

Edwin Collett was born at Slaughterford in 1819, the last child of William Henry Collett and Sarah Ann Kearsey.  When old enough to do so, he left his family and moved to London where he took up employment as a driver of a Hansom Cabriolet.  The ‘hansom cab’ was a two wheeled horse-drawn carriage designed and patented in 1834 by Joseph Hansom and replaced the Hackney Carriage as the vehicle to hire.  They were later fitted with a taximeter to measure the high charge and from this came the more common term today of the taxi cab.

 

 

 

It would appear that he married Martha Young of London around 1841 and by the time of the census of 1851 Edwin and his family were living at 6 Brook Street in the Hammersmith St Paul district of London.  The family then comprised Edwin 32, Martha 35, and their three children, Emma who was eight, Harriet who was six, and Henry who was three years old.  All three children had been born at Marylebone.  Edwin and Martha both gave their place of birth as being Middlesex and Edwin was listed as having the occupation of a conductor, presumably taking the fares from paying customers on some form of transport.  Also living at 6 Brook Street in 1851 with the Collett family was another conductor, Robert Collins 29 and his wife Martha from Wiltshire and their son Robert who was two years old. 

 

 

 

Just prior to the census day in 1851 Edwin’s and Martha’s family was extended with the birth of a second son at the end of February, when Edwin was described as a traveller on the birth record.  Curiously the child was not listed with the family in 1851, when perhaps he had not been named.  However, by 1861 the family was made up of Edwin 42, Martha 45, Emma 18, Henry 13, and Robert who was nine.  The family was still living in Hammersmith but had moved to 9 Spring Street.  Edwin would appear to have been fairly successful with the hansom cab business since he was then listed as a cab proprietor.  On that occasion he gave his place of birth as Bath in Somerset.  The couple’s absent daughter Harriet was working away from home at Paddington at that time.

 

 

 

Another change of address happened during the next ten years, so by 1871 Edwin and Martha were living at 18 Overstone Road in the Brook Green area of Hammersmith.  It is this census that finally confirmed Edwin was born at Slaughterford in Wiltshire although it was recorded as ‘Slouterford’.  Edwin was then 51 and an omnibus conductor, his wife Martha was 55, and the only one of their four children still living with them was 19 years old Robert, whose occupation was that of a plumber.

 

 

 

By April 1881 Edwin (of Somerset) was 62 and a licenced victualler living a 5 Little Ormond Street in the St George the Martyr district of London, the premises being known as The Swan Public House.  Living with him was his wife Martha, who was 65 and of London, and the couple’s two unmarried children.  They were Harriet who was 36 and Henry who was 33, neither of whom was listed with an occupation.  Supporting Edwin at The Swan was pot-man William Lucas, and domestic servant Ann Bradley.

 

 

 

It is believed that Edwin Collett died around two years later in 1883.  Certainly, according to the census of 1891, his wife Martha, age 76, was recorded as a widow of Hammersmith by that time.  Following the death of her husband, Martha had left London and was living at 31 Mount Sion in Tunbridge Wells in Kent.  Martha was recorded as being a caretaker of a furnished home, the same job title being given to her daughter Harriet Martha, aged 43, who was also living there with her.  It would appear that the head of the household was Orlando Stimpson and his wife Jane Merriman Stimpson.

 

 

 

62N11

Emma Collett

Born in 1842 at Marylebone

 

62N12

Harriet Martha Collett

Born in 1844 at Marylebone

 

62N13

Henry Edwin Collett

Born in 1847 at Marylebone

 

62N14

Robert William Collett

Born in 1851 at Marylebone

 

 

 

 

62M10

Henry Collett was born at Keevil in 1829, the eldest of four children of Daniel Collett and Mary Buckland.  In the Keevil census returns for 1841 and 1851, Henry was recorded as being eleven years old, and twenty-one years old, respectively.

 

Four years later Henry Collett married (1) Elizabeth Buckland (Ref. 62m3) who was around 21 years of age, compared to Henry who was 26. 

 

Elizabeth was the daughter of Edwin Buckland and Louisa Collett, and had been born at Kington St Michael in 1834.  See Appendix at the end of the second section of this family line for more Buckland family details.

Photograph courtesy of Gerri Hopkins

 

The wedding of Henry and Elizabeth took place at Chippenham during the fourth quarter of 1855, but once married the couple settled in Lushill, near Castle Eaton by the River Thames, within the registration district of Highworth, to the east of Swindon, where the first three of their six children were born.

 

 

 

It was at Hillsworth Farm in Lushill that the family was living in 1861, when Henry Collett from Keevil was 31 and a farmer of 530 acres employing 15 men and four boys.  His wife Elizabeth from Kington St Michael was 26, and the couple’s first two children were Frank W Collett who was four, and Louisa Collett who was two years old, both of them born at Lushill.  Also visiting family on that day was Henry’s cousin Rosa Wright, age 18 and a superintendent domestic from Chippenham who, in just over ten years, would become Henry’s second wife.  The household employed a servant Caroline King who was 14 and from Castle Eaton whose occupation was that of a domestic labourer.  Elizabeth may well have been pregnant with Henry’s third child on the day of the census, since later that same year their third child was born when the family was still living at Hillsworth Farm in Lushill.  Not long after the birth of that child Henry and his young family left Lushill when they temporarily made their home at Pew Hill in Chippenham, where the couple’s fourth child was born.

 

 

 

That move was also confirmed at the time of the death of his father in October 1861, when Henry Collett was one of the three executors of his Will which was proved on 26th November 1861.  In that document he was described as a farmer of Pew Hill.  Following the birth of his son Charles at Pew Hill in 1866, the family moved again, on that occasion to the village of Langley Burrell, on the northern outskirts of Chippenham.  And it was there that the remainder of Henry’s children were born, and where the family was living at the time of the census in 1871.  By then Henry’s occupation was that of a brewer and a maltster.

 

 

 

At that time, Henry was 41 and his wife Elizabeth was 36.  Living there with them was their first five children, they being Frank Walter 14, Louisa 12, Mary Kate 9, Charles Henry 4, and Daniel Warren who was three years of age.  Also listed with the family in 1871, again as a visitor, was the aforementioned Rosa Wright who was 28, and who had been living within the same Highworth area ten years earlier.

 

 

 

Tragically during the following year, Elizabeth Collett nee Buckland died while giving birth to the couple’s sixth child, both events taking place in 1872, following which she was buried at Kington St Michael where she was born and where a headstone marks the grave.  It was therefore cousin Rosa that Henry turned to in his grief, at the loss of his wife, and the following year Henry Collett married (2) Rosa Wright (Ref. 62m9).  Rosa was born in Chippenham in 1842, the daughter of James Wright and Ann Buckland, who was the sister of Henry’s late wife Elizabeth Collett nee Buckland. 

 

 

 

The appendix at the end of the second section of this family line has more

details of the Buckland family and the many connections it has to the Collett family

 

 

 

The wedding took place by licence at St James’ Parish Church in Bath on 5th June 1873 in the presence of Joseph Collett, Henry’s younger brother, and Kate Wright, Rosa’s younger sister.  Henry was described as a widower and a brewer of Langley Burrell, while Rosa was a spinster from St James Bath, the daughter of James Wright a police superintendent.  It was during the following year that the first of Henry’s and Rosa’s six children was born at Langley Burrell, where the subsequent five children were also born.  By the time of the census in 1881, Henry’s family was almost complete, by which time he had established himself as a brewer and maltster.  The address for him and his large family in Langley Burrell was simply ‘The Brewery’.  Of the eleven children listed with him, only his eldest son Frank was credited with an occupation, that of a brewer, working with his father.

 

 

 

According to the census return, the full family was made up of Henry Collett, age 50 and from Keevil, and his wife Rosa Collett, age 38 and from Chippenham, who was expecting their last child any time during the next month.  Henry’s six children from his first marriage were Frank 24, Louisa 22, Mary 19, Charles 14, Daniel 13, and Edwin who was eight, while the five children from his second marriage were Roland who was seven, Mabel who was five, Laura who was four, Herbert who was three, and Godfrey who was one-year old.

 

 

 

Supporting Rosa when she was heavily pregnant on 3rd April 1881 were two domestic servants, they being seventeen years old Ellen Chequer from Wootton Bassett, and sixteen years old Ellen Freegard from Langley Burrell.  It was exactly three weeks to the day after the census day that Henry’s and Rosa’s last child was born at Langley Burrell. 

 

 

 

Ten years later only six of Henry’s twelve children were still living at the family home in Langley Burrell in 1891.  It would be logical that the six eldest children had gone their own way in the world by then.  However, absent from the family was Herbert James Collett, age 13, who was recorded in the Bath & Batheaston registration district, where he was attending Weston Boarding School.  The five unmarried children listed with Henry who was 61 and Rosa who was 48, were Charles H Collett 24, Mabel Collett 15, Laura N Collett 14, Godfrey Collett 11 and new arrival Stanley B Collett who was nine years old.  Henry’s married daughter Mary K Banks, together with her daughter Hilda Banks were also visiting the family on the day of the census.  One other person was recorded at the same address and that was Emily J Halliday who was 26.  Of the other children, sons Frank and Roland and married daughter Louisa Bryant have been positively identified in 1891 and their details are included under their individual entries.  However, son Edwin Graham Collett had died five years earlier, while no record has been found for son Daniel in either 1881 or 1891.

 

 

 

Henry Collett survived for only another five years when he died at Langley Brewery in Langley Burrell Without on 12th April 1896, following which he was buried at Kington St Michael with his first wife.  His death was recorded at Chippenham register office on 13th April and his death certificate stated he was 66 and a maltster and a brewer.  The cause of death was cirrhosis of the liver, ascites, as certified by surgeon M S Wilson who was present at the death as was Herbert Collett his son who registered the passing of his father. 

 

 

 

During his life he and his family are known to have lived at Frogwell House, and at Ferndale, The Folly, the latter being mentioned in the Will of Rosa Collett, his widow, and later in the Will of their daughter Laura Rose, with the former being mentioned in the Will of his daughter Mabel Burden nee Collett.  The Will of Henry Collett was proved in London on 9th June 1896 and included the following words “Collett, Henry of Langley brewery, Langley Burrell Wiltshire brewer died 12 April 1896. Probate at London given to Frank Walter Collett and Charles Henry Collett, brewers, and Alfred Wright, relieving officer”.  The value of his estate amounted to £3,195 11 Shillings 2d, while Alfred Wright was Rosa Wright’s brother.  Henry’s Will made no provision for any of his children from his second marriage to Rosa, and it is believed that this was the main reason why all of his sons from that marriage eventually emigrated to Canada.

 

 

 

Rosa Collett from Chippenham was 58 and a widow in the March census of 1901.  She was recorded as having no occupation while still living at Langley Burrell, and still living there with her were her two daughters Mabel age 25 and Laura Rose who was 24, together with her youngest son Stanley B Collett who was 19 and a solicitor’s clerk.  The place of birth of all three children was confirmed as Langley Burrell.  By the time of the next census in 1911 Rosa Collett, who had given birth to six children, signed the census form as head of the household when she was living at Frogwell on Sheldon Road in Chippenham which consisted of ten rooms.  With her on that occasion were her unmarried daughters Mabel who was 35 and Laura Rose who was 34.  Also boarding with the family was Frederick John Burden, age 35 and an accountant – the future husband of Mabel to whom she was married during the following year, and Sydney Augustus Putnam age 32 and a surveyor of taxes with the Ireland Revenue Department.

 

 

 

Rosa Collett nee Wright died at Langley Burrell on 8th November 1923 at the age of 81.  Her Will was proved at Salisbury on 26th January 1924 and included the following words “Collett, Rosa of Ferndale the Folly, widow died 8 November 1923.  Probate given to Frederick John Burden, accountant, effects £419 1 Shilling 6d”.  Frederick John Burden was her son-in-law through his marriage to her daughter Mabel who had died six years earlier in 1917.  At the time of the census in April 1911 the only members of her family still living in the Chippenham area were her two unmarried daughters Mabel Collett and Laura Collett.

 

 

 

During the period in his life from 1866 until his death in 1896, Henry Collett held the freehold to: a brewery, barn, outhouses, house and public house known as the Langley Brewery, adjoining the Chippenham to Tytherton Road (Kellaways Road) in Langley Burrell; a freehold public house called the ‘Rose and Crown’ in the Market Place at Chippenham, and a copyhold public house called the ‘Station Hotel’, formerly the ‘Great Western Station Hotel’, adjoining the railway station in Corsham.  He was also the owner of Priory Farm at Tytherton.  Thirteen years after Henry had died and been reunited with his first wife, the same grave at Kington St Michael was used by their daughter Mary Kate Banks nee Collett who was buried there in 1909.

 

 

 

62N15

Frank Walter Collett

Born in 1856 at Lushill, Castle Eaton

 

62N16

Louisa Naomi Collett

Born in 1858 at Lushill, Castle Eaton

 

62N17

Mary Kate Collett

Born in 1861 at Lushill, Castle Eaton

 

62N18

Charles Henry Collett

Born in 1866 at Pew Hill, Chippenham

 

62N19

Daniel Maurice Collett

Born in 1867 at Langley Burrell

 

62N20

Edwin Graham Collett

Born in 1872 at Langley Burrell

 

The following are the children of Henry Collett by his second wife Rosa Wright:

 

62N21

Roland Collett

Born in 1874 at Langley Burrell

 

62N22

Mabel Collett

Born in 1875 at Langley Burrell

 

62N23

Laura Rose Collett

Born in 1876 at Langley Burrell

 

62N24

Herbert James Collett

Born in 1877 at Langley Burrell

 

62N25

Godfrey Collett

Born in 1879 at Langley Burrell

 

62N26

Stanley Beaconsfield Collett

Born in 1881 at Langley Burrell

 

 

 

 

62M11

Marianne Collett was born at Keevil in 1830 and was the eldest daughter of Daniel Collett and Mary Buckland.  In the Edington area census of 1841 she was recorded as Mary Collett, age 10, and ten years later in the Westbury census of 1851 she was listed as Mary Collett, age 19.  On both occasions she was living with her parents at Keevil.  A couple of years later, during the first quarter of 1853, Marianne Collett married Joseph Maslen of Keevil, the married being registered at Westbury.  By the time of the census in 1861 Marianne had presented Joseph with five children, although their eldest son Thomas Maslen, born in 1854, was absent.  At that time, Marianne was recorded as Mary Ann Maslen, age 29, the wife of Joseph Maslen who was 40 and a farmer of 210 acres employing 7 men and 3 boys.  Living with the couple at Longlease Farm in Keevil were their four children, Louisa Anne Maslen who was five, Ernest Maslen who was three, Arthur Maslen who was one-year old, and Clara Maslen who was only two months old, with the whole family being supported by one housemaid.

 

 

 

It was just two years later that Joseph Maslen died at Longlease Farm in Keevil on 5th April 1863.  Within his Will proved later that same year at Salisbury, Marianne’s younger brother Joseph Collett (below) of Keevil Farm was named as an executor.  The other executor was Henry Hunt of Ashton Mill Farm in Steeple Ashton who was the husband of Marianne’s sister Rosa Jane Hunt nee Collett.

 

 

 

Following the death of her husband, Marianne continued to manage Longlease Farm, and it was there that she was still living in 1871.  The census that year recorded her as Marianne Maslen 39, a widow farming 209 acres and employing 6 men and 3 boys.  Still living with her was one of her two sons Thomas H Maslen 17, and one of her three daughters Louisa Maslen who was 15.  Also living with the family on that occasion was Marianne’s widowed mother Mary Collett, plus one servant.

 

 

 

At some time during the next decade Marianne left Keevil when she moved to the village of Goosey, near Wantage in Berkshire – today it is in Oxfordshire following the 1974 county boundary changes.  This was confirmed by the Wantage area census in 1881.  Marianne was 49 and was at Wick Farm in Goosey, which comprised 355 acres for which she needed to employ 10 men, 6 boys and 2 women. The only members of her family still living with her by then, was son Ernest Maslen, age 23, and her widowed mother, Mary Collett who was 80.  Jane Cook, age 15, was the family’s general servant.

 

 

 

It was possibly following the death of her mother during the 1880s that prompted Marianne to retire from farming, since by 1891, she was living at 29 Disraeli Road in the Ealing area of London.  Living with her at that time was her son Arthur Maslen, age 31, who was a civil servant working in a science department. 

 

 

 

She was also looking after two of her grandchildren, who were Marie (Marion) Wilshire who was eight years old and Thomas W Wilshire who was four years old, both of them born at Steeple Ashton.  They were the two youngest of the three children of her daughter Louisa Anne Maslen who had married Charles Fisher Wilshire, but who was a widow by 1891. 

 

 

 

It is also interesting that in the Melksham census of 1891 a certain widow Ann Wilshire, age 63 and a laundress from Atworth, had living with her at Lowbourne her grandson Sidney Collett who was eight years old and from Melksham.  That family can be found in Part 35 – The Melksham to Wisconsin Line, where Ann Wiltshire was the former widow of Henry Collett (Ref. 35N55) and her grandson was Sidney Collett (Ref. 35P112).

 

 

 

In the London census of 1901 Marianne Maslen was 69 and by then she was living with her daughter, the widow Louisa Wilshire, at 22 Coverdale Road in St Stephen’s in Shepherds Bush.  Also living there were Marianne’s grandchildren, Marion Wilshire 18, Charles J Wilshire 19 and a civil servant, and Thomas W Wilshire who was 14. Louisa’s occupation was that of a hospital nurse and living at the same address were patients, widow Mary Beggs 65, widow Jane Templeton 50, and unmarried Hannah M Ward who was 48.

 

 

 

Marianne Maslen was still living at 22 Coverdale Road when she died on 25th September 1912.  The Will of Marianne Maslen nee Collett was proved at London on 8th February 1913, which named the beneficiaries as her daughter Louisa Annie Wilshire, widow, and her son Arthur Maslen, a clerk.  Her estate amounted to £1,032 6 Shillings 10d, which was re-sworn as £1,365 13 Shillings 6d.

 

 

 

Some of the records for the address where she lived from 1901 until her death in 1912 gave the name of the road as Cloverdale in Shepherd’s Bush, whereas today this is Coverdale Road, on the south side of the Uxbridge Road (A4020).  And it was at St Stephen’s Vicarage in Coverdale Road that the Reverend William Lloyd Collett (Ref. 18O28) lived up until his death in 1896.

 

 

 

 

62M12

Joseph Collett was born at Keevil in 1834, the son of Daniel Collett and Mary Buckland.  And it was at Keevil that he was living with his family in 1841 and 1851 when he was six and sixteen years of age respectively.  It was on 31st May 1859 at Melksham that Joseph married Susan Harris Collett the daughter of John Collett and Maria Harris who had been born at Nettleton in Wiltshire in 1836.  Who John was has not yet been determined, while the life of Maria Collett nee Harris is detailed in Appendix Two at the end of this section of Part 62.  So far during the research it has not yet been possible to ascertain whether Joseph and Susan were related or whether they originated from completely separate branches of the wider Collett family.

 

 

 

By the time of the census in 1861 Joseph Collett, age 26 and from Keevil was still living there with his wife Susan who was 24, together with their first child Fanny Harris Collett who was not yet one-year old.  It was later that same year that Joseph’s father died at Keevil in October 1861, following which his Will was proved one month later.  Joseph Collett, the son of Daniel Collett, was named as one of the three executors, when he was described as Joseph Collett, farmer of this parish, that being Keevil.  Two years later Joseph Collett of Keevil Farm was once again named as an executor of a Will, on that occasion it was the Will of Joseph Maslen the late husband of Joseph’s sister Marianne Maslen nee Collett (above).

 

 

 

Sadly, it would appear that Joseph’s daughter Fanny did not survive, but over the next ten years a further four children were born to Joseph and Susan while they continued to live at Keevil.  The Keevil census of 1871 listed the family as Joseph Collett, age 36 and a farmer who was born at Keevil, his wife Susan who was 34 and from Nettleton, and their four new children as Edith M Collett who was eight, Frances L Collett who was seven, Charles E Collett who was three, and Alice E Collett who was one-year old.  Susan was very likely pregnant with the couple’s sixth child on the day of the census since their daughter was born later that same year.  Supporting the family that day were two servants Sarah J Price from Lacock who was 15 and Mary E Strugnall who was 12 and from Tinhay in Wiltshire.

 

 

 

Just over two years after the census day in 1871 Joseph was one of the witnesses at the second marriage of his older brother Henry Collett when he married Rosa Wright in Bath on 5th June 1873.  That same year Susan presented Joseph with their last child, which was also born at Keevil.  Joseph and his family were still living in Keevil during the summer of 1876, when Joseph Collett of Keevil was named as the executor of the Will of his cousin George Collett (Ref. 62M5).  However, sometime after that Joseph took his family to live in the village of Bowerhill, immediately south of Melksham, where Susan’s brother Edward Collett (Ref. 62A/M4) was living with his wife and where both families were living at the time of the census in 1881. 

 

 

 

The census return on that occasion described Joseph Collett of Keevil as 46 and an auctioneer and a farmer of 98 acres employing two men.  His wife Susan was 43 and from Nettleton in Wiltshire while just four of their children were still living with them.  They were Frances L Collett 17, Charles E Collett 13, Alice E Collett 11, and Percy H Collett who was seven years old.  Their older missing daughter Edith was 18 and was living in the Fulham & St Peter Hammersmith district of London on that occasion.  However, why the couple’s youngest daughter Mary F Collett, aged eight years and born at Keevil, was living with her maternal grandmother, the widow Maria Collett nee Harris aged 82, at Lowbourne Road in Melksham is not known.  

 

 

 

It may be of interest, that Joseph and Susan employed a general servant in 1881 and she was Elizabeth Curnick who was 15 and from Beanacre, a village to the north of Melksham.  Thirty years earlier Andrew William Collett (Ref. 31M11) of South Wraxall near Bradford-on-Avon, married Sarah Curnick from Beanacre, the daughter of Robert and Hester Curnick.

 

 

 

Ten years later, according to the census in 1891 only Frances Louisa Collett, age 26, was still living at Bowerhill with her father, farmer Joseph who was 56, and her mother Susan who was 54.  The couple’s eldest daughter Edith Collett was 28 and was working as a nurse while living in Hastings.  The couple’s youngest son Percy was 17 and was recorded living and working in the Devizes area of Wiltshire, while their youngest daughter Mary Florence, who was 18, was also living in Bowerhill at the farm of Susan’s sister Louisa Maria Collett (Ref. 62A/M1).  No traced has been found of absent daughter Alice, who may have been married by then, or their son Charles.  However, living with the family was nephew Charles Henry Collett from Chippenham, who was the son of Joseph’s brother Henry Collett (above) and his wife Elizabeth Buckland.

 

 

 

By April 1901 Joseph Collett was 65 and a farmer living at Bowerhill with his wife Susan who was 64.  However, eight years later Joseph Collett died on 17th October 1909 and his Will was proved at Salisbury on 3rd January 1910 when Joseph Collett of Melksham was an auctioneer.  His widow Susan Collett and son Charles Edwin Collett, a farmer, were made as the joint executors of his estate of £2,268 6 Shillings 10d.  In his lifetime Joseph Collett was named in the Wills of his father Daniel in 1861, his brother Henry in 1896, his brothers-in-law Joseph Maslen in 1863 who was the husband of his sister Marianne Collett, and Edward Collett in 1900 the brother of his wife Susan Harris Collett, and his mother-in-law Maria Collett nee Harris in 1889.

 

 

 

By the time of the next census in April 1911 Susan Collett from Nettleton was 74 and a widow who was still living at Bowerhill.  Living there with her was her unmarried daughter and nurse Edith Collett who was 48, and her unmarried son Percy Collett who was 37.  Living with the three of them was spinster Louisa Collett, age 76 and from Nettleton, who was Susan’s older sister Louisa Maria Collett.  It was ten years after that when Susan Harris Collett, whose maiden name was also Collett, died at Bowerhill, Melksham on 23rd November 1921.  Her Will was proved at Salisbury on 31st January 1922 when her son Charles Edwin Collett, a farmer, was the sole executor of her personal effects valued at £969 16 Shillings 5d.

 

 

 

In addition, a Thomas George Harris Collett age 28, was the only person with the Collett name living in the village of Langley Burrell near Chippenham in 1911.  He was born at Stoke Damerel in Devonport in 1882 and he and his family feature in Part 1 – The Main Gloucestershire Line (Ref. 1P131).  His mother was another Susan Harris who came from Ireland.

 

 

 

62N28

Fanny Harris Collett

Born in 1860 at Keevil

 

62N29

Edith Matilda Collett

Born in 1862 at Keevil

 

62N30

Frances Louisa Collett

Born in 1864 at Keevil

 

62N31

Charles Edwin Collett

Born in 1867 at Keevil

 

62N32

Alice Eliza Collett

Born in 1869 at Keevil

 

62N33

Mary Florence Collett

Born in 1871 at Keevil

 

62N34

Percy Harris Collett

Born in 1873 at Keevil

 

 

 

 

62M13

Rosa Jane Collett was born at Keevil in 1837, the youngest of the four children of Daniel Collett and Mary Buckland.  In 1841 she was three years old, and was 13 years of age in 1851.  She was only nineteen years of age when she married farmer Henry Hunt during the first three months of 1857, the marriage being recorded at Westbury in Wiltshire.  Henry had been born at Keevil during 1830.  In the 1861 Census Rosa Hunt was 24 when she was living at Mill Farm in Steeple Ashton with her husband Henry Hunt a farmer of 32, together with their son William Henry hunt who was one-year old.  Supporting the young family was dairy maid Mary Jane Gum who was 22 and her sister Victoria Gum who was a nursemaid at the age of 14.  Also staying with the family that day was John Kingman who was 56.

 

 

 

Two years later in 1863 the husband of Rosa’s older sister Marianne Maslen nee Collett (above) passed away at Longlease Farm in Keevil and when the Will was proved at Salisbury the two executors were Rosa’s brother Joseph Collett (above) of Keevil Farm and her husband Henry Hunt of Ashton Mill Farm in Steeple Ashton.  By 1881 the same family of three was still living in Steeple Ashton where Rosa was 43, Henry was 52 and unmarried William was 20.  Henry Hunt was a farmer of 238 acres employing eight men and four boys.  Living with them that day was Rosa’s unmarried niece Louisa Maslen who was 25 and the daughter of Rosa’s older sister Marianne Maslen nee Collett.  Working for the family that year was domestic servant Kate Holloway age 19.

 

 

 

It was at a dwelling in the High Street in Steeple Ashton that the couple was living in 1891 and again in 1901.  Tragically one week after the census in 1901 farmer Henry Hunt died at Steeple Ashton on 7th April 1901.  His Will was proved in London on 25th May 1901 which named Rosa Jane Hunt, his widow, and William Henry Hunt, a farmer (his son) as executors of his personal effects amounting to £5,688 1 Shilling.  Ten years later the census in 1911 placed Rosa Jane Hunt as a widow of 73, the head of the household still residing at the High Street in Steeple Ashton.  Living there with her as her companion was her unmarried niece Frances Louisa Collett, age 46, the daughter of Rosa’s brother Joseph Collett and his wife Susan Harris Collett.  The domestic servant servicing the two ladies was Alice Mead who was 19.  Almost exactly like her husband ten years earlier, it was just four days later that Rosa Jane Hunt nee Collett died at Steeple Ashton on 6th April 1911.  Her Will was proved on 26th May 1911 when her son William Henry Hunt, a farmer, was executor of her estate of £655 13 Shillings 8d.

 

 

 

 

62M14

Jane Collett was born at West Yatton in Yatton Keynell during 1815, the year after her parents Henry and Hester Collett were married there in October 1814, following which Jane was baptised at Yatton Keynell on 7th January 1816.

 

 

 

 

62M15

Llewellyn Collett was born at West Yatton in Yatton Keynell during 1817 and it was there also that he was baptised on 27th July 1817, although another source states that Lewin Collett was born on the 27th July 1817.  In the census of 1851 unmarried Lewen Collett, age 30 and from Yatton Keynell was living within the Chippenham registration district, not far from where his younger brother Henry (below) was living and working.  No further record of Llewellyn has been found in the census returns for 1861, although it is established that Lewellin (sic) Collett died in Wiltshire, his death being recorded at the Chippenham register office (Ref. 5a 32) during the last three months of 1865.

 

 

 

 

62M16

Caroline Collett was born at West Yatton in Yatton Keynell on 18th October 1818, and was baptised there on 14th March 1819.  She was twenty-five when she married plumber and glazier Henry Young of Biddestone, the event recorded at Chippenham during the second quarter of 1844.  Their marriage produced three children and they were Edwin Young who was born in 1848, Elizabeth Young who was born in 1850 and late arrival Jane Young who was born at Yatton Keynell in 1862.  By the time of the census in 1851 Henry Young and his family were living at the inn and beer-house in ‘Giddy Hall’ at Yatton Keynell, where he was described as a master plumber and glazier from Biddestone at the age of 30.  His wife Caroline from Yatton Keynell was 28, and their two children were Edwin who was three and Elizabeth who was one-year old.  Staying with the family was Caroline’s younger unmarried brother Henry (below), the brother-in-law of head of the household Henry Young.  Henry Collett was a butcher from Yatton Keynell who was 25.  It may be of interest that during the previous century Martha Collett (Ref. 35J6) married John Young at Broughton Gifford on 4th March 1716.

 

 

 

According to the census in 1871 Caroline Young nee Collett was 52 and her husband Henry Young was 52 and a painter.  Living with them at Yatton Keynell was their unmarried son Edwin Young who was 23 and also a painter, presumably working with his father, and their daughter Jane Young who was 10 years old.

 

 

 

 

62M17

Elizabeth Collett was born at ‘Giddy Hall’ in Yatton Keynell on 1st April 1821, where she was baptised on 22nd July 1821 the daughter of Henry and Hester Collett.

 

 

 

 

62M18

Henry Collett was the son of Hester Collett and Henry Collett and was born at ‘Giddy Hall’ in Yatton Keynell around 1825, although he was not baptised there until 31st August 1828.  By the time of the census in 1841 Henry had left school and was an M S (manservant) at the Box home of butcher James Visey and his large family when he was 16.  It may have been his own father, who was a master butcher, who arranged for Henry to be there.  Ten years later when Henry Collett from Yatton Keynell was 25 he was a butcher staying with the family of Henry and Caroline Young at Yatton Keynell, Caroline being his older sister (above) and Henry being described as the brother-in-law of Henry Young. 

 

 

 

Where Henry was in 1861 when he would have been around 35 is not known, but about two years later, sometime during 1863, he married Mary Bird who was born at Corsham in 1836.  Prior to the next census in 1871 Mary presented Henry with their first three children at Biddestone, so by then the family living there was recorded as Henry, age 46, who was a journey butcher, his wife Mary who was 36, William who was seven, Emily J Collett who was three, and Edwin who was one-year old.  Sadly it would appear that their daughter Emily did not survive, since she was not listed with the family in 1881.

 

 

 

The census that year recorded the family as Henry who was 53 instead of 55, while his wife Mary was curiously 44.  Living with them at a cottage in Church Street at Lacock, midway between Chippenham and Melksham were four of their five children.  Eldest son William, age 17, was following a similar profession to that of his father, in that he was a journeyman baker, while the other children were Edwin who was 11, Harry who was eight, and Herbert who was six years old.  The first three of those children were born at Biddestone, and the fourth at Melksham, while head of the house Henry gave his place of birth as Giddea Hall, which is in Yatton Keynell, where his mother died in 1842.

 

 

 

By 1891 Henry and Mary were still living at Lacock, and living with them were their two sons Harry and Herbert.  It has been established that eldest son William had married by then, although no record of the other missing son Edwin has been found, either in 1891 or at any time thereafter – separate entry for details.

 

 

 

In the census of 1901 Henry and Mary were both recorded as having been born at Corsham, which was an error.  Both of them were still living at Lacock, where two of their married sons were also living at that time.  Just over four years later Henry Collett died at Lacock, his death recorded at Chippenham register office (Ref. 5a 32) during the third quarter of 1905 when he was 79.  After a further six years the census in 1911 recorded Mary Collett of Corsham as a widow of 74, when she was still living at Lacock where her two sons William and Harry were also still living with their families.  She survived for another eight years when the death of Mary Collett nee Bird was also recorded at Chippenham.

 

 

 

62N35

William Collett

Born in 1864 at Biddestone

 

62N36

Emily J Collett

Born in 1867 at Biddestone

 

62N37

Edwin Collett

Born in 1869 at Biddestone

 

62N38

Harry Collett

Born in 1872 at Biddestone

 

62N39

Herbert Lewin Collett

Born in 1874 at Melksham

 

 

 

 

62M19

William Collett was born at ‘Giddy Hall’ in Yatton Keynell during 1830, the last child of Hester Collett of Kington St Michael and her husband Henry Collett, a master butcher from Melksham.  No record of William or his parents has been found within the census returns for 1841, in addition to which it is known that his mother died in early 1842 and his father re-married a couple of years later.  By 1851 William Collet (sic) from Yatton Keynell was 21 and a servant at a house in Chippenham.  It was while he was in Chippenham that he met his future wife, and around four or five years later he married Harriet Austin of Chippenham, the eldest child of James Austin of Chippenham and his wife Elizabeth, who was also born in 1830.  Once married the couple settled in Melksham where all of their seven known children were born.

 

 

 

According to the census in 1861 William Collett was 31 and a butcher living in Melksham with his daughter P V E Collett who was four years old and his son Albert Henry Collett who was three and recorded in error as Robert H Collett.  Also staying with the family on that day was Elizabeth Austin who was 17, a visitor and a farmer’s daughter, perhaps Harriet’s younger sister.  At that same time William’s wife Harriet Collett from Chippenham, who was also 31, was a visitor at the farm of her Austin family in Kington St Michael and had with her William Collett her one-year old son from Melksham.  Ten years later the family was still living at Melksham in 1871 and comprised the following members.  William Collett from Gildea Hall was 42 and a farmer and a master butcher employing one man and one boy, his wife Harriett Collett from Chippenham was 41, and their six children were Paulina Collett who was 14, Albert Collett who was 13, William Collett who was 11, Ada Collett who was eight, Charles Collett who was six and Florence Collett who was one-year old. 

 

 

 

Very little else is known about William at this time, except that he died at Melksham on 3rd September 1880 at the age of 50, the same year that his father died at Yatton Keynell.  From the headstone at Melksham it is now known that William’s wife Harriet Collett nee Austin died on 26th January 1919 aged 89, and their youngest son Gilbert Alfred Collett died at the age of three years on 28th February 1875.

 

 

 

By the time of the census in 1881 widow Harriett Collett, age 51, had taken over the running of the family’s 58 acre Holbrook Farm in Melksham, where she employed one labourer.  Living there with her was her sons Albert H Collett, age 23, Charles S Collett, age 16, and Florence Collett who was 11.  Supporting the family was servant Sarah Sheat from Baltons Brough in Somerset.  Already having left the family home three years earlier to be married was Harriet’s eldest daughter Paulina, while her son William J Collett, age 21, and her daughter Ada J Collett, age 18, were both living nearby at Bath Buildings in Melksham.

 

 

 

During the next decade Harriet’s son Albert left the farm to become a married man, leaving just her two youngest surviving children still living at Melksham with her in 1891.  Harriet was 61, Charles L Collett was 27 and Florence E Collett was 21.  It was the same situation ten years later, when Harriet Collett from Chippenham was a retired farmer at the age of 66 (sic), her son Charles L Collett was 29 (sic), and also described as a retired farmer, and her daughter Florence E Collett was 31.  The 29 years recorded for Charles is likely to be an error in translation, since he would have been around 36, while Harriet would have been 71 and not 66.  Staying with the family on the day of the census was Herbert S (Stanley) Blake who was 17 and the grandson of Harriet Collett, being the son of her eldest married daughter Pauline Victoria Elizabeth Blake.

 

 

 

After a further ten years the family of three at Melksham had a visitor staying with them on the day of the census in April 1911, in the form of another member of their extended family.  Harriet Collett was 81, her son Charles Collett was 46, and her daughter Florence Collett was 40.  Recorded with them that day was Harriet’s granddaughter Lilian Collett who was 28 and from Melksham, the eldest of the two known children of her eldest son Albert Henry Collett.  It was eight years later that Harriet Collett nee Austin passed away during 1919, following which she was buried at Melksham in the same grave as her husband and their youngest son Gilbert.

 

 

 

62N40

Paulina Victoria Elizabeth Collett

Born in 1856 at Melksham

 

62N41

Albert Henry Collett

Born in 1858 at Melksham

 

62N42

William James Collett

Born in 1860 at Melksham

 

62N43

Ada Jane Collett

Born in 1862 at Melksham

 

62N44

Charles Lewin Collett

Born in 1865 at Melksham

 

62N45

Florence Emily Collett

Born in 1870 at Melksham

 

62N46

Gilbert Alfred Collett

Born in 1872 at Melksham; died 1875

 

 

 

 

62M20

Ann Collett was born at Yatton Keynell during 1845, the only child of Henry Collett from Melksham and his second wife Martha from Box in Wiltshire, possibly Martha Visey (Vezey).  Martha was a nurse working away from the family home in West Yatton in 1851 when it was just Ann, who was five, living there with her father, master butcher Henry.  Ten years later in 1861 all three of them were together and living at Yatton Keynell, albeit under the Collitt spelling of their surname, when Henry Collitt was 74 and a butcher from Melksham, Martha Collitt was 52 and from Box, and Ann Collitt of Yatton Keynell was 15 years of age.

 

 

 

 

62M21

Emma Jane Collett was born at Kington St Michael in 1835.  She was baptised there on 10th June 1835, and was living there with her parents Joseph Collett and his wife Elizabeth Collett nee Buckland and her younger sister Mary (below) at the time of the census in 1841 when, as Emma Collett she was six years old.  Ten years later she was still living on the farm at Kington St Michael with her parents at the age of 15, and was also still there in 1861 when she was 25.  It has now been established that just over one year later Emma Jane married into her mother’s Buckland family when she married Edward Buckland (Ref. 62m4 in Appendix), the event recorded at Chippenham during the third quarter of 1862.

 

 

 

Their marriage apparently produced three children, all of whom were born at Kington St Michael.  The first of the three children was Edith Frances Buckland who was born during the third quarter of 1863 but who died during the last three months of 1871.  The other two surviving children were Alice Buckland who was born in 1866 and Ernest Edward Buckland who was born on 21st June 1873 who eventually passed away on 7th March 1929.  Curiously on the day of the census in 1871 the couple’s youngest daughter, Alice who would have been three or four years of age, was absent from the family home.  Instead Emma Buckland, aged 35, and her husband Edward, aged 34, and their daughter Edith aged seven years, were recorded at New Priory Farm in Kington St Michael the home of Emma’s mother Eliza Collett nee Buckland.  Also living there was Emma’s niece, Amy Louisa Buckland, who was five years old and the daughter of Emma’s sister Mary Anne Buckland (below).  The two young girls were described as the granddaughters of Eliza Collett.

 

 

 

In the Kington St Michael census of 1881 the head of the household at New Priory Farm was again Eliza Collett, the farmer of 268 acres, employing 2 men, 3 boys and 3 women.  By then Emma J Buckland was 45, while her husband Edward, aged 44, was described as a farmer, presumably one of the two men employed by his mother-in-law.  Still living with the couple were their two surviving children, their daughter Alice Buckland who was 14 and their son Ernest Buckland who was seven.  Completing the household was general servant Jane Elms aged 19.  Every member of the household had been born at Kington St Michael.

 

 

 

By 1891 Emma Jane Buckland was 55 and her husband Edward Buckland was 54 when they were still managing New Priory Farm in Kington St Michael, helped by their son Ernest E Buckland who was 17.  Still living with the family at that time was Emma’s widowed mother Eliza Collett nee Buckland who was 85.  Also staying with them on that day were four of the children of Emma’s sister Mary Anne Buckland (below) who had died two years earlier.  They were nephew Arthur Collett Buckland who was 27 and three nieces Amy Louisa Buckland who was 25, Alice Buckland who was 24 and Annie Laura Buckland who was 23.  It was three years later when Emma’s elderly mother Eliza passed away.

 

 

 

Curiously by 1901 former Collett farm previously New Priory Farm, was described as Lower Priory Farm at Kington St Michael in the census that year.  Edward Buckland was 64, Emma Buckland was 65 and their still unmarried son Ernest Buckland was 27.  Two of Emma’s dead sister’s daughters were still living there with them, and they were unmarried nieces Amy L Buckland who was 35 and Alice Buckland who was 34.  It was later that same year when Edward Buckland died and two years after that his son Ernest Edwin Buckland married Rosa Mary Hiscock.  So by the time of the 1911 Census Ernest was 37, head of the household, had been married for seven years, and was a farmer living in an eight-roomed property in Kington St Michael.  His widowed mother Emma was living with him, although his wife Rosa Mary Buckland was a visitor in the home of widow Margaret Horton in Ashton Keynes, Wiltshire.  Helping Ernest with the domestic chores was servant Caroline Jane Ponting who was 15.

 

 

 

Emma Jane Buckland was still living at New Priory Farm in Kington St Michael, the former home of her parents, when she died on 23rd April 1919.  Her Will was proved in London on 12th June 1919 when her son Ernest Edward Buckland, a farmer, was named as the sole executor of her estate of £490 19 Shillings 10d.

 

 

 

 

62M22

Mary Anne Collett was born at Kington St Michael in 1837.  It was there that she was also baptised on 13th May 1837, although the baptism record recorded that she was ‘Marianne Collett, the daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth Collett.  In June 1841 and March 1851, as Mary Collett, she was still living at Kington St Michael on her parent’s farm when she was aged four years old and thirteen years old respectively.  By 1861 she was 23 and was listed in that year’s census as Mary A Collett of Kington St Michael, where she was still living with her family.  Like her sister Emma (above), Mary Anne also married into her mother’s Buckland family when she married her brother-in-law Arthur Henry Buckland (Ref. 62m5 in Appendix) the brother of Edward Buckland, Emma’s husband, the Buckland brothers being the son of Edwin Buckland, the brother of Emma’s and Mary’s mother.

 

 

 

The marriage of Mary Anne Collett and Arthur Henry Buckland took place during the first three months of 1863 and was recorded at Chippenham.  Arthur was born in 1838, the son of Edwin Buckland and Louisa Collett, and over the following two decades Mary Anne presented Arthur with seven children, all of them born at Kington St Michael.  They were Arthur Collett Buckland (born on 19th November 1863), Amy Louisa Buckland (born on 30th November 1865), Alice Buckland (born on 21st February 1867), Annie Laura Buckland (born on 30th January 1868), Henry Buckland (born circa 1870, died on 7th January 1875), Charles Buckland (born on 15th September 1872), and Henry Buckland (born in February 1875, died on 18th March 1876).

 

 

 

The family was still living in Kington St Michael in 1871 when Mary Anne was 34 and Arthur was described as a maltster out-of-business.  Living with them were their children Arthur Collett Buckland who was seven, Alice Buckland who was four, Annie Laura who was three and Henry Buckland who was four months old, while the couple’s absent daughter Amy Louisa Buckland aged five years was staying with her grandmother Eliza Collett at New Priory Farm in Kington St Michael.  Supporting Mary Anne and Arthur was domestic servant Caroline Wilcox aged 18, and lodging with the family was unmarried police officer Thomas Perrett.

 

 

 

Over the following half decade their family was completed, but tragically Arthur Henry Buckland passed away after the birth of their last child, so by 1881 Mary Anne Buckland aged 44 had been a widow for four years.  The census that year recorded the family residing at the Malt House on the High Street in Kington St Michael which comprised Amy Louisa Buckland who was 15 – recorded as Mary L Buckland, Annie Laura Buckland who was 13 and Charles Buckland who was eight years old, all still attending school.  Mary Anne’s missing son Arthur Buckland, aged 17, was a servant at the Faringdon home of butcher Edward Heavens where his occupation was that of a butcher’s boy.  Mary Anne Buckland nee Collett survived as a widow for fourteen years when she died on 22nd October 1889, her death recorded at Chippenham.

 

 

 

Following the deaths of both of their parents, a number of the children of Mary Ann and Arthur Buckland remained living with the family of Emma Jane Buckland and her husband Edward at New Priory Farm in Kington St Michael where they were recorded in both 1891 and 1901.

 

 

 

 

62M23

Henry Collett was born at Kington St Michael in 1838, where he was baptised on. 22nd December 1838, the son of Joseph and Elizabeth Collett.  Sadly, he died before he was two years old and was therefore absent from the family by 1841.

 

 

 

 

62M24

Henry Collett was born at Kington St Michael on 17th August 1841 and was baptised there on 27th October 1841.  The baptism record confirmed that his parents were Joseph and Elizabeth Collett.  His father was a farmer of over 200 acres at Priory Farm in Kington St Michael, where Henry was living with his family in 1851 at the age of nine years.  Ten years later he was still there at the age of 19.  Just a few years after that, Henry emigrated to North America and that would appear to have taken place between 1863 to 1865, judging by the age of his oldest child who was born in Kansas.  On his arrival in America, Henry settled in the state of Kansas where he married Carolina (Carrie) Eliza Houston who had been born in 1847 at Knoxville in Tennessee, the daughter of America parents George Blackburn Houston and Lamenda Owen Munday.  Over the next fifteen years the marriage produced six children for Henry and Carrie, and all of them were born within the state of Kansas.

 

 

 

According to the US Census of 1880, the Collett family was living at Chase Township in Kansas.  This was situated on the railway midway between Great Bend and McPherson, which today lies on Route 96.  The family was made up of Henry Collett from England who was 38, his wife Carrie E Collett who was 34, and their five children Franklin Collett 13, Frederick H Collett 11, Rosina C Collett 10, Elizabeth Collett who was six and Grace Collett who was two years old.  At that time Henry’s occupation was that of a farmer, like his father.  On 15th December 1904 the following item was printed in the Chase Township newspaper Another of Chase County's oldest and most respected citizens has passed away.  Henry Collett for more than 40 years has been an active participant in the affairs of Chase County”.  It was twenty years after his death when Carolina Eliza Collett nee Houston died in 1924.

 

 

 

62N47

George Franklin Collett

Born in 1867 at Kansas

 

62N48

Alfred (Fred) Henry Collett

Born in 1869 at Kansas

 

62N49

Caroline (Carrie) Rosina Collett

Born in 1870 at Kansas

 

62N50

Elizabeth E Collett

Born in 1874 at Kansas

 

62N51

Charles O Collett

Born in 1876 at Kansas

 

62N52

Grace Collett

Born in 1878 at Kansas

 

 

 

 

62M25

Edward Collett was born at Kington St Michael on 18th August 1843 and was baptised there on 4th January 1844, the son Joseph and Elizabeth Collett.  Tragically it was later that year when the death of Edward Collett was recorded at Chippenham during the third quarter of 1844.

 

 

 

 

62M26

Eliza Collett was born at Kington St Michael in 1845, where she was baptised on 21st July 1845.  She was five years old by 1851 and fifteen years old in 1861.  Sadly, six years later, Eliza Collett died during 1867 at the age of 22.

 

 

 

 

62M28

John Collett was born at Easton Piercy in Kington St Michael and was baptised in the parish church at Kington on 7th June 1834, the second child and only surviving son of Stephen Collett and his first wife Sophia Rawlings.  His mother died when he was around four or five years old after which his father re-married, so in the June census of 1841 John was seven years old when he was living at Kington St Michael with his father, his stepmother Louisa and his two sisters, at the home of farmer Henry Collett.  On the day of the census his stepmother Louisa was expecting the birth of her first and only known child by his father, who was born almost exactly three months later.

 

 

 

Further tragedy hit the young family over the following years when first John’s stepmother died, and then his father passed away in 1850.  At that time in their lives the three youngest children of Stephen Collett were taken into the Easton Piercy home of their elderly unmarried uncle, farmer Henry Collett.  By 1851 nephew John Collett was 17 and was employed by his 75-year old uncle as an assistant farmer on his 230 acre holding, which also employed eight other labourers.  Living at the farmhouse with John and his uncle, was his sister Constance, who was 16, and his half-brother Daniel (below), who was nine.  All of them were described as having been born at Kington St Michael.  Supporting the family was Ann Dyer, age 28, who was the housekeeper, Julia Woodward, age 18 who was a servant, and agricultural labourer Henry Sergant who was 16.

 

 

 

During the next decade farmer Henry Collett must have died and appears to have passed his fortune onto his nephews, because by 1861 John Collett, age 27, was residing at a dwelling named as the Manor House in Easton Piercy, from where he was a fund-holder.  In other words, he was living on an income gained from owning land and the dividends arising there from.  Still living with him was his younger half-brother Daniel, who was also a bachelor and a fund-holder.  The place of birth for both of them was given as Easton Piercy, while supporting them was housekeeper Charlotte Tanner, who was 38, and servant girl Eliza Sheptown age 21. 

 

 

 

Rather mysteriously both John and Daniel died within five months of each other less than two years later.  Daniel died in November 1863, while the death of John Collett was recorded at Chippenham on 13th March 1864, his Will proved at Salisbury one month later on 13th April.  The Will of John Collett of Chippenham was proved by the oath of Constance Prudence Fry, John’s married sister (below).

 

 

 

 

62M29

Constance Prudence Collett was born in 1836 and was baptised at Kington St Michael on 21st June 1836, the daughter of Stephen Collett and Sophia Rawlings.  Her mother probably died giving birth to her younger brother Lot Collett since her father had remarried by the time of the census in 1841 when Constance was named in error as Constant Collett who was five years old.  The family was then hit by a double tragedy with first her stepmother passing away and then her father, who died in 1850.  As a result of their loss Constance and her two older siblings were taken into the care of her uncle Henry Collett at Easton Piercy.  It was during the last three months of 1857 that Constance Prudence Collett married maltster Richard Henry Fry, their wedding being recorded at Chippenham register office (Ref. 5a 125).

 

 

 

Over the following years Constance gave birth to eight children, but by the time of the census in 1911 Constance Prudence Fry, age 75, was a widow residing in Corsham in Wiltshire and only four of her children were still alive.  She was then living on her own means, while living with her was her unmarried daughter Amy Ethel Fry who was 41 and a music teacher and an organist.  It was just less than six years later that Constance passed away on 29th January 1917 when she was living at the High Street in Corsham.  Sadly, her personal effects amounted to only £21 11 Shillings 4d, administration of which was granted to another of her daughters, spinster Maud Fry, in London on 30th May 1917.

 

 

 

 

62M31

Daniel Collett was born at Easton Piercy in Kington St Michael on 11th September 1841, and was baptised at Kington St Michael on 27th October 1841 the only known child of farmer Stephen Collett by his second wife Louisa Davis.  His mother died when he was still very young and tragically his much older father also passed away during the September quarter of 1850.  So by the time of the next census in 1851 nine-year old Daniel Collett was living with his older half-brother John and his half-sister Constance at the Easton Piercy home of their uncle Henry Collett.  Henry was a bachelor of 75 who had been born at Kington St Michael.  He was a farmer of 230 acres and employed nine labourers, one of which was Daniel’s half-brother John (above).

 

 

 

It might appear that Daniel and his half-brother both benefited from the death of their uncle, since by 1861 they were still living together at Easton Piercy, but at the Manor House, where both of them were described as fund-holders.  Daniel Collett from Easton Piercy was 19 by that time, although tragically he only survived for just over two years when he died on 2nd November 1863 at Chippenham, coincidentally just five months before the death of his half-brother John.  It was on 13th January 1864 that administration of his effects of under £450 was granted to Constance Prudence Fry his married half-sister (above), the wife of Richard Henry Fry, a maltster.

 

 

 

 

62M32

William Collett was born in London during January 1812, the eldest child of William Collett and Harriet Mence who had only been married for around one month when he was born.  It was over two years later, perhaps out of embarrassment, that he was baptised at Old Church in St Pancras in a joint ceremony with his younger sister Harriet (below) on 1st June 1814.  Tragically he died of consumption while at Haggeston within the London Borough of Hackney on 18th June 1840 at 8 Great Cambridge Street in Haggerston, aged 28 years and 5 months.  His death entry records his occupation as Gentleman.  His married sister Hester Paddon nee Collett, of 48 Lower Marsh, Lambeth in Surrey was present at the time of death.  He was buried one week later at St. Mary’s Church in Haggerston on June 25th 1840.  It may be of interest that it was not only William who suffered with poor health, since five other members of the Collett family succumbed to tuberculosis or lung-related conditions, and they were Hester Collett and Charles Collett, Charles’ first wife Elviner, and two of his children from his second marriage.

 

 

 

 

62M33

Harriet Collett was born within the London Borough of Hackney in 1814 and was baptised in a joint ceremony with her brother William (above) at Old Church in St Pancras on 1st June 1814, when her parents were confirmed as William and Harriet Collett.

 

 

 

At the time of her marriage she was referred to as Harriet Collett of Haggeston when she was married by licence to Doctor Thomas Ottrey Rayner, of Hackney, surgeon, at St. John’s Church in Hackney on 11th August 1838.  The ceremony was conducted by Ashby Blair Haslewood, curate, in the presence of Charles Thomas Purchase and Caleb Turner.  All parties appear to have signed the register, when the father of the bride was named as William Collett, in the Post Office, and the father of the groom was named as Thomas Rayner, in the Excise Office.

 

 

 

It is likely that the couple was married by licence because Harriet was already pregnant with their first child, Harriet Florence Angelina Rayner, who was born on 12th October 1838, but who sadly died five weeks later and was buried at St. Mary’s Church in Haggerston on 21st December 1838, where Harriet’s brother William (below) was buried less than two years later.

 

 

 

Harriet and Thomas Rayner had at least nine more children over the following years, the family eventually emigrating to Canterbury in New Zealand.  The first to leave was Thomas was the first to leave, when he sailed from England on the ship ‘Sir Edward Paget’ in 1856, with Harriet and their nine children following on board the ‘Clontarf’, which arrived at Lyttelton on 5th January 1859.  Harriet Rayner nee Collett died from breast cancer on 26th November 1887 while at Pleasant Point, South Canterbury in New Zealand, and was buried at the local cemetery two days later on the 28th November.  We must only wonder now, whether Harriet discovered that one of her travelling companions was Sarah Collett, the wife of Francis Collett (Ref. 1N28) of Bibury, who had with her, her married daughter Anne Bryan and youngest son William Collett.

 

 

 

 

62M34

Hester Collett was born on 7th October 1815 at St James in Clerkenwell, Middlesex and was later baptised at Pentonville Chapel in St James on 25th October 1815, when she was confirmed as the daughter of William Collett and Harriet Mence.  Hester later married Charles Paddon by banns in St. Luke’s Church at Old Street in Middlesex on 24th February 1835.  The ceremony was performed by John Howard Rice in the presence of William Collett, senior, and William Collett, junior, Hester’s father and older brother. Hester and Charles both signed the register.

 

 

 

Charles Paddon, of 48 Lower Marsh, Lambeth, in Surrey, was one of the witnesses to the Will of William Collett, his father-in-law, on 9th December 1842.  Interestingly, a Charles Paddon, of Lambeth, was declared a bankrupt in 1846, “Charles Paddon, slop seller, Charlotte Street, New-cut, Lambeth”. This appears to have been annulled about one month late, and this individual was almost certainly Hester’s husband, as New-cut was but one of several verified addresses of the Paddon family.

 

 

 

Hester and Charles had four children.  Charles William Paddon, who was born in Middlesex on 2nd March 1836, William Edwin Paddon, who was baptised on 24th May 1837 at Lambeth, Hester [Esther] Paddon, who was born on 3rd January 1840 at Lambeth, and Walter Collett Paddon, who was born on 12th June 1841, also at Lambeth in Surrey.  Tragically, Hester Paddon nee Collett died from phthisis on 31st August 1847 at 48 Lower Marsh in Lambeth at the age of only 31.  Her husband Charles, also of the same address, was present at the time of her death, following which she was buried a week later on 7th September at St. Mary’s Church in Lambeth.  Following her death Hester’s daughter and namesake Hester Paddon went to living with Hester’s married sister Helen Herman nee Collett (below), while it would appear that her three sons remained with her husband Charles Paddon.

 

 

 

 

62M35

Henry Collett was born on 5th September 1817 at Shoreditch in Middlesex and was later baptised at Christchurch St Leonard in Middlesex on 29th October 1817.  It was also at Shoreditch that Henry was living and working in 1841 when the census that year described him as Henry Collett from Middlesex who was 24 and a bone mincher.

 

 

 

 

62M36

Charles Collett was born at Shoreditch on 15th April 1821 and was baptised there at St Leonard’s Church in Shoreditch on 14th October 1921.  At the time of the census in 1841 Charles, age 20, was living at Shoreditch with his parents.  Six year later he married (1) Elviner Mayhew Merry on 26th May 1847 at Hackney in London.  Elviner was born on 4th September 1824 at Shoreditch and was the daughter of George and Charlotte Mayhew. 

 

 

 

However, within a year of their wedding day, Elviner died on 15th February 1848 while the couple was living in Hackney, following which she was buried at Abney Park Cemetery in London on 19th February 1848.  The cause of death was phthisis pulmonalis, a condition with which she had suffered for only the previous six months.  The next census in 1851 recorded Charles Collett, age 29, as being a widower, by which time he had returned to living with his parents at Shoreditch St Leonards.  During the period after the death of his wife Charles met the widow (2) Martha Yates whom he eventually married by licence at St John’s Church in Hackney on 24th July 1852.  Martha was the daughter of William and Martha Yates and was born on 6th July 1825 and was baptised at St Mary’s Church in Marylebone Road in London on 27th July 1825.  The wedding ceremony was conducted by Alexander Gordon in the presence of Charles’ younger brother Edwin Collett (below) and his younger sister Louisa Collett (below).  All parties appear to have signed the register, when the entry also confirmed the father of the groom as William Collett, Gentleman, and the father of the bride as Henry Bellamy, Captain with the Royal Navy.

 

 

 

The marriage of Charles and Martha produced three children, the first two born at Dalston, where the third child may also have been born.  Charles worked for the Travelling Post Office, as did his brother Edwin (below).  During that time, he was badly injured in a train-shunting accident, and it may have been from the injuries he sustained that he died in 1860 while he was still living in Hackney area.  Following his death, he was buried on 15th March 1860 at Abney Park Cemetery, either near to or with his first wife.  Later that same year Charles’ youngest daughter died and was buried with him.  Sometime during the following years Martha Collett, formerly Yates nee Bellamy, married her third husband, commercial traveller George William Smith.  By 1872 Martha and George were residing at 3 Stoke Place, West Green in Tottenham, with Martha’s only surviving child Adine, who tragically died during the first two days of the following year.

 

 

 

62N53

Adine Collett

Born in 1853 at Dalston, Hackney

 

62N54

Herrman Collett

Born in 1855 at Dalston, Hackney

 

62N55

Edith Collett

Born in 1859 at Hackney

 

 

 

 

62M37

EDWIN COLLETT was born at Shoreditch on 9th January 1824 and was baptised at St Leonard’s Church in Shoreditch on 30th January 1824.  He was listed as being 17 years of age in the census of 1841, when he was living at Shoreditch with his family.  He married Mary Cook on 15th April 1847 at Lambeth in Surrey.  Mary was born at Southwark in London in 1824 and was the daughter of William Cook.  The couple’s first two children were born at Lambeth but they then moved to live at Leytonstone where the next four children were born.

 

 

 

By 1851 Edwin Collett was 27 and his wife Mary was 28, and by then their marriage had produced three children.  The family of five was living at Leytonstone in the West Ham registration district of East London, where Horace Collett was three, Mary Collett was two, and William Collett not yet one-year old.  Five more children were added to the family during the next decade, although sadly by the time of the next census in 1861 the couple’s eldest daughter Mary had died, as had baby Clara.  So the family living in Hackney in 1861 comprised Edwin age 37, Mary age 38, Horace who was 13, William who was 10, Julia, Eugene who was seven, Flora Emily who was two and Lily who was under one-year old. 

 

 

 

One last child was born into the family in March 1863 when Edwin and Mary Collett living at 22 Mare Street in Hackney, from where Edwin was employed as a clerk in the local branch of the General Post Office.  The birth and the baptism of that child, over three years later, were both recorded using the name Elvena Mary Collett who, in later census returns, was recorded as Elvina, as confirmed in the census of 1871 when the family was still living in Hackney.  By that time Edwin was 47 and Mary 48, the children still living there with them were Horace Collett, age 23, William Collett, age 20, Julia Collett, age 17, Eugenie Collett, age 14, Flora Collett, who was 12, Lily Collett, who was 10, and Elvena (Elvina) Collett who was eight years old.

 

 

 

No trace of any member of the family has been found within the Great Britain census of 1881, and their absence may have been associated with the fact that the couple’s eldest son Horace emigrated to New Zealand, and was followed by his brother William who emigrated to South Africa.  So there is a chance that the whole family were out of the country at that time.

 

 

 

However, perhaps life in a new world did not suit Edwin and his wife, because by 1891 they were once again living in London.  The census that year place Edwin Collett, age 67, and his wife Mary, also 67, living within the Wandsworth & Streatham registration district with two of their daughters. Eugenie Collett was 35, and Flora E Collett was 32.  It was just over two years later that Edwin Collett died at 21 Salters Road in Brixton on 15th July 1893, following which his Will was proved in London on 13th August in favour of his widow Mary Collett.  His personal effects had a value of £600.  Sometime after her husband had passed away Mary moved to Croydon where she was living in 1901 at the age of 78.

 

 

 

Ten years after that, according to the next census in April 1911, Mary was residing at 46 Central Hill in Upper Norwood, described as a comfy 6-roomed home.  At that time in her life, widow Mary Collett from London was 88 when she was described as surviving on private means.  Living there with her on that day were two of her unmarried daughters, and they were Eugenie Collett who was 54 and Elvena (Elvina) Mary Collett who was 48.  Neither of them was recorded as having an occupation but they were listed as having been born in Leytonstone Green and Hackney respectively.  Of further interest is the fact that Harriet Martha Collett was living at 117 Central Hill in Upper Norwood during the Great War, which was also the temporary address for Captain Clive Franklyn Collett from New Zealand.  He was the grandchild of Edwin and Mary Collett, the son of their eldest child Horace Edwin Collett.  Sometime during the next few years, perhaps after the start of the war, Mary return to Croydon where the death of Mary Collett nee Cook was recorded as having taken place on 27th March 1919.

 

 

 

62N56

HORACE EDWIN COLLETT

Born in 1848 at Lambeth

 

62N57

Mary Louise Collett

Born in 1849 at Lambeth

 

62N58

William Edwin Collett

Born in 1850 at Leytonstone

 

62N59

Clara Collett

Born in 1852 at Leytonstone

 

62N60

Julia Collett

Born in 1853 at Leytonstone

 

62N61

Eugenie Collett

Born in 1856 at Leytonstone

 

62N62

Flora Emily Collett

Born in 1858 at Hackney

 

62N63

Lily Collett

Born in 1860 at Hackney

 

62N64

Elvena Mary Collett

Born in 1863 at Hackney

 

 

 

 

62M38

Helen Collett was born at Shoreditch on 31st December 1825 and was baptised there a month later on 27th January 1826 at St Leonard’s Church, the daughter of William Collett and Harriet Mence.  She was 15 in 1841 and was living with her family at Shoreditch.  It was nine years later when Helen Collett married Charles Herman on 30th October 1840 in the parish Church of St. Mildred Poultry and St. Mary Colechurch at Cheapside in the City of London. Charles was described as a bachelor and a merchant residing at 8 Great Cambridge Street, off Hackney Road whose father was Charles Herman, also a merchant.  Helen’s father was confirmed as William Collett, an officer in the Post Office. Over the following twenty-three years Helen presented Charles with six children.  They were Charles Sidney Herman (1850-1934), Sarah Herman (1853-1938), Louisa Herman (1855-1936), Eugenie Helena Herman (1858-1909), Constance Laura Herman (1860-1914) and Alfred Edward Herman (1863-1906).

 

 

 

On the day of the census in 1851 Charles Herman was 30 and a leather merchant who had been born in Germany, while his wife Helen Herman was 25 and born in Shoreditch.  They were living at 10 Washington Place off Commerce Road in Lambeth with their son Charles Sidney Herman who was just four months old.  Staying with the family on that occasion was Helen’s niece Hester Paddon who was 11 and born in Lambeth, the daughter of Helen’s later married sister Hester Paddon nee Collett who had died four years earlier.

 

 

 

During the next decade the family moved to Greenwich and in the 1861 they were recorded at 2 Acton Place at Deptford where Helen Herman was 35 and Charles Herman was 40 and a wine merchant whose place of birth was named as Alsfeld Hease Bumstadt in Germany.  Their children on the day of the census were listed as Charles Sidney who was 10 and born at Camberwell as was Sarah who was eight, Louisa who was six and born at Deptford and Eugenie who was three and also born there.  Still living with the family was Helen’s niece Hester Paddon who was 21 by then, but sometime thereafter the family moved again, that time to settle in Croydon.

 

 

 

After a further ten years Charles Herman was 50 and Helen was 45 when they were living at 260 Victoria Villa in Croydon where Charles was still working as a wine merchant.  By that time their son Charles Sidney Herman was 20 and a clerk, Sarah Herman was 18, Louise Herman was 16, Eugenie H Herman was 13, Constance L Herman was 11 and Alfred Edward was eight years of age.  The family appear to be quite affluent as they were able to employ two domestic servants Marian Drew aged 27 and Ellen Drew who was 21.

 

 

 

It was at a property called Homewood on Princess Road in Croydon where the family was recorded in the census of 1881.  By then Charles Herrman was 60 and a general merchant, Helen from Shoreditch was 55, Sarah Herrman was 28 and born at Fulham, Louisa Herrman was 26, Eugenie H Herrman was 23, Constance L Herrman was 21, all three sisters having been born at New Cross in Kent, and Alfred E Herrman was 18 and had been born at Peckham.  Supporting the family was cook Maria Simpson and housemaid Jane Howe.

 

 

 

Charles Herman died at Croydon eight years later on 4th January 1889, so by the next census in 1891 confirmed that Helen Herman was a widow at 65 years of age when she was living on her own means at 3 Princess Road in the Southbrook district of Croydon.  When Charles’ estate was settled it was valued at over four thousand pounds.  Still living with Helen in 1891 were her three unmarried daughters who were also described as living on their own means, and they were Sarah Herman aged 38, Eugenie H Herman aged 33 and Constance L Herman who was 31. The family’s two servants that year week were sisters Eliza Tichbury who was 28 and a cook and Maria Tichbury who was 26 and a housemaid.

 

 

 

Just less than two years later Helen Herman nee Collett died at Croydon on 20th February 1893, following which her Will was proved in London on 18th March 1893.  The probate confirmed that Helen Herman of Homewood, Princess Road, South Norwood in Surrey, a widow, left personal effects valued at £975 4 Shillings 3d to her spinster daughters Sarah Herman and Louisa Herman.  Of all of Helen’s children it is the eldest, Charles Sidney Herman, who is very interesting.  Firstly, he changed his name to Frank Charles Richardson and then emigrated to New Zealand.  This information was only discovered when his Will was proved in London seventeen years after his death.  The probate process revealed that Richardson, Frank Charles or Herman, Charles Sidney, of Sandy Bay in Nelson, New Zealand died on 3rd July 1934.  Probate was granted at Nelson to Eliza Selina Richardson, his widow, his personal effects valued at £1,092 in England sealed in London on 8th May 1951.  Since then it has been established that Charles and Eliza were married at Nelson on 27th July 1898.

 

 

 

 

62M39

Alfred Collett was born at Shoreditch on 3rd July 1827 where he was baptised the following year at St Leonard’s Church on 16th March 1828.  Sadly, he died in early October 1829 at Hackney in Middlesex when he was only 2 years and 3 months old.  He was buried at St. Mary’s Church in Haggerston on 7th October, and his address at the time of death was recorded as Brunswick Street in Hackney, a verified place of residence of the Collett family from 1826 to 1833.

 

 

 

 

62M40

George Collett was born at Shoreditch on 7th July 1829 and was baptised there on 20th September 1829 at St Leonard’s Church.  By 1841 he was 12 years old when he was living at the family home in Shoreditch.  Ten years later in 1851 when he was 21 he was still living with his parents at Shoreditch St Leonards, but no trace of him has been found during the three decades thereafter.  However, within the census of 1891 a bachelor by the name of George Collett, who had been born in London and who was 62 and a retired labourer, was an inmate at the Union Workhouse in the St Marylebone district of London.  Whether he was George Collett from Shoreditch is not known.

 

 

 

 

62M41

Louisa Caroline Collett was born at Shoreditch on 31st July 1831.  She was baptised seven weeks later on 18th September 1831 at St Mary’s Church in nearby Haggerston within the London Borough of Hackney.  In 1841 she was 10 years old and in 1851 she was 19, and on both occasions she was living with her parents at their Shoreditch home.  Four years later she married John Cairns on 10th September 1855 at St John’s Church in Hackney.  John was the son of Charles Cairns and his wife Frances Rockcliffe.

 

 

 

 

62M42

Frederick William Collett was born at Shoreditch on 29th May 1833 and was baptised there at St Leonard’s Church on 10th July 1833.  He was 17 in the Shoreditch census of 1851 and it was six years later when he married Sindia Frances Turner on 18th May 1857 at Old Church in St Pancras.  Sindia was born at Bethnal Green in 1836 and was the daughter of Joseph Turner.  She is not easy to identify in the various census records because of the many interpretations of her christian name.  At the time of the birth of their only child, Frederick was working as a book keeper with a carrier company at a time when he and Sindia were living at 18 Weymouth Terrace in Shoreditch.

 

 

 

It may have been that same carrier company that Frederick was working on the day of the census in 1861 when his occupation was that of a cabman.  The census return that year recorded the family of three residing at 28 Allerton Street in Shoreditch St Leonard as Frederick Collett from London who was 27, his wife Lidia F Collett who was 26 and a milliner from London, and their son Charles F Collett who was three years old and born at Shoreditch.

 

 

 

It was as William Collett, aged 37 and from Shoreditch, that Frederick was named in the Shoreditch census of 1871 when he was still employed as a cabman.  His wife Lydia F Collett, spelt in error as Colett, was 34 and still working as a milliner, while her place of birth was then stated as being Bethnal Green.  By that time, and at the age of 13, their son Charles F Collett from Shoreditch had already finished his schooling and was already working as an errand boy.

 

 

 

Towards the end of the next decade Frederick’s son left home to be married, so by 1881 Frederick and his wife were living alone at 11 Pleasant Row in Islington.  Once again Frederick Collett from Shoreditch was still working as a cabman at the age of 47, while his wife Lindia Frances Collett from Bethnal Green was continuing to work as a milliner when she was 44 years old.  And it was also at Islington that five years later Frederick William Collett died during 1886.  No record of his widow has been found in 1891, but in March 1901 Lydia Collett, age 65, was living in Clerkenwell, where she died later that same year.  It may be of interest that in 1871 it was Frederick’s cousin Andrew William Collett (below) who was living at 5 Pleasant Row.

 

 

 

62N65

Charles Frederick Collett

Born on 25.09.1857 at Shoreditch

 

 

 

 

62M43

Horace Walter Collett was born at Shoreditch on 22nd August 1835, where he was baptised on 11th September 1835 at St Leonard’s Church.  Sadly, he only lived to be four years of age, before he died at Bethnal Green on 21st November 1839, following which he was buried there at St Matthews Church.

 

 

 

 

62N1

Richard Pook Collett was originally born as Richard Pook at Clifton in Bristol during the last quarter of 1844.  He was the only son of Mary Anne Collett and Richard Pook and was baptised at St Andrew’s Church in Clifton on 3rd November 1844.  One the day of the Clifton census in 1851 Richard was six years of age and he retained his Pook surname for a further twenty years.

It was around the time of the death of his mother when Richard changed to his name by adopting her maiden name.  She died in 1872 but in 1871 a potential relative of a similar age, by the name of Edmund Walter Pook, was arrested for the Eltham murder of Jane Clouson.  That happened when Richard was also in London, so it is believed that it was that incident which was the real reason for his change of name in order to avoid being associated with the murderer.

 

 

 

Edmund Walter Pook was born at Walworth in Surrey in 1851, the son of Ebenezer Whitcher Pook and Mary Burch.  He was employed in his father's printing works at Greenwich in London and in May 1871 he was accused of murdering Jane Maria Clouson, a former maid in his parents' home.  Jane, who was just seventeen years old, was attacked with a hammer in Kidbrooke Lane, Eltham, South-East London - a killing that came to be known as the Eltham Murder.  It was claimed that Edmund Pook and Jane Clouson had been having an affair lasting several months, with the result that she had become pregnant with his child.  Edmund would not marry Jane because his brother had already angered his father by marrying beneath his station and Edmund had no intention of doing the same.  So Jane was fired from the household.  However, this claim was refuted by his parents, who stated that Jane was dismissed following several warnings about her unkempt appearance and slovenly work habits.  It was also claimed that Edmund and Jane had continued their relationship following her dismissal and it was said that they met secretly and corresponded romantically with one another.

 

 

 

Before she died, Jane Clouson allegedly named Edmund Pook as her assailant. The bloodstained murder weapon was found nearby and it was alleged that the hammer used in the crime had been sold to Edmund by a local shopkeeper some days earlier.  Reports also stated that that there was blood on Edmund's clothes (when asked about the clothing he wore on the night, it matched the description, and the blood on the clothes was claimed to be a result of biting his tongue during a seizure). A man matching Edmund's description had been seen running from the lane that night, with seven witnesses swearing they had seen Jane and Edmund together that evening. The case went to coroner’s trial first, when Edmund was found guilty of the wilful murder of Jane.  This was then rushed through to the Central Criminal Court at The Old Bailey and in the criminal trial in July 1871 the judge ordered that Jane’s last words were inadmissible as they were hearsay.  Secondly, the judge chastised the police, saying that they were after a quick arrest and hounded Pook with no real evidence. As a result, Pook was found not guilty.

 

 

 

Newspaper accounts of the time had intimated Edmund's guilt, even before his trial.  During the final day of his trial a large crowd had gathered in the street outside the court, the courtroom being packed with spectators.  As his acquittal by jury was announced to the crowd the mood was one of anger and disappointment.  It has been suggested that Edmund had escaped justice because of his social class, and family connections.  His father had previously worked for The Times as a tradesman printer.  Edmund was represented at the Coroner's Inquest by Henry Pook, a solicitor, not related to Edmund's family.  Henry Pook had also represented Edmund Pook at two subsequent criminal libel suits, where Edmund was openly accused in pamphlets of being a murderer, despite his acquittal.  Edmund and his family subsequently fled London, changing their identity as they continued to be hounded mercilessly by the press.

 

 

 

It was just a few years after changing his name that Richard Pook Collett married Sarah Ann Hulin who was born at Fishponds in Clifton at the beginning of 1845.  Their wedding took place at Exeter in Devon where it was recorded during the final quarter of 1874 (Ref. 5b 153).  In 1851 Sarah Ann Hulin was six years of age when she was living with her parents George Hulin, a painter and glazier, and Rebecca Hulin at Stapleton within the Clifton registration district.  Shortly after they were married the couple were living at Small Heath in Birmingham when their first child was born.  Curiously the parents of the child were recorded at Richard and Sarah Ann Pook.  Not long after that the family moved to Evington, on the eastern outskirts of Leicester, where their next two children were born using the Collett surname.  By the time of the census of 1881 Richard P Collett, age 36, was working as an assistant embosser in glass and was employing one man.

 

 

 

His place of birth was confirmed as Clifton in Bristol and his wife was recorded as Sarah Ann Collett, age 36 and of Fishponds in Bristol.  Living with them at 61 Myrtle Road in the city of Leicester was their daughter Gertrude who was five, their son Herbert who was three, and baby Edith who was just six months old.  Also living with the family was Sarah Ann’s brother Oliver Hulin, age 26 and of Fishponds, who was an unemployed engine fitter.  The family were affluent enough to employ a domestic servant in the shape of 18 years old Harriet A Hilter.

 

 

 

Ten years later the family was complete, following the arrival of daughters Beatrice and Mabel and son Richard.  Therefore, the family was listed in the Leicester census of 1891 as Richard Collett who was 46, Sarah Collett who was 46, Gertrude Collett who was 15, Herbert Collett who was 13, Edith Collett who was 10, Beatrice Collett who was seven, Mabel Collett who was five and Richard who was three years old.  It was nine years after that when Richard Pook Collett died at Leicester on 15th May 1900, his death recorded at Leicester register office (Ref. 7a 153) during the second quarter of that year.  Probate for the Will of Richard Pook Collett of Mayview, Mayfield Road in Leicester, a leaded glass worker, was granted to his son Herbert Frank Collett, also a leaded glass worker, on 28th June 1900.  His personal effects were originally established as £753 16 Shillings, but during February 1901 they were re-sworn as £978 16 Shillings.

 

 

 

So just after the start of the century the family, excluding Richard, was still living at Mayfield Road in Leicester.  His widow Sarah, at the age of 56, had taken over the family business by 1901 and was described as a leaded glass maker, while working with her was her son Herbert.  In addition to her son Herbert, all of Sarah’s other children were still living with her.  Gertrude Annie was 25, Herbert Frank 23, Edith Mary 20, Beatrice Emily 17, Mabel Eveline 15 and Richard Ernest who was 13.  Sarah Ann Collett from Fishponds in Bristol was still living in Leicester ten years later in April 1911 at the age of 66.  Still living there with her at the extensive 10-roomed dwelling that was 26 Mayfield Road was her son Herbert Frank Collett who was 33, and her two daughters Edith Mary Collett who was 29, and Mabel Eveline Collett who was 25.  Supporting the family was domestic servant Clara Attwood who was 15, while boarding with the family was merchant cashier Sidney James Andrew aged 38 from Naseby in Northamptonshire.  The census return also confirmed that Sarah had been married to Richard for twenty-five years when he died in 1900 and that their marriage had provided them with eight children of which six were still alive.  This means there are two names missing from the list below.

 

 

 

Sarah Ann Collett nee Hulin was still living at 26 Mayfield Road in Leicester eight years later, where she died on 9th March 1919.  Her Will was proved at Leicester on 12th July 1919, when probate was granted to Arthur Stanton Todd, an accountant, and Herbert Frank Collett, an engineer, in respect of her personal estate valued at £1,243 5 Shillings 4d.

 

 

 

62O1

Gertrude Annie Collett

Born in 1875 at Small Heath, Birming.

 

62O2

Herbert Frank Collett

Born in 1877 at Evington, Leics.

 

62O3

Edith Mary Collett

Born in 1880 at Evington, Leics.

 

62O4

Beatrice Emily Collett

Born in 1883 at Leicester

 

62O5

Mabel Eveline Collett

Born in 1885 at Leicester

 

62O6

Richard Ernest Collett

Born in 1888 at Leicester

 

 

 

 

62N2

Emma Collett was born in 1839 at Horton in Gloucestershire, just north of Chipping Sodbury.  In June 1841 Emma was one-year old and was living with her parents at Leonard Stanley.  Her age in the subsequent census records would indicate that she was born in 1842, but this may have simply been to reduce the age difference between herself and her younger husband.  She married George Sparrow during the last quarter of 1867, the event recorded at Chipping Sodbury and by 1871 Emma and George were living at Cherington with their two children.  George was 25 and Emma was 28, and listed with them was their son William Sparrow who was two, and their daughter Annie G Sparrow who was under one-year old.

 

 

 

By 1891 Emma and George had moved north, and were living in County Durham.  The census that year listed the family as gamekeeper George Sparrow of Cherington, age 45, his wife Emma, age 48 and of Horton, and their daughter Annie Sparrow who was 20 and also of Cherington.  Living with the family at Londonderry Cottage in Longnewton, near Stockton-on-Tees at that time, was Emma’s widowed father William Collett who was 83 and from Slaughterford in Wiltshire.

 

 

 

The death of Emma Sparrow nee Collett was recorded at Stockton-on-Tees during the last three months of 1894.  So, within the census of 1901, George Sparrow of Cherington was a widower of 54 years who was still working as a gamekeeper at Longnewton.  The only person then living with him at that time was his daughter Annie Grace Sparrow who was 30 and whose occupation was that of a dressmaker.  It was seventeen years later when George Sparrow died on 7th June 1928, his death recorded at Stockton-on-Tees register office, when his personal effects were left to his married daughter Annie Grace Allen, the wife of Joseph Allen.

 

 

 

 

62N6

Sarah Collett was born early in 1843 at 53 Old Hall Street in Liverpool where her father managed a butcher’s shop.  She was baptised at St Peter’s Church on 19th March 1843, the third of the four children of Thomas Collett from Slaughterford and his wife Mary.  Shortly after she was born the family moved to 73 Dale Street in Liverpool, where they were living in 1845 when both her father and her brother Thomas died there.  Sarah was just twenty years old when she married (1) Alfred Leatham at Edge Hill on Merseyside on 2nd March 1863, the marriage being recorded at the West Derby register office during the first quarter of that year.

 

 

 

Over the next fourteen years Sarah presented Alfred with seven children before his untimely death around 1878.  The children were Frances Mary Leatham, who was born at Wolverhampton in 1863 and who was seven in the Toxteth census of 1871, Richard Leatham, who was born at Preston in 1865, who died in 1938, and who was five in 1871, Sarah Leatham, who was born in 1868, who was three in 1871, and Alfred Leatham who was born in 1870, who died in 1941, and who was one-year old in 1871.  In the census of 1871 Alfred Leatham was 27 and his wife Sarah was 28.  The next three children were Harriet Leatham, who was born in 1873, George Leatham, who was born in 1876, and Louisa Leatham who was born in 1877.

 

 

 

Following the death of her husband Sarah married (2) James Keef at St Thomas’ Church at Walton-on-the-Hill in Liverpool on 20th September 1880, the wedding being recorded at the West Derby register office.  The first of their two children was born just prior to the next census in 1881, but on the day of the census James Keef was absence from the family home at 10 Denton Street in Toxteth.  Sarah Keefe (sic) from Liverpool was 36 and a labourer’s wife, while all of her children carried the Keefe named by then.  They were Richard Leatham Keefe, age 15, Alfred Leatham Keefe, age 11, Harriet Leatham Keefe, who was seven, and John Keefe who was just four months old.  Not long after the census day the family left Liverpool when they moved to Colebrook Street in Cambuslang, Strathclyde, Scotland where Sarah’s last child, Mary M Keef was born on 19th December 1882.

 

 

 

And it was at 10 Colebrooke Street in Cambuslang the family was living in 1891 when Sarah Keef was again a widow at the age 46.  Still living with her were five of her children; Richard Letham (sic), Alfred Letham (sic), Harriet Letham (sic), and John and Mary Maud Keef.  Ten years later Sarah Keefe (sic) was recorded at Victoria Place in Cambuslang with just her two youngest children John and Maud Keefe.  Ten years later she was residing at 87 Main Street in Cambuslang where she died from a carcinoma caecum (bowl cancer) on 28th March 1912 at the age of 69.  Her death was reported by her son John Keef of 7 Silverbanks Street in Cambuslang.  The death certificate No 68 Cambuslang, Lanarkshire, Scotland read as follows: ”Sarah Keef widow of (1) Alfred Leatham, House Painter Journeyman, and (2) James Keef, Steelworker, died 7.30 am 28 March 1912 of 87 Main Street, Cambuslang, aged 69 years, daughter of Thomas Collett, Butcher, deceased and Marie previously Collett, maiden surname unknown, deceased”.

 

 

 

 

62N7

Harriet Collett was born at 73 Dale Street in Liverpool during 1845, the youngest of the four children of Thomas and Mary Collett, and was baptised at St Peter’s Church in Liverpool on 26th April 1845.  Tragically both her father and her brother Thomas died during the third quarter of 1845, after which it is not known what happened to the remaining members of the family.  Harriet married (1) George Smith Spencer at the Church of St Michael-in-the-Hamlet in Toxteth Park, Liverpool on 8th August 1864, as confirmed by the marriage certificate which read as follows: George Smith Spencer, aged 24, upholder (upholsterer), bachelor of William Street, son of Job Spencer, tailor; and Harriet Collett (who made her mark with a cross) aged 19, spinster of William Street, daughter of Thomas Collett, butcher, marriage by banns”.  Their marriage produced five children before Harriet was made a widow, and they were Sarah J Spencer, who was born in 1865, Margaret Spencer, who was born in 1870, Harriet Smith Spencer, who was born in 1872, Mary Spencer, who was born in 1874, and Ann Spencer who was born in 1875.  In 1871 Harriet and George were living at 38 Dundas Mews in Middlesbrough with their daughters Sarah and Margaret, while in 1881 the complete family was residing at 34 Brook Street in Hyde, Cheshire.

 

 

 

When her husband George died is not known at this time, except that on 13th April 1885 at Ashton-under-Lyne in Lancashire Harriet Spencer nee Collett, aged 40, married (2) William Isherwood, aged 45, the son of William Isherwood, to Harriet Spencer nee Collett aged 40, daughter of Thomas Collett.  It was that same year that their daughter Grace was born, although by 1891 Harriet was once again a widow when she was living at Sough Bridge in Barnoldswick with three of her children.  Twenty years later the census in 1911 recorded the widow Harriet Isherwood living in the four-roomed dwelling that was 23 Pollard Street in Burnley.  She was incorrectly aged as being 60 rather than 65, had been born in Liverpool, and had no stated occupation.  Living with her was her unmarried daughter Grace Isherwood who was a cotton winder who had been born at Hyde in Cheshire.  However, her age like her mother’s was also incorrect when it was stated she was 32 and not 25.

 

 

 

Harriet Isherwood, formerly Spencer, nee Collett, died on 17th February 1923 at her home at 77 Brockenhurst Street in Burnley at the age of 78, following which she was buried on 23rd February 1923.  Probate for her personal effects was granted in London on 17th April 1923 to her daughter Grace Crossley, the wife of Reginald Crossley, in the sum of £57 11 Shillings 3d.

 

 

 

 

62N8

Mary Kate Collett was born at Saltford in Somerset in 1842, where her birth was recorded at the Keynsham register office (Ref. 11 114) during the final three months of that year.  She was baptised at Rodney Stoke in Somerset and was the eldest of the two daughters of farmer George Collett from Slaughterford and his first wife Mary Aust from Colerne.  By the time she was eight years old Mary Kate and her family were living on a 55-acre farm at Whitley near Melksham.  Her mother died shortly after that and her father married for a second time in 1853.

 

 

 

In the next census of 1861 Kate Collett, age 18 from Bath (?) was recorded attending a private girls’ school at 12 Norland Square in Kensington Town, District 13, Kensington St Mary Abbott in London run by Margaret A. Newman a widow of 35 who was born in Clapham in Surrey.  The full census record also listed four female members of staff and just seven pupils, of which Mary Kate Collett was the eldest.  Upon completing her education Mary also became a school teacher.  After a further twenty years, Mary Kate and her sister Jane (below) were reunited and were recorded living and working together at the School House in Stoke Charity, a village in Hampshire, just north of Winchester.  Unmarried Mary K Collett, age 38 and from Saltford was the head of household and her occupation was that of a school mistress.  Her unmarried sister Jane M Collett, age 36 and also from Saltford, was described as an annuitant.  Completing the household was general servant Annie M. Hunt who was age 19 and from Southampton.

 

 

 

By the time of the next census in 1891 Mary had retired from teaching, when she was living at Kingston Blount within the Aston Rowant registration district of Oxfordshire.  Mary K Collett was described as head of the household, an unmarried female aged 48, living on own means, who had been born at Saltford in Somerset.  The only person living there with her was her sister Jane M Collett, also unmarried at the age of 46, who was also living on her own means.  The two sisters were still together in March 1901, but sadly later that same year the younger of the two sisters passed away.

 

 

 

According to the census that year they were residing at Ivy Cottage in Middleton Cheney in Northamptonshire.  Mary Kate Collett was 58, while her sister Jane M. Collett was 56, while both of them were living on their own means, although their place of birth was incorrectly recorded by the enumerator as Salford in Somersetshire.  Following the death of her sister at the start of June that same year, Mary remained living at Middleton Cheney where, in April 1911, she was the occupant of The Cottage, a six roomed dwelling, at the age of 68.  Three years later, during a concert at the primary school in 1914 in aid of scout funds, a banner was presented to the 1st Middleton Cheney Scout Group by Miss Collett who lived at Ivy Cottage, later renamed Brasenose Cottage, on the corner of Glovers Lane.  Footnote:  On 22nd May 1985 Brasenose Cottage in Glovers Lane was deemed to be a valuable Grade II listed building.

 

 

 

It was just over six years later that Mary Kate Collett died at Middleton Cheney on 14th August 1920 at the age of 79, her death being recorded at the Banbury register office (Ref. 3a 930).  The details of the announcement of her Will were published as follows: “Mary Kate Collett of Middleton Cheney Northamptonshire, spinster, died 14 August 1920.  Probate granted at Northampton on 11 October 1920 to Sarah Ann Shield, spinster, and Edward Lamley Fisher, solicitor.  Personal Effects £1,047 9 Shillings”.

 

 

 

 

62N9

Jane Millicent Collett was born at Saltford in 1844, the youngest of the two daughters of George and Mary Collett, whose birth was registered at Keynsham (Ref. 11 120) during the second quarter of that year and whose baptism took place at Rodney Stoke in Somerset on 16th June 1844.  In 1851 Jane Melisient (sic) Collett, who was six years old was living with her family at Whitley near Melksham.  Following the death of her mother within the next year, her father married the widow Ann Collett, although no record of her father, her sister or her stepmother has been found within the census of 1861.  However, at that time in her life Jane M Collett, age 16, was a visitor at the Bath Lane home in Colerne of her maternal grandmother Sarah Aust. 

 

 

 

By the time of the census in 1871 Jane Collett from Salford (sic) was 26 when she was living with her father and her stepmother at Bottom Farm in the village of Checkendon in Oxfordshire.  Where she was in 1881 has not been determined, but ten years after that she was living with her older sister Mary (above) at Kingston Blount in Oxfordshire in 1891 when she was described as being 46 and living on her own means.  During the final decade of the century the two sisters moved to the Northamptonshire village of Middleton Cheney and were living at Ivy Cottage on Glovers Lane in March 1901 when the census that year recorded Jane M Collett, age 56, once again living on her own means.

 

 

 

Sadly, it was at Ivy Cottage not long after the census day that Jane Miliscent Collett died on 4th June 1901 at the age of 57, her death being recorded at the Banbury register office (Ref. 3a 533).  Upon her death her sister Mary inherited her person effects, with the following notice of probate being published “Jane Miliscent Collett of Middleton Cheney Northamptonshire, spinster, died 4 June 1901.  Probate granted in London on 28 June 1901 to Mary Kate Collett, spinster.  Personal Effects £227 12 Shillings 7d”.

 

 

 

 

62N12

Harriet Martha Collett was born at Marylebone in London in 1844.  In the census of 1851 she was six years old and was living with her parents at 6 Brook Street in Hammersmith.  Ten years later, at the age of 16, she was a nurse in domestic service at the home of cloth merchant and shipper John P Bull at 15 Hyde Park Street in Paddington.  By 1881 when she was 36, Harriet was living with her parents at The Swan Inn in the Southwark area of London.  Ten years later in 1891, she was living with her mother at 31 Mount Sion in Tunbridge Wells, where they were both described as caretakers of a furnished house.

 

 

 

It was Harriet who was described as ‘aunt Harriet M Collett’ within the military service records, as the English next-of-kin, of Captain Clive Franklyn Collett (Ref. 62O36) of New Zealand who died in 1917, when her address was given as 117 Central Hill in Upper Norwood in London.  It may be of interest that in 1911 Mary Collett, the 88-year old widow of Edwin Collett (Ref. 62M37), was living at 46 Central Hill in Upper Norwood, and it was her grandson Clive Franklyn Collett who was staying with Harriet during the First World War.

 

 

 

 

62N13

Henry Edwin Collett was born at Marylebone in London in 1847 and was listed as being three years old in the Hammersmith census of 1851, when she was living at the family home at 6 Brook Street.  Sometime during the next decade, the family moved house, but stayed living within the Hammersmith area of London.  The 1861 Census recorded Henry Collett, age 13, as living with his family at 9 Spring Street.

 

 

 

At the age of 33 he was still a bachelor living with his parents at The Swan Inn in the St George the Martyr district of Southwark, south London.  And with no occupation stated, it seems likely that he helped his father Edwin in the running of the public house.  From the information within the later census records it is apparent that, about five years later, at the age of 38, he married Emily from Ramsgate, possibly during 1886.  Emily was also in her late thirties, and within the next four years she presented Henry with two daughters.

 

 

 

By the time of the census in 1891 the family of four was residing within the St Olave district of Southwark, where Henry E Collett was 43, his wife Emily Collett was 42, and their two daughters were Patience Collett who was three and Dorothy M Collett who was still under one-year old.

 

 

 

Ten years later in March 1901 Henry Collett of Marylebone, age 53, was an off-licence holder living in the Acton area of London with his wife Emily who was 52.  With them were their daughters Patience who was 13 and born at Marylebone, and Dorothy who was 10 and born at Southwark.  The census of 1911 recorded the family living within the Brentford registration district, where the head of the household was Henry Edwin Collett of London, age 63, and his wife was Emily who was 62.  Still living with the couple were their two daughters, Patience Emily Collett who was 23, and Dorothy Martha Collett who was 20.

 

 

 

62O7

Patience Emily Collett

Born in 1887 at Marylebone

 

62O8

Dorothy Martha Collett

Born in 1890 at Southwark

 

 

 

 

62N14

Robert William Collett was born at 6 Brook Street in Hammersmith on 28th February 1851, the son of traveller Edwin Collett and Martha Young, and was baptised on 31st August 1851 at the Chapel of St. Peter’s Church in Hammersmith.  Curiously one month after he was born there was no child who was four weeks old in the census of 1851, when his father employed as a conductor.  Robert was nine years old in the Hammersmith census of 1861 when he was living with his family at 9 Spring Street.  Ten years later, at the age of 19, he was working as a plumber, while he was still living with his parents who, by then, were residing at 18 Overstone Road in Hammersmith.  Just over five years later Robert William Collett married Christine Louisa Grove at Fulham in London where the event was recorded (Ref. 1a 366) during the last quarter of 1876 when Robert, a plumber, was confirmed as the son of publican Edwin Collett.  It was as Christine Louisa Grove that she was born in London on 29th January 1859 and baptised at Holy Trinity Church in Clapham, Surrey on 8th May 1859, the daughter of James and Laura Mary Grove.

 

 

 

Although the couple had two children prior to 1881, the first born at Acton and the second at Clapham, curiously no record of any member of the family has been found in the census that year.  However, ten years later in 1891 the family of four was recorded as living at 67 Manor Street in Battersea & Clapham, London.  At that time in his life Robert Collett was a plumber aged 35, which may have been a misinterpretation of 39, when he was living there with his wife Christina Collett who was 34, also an error since she was 31, together with their two children.  They were Ernest Collett who was 13 and Florence Collett who was 12 years old.

 

 

 

Ten years after that the family was still together, according to the census in March 1901, by which time Robert was no longer a plumber, but had followed in his father’s footsteps and was a publican’s manager at the age of 49.  The hostelry in question was ‘The Two Brewers Inn’ at 76 Perry Hill in Lewisham.  Robert was also described as having been born in Middlesex, and that he was a worker at home.  His wife was listed as Christine Collett, age 41 and from Clapham, while their two children were Ernest Collett, age 23 and from Acton, who was an ironmonger’s assistant, and Florence Collett who was 22 and from Clapham who had no occupation, presumably helping her parents at the public house. 

 

 

 

After a further ten years Robert William Collett, age 59 and from Middlesex, was the landlord at The Victoria Inn on the High Street in Oxshott, Surrey, when he was described as a beer retailer and an inn keeper – an employer.  Living there with him was his wife of 35 years Christine Louise Collett who was 52 and assisting with the family business.  The census return also confirmed that she had given birth to three children of which two were still alive, although, who, where and when the child missing from the list below was born is not known at this time.  As an employer Robert had working for him at the inn married couple Ernest and Emily Mousley who were both 35.

 

 

 

It was ten years later that Robert William Collett died on 6th February 1921, at which time in his life he and Christine were managing the Spencer Arms Inn at Ardleigh Green in Hornchurch, Essex.  His passing was recorded at Romford register office (Ref. 4a 568) at the age of 69, while his Will was proved in London on 4th May 1921 when administration of his personal effects estimated at £187 14 Shillings 3d was granted to his widow Christine Louisa Collett.  Following the death of Robert, Christine appears to have gone to live with her son who was running The Fox and Hounds public house on South Street in Romford since it was there, twenty months after losing her husband, that Christine Louisa Collett died on 8th October 1922.  Her death was also recorded at Romford register office (Ref. 4a 399) when she was 63.  Less than three week later her Will was proved in London on 27th October 1922 when her son Ernest Edwin Collett, a licenced victualler, was charged with administering her personal effects valued at £83 15 Shillings.

 

 

 

62O9

Ernest Edwin Collett

Born in 1877 at Acton

 

62O10

Florence Collett

Born in 1878 at Clapham

 

 

 

 

62N15

Frank Walter Collett was born in 1856 at Lushill near Castle Eaton by the River Thames, within the Highworth registration area to the east of Swindon.  He was four years old in the Highworth census of 1861 when he was living with his parents and his Louisa (below) at Hillsworth Farm in Lushill.  Shortly before he reached the age of ten years, Frank and his family left Lushill, when they moved to Chippenham and to Pew Hill, where they were living in 1866.  Their time at Pew Hill was short-lived, and by 1867 the family had moved out of the town of Chippenham, and was living just to the north, in the village of Langley Burrell, which became the family’s more permanent home.

 

 

 

At the time of the census in 1871 Frank Walter Collett was 14, and he was living at Langley Burrell with his family.  Tragedy hit the family later that same year, when Frank’s mother Elizabeth died during childbirth, leaving his father with a large family to care for.  However, living with the family as a visitor, was Frank’s aunt Rosa Wright, whom his father married in 1872.  So in 1881 Frank was living with his father and his stepmother at The Brewery in Burrell, along with his four siblings and six half-siblings.  Frank W Collett was unmarried at 24, and was working as a brewer with his father Henry Collett.

 

 

 

It was a few years later that Frank married Lucie Elizabeth Rich who was born at Chippenham in 1866, the daughter of Richard and Maria Rich.  By 1891 the couple had settled in the village of Banwell to the east of Weston-super-Mare in Somerset, when they were living at The Farms.  Lucie was nearly ten years younger than Frank as recorded in the census, when Frank W Collett was 34 and his wife Lucie E Collett was 25.  Also living at The Farms with the couple, was Lucie’s cousin Ethel L Rich who was six years old.  Nine months later Lucie gave birth to the first of their two sons, both of whom were born at Banwell in Somerset.  Sometime after the birth of their second child, the family gave up Somerset for Berkshire, and in March 1901 the family of four was living at 44 Peasecod Street in New Windsor.

 

 

 

The census that year recorded the family as Frank Walter Collett, age 44 and from Tushill (sic) in Highworth, whose occupation was that of a brewer’s manager, his wife Lucy Elizabeth Collett, age 35 and from Chippenham, and their two sons Cecil Henry Collett who was nine, and Francis Austin Collett who was seven years old.  It was during the following decade that the family returned to Wiltshire and settled at Broadfields in Chippenham, where three of them were living in April 1911.  According to that year’s census return Frank W Collett was 53, his wife Lucie E Collett was 43, and their son Francis A Collett was 17.  It was during the previous year that the couple’s eldest son sailed off to a new life in Canada.

 

 

 

Frank Walter Collett died at Chippenham on 8th April 1935 when he was approaching 80 years of age.  The Will of Frank Walter Collett was proved at Winchester on 10th July 1935 and this left effects of £7,917 9 Shillings 11d to his wife Lucie and to Frederick John Burden, accountant.  Frederick was his brother-in-law who by then was a widower.  He was also named in the 1917 Will of his wife Mabel Burden nee Collett (below), and again in the 1923 Will of Rosa Collett, his mother-in-law.

 

 

 

Lucie Elizabeth Collett nee Rich survived her husband by nearly ten years when she passed away during the first few weeks of 1945.  Her Will was proved at Winchester on 16th February 1945 when her address was given as 229 London Road in Chippenham and her personal effects were valued at £3,162 17 Shillings 8d.  Executor of her estate was her son Francis Austin Collett who was a corn merchant.  Apart from son Cecil, the other three members of the family were all buried at the London road Cemetery in Chippenham.

 

 

 

62O11

Cecil Henry Collett

Born in 1892 at Banwell

 

62O12

Francis Austin Collett

Born in 1893 at Banwell

 

 

 

 

62N16

Louisa Naomi Collett was born at Lushill near Castle Eaton in 1858, the second child and eldest daughter of Henry Collett and his first wife Elizabeth Buckland.  Louisa married George Allen Wayte Bryant in Chippenham during 1883.  George was the son of George Bryant and Mary Catherine, and was born at Langley Burrell in 1856.

 

 

 

During the first seven years of their life together, Louisa presented her husband with four children while they were living at Langley Burrell.  Catherine Elizabeth Bryant, known as Kate, was born in 1884 and died at Salisbury in 1965, Francis George Herbert Bryant, known as Frank, was born in 1886 and died at Weymouth in 1964, Florence L Bryant was born in 1888, and Graham Henry Charles Bryant was born in 1890 and died at Chippenham in 1960.  New information received in 2013 suggests that spinster Catherine died while she was staying with her brother Frank in Weymouth when she died, although her address was stated as being Sheldon Road in Chippenham.  Interestingly probate of the Wills of Catherine, Francis and Graham has all their effects being left to Lloyds Bank and their solicitors.

 

 

 

The Bryant family was documented in the 1891 Census as living at Commons Farm in Langley Burrell, Chippenham, but by the time of the next census in 1901, and again in 1911, they were living at Manor Farm in Chippenham Without.  On the occasion of the 1891 Census, Louisa’s mother-in-law, Mary Catherine Bryant, age 72, was also living with the family.  Twenty years later for the census in 1911 all of the Bryant children were not married and were living and working with their parents on the family farm in Chippenham.

 

 

 

Louisa’s husband George Bryant died on 2nd February 1940.  Probate of the Will of George Allen Wayte Bryant on 11th March 1940 left an estate of £7,690 4 Shillings 6d to Graham Henry Charles Bryant, milk-buyer, and Edmund Portman Awdry, solicitor.  At the time of his death, George Bryant was residing at 2 Greenway Park in Chippenham.  It was during the following year that his widow Louisa Naomi Bryant nee Collett passed away.

 

 

 

 

62N17

Mary Kate Collett was born at Lushill near Castle Eaton during the last quarter of 1861, the third child of Henry and Elizabeth Collett.  It was during 1884 that she married Charles Banks with whom she had a daughter, Hilda Blanche Banks, who was born 1886.

 

At the time of the census in 1891, Mary K Banks, age 29, was living with her daughter Hilda Blanche, age five, at The Brewery in Langley Burrell, the home of her father, Henry Collett and her step-mother Rosa Collett.  Also living there was her brother, brewer Charles H Collett, and her half-siblings, Mabel, Laura Rose, Godfrey, and Stanley B Collett.

Photograph courtesy of Gerri Hopkins

 

 

Ten years late, in the 1901, Mary Kate Banks, age 39 and a book-keeper, was living at 105 Frogwell House, the home of her stepmother Rosa Collett.  Also living there was her daughter, Hilda Blanche Banks who was 15 and a millinery apprentice, together with Mary Kate’s half-siblings, Mabel Collett, Laura Rose Collett, Stanley B Collett, a solicitor’s clerk, and her cousin Percy Harris Collett (below) who was 27 and a farmer’s son.  Where Mary’s husband was in 1891 and 1901 is not known although on both occasions the census return did not state that she was a widow.

 

 

 

Mary Kate Banks nee Collett died at Frogwell House in Chippenham on 9th January 1909.  Her Will was administered and proved in London on 6th February 1909 and stated that her daughter, the spinster Hilda Blanche Banks, was the sole beneficiary of her estate of £143 11 Shillings 9d.  Following her death, Mary Kate Banks nee Collett was buried with her parents at Kington St Michael where a single headstone marks their grave.

 

 

 

Five months after the death of her mother Hilda Blanche Banks married Frederick George Scutt at St Andrew’s Church, Montpelier in Bristol on 30th June 1909, so by the time of the census in 1911 Hilda and her husband George, a grocery manager, were living in Bristol with their son George Neville Scutt who was one-year old.  Hilda Blanche Scutt nee Banks died in Chippenham during 1968.

 

 

 

 

62N18

Charles Henry Collett was born at Pew Hill in Chippenham in 1866.  Just after he was born his family settled in the village of Langley Burrell on the northern outskirts of Chippenham, where his father took over The Brewery.  And it was at The Brewery, as Charles Henry Collett aged four years, that he was living with his family in 1871.  Later that same year Charles’ mother died, and the following year his father married Charles’ aunt Rosa Wright.  The family continued to live at The Brewery in Langley Burrell, where Charles was 14 in 1881, and again in 1891 when he was 24.

 

 

 

After his father died in 1896, Charles chose not to stay with his stepmother.  Instead he went to live with his uncle Joseph Collett (his father’s older brother) at Bowerhill, near Melksham.  According to the census in 1901, Charles Collett of Chippenham was 34 and a visitor at the house of his uncle, farmer Joseph Collett of Keevil.  It was stated in the census that Charles Collett was ‘living on own means’.  Ten years later in 1911, no record of a Charles Collett born in Chippenham around 1866 has been found.  It is established that it was while he was at Devizes in Wiltshire around June 1935 that Charles Henry Collett died, although it is not known if he ever married after 1901.

 

 

 

 

62N19

Daniel Maurice Collett, previously listed as Daniel Warren Collett, was born at Langley Burrell in 1867, where he was baptised on 1st December 1867, the son of Henry Collett and Elizabeth Buckland.  At the age of three years, he was living with his family at Langley Burrell in April 1871 when his name was recorded as Daniel Warren Collett.  A few months after that his mother died and during the following year his father married his cousin Rosa Wright.  In 1881 Daniel and his family were living at The Brewery in Langley Burrell.  On that occasion he was listed as Daniel M Collett aged 13 years.  The reason for his absence from any future census is due to the fact that he emigrated to Australia and at the time of his death on 8th January 1903 Daniel Maurice Collett was living at Ayr Burdekin in Queensland.  However, his Will was proved in London on 2nd June 1903 when the sole executor of his personal effects of £416 5 Shillings 2d was his eldest brother Frank Walter Collett, a brewer.

 

 

 

 

62N20

Edwin Graham Collett was born at Langley Burrell in 1872, the last child of Henry Collett and his wife Elizabeth Buckland who tragically did not survive the birth.  His birth and the death of his mother were both registered on the same day.  Following her death his father remarried in 1873, so by the time of the census in 1881, Edwin G Collett was eight years old when he was living with his father and stepmother and his five younger half-siblings, plus his five older brothers and sisters at The Brewery in Langley Burrell.  Sadly, Edwin Graham Collett died at Langley Burrell when he was around 13 years of age, the death being recorded in Chippenham during the first quarter of 1886.  By then he may have already left school, and therefore his death might have been the result of an accident while he was at work.

 

 

 

 

62N21

Roland Collett was born at Langley Burrell in 1874, the first son of Henry Collett and his second wife Rosa Wright.  He was seven years old in 1881, when he was living with his family at The Brewery in Langley Burrell. 

 

Ten years later he had completed his education and had left the family home in Langley Burrell.  He was working as a printer compositor in 1891, while staying at 31 Springfield Road in the Barton Regis & Ashley area of Bristol, a boarding house run by Louisa Harris.

 

It would appear that he took a temporary break from his career in printing when, by the end of the century he had followed in his father’s footsteps and was working in the brewery trade.                      Photograph courtesy of Gerri Hopkins

 

 

 

According to the census in March 1901, bachelor Roland Collett, age 27 and from Chippenham, had returned to the town, where he was the inn keeper at the Rose & Crown Inn at 14 Market Street.  Also living at the Rose & Crown Inn, was Florence M Collett who said she was from Trowbridge and aged 27 who was a domestic servant and described as the cousin of head of the household Roland Collett.  It was six months later that Rowland Collett married Florence Mary Collett at Melksham on 4th September 1901 when it was recorded that she was the daughter of Joseph Collett.  It is now established that they were indeed first cousins, with Florence actually being Mary Florence Collett (Ref. 62N33) from Keevil near Trowbridge, the daughter of Joseph Collett and his wife Susan Harris Collett, Joseph being the brother of Roland’s father Henry Collett.  The marriage of Roland and Florence produced no children for the couple, who later emigrated to Canada.

 

 

 

It would appear that Roland sailed to Canada ahead of his wife, perhaps to secure a life there before she joined him.  He may even have made the crossing in 1903 when his younger brother Stanley is known to have attended the wedding of their brother Herbert in Winnipeg.  What is known for sure is that his wife Florence M Collett sailed from Liverpool on the SS Ionian and arrived at Quebec on 1st May 1905.  Accompanying her on the voyage were her brothers-in-law, Godfrey Collett and Stanley B Collett (both below).  The ship’s passenger list recorded that she was a farmer bound for Grenfell in Saskatchewan, and that Godfrey, a brewer, was going to Winnipeg with his brother Stanley who was a farmer.

 

 

 

Once reunited in Canada, it was Roland and Florence who initially settled in Winnipeg, while Godfrey and Stanley ended up in Grenfell.  Roland then reverted back to his experience in the printing world, and with his knowledge of English, he pursued a new career as a publisher and an editor.  This he carried on for over twenty-seven years, working on the Sintaluta Times newspaper in Sintaluta, Saskatchewan, which he himself had established.

 

 

 

No record of the couple has so far been found within the Canadian census records for 1906 but by 1911 the census that year placed Roland and Florence as living in Qu’Appelle District 21 in the town of Sintaluta when they were both 37 years old.  However, five years later the census in 1916 gave their age as being 46 when they were still living in Sintaluta, Saskatchewan within the Western Provinces of Canada.  It was on that occasion that Roland’s occupation was a printer.  The same census also confirmed that Roland came to Canada in 1905, even though there is no known record of his arrival, while Florence arrived in 1906.  Despite stating this for the census, it is well documented that Florence did arrive in the country with her two brothers-in-law in 1905.

 

 

 

Roland Collett died at Sintaluta, Saskatchewan in Canada on 4th June 1934.  His funeral was attended by a large number of people which was a “testimony to the love and esteem in which he was held”.  Roland and Florence were both buried at Sintaluta, although it is not known exactly when Florence Mary Collett died.  On his death, the newspaper described him as “One of our most popular and respected citizens”.  According to his biography, published in the Sintaluta Times, Roland came to Canada in 1905 and lived in Winnipeg, Manitoba before moving to Sintaluta in 1907 to found the Sintaluta Times newspaper of which he was publisher and editor.  He was very active in his community.  His brother Herbert J Collett and his family lived in Grenfell, Saskatchewan about twenty-five miles east of Sintaluta.

 

 

 

 

62N22

Mabel Collett was born at Langley Burrell in 1875 and at the time of the Langley Burrell census of 1881 she was five years old and was living at The Brewery with her parents Henry Collett and his wife Rosa, formerly Rosa Wright.

 

In 1891 she was 15 years of age, and was 20 years old when her father died in 1896.

 

By March 1901 Mabel was one of three children still living at Langley Burrell with their mother Rosa Collett.  Neither Mabel, nor her sister Laura (below) were credited with an occupation, it was just their brother Stanley (below) who was working at that time.

Photograph courtesy of Gerri Hopkins

 

Ten years later, in April 1911, Mabel and her sister Laura were still unmarried and living at Frogwell in Chippenham with their mother Rosa, when Mabel was 35.  Also boarding at the house with the three ladies was bachelor Frederick John Burden who was 35 and an accountant.  Where he was already romantically attached to Mabel by that time is not known, but it was during the second quarter of the following year that Mabel Collett married Frederick J Burden at Chippenham.  The couple had only been married for five years when Mabel Burden nee Collett died on 20th May 1917, following which she was buried in the churchyard of the Church of St Nicholas Hardenhuish in Chippenham, where her sister Laura was also buried, nearly thirty years later.

 

 

 

The Will of Mabel Burden was proved on 23rd August 1917 at Salisbury, and included the following words: “Mabel of the Folly, Chippenham Wiltshire, wife of Frederick John Burden, died 20 May 1917. Administration at Salisbury to the said Frederick John Burden, accountant, effects £251 13 Shillings 10d.”  Frederick Burden was also named during the administration of the personal effects of his mother-in-law, Rosa Collett when she died in 1923, amounting to £419 1 Shilling 6d, together with his half-brother-in-law, Frank Walter Collett who died in 1935.

 

 

 

Four years after the death of his wife Frederick married Freda Kathleen Louise Cheyney in 1921, Freda having been born at Christchurch near Bournemouth.  When he died on 15th December 1944 he left his effects of £18,210 7 Shillings 9d to his second wife.  During his life the name of Frederick Burden was mentioned in several Wills relating to his mother-in-law’s Buckland family, Rosa Wright being the daughter of Ann Buckland and James Wright.

 

 

 

 

62N23

Laura Rose Collett was born at Langley Burrell during the third quarter of 1876 and was four years old and living with her family at The Brewery in Langley Burrell in 1881, and again in 1981 when she was 14. 

 

Five years after that her father died, and by 1901 she and her sister Mabel (above) and brother Stanley (below) were the only members of the family still living at Langley Burrell with their widowed mother.

 

Photograph courtesy of Gerri Hopkins

 

Laura Rose Collett was still unmarried by the time of the census in April 1911, when she was 34 and was still living in Chippenham with her sister Mabel.  However, that arrangement ceased in 1912 when Mabel was married.  Laura never married and died at Langley Burrell on 14th July 1945, following which she was buried with her sister Mabel Burden nee Collett at the Church of St Nicholas Hardenhuish in Chippenham.  Coincidentally the wife of her cousin Frank Walter Collett, Lucy Elizabeth Collett (above), died earlier that same year and her Will was also processed at Winchester on the same page as that of Laura Rose Collett – see below. 

 

 

 

Probate of her Will at Winchester on 10th September 1945 stated that Laura Rose Collett of Ferndale the Folly in Chippenham, a spinster, died 14 July 1945 at Chippenham, while it was William Goold Slade, a retired brewer, who was the executor of her personal effects valued at £1,699 13 Shillings 6d. How William Goold Slade was related to the Collett family, if at all, is not known, but in the 1911 Census there were several Slade families living in Langley Burrell where Laura’s father and step brothers had been listed as brewers and maltsters.

 

 

 

 

62N24

Herbert James Collett was born at The Brewery in Langley Burrell on 25th July 1877, which corresponded with him being three years old in the census of 1881 and 13 years old in 1891. 

 

An alternative source states that the year he was born was 1876.  However, his actual birth certificate No 29741 registered at Chippenham (Ref. 387) confirms that he was born on 25th July 1877 at the Brewery in Langley Burrell, the son of brewer Henry Collett and Rosa Wright.

 

When he was three years old, he was living at The Brewery in Langley Burrell with his parents, but ten years later, the census in 1891 placed him living within the Bath & Batheaston registration district, when he was 13 and attending the Weston Boarding School. 

Photograph courtesy of Gerri Hopkins